All posts tagged: 2501

Living Walls 2013 ALIVE in Atlanta

The artists are having breakfast at the Goat Farm, and Georgie is yelping in his cage. The year old beagle wants to get out and jump on everybody’s lap and help clean off their plates with his pink tongue and but for right now Emily is looking at the weather channel on her laptop and transfixed by the forecasted rain that could hit tonight’s block party in Edgewood and Know Hope is debating a second helping of scrambled eggs. Somebody plows through the screened door with fresh copies of the local arts newspaper that features JR on the front and the Living Walls 2013 official map inside, and assorted bearded bros are pawing through their iPhones to answer emails and catch Instagram shots of the walls that have gone up so far here in Atlanta.

brooklyn-street-art-the-goat-farm-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Mr. Chicken feeling it at The Goat Farm. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Goat Farm is the central meeting spot for the 20 or so artists in this, the 4th Living Walls festival, and you are free to wander the grounds of this 19th-century complex of industrial buildings that made cotton machinery and munitions during two of its previous iterations. Now it has a few hundred artists studios, performance spaces, and cool little places to hang out and talk about the new walls by artists like 2501, Inti, Agostino Iacurci, and many others in neighborhoods like Summer Hill and Edgewood. Naturally, you can also hang out with the goats in their penned off area or be entertained by the personality-plus chickens that walk freely around the sprawling grounds.

brooklyn-street-art-axel-void-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Axel Void. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-inti-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Inti. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-inti-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web-1

Inti. Detail. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

BSA-Movie-Nite-Motion-1000-Living-Walls-2013-Poster-080313

Last night was the kick off Movie Night party at Callenwolde Arts Center and BSA gave the room of 200+ guests an entertaining tour of about 15 Street Art videos from around the world called “Street Art in Motion”. After giving a bit of history about BSA and our involvement with the arts in general and Street Art in particular we introduced three categories that we think represent Street Art in video right now – “Explorers, Experimenters, and Anti-heroes”. Drawn from the archives of BSA Film Friday we looked at works from a group in Tel Aviv, Vhils in Brazil, Vexta in India, Conor Harrington in Norway, Creepy in the Australian outback, MOMO in Jamaica, Various and Gould in Instanbul, and Jay Shells in Brooklyn, among others.

It was great to invite special guest RJ Rushmore from Vandalog introduce a video from Evan Roth and we ended the hour and half presentation with the most popular video of the year so far, “Infinite” featuring Sofles slaying wall after wall in a mammoth abandoned building – a perfect combining of stop action editing and low-tech special effects that pulls together all three of our themes of exploration, experimentation, and a bit of the badass anti-hero stance. By the time the drums and bass stopped pounding on the speakers we were ready for a visit to the bar and some excited talking about music, spraycans, and the city’s longest continually operating strip club, the Clermont Lounge.

brooklyn-street-art-3ttman-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

3TTMAN at work on his wall. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Living Walls 2013 typifies the rolling feast of Street Artists, neighborhood and volunteering that can put together like-minded creators and fans in a harmonious collaborative way. With so many energetic and organized volunteers, its just a good vibe, and the work on the walls reflect a quality and a developed sense of concept that sets up Living Walls Atlanta as a standard of sorts that you may want to study. Even when your car battery goes dead and you need to find a new one to continue touring, its great to see that there is a genuine sense of that thing called southern hospitality here in the city, and we have already met some great neighbors on the street who are happy with the artists and the walls, some even honking and giving the “thumbs up” from their passing cars.

Here’s our first group from Living Walls Atlanta this year. Hope you dig.

brooklyn-street-art-alexandra-parrish-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Alex’s car having an emergency boost to send us on our way. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-freddy-sam-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Freddy Sam at work on his wall. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-agostino-iacursi-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Agostino Iacurci. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-know-hope-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Know Hope. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-gyun-hur-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Gyun Hur at work at her first wall ever with her assistant Yoon.  Yoon, as it turns out, is a huge fan of Judith Supine. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jr-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

JR. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-elian-3ttman-howdy-neighbor-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Elian with Howdy Neighbor. 3TTMAN wall in progress on the left. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-2501-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web-1

2501. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-2501-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web-2

2501. Detail. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaz-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web-2

JAZ. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaz-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web-3

JAZ. Detail. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaz-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web-1

JAZ. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-brandon-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Brandon English of the media team setting up a shot. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-matt-haffner-laura-bell-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Matt Haffner and Laura Bell. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-pastel-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Pastel at work on his wall. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-nanook-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Nanook at work on his wall. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-trek-matthews-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Trek Matthews at work on his wall. Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-know-hope-2501-jaime-rojo-living-walls-atlanta-2013-web

Know Hope and 2501 working on their collaboration on a sculptural installation for Saturday’s Main Event Exhibition at The Goat Farm . Living Walls Atlanta 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more

I Love Paris In The Winter… New Street Art Dans la Rue

La neige! C’est romantique!

It is snowing in many city Street Art spots this time of year – transforming the evolving visual conversation on the street to something more. It may make you walk faster past it on your way to school or office or apartment, but for Demian Smith, editor at Alternative Paris, it is a source of inspiration, even romance. Today he shares these latest snowy Parisian Street Art scenes exclusively with BSA readers along with his ruminations.
 

The cradle of the French revolutions, a steep and hilly area in north-east Paris known as Belleville, was covered in snow just a day or so ago, and my first thought was to withdraw from this beautiful, dangerous spectacle.

2501 (photo © Demian Smith)

Why expose myself voluntarily to the heart-rending and often precarious trials of seeking out artwork displayed in the streets without censure? Was I going to see an old masterwork? —No.*

However, after reflection, I overcame my repugnance. I had, in my excursions, noticed, among the multifarious artistic creations, so many heterogeneous elements; that is to say, dozens of artists and respondents of all social positions and of so many nationalities, that I began to think it would perhaps be useful to my compatriots at Brooklyn Street Art to view photographs by and by a sincere recital, photographed with a Canon 350D, of the events that are ever more frequently taking place in this part of Western Europe.

Le Module de Zeer (photo © Demian Smith)

All photos were all taken in Belleville in north-east Paris, currently the most active zone for street art and graffiti anywhere in France.

Bvault (photo © Demian Smith)

Jean le Gac (photo © Demian Smith)

Roti (photo © Demian Smith)

Artist Unknown (photo © Demian Smith)

Fred le Chevalier (photo © Demian Smith)

Fred le Chevalier, Gzup and Diamant (photo © Demian Smith)

Fred le Chevalier (photo © Demian Smith)

Ben Vautier (photo © Demian Smith)

Stinkfish (photo © Demian Smith)

MW (photo © Demian Smith)

Artist Unknown (photo © Demian Smith)

Denk Becky (photo © Demian Smith)

Da Cruz for L.E.M.U.R. (photo © Demian Smith)

Cony, Tomek Pal Crew (photo © Demian Smith)

Artist Unknown (photo © Demian Smith)

Mural at rue Denoyez (photo © Demian Smith)

Rue Denoyez (photo © Demian Smith)

 

* Text is adapted from a passage in the 1871 publication, ‘The Insurrection in Paris, by an Englishman: An eye witness account of that frightful war and of the terrible evils which accompanied it’ (1871), on the author’s impressions of Belleville. -Demian Smith

 

Demian Smith is editor at Alternative Paris, which reports on Paris’ street art, graffiti and fringe culture. Our special thanks to him for sharing this with BSA readers.

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more

(VIDEO) 2012 Street Art Images of the Year from BSA

Of the 10,000 images he snapped of Street Art this year, photographer Jaime Rojo gives us 110 that represent some of the most compelling, interesting, perplexing, thrilling in 2012.

Slideshow cover image of Vinz on the streets of Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Together the collection gives you an idea of the range of mediums, techniques, styles, and sentiments that appear on the street today as the scene continues to evolve worldwide. Every seven days on BrooklynStreetArt.com, we present “Images Of The Week”, our weekly interview with the street.

We hope you enjoy this collection – some of our best Images of The Year from 2012.

Artists include 2501, 4Burners, 907, Above, Aiko, AM7, Anarkia, Anthony Lister, Anthony Sneed, Bare, Barry McGee, Bast, Billi Kid, Cake, Cash For Your Warhol, Con, Curtis, D*Face, Dabs & Myla, Daek One, DAL East, Dan Witz, Dark Clouds, Dasic, David Ellis, David Pappaceno, Dceve, Deth Kult, ECB, Eine, El Sol 25, Elle, Entes y Pesimo, Enzo & Nio, Esma, Ever, Faile, Faith47, Fila, FKDL, Gable, Gaia, Gilf!, Graffiti Iconz, Hef, HellbentHert, Hot Tea, How & Nosm, Icy & Sot, Interesni Kazki, Jason Woodside, Javs, Jaye Moon, Jaz, Jean Seestadt, Jetsonorama, Jim Avignon, Joe Iurato, JR, Judith Supine, Ka, Kem5, Know Hope, Kuma, Labrona, Liqen, LNY, Love Me, Lush, Matt Siren, Mike Giant, Miyok, MOMO, Mr. Sauce, Mr. Toll, ND’A, Nick Walker, Nosego, Nychos, Occupy Wall Street, Okuda, OLEK, OverUnder, Phlegm, Pixel Pancho, Rambo, Read Books!, Reka, Retna, Reyes, Rime, Risk, ROA, Robots Will Kill, Rone, Sacer, Saner, See One, Sego, sevens errline, Sheyro, Skewville, Sonni, Stick, Stikman, Stormie Mills, Square, Swoon, Tati, The Yok, Toper, TVEE, UFO, VHILS, Willow, Wing, XAM, Yes One, and Zed1 .

Images © Jaime Rojo and Brooklyn Street Art 2012

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Fun Friday 12.14.12

Hey bro and sis! Here are some of our favorite picks for the weekend around the global way as we head into the final holiday and New Year beauty that we hope everyone is surrounded by. Happy 7th night of Hanukkah to the Jews, and Happy ongoing holidayz to the Christmas and Kwanzaa and Solstice people.

1. 215 “Orgullecida” (Barcelona)
2. “Kids Eat For Free” at Tender Trap (BKLN)
3. Fresh Low-cost Original Silkscreens at “First Worldwar in Silkscreen” Group Show (BKLN)
4. “Graffuturism” at Soze Gallery (LA)
5. “Dark Corners, Savage Secrets”, Photography by Imminent Disaster (BKLN)
6. “Snap Back…” Rime and Toper at Klughaus (Manhattan)
7. New2 at White Walls (San Francisco)
8. Dave Kinsey “Everything at Once” at Joshua Liner (Manhattan)
9. Brett Amory at 5 Pieces (Switzerland)
10. RISK: The Skid Row Mural Project by Todd Mazer (VIDEO)
11. Swoon’s Konbit Shelter in Haiti (VIDEO)

215 “Orgullecida” (Barcelona)

French Street Artist C215 has a new solo show titled “Orgullecida” at the Montana Gallery in Barcelona, Spain. The artist has been for awhile using a lot of color with his multilayered stencil work – expanding his established vocabulary bravely in a way that most artists are too afraid to do. His portraits are placed well, are individually hand-cut, and sprayed with a sense of the humanity he’s always giving center stage.  This show is now open to the general public.

A one color stencil from an earlier period by C215 on the streets of Brooklyn, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A detail from a more recent C215 (© and courtesy the gallery)

For further information regarding this show click here.

“Kids Eat For Free” at Tender Trap (BKLN)

A phrase lifted from restaurant franchises that serve food like you are livestock at a trough, “Kids Eat For Free” is a mini survey of train riders who know the back sides of the country well. Under the moniker of The Superior Bugout, curator Andrew H Shirley continues to explore fresh talent from the emerging margin, and this group exhibition features work by North Carolina’s NGC Crew. Now open, and don’t forget the kids!

For further details regarding this show click here.

Fresh Low-cost original Silkscreens at “First Worldwar in Silkscreen” Group Show (BKLN)

The best way to support your local artist is to give their stuff as a Christmas/Hanukkah/Kwanza/Soltice present. No kidding. Everybody wins. Tonight a show of original silkscreens at totally reasonable prices is at Low Brow Artique in Bushwick. For tonight’s opening of their silk screen print show where you’d be able to purchase prints for $20…yes you read it right $20 bucks buys you art from 25 artists – many of them with work on the street – from Sao Paulo, Brooklyn, Buenos Aires and Berlin. Participating artists include: Selo, Markos Azufre, Hellbent, El Hase, ND’A, XOXU, Daniel Ete, Salles, Baila, Anderson Resende, DOC, SHN, XILIP, Serifire, Vero Pujol, Marquitos Sanabria, Diego Garay, Desastre, and Head Honcho.

Head Honcho. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Salles (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

“Graffuturism” at Soze Gallery (LA)

This is like an exclamation point for the end of the year. No kidding.

POESIA, founder of Graffuturism, the term and website, continues to explore the depths of “Progressive Graffiti” or, as it was previously known, “Abstract Graffiti”. With great intelligence, passion and an acute eye for detail, POESIA brings to the forefront the importance and beauty of this emergent new direction that is impacting the Street Art and graffiti scene (with ramifications for others).

“Graffuturism” opening tonight at Soze Gallery in Los Angeles and promises a smart-headed visual feast of shapes, patterns and color from a mini-galaxy of talent from all over the world. Perhaps more significantly, it’s a bit of a decentralized movement that has been centralized for you. The artists list includes: 2501, Aaron De La Cruz, Augustine Kofie, Boris “Delta” Tellegen, Carl Raushenbach, Carlos Mare, Clemens Behr, Derek Bruno, Doze Green, Duncan Jago, DVS 1, El Mac, Eric Haze, Erosie, Franco “Jaz” Fasoli, Futura, Gilbert 1, Greg “Sp One” Lamarche, Graphic Surgery, Hense, Hendrik “ECB” Beikirch, Jaybo Monk, Joker, Jurne, Kema, Kenor, Lek, Marco “Pho” Grassi, Matt W. Moore, Moneyless, O.Two, Part2ism, Poesia, Rae Martini, Remi Rough, Samuel Rodriguez, Sat One, Sever, Shok-1, Sowat, Steve More, West and Will BarrasSoze Gallery in Los Angeles .

Also New York chronicler and enthusiastic lover of the graff/street art scene  Daniel Feral will be there with a  special edition of the Feral Diagram in glicee prints, and a couple other formats (salivate). An ambitious exhibition like this is rare and not easy to come by so if you are in Los Angeles you must go.

El Mac on the streets of NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show and to read a great essay for the show written by Daniel Feral click here.

“Dark Corners, Savage Secrets”, Photography by Imminent Disaster (BKLN)

Self-appointed moral custodians (mostly white men) have traditionally hampered the exploration of sexuality in formal art history and the academic canon of what gets celebrated and revered continues to evolve more quickly now. The sea change that modern social liberation that was once revolutionary is now a given, but the debate of the appropriate role of sex and sexuality in the arts is far from over. We may have just quashed one Trojan horse of social conservatism in the White House, but the radical right wing has pulled the center pretty far in the last decade and some have even said there was a war on women launched legislatively throughout 2012. So we are pleased to tell you about fine artist and Street Artist Robyn Hasty AKA Imminent Disaster, who has a new show in collaboration with Alex Pergament entitled “Dark Corners, Savage Secrets”. Furthering her exploration of photography Ms. Hasty has semi-retired her now well known hand cut paper pieces and lino prints on the street and traded the cutting knife for the camera. With this show of photographs, sculptures and performance art she’s aiming to tear apart the inhibitions associated with the  sexual act. “Dark Corners, Savage Secrets” opens tomorrow at Weldon Arts Gallery in Brooklyn.

Imminent Disaster and Alex Pergament (exclusive photo for BSA © courtesy of the artist)

For further information regarding this show click here.

“Snap Back…” Rime and Toper at Klughaus (Manhattan)

Freshly snapping back to New York from their successful truck trip to Miami, Klughaus Gallery brings Brooklyn natives RIME and TOPER for their new exhibition titled “Snap Back – Dangerous Drawings About New York”. The storytelling show features illustration and painting inspired by personal stories. Says RIME. “This show aims to tap into our life experience coming up in New York.” Show opens Saturday.

Rime and Toper shown here with Dceve in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

New2 at White Walls (San Francisco)

The White Walls Gallery in San Francisco are fortunate to host Australian artist New2 with his solo show titled “In One Hand a Ghost, The Other an Atom”. New2’s work on the streets is complex and dynamic with aerosol, but his handcut collage work for the gallery is moreso somehow – maybe because of a painstaking process of arranging thousands of hand cut pieces of paper. This show opens on Saturday.

New2. Detail of one of his hand cut paper pieces. (photo © courtesy of the gallery)

New2 on the streets of San Francisco. (photo © courtesy of the gallery)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Also happening this weekend:

Dave Kinsey with “Everything at Once” at the Joshua Liner Gallery in Manhattan. This show is now open to the general public. Click here for more details.

Brett Amory at the 5 Pieces Gallery in Berne, Switzerland opens on Sunday with his solo show “Lil’ Homies”. Click here for more details.

RISK: The Skid Row Mural Project by Todd Mazer (VIDEO)

Art in the Streets from MoCAtv

 

Swoon’s Konbit Shelter in Haiti (VIDEO)

Street Artist Swoon is looking to return to Haiti to build more shelters for people in the rural part of the country. This video gives a great look at the families and community who are helped. You also can participate by donating to the Kickstarter campaign to help Swoon make it happen.

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Soze Gallery Presents: “Graffuturism” A Group Exhibition (Los Angeles, CA)

Graffuturism

Graffuturism.com, opens in the new Soze Gallery location at 2020 E 7th St, Unit B, Los Angeles, CA, 90021.

Since Graffuturism’s inception as a public blog and private Facebook group in 2010, there have been two major group exhibitions that featured associated artists: “Rudimentary Perfection” in Glasgow and “Futurism 2.0″ in London. Both were successful in their curatorial intentions and created a sense of community and motion for the movement. Soze Gallery also has been an early advocate hosting solo exhibitions in 2012 by Jaybo Monk, Moneyless, Remi Rough, Dale Marshall, and a two-man show with Augustine Kofie

and Jaybo. Recognizing the significance of the Graffuturists, Soze Gallery also presented the opportunity for Poesia to curate this exhibition, which he chose to simply call ““Graffuturism.” This exhibition has been eagerly anticipated as the first group show to be curated by Poesia, because he is the founder of Graffuturism.com and also a well-respected graffiti artist with a twenty-year history. Ending up in this unique dual position as artist and commentator, it has fallen on him to be the cultural instigator and diplomatic facilitator of this renewed interest, practice and discourse surrounding what he calls “Progressive Graffiti,” which has also previously been called “Abstract Graffiti.” At this juncture in the three-year history of the website, as well as in the thirty-year history of this over-looked aesthetic trajectory within the Graffiti movement, Graffuturism.com has become a hub and Poesia the dedicated and consistent chronicler and theoretician. With the internet as his podium and round table, he has been historicizing and canonizing these artists, young and old, who have been creating art outside the norms of traditional graffiti, esoteric forms of painting and sculpture that veer outside of the proscribed boundaries into the experimental, the abstract, the poetic, and the hybrid.Artists that fall under the term Progressive Graffiti are generally innately gifted draftsmen, who aspire to a Master’s Level at their craft. Overall this movement could be classified as a “High Style New Millennial Aesthetic.” The art they produce is derived from a dialogue that ricochets around within a pin-ball matrix constructed of coordinates lying between the historical and the contemporary, including high and low influences, fine art and graffiti studies, scholarly and street pursuits, intellectual and visceral marks. Whether the resulting output is graffiti, painting, murals, design, sculpture or installations, the pictorial elements are mutated and transformed through each artist’s unique vision into a personal vocabulary of cross-pollinated styles. Whereas the Street Art movement of the mid-2000s tended to focus on figurative stencils and wheat-pastes, this group of artists on the whole is more concerned with hands-on, singular creation, whether within an academic or street setting. Unlike Post-Modernism, the resultant overall aesthetic is a seamless personal statement, not a collaged juxtaposition of historic styles.

Because of Poesia’s dual roles within the movement, he as been in the unique position to attract this international line up of esteemed contemporary artists, which includes many of the significant forefathers from the seventies and eighties. As a result, by including so many of these original Masters, he has created a chronological continuum within the line up, which defines this historical thread from its earliest days. Therefore this group show has developed into a “survey” that historicizes and canonizes each artist within the Progressive Graffiti thread, as well as within the larger Graffiti movement. One of the earliest, and possibly the most influential to most these artists, is Futura. In the early eighties, after a ten-year career as one of the early seventies writers, he broke away from one of graffiti’s most sacred traditions, the letterform as subject matter. At that point he began to paint in what became known as an “Abstract Graffiti” style. With his groundbreaking subway whole-car “Break,” as well as on the canvasses he was painting at the time, he pushed an atmospheric geometric style to the forefront of his work and began to experiment with a wide array of experimental spray can techniques that had not been seen before.

Around this same time, other early NYC writers, who had also started their careers in the seventies, began to experiment with new hybrid directions not based in pure graffiti traditions. In 1985, Carlos Mare began to combine abstraction and Wildstyle within the medium of sculpture, which over the past couple of decades has expanded to include other mediums under the term Urban Modernism. Haze also began to cross over into the fine art domain and over the years has created a body of work that might be referred to as Iconographic Minimalism. Doze Green was also a significant member of the early community of writers who crossed over with an experimental style that included the use of archetypal icons, poetic typography, figurative motifs and painterly styles. West was also another early intrepid explorer, adopting a gestural expressionist style, applying the muscle memory of train and wall painting to the canvas with his long whole-body marks and splashy, dripping strokes.

This exhibition has also united artists from the second generation who took off along the path forged by those early pioneers. These artists started to formulate their progressive aesthetics in the late eighties, such as Delta, the European three-dimensional geometric letterform pioneer turned pure abstractionist; New Yorker Greg Lamarche aka SpOne, who has been able to establish an abstract typographic collage aesthetic parallel to his foundation as a graffiti writer obsessed with the hand-written letterform; Part2ism was one of the earliest UK experimentalists in Hyperrealism, as well as co-founder of the Ikonoklast Movement in the UK with Juice126, which also came to include abstract colorist Remi Rough in the early-nineties.

Also beginning in the late eighties on the West Coast of the US, the Wildstyle-reductionist Joker was one of the first graffiti artists to paint purely geometric abstractions and pushed for its acceptance within the graffiti community by founding the Transcend Collective in 1991 with She1, who was an abstract writer in the UK. Poesia, became a key member of the collective in 1995, exploring a more hybrid, expressionistic approach to Wildstyle, as well as taking it into pure abstraction, which he is currently pushing in new directions, as well as reaching back to the Baroque painters and reinterpreting their masterpieces as graffiti-dissected new millennial re-paintings. Over in Europe, first in Paris then Italy during the same time period, Marco Pho Grassi started out as a wall and train painter but quickly started mixing in abstraction and more painterly expressionist techniques much like Poesia, yet totally unknown to each other. Then in the mid to late nineties, back in the US along the West Coast, other artists with alternative, experimental mind-sets, who were aware of recent developments, were coming out with brilliant, refined hybrid styles, such as Augustine Kofie and El Mac.

Artists such as these had been forced to skirt the edges of graffiti culture as well as the fine art world for the past ten to thirty years. Due to the esoteric nature and hybrid aesthetics of their graffiti-based paintings, and their disparate locations around the globe, they had no way to band together or find an audience to support them because of the lack of enough interest in their local communities for their esoteric and singular aesthetics. On the other side of the tracks, they were also ignored by the fine arts establishment because of their association with graffiti culture and for unabashedly continuing their gallery-related practices under the term Graffiti, which they still did not entirely leave behind. But, as the world population grows and becomes more connected through the internet, these geographically disparate artists have found it easier to come together, work together, and share global opportunities with each other, rather than being confined to tiny local communities.

Now, as this historical thread comes of age and recognizes itself in the mirror of history and on the faces of its youth, as the pioneers of the culture are canonized and the younger artists are united, there are many more opportunities afforded them within the design market, auction houses and fine art world, as these communities continue grow in their recognition of the cultural value and influence of Graffiti and Street Art, as the most prevalent styles and art movements in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. This particular Graffuturist group exhibition, as well as the previous two, are significant steps in the growth of awareness and activity. This is a significant exhibition because it connects all the artists across the continuum of this overlooked historical trajectory back to these forefathers to finally make the connections and give the recognition due to Progressive Graffiti in all its current manifestations and their historical referents.

Across the board, 2012 has been an explosive year for Progressive Graffiti. The synchronicity of all these group exhibitions and solo shows can only emphasize that there is increased activity by the artists and an amplified interest in the audience. Futura had his first solo show in ten years, which attracted a massive turn out of the wealthy and the fashionable, as well as the highly-respected hardcore members of the graffiti community, which is a testament to his growing importance outside the culture, as well as cementing his stature within it. Following on the heels of the success of his solo show, Futura exhibited with two other crucial esoteric Old School Masters, Rammellzee and Phase2, in conjunction with the Modernist Master Matta in the exhibition “Deep Space” in NYC. This exhibit was particular significant because it canonized these three graffiti artists within the fine art pantheon by successfully illustrating their undeniable aesthetic accomplishments in relation to Matta’s masterworks. Rammellzee also had a banner year, being included in the “Vocabularies Revitalized” exhibition at the MoMA, as well as being given a complete retrospective at the Children’s Museum, both of which were in NYC, not even to mention his solo show at the Suzanne Geiss gallery in 2011 called “The Equation.”

In London, also significant in its curatorial aims to canonize and historicize, as well as it’s grand scope, was “Futurism 2.0,” which compared and contrasted the Futurists and the Graffuturists in an exhibition, book and documentary. Another group show of significance was BrooklynStreetArt.com’s exhibition “Geometricks” which held high the torch of Abstract Graffiti in it’s title and Progressive Graffiti in its roster, which included Hellbent (the curator), Augustine Kofie, Drew Tyndell, Momo, OverUnder and SeeOne. One of the most significant of the many murals and “in situ” collaborations painted this year by Graffuturist-related artists was the abstract mural painted on the Megaro Hotel by Agents of Change members Remi Rough, Augustine Kofie, Lx.One, and Steve More, which is currently the largest mural ever painted in London. Also, a slew of solo and duo exhibitions opened every month around the world by many of the artists associated with Graffuturism and Progressive Graffiti: Poesia, Dale Marshal, Part2ism, Remi Rough, Augustine Kofie, Jaybo Monk, Mark Lyken, Moneyless, Carlos Mare, She One, Matt W. Moore, Jurne, Greg Lamarche, Delta, Hense, Rae Martini, Marco Pho Grassi, and Graphic Surgery. In order to see the full scope of activities though, one would have to go back through Graffuturism.com for a complete review.

Above and beyond the growing interest in Progressive Graffiti is the expanding interest in the over-all culture as well during these first two decades of the new millennium. Massive museum exhibitions encompassing the full spectrum of subcultures and historical threads within the Graffiti and Street Art cultures have also opened to wide acclaim. The success of ticket sales for “Street Art” in 2008 at the Tate Modern in London and “Art in the Streets” in 2011 at the MOCA in Los Angeles revealed the mass cultural interest of these art movements and all the art forms that are connected to them. The fact that these two exhibitions happened at all signifies the growing acceptance by the fine art community as well.

These museum exhibitions, as well as the trend towards many other smaller historical exhibitions, such as “Deep Space” and “Futurism 2.0” at the end of 2012, and “Pantheon: A history of Art from the Streets of NYC” in 2011, indicate a new interest in the study of the history and cultural significance of these movements. Other indicators are the release of high quality scholarly books, articles and movies, such as “Abstract Graffiti” by Cedar Lewisohn in 2011; “Beyond Graffiti” published in ArtNews in 2011 by Carolina Miranda; the 2005 documentary “Next: A Primer on Urban Painting” by Pablo Aravena; and “The Feral Diagram 2.0: Graffiti and Street Art” published in 2012 by Daniel Feral. These are all testament to the growing enthusiasm of scholars, historians, and theoreticians to examine, define and record the fifty year history of graffiti and street art, and recently in particular the Progressive Graffiti thread. Like any misunderstood movement before these, such as rock’n’roll, comic books, and cinema, eventually the art forms, the audiences and the scholars united to finally recognize the movement’s undeniable cultural value, relevance and resonance in all their forms from the simple and visceral to the esoteric and intellectual.

Text by Daniel Feral

On Friday, Dec 14, 2012, the eponymously-titled “Graffuturism” exhibition curated by Poesia, the founder of Graffuturism.com, opens in the new Soze Gallery location at 2020 E 7th St, Unit B, Los Angeles, CA, 90021.

The complete artist list in alphabetical order by first name is as follows: 2501, Aaron De La Cruz, Augustine Kofie, Boris “Delta” Tellegen, Carl Raushenbach, Carlos Mare, Clemens Behr, Derek Bruno, Doze Green, Duncan Jago, DVS 1, El Mac, Eric Haze, Erosie, Franco “Jaz” Fasoli, Futura, Gilbert 1, Greg “Sp One” Lamarche, Graphic Surgery, Hense, Hendrik “ECB” Beikirch, Jaybo Monk, Joker, Jurne, Kema, Kenor, Lek, Marco “Pho” Grassi, Matt W. Moore, Moneyless, O.Two, Part2ism, Poesia, Rae Martini, Remi Rough, Samuel Rodriguez, Sat One, Sever, Shok-1, Sowat, Steve More, West, Will Barras.

Please follow and like us:
Read more

“Articulate: Baltimore” Hits the Streets

The City of Baltimore just got hit with its second large scale mural project in one calendar year as Articulate: Baltimore joined Open Walls Baltimore during a five week period this autumn.

Chris Stain . Billy Mode. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

A mixture of local artists and some Street Artists who are known internationally, the project is sponsored by a collection of public, private, and tourism development concerns as a way of activating a small selection of the city’s huge inventory of vacant spaces to “increase the visibility (of) the new westside district and encourage more visitors to frequent its venues”. With this sort of laser-sharp urban renewal employed in a very confined area, we may be witnessing the splintering of so-called Street Art festivals into more focused venues, employed in a more selective way to achieve specific ends.

Baltimore natives and well known Street Artists Chris Stain and Billy Mode get to do something at home for a change. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

The list of artists in Articulate: Baltimore includes artists Ways & J. Digital, Jessie Unterhalter & Katey Truhn, Indigo, HKS 181, Chris Stain & Billy Mode, Pixel Pancho, and 2501. Co-curated by Maryland-based artists Stefan Hauswald and Jesse James, the full collection covers roughly a two-block area that is very near the center of downtown.  The whole initiative appears to be one conceived with rejuvenation in mind, as public art often does for previously moribund areas. According to the website for Articulate, all of the artists realize that their work isn’t meant as a permanent installation and may be replaced at any time. “The artists expect their impact to be powerful but limited in duration— they expect that their work will be replaced over time, perhaps a matter of months or years.”

Many thanks to photographer Martha Cooper, who was there to capture official images of the installations, and she shares them here, including some that are exclusive to BSA.

Chris Stain . Billy Mode. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Combining the colorful 3-D letterforms of Mode and the stencil-styled portraiture of Chris Stain for Articulate, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Canada’s INDIGO. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

INDIGO. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

INDIGO. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Pixel Pancho. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Pixel Pancho. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Pixel Pancho. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Pixel Pancho. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Jessie Unterhalter and Katey Truhn bring a D.I.Y. aesthetic by using additional materials for a poppy hand-made collage effect. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Jessie Unterhalter . Katey Truhn. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie that’s 2501. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

2501. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

2501. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Having pink eye in this case is something good. HKS 181. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

HKS 181. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

WAYS – J. Digital. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

WAYS – J. Digital. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

WAYS – J. Digital. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

WAYS – J. Digital. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

For more information about Articulate Baltimore click on the link below:

http://www.articulatebaltimore.org/

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Images of the Week 11.04.12

This was a tough week for New York and we’re still struggling to recover from the Hurricane whose name we’re tired of saying. We have every reason to believe New Yorkers will continue to pull together, as we always do. Go Brooklyn! Go Staten Island! Go Manhattan! Go Queens! Go Bronx! Go Long Island! Go New Jersey! Go Connecticut! New York, you are beautiful and we love you.

As ever, photographer Jaime Rojo was on the streets shooting a lot of stuff, and of course there was new Street Art to discover too. So here’s our weekly interview with the street, including 2501, Bast, Cash for Your Warhol, Classic, Cynthia von Buhler, FKDL, Gilf!, Hanksy, JR, Nick Walker, Pixel Pancho, Rene Gagnon, Ron English, and You Are Beautiful.

These new Cash For Your Warhol signs are suddenly appearing again, and offering valuable authentication services also.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nick Walker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

FKDL has a complimentary and cozy relationship with Dain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

FKDL (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Parisian FKDL left new stuff that appeared on the streets of Brooklyn recently, his collages now evolving to include more detailed figurework in a 1950s illustration style. Using clippings from vintage newspapers and magazines in the compositions, these wheat pastes/collages are hand colored and one of a kind, left for the few who catch sight of them before the weather destroys them. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Many boarded up and empty lots were uncovered by the fury of hurricane Sandy this week. Many plywood fences blew up and away, exposing the hidden walls. This is an old JR piece that we have documented before but we have not been able to get inside this fenced lot until now. Naturally, it now has been transformed a bit by the contributions of tags on it, sort of emulating the stripe painted across this native American’s face. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cynthia von Buhler “Speakeasy Dollhouse” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Here’s a Ron English installation in progress in Little Italy for The New York Comedy Central in association with Vandalog: “The Art of Comedy”. There will be an art walk to celebrate this installations. More details to follow on the BSA Calendar and Upcoming Events. Some local guys stopped to pose for this one. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gilf! says Lady Liberty is still drinking the KoolAid in this installation in Little Italy for The New York Comedy Central in association with Vandalog: “The Art of Comedy”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gilf! styles Barack Obama as a marionette in this installation in Little Italy for The New York Comedy Central in association with Vandalog: “The Art of Comedy”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hanksy installation in Little Italy for The New York Comedy Central in association with Vandalog: “The Art of Comedy”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hanksy installation in Little Italy for The New York Comedy Central in association with Vandalog: “The Art of Comedy”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Thanks darlin’ so are you. Your Are Beautiful (photo © Jaime Rojo)

One of the most unhinged and kinetic Bast tags we’ve seen in a while (photo © Jaime Rojo)

2501 is in town and pulling out the optic trickery at Bushwick Five Points (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho brings in the robotic Dandy aesthetic at Bushwick Five Points. Also makes you think of a very young Colonel Sanders, right? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho at Bushwick Five Points. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rene Gagnon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rene Gagnon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rene Gagnon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Classic. Looks like Charlie Browns having a bummer. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Hurricane Sandy caused NYC to go partially dark this week and even days after the storm there are still 2 million people without electricity. In this photo the Williamsburg Bridge is half illuminated on the Brooklyn side, half dark on the Manhattan side – a visual representation of the sense of loss the city is feeling right now. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Pixel Pancho and 2501 in Unsanctioned Baltimore

Unsanctioned Baltimore (Part 1 of 3) : Pixel Pancho, 2501

What’s better than hunting around back lots and alleys in Baltimore’s boarded up neighborhoods looking for Street Art? Having Baltimore native Martha Cooper as your guide, showing you all her favorite secret spots, listening to her stories, and meeting the neighbors, who all call her “picture lady”.  Open Walls Baltimore brought a lot of attention to the city this spring and we were lucky to see many familiar Street Artists and see the giant murals in process in the district where Gaia staged it.

But zipping through SoWeBo with the formidable hosts of Martha and her cousin Sally, who used to take the bus to school together through these streets a half century ago, leaves all that stuff in the shadow. With a natural radar for finding the unsanctioned, Martha is a blur, pointing in different directions and laughing and telling you about trailing Stikman up the street or hooking up Other (Toy Lovegates) with a spot – with much the same ease as she recalls stories of graffiti artists Dondi and Blaze and Lee in NYC rail yards in the 70s.  We’ve been happy to share our Street Art knowledge with her these last few years, and she always generously leads us to a head-scratching bit of gorgeousness that’s just beyond this alleyway, or tracks, or skateboard park, if you know where to look. We are most grateful for the sweet moments of discovery together.

Pixel Pancho and 2501. Baltimore. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho and 2501. Baltimore. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

2501. Baltimore. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho. Baltimore. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

2501 and Stikman. Baltimore. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho and 2501. Baltimore. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho. The owner of this house asked them to include the mascot from Baltimore Oriols baseball team into the composition for her children. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho and 2501. Baltimore. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Fun Friday 04.06.12

Good Friday for the Christians, Passover for the Jews, Movie Night for the Atheists

 

1. “This Side of Paradise” in Da Bronx
2. “Highbrow, Lowbrow, Nobrow – MOUSSE! (Netherlands)
3. G40 in Richmond, VA
4. New Website called “The Facebook” (VIDEO)
5. Dolk and Pøbel: Norwegian Street Artists Fan Video
6. This Video Contains a Large Depiction of Eggs and is therefore Tangentially Related to Easter >> Michael Beerens (Video)

“This Side of Paradise” in Da Bronx

“This Side Of Paradise” opens this week to the public – involving 32 artists in a massive Mansion in the Bronx that is in disrepair. The exhibition is curated by No Longer Empty and hosted by The Mid-Bronx Council at the Andrew Freedman Home, a limestone palazzo that for several decades served as a “homeless shelter” for those poor folks that lost their fortunes during the Great Depression. Having been rich once was a key requirement for those applicants that wished to be admitted to the club. We hear that the waiting list was long.

This weekend take the D train to 167 St. in the Bronx and have fun.

How and Nosm installation “Reflections” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this exhibition click here.

For more photos of the installation and to read our article and interview with the curators click here. “Poorhouse for the Rich” Revitalized By The Arts

“Highbrow, Lowbrow, Nobrow – MOUSSE! (Netherlands)

MAMA”S new group show “Highbrow, Lowbrow, Nobrow – MOUSSE! Opens today in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Artists included are: Admir Jahic (CH, 1975), East Eric (FR, 1974), Isaac Cordal (ES, 1974), Mark Jenkins (USA, 1974), Nomad (DE, 1971), Stefan Gross (DE, 1965), Tobias Allanson (SE, 1974), Zoe Strauss (USA, 1970)

Isaac Cordal (photo © Isaac Cordal)

G40 in Richmond, VA

The reception for the G40 Summit in Richmond, Virginia takes place tomorrow. Artists will be present and there will be an Art Battle where teams of artists will paint live.

With 12 internationally known Street Artists invited to create murals for this festival including:  Jacopo Ceccarelli aka 2501, Italy, Angry Woebots – California, Aryz – Spain, El Mac – California,  Gaia – New York, Jaz – Argentina, Jesse Smith – Virginia, La Pandilla – Puerto Rico, Lelo – Brazil, London Police – UK, Pixel Pancho – Italy, Roa – Belgian and Scribe – Kansas City.

The downtown Art Walk is reported to include murals by Gaia, Pixel Pancho, Aryz, Roa, Jaz, Lelo, La Pandilla, Angry Woebots, 2501 and Scribe. Check your local listings as there is quite a bit of variation in reported artists lists. You might get lucky and catch an artist at work.

To learn more about The G40 Summit click here.

There’s a new Website called “The Facebook” – This leaves Atari in the Dust! (VIDEO)

Dolk and Pøbel: Norwegian Street Artists Fan Video

This Video Contains a Large Depiction of Eggs and is therefore Tangentially Related to Easter >> Michael Beerens (Video)

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Images of the Week 01.08.12 Miami Special Part II

Here is the 2nd half of the Miami images we captured for you from the massive blocks long street installation party called Art Basel this year. Most of these pieces are legal, many are not. You can call them Street Art, but not all are actually on the street and many could also be classified as murals.

Now is a perfect window of opportunity to go see these as many will be buffed in the next few weeks and months, as property owners sell the buildings or decide they didn’t actually dig the art as much as they thought they would. Within a decade or so, this area in Miami will most likely be less enthused with and even hostile toward graffiti and Street Art in general, but the red carpet is laid out at the moment. Artists are flocking from all over the world to jockey for walls, hoping to be seen by potential fans and collectors, or at least to hang out with peers and make new friends. This is a moment on a timeline and, for right now, the colors, patterns, textures, messages and lucid dreams are pulsating on walls everywhere; a mountain of creativity set free.

So here are more than 50 images in our interview with the street, this week featuring 2501, Adjust, AM, Andrew Schoultz, Art Basel 2011, AWR, Bask, Ben Eine, Bik Ismo, Buff Monster, C215, Chris Stain, Clown Soldier, Col, Cope, Dabs&Myla, Des, Ema, Emo, Entes Pesimo, Ethos, Ever, Florida, Gaia, Interesni Kazki, Jade Uno, Jaz, Joe Iurato, Liqen, Miami, Michael DeFeo, Neuzz, Nomade, Nomads, Nunca, Pancho Pixel, Pez, PHD, Pi, el Pancho, Primary Flight, Remote, Retna, Roa, RONE, Shark Toof, Shiro, Smells, Spagnola, Stormie Mills, Vhils, Wynwood Walls, and Zed1.

With special thanks to all the people who helped us out, showed us around and provided insight and background, especially the good folks from Primary Projects and Wynwood Walls.

Liqen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Liqen’s metaphoric mural of miserable corporate finance workers in a labyrinthine maze may have been the singular most powerful and timely image this year.   (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Liqen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

International star Vhils and crew created a few signature portraits using his very original method of destruction and creation, a low relief sculpture that emanates from the wall (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rone’s model looked skyward from a few locations on the street. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shiro (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Now, why is that? Smells Like Junk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ROA and Ben Eine hit up this little corner spot with Primary Flight. The unusual free-standing structure called “The Living Room” has played host to a number of graffiti, mural, and street artists over the last few years, and this year also featured a pop-up piano ensemble performance. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JAZ (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Neuzz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Assume Vivid Astro Focus killed this wall last year and it still looks fresh. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Famed duo Assume Vivid Astro Focus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

New Jersey’s Joe Iurato (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jade Uno . Entes Pesimo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia and C215 appeared frequently with one another this year on the street. This one is bookended by some Nomade posters (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia, C215 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bik Ismo, a custom hot rod, and of course a couple of appreciative dudes. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Zed1 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Despite relative domestic tranquility, sometimes Felix and Ana were not sure if they were seeing the same thing. Ever (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Retna stretched his alphabet tall, and tucked in many tributes to local friends. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Interesni Kazki . Liqen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki and Liqen combined forces on this mural referencing the world wide web. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki . Liqen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki . Liqen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Michael DeFeo lit up a desolate spot under the highway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ethos (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Emo, PHD, Remote (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Emo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ema (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A killer repetition from Des (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dabs & Myla collaboration with AWR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Col on a bed of seafoam blue (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Stain brought some friends from New York and Baltimore. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This bull head popped out at discrete locations. Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bask bolted to a post. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stormie Mills (photo © Jaime Rojo)

One of the few blatantly political pieces from Spagnola, with additional commentary added by a third party. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This Shark Toof appears to be whispering something to Anthony Lister. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho kind of killed it.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pez is on multiple surfaces everywhere. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nunca (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nunca (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cope crushed repeatedly. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Clown Soldier stands guard at the gate. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Buff Monster . Cope (photo © Jaime Rojo)

2501 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Andrew Schoultz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Andrew Schoultz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

AM (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adjust (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Images of the Week 01.02.12: Miami Special Part I

Ding Ding Ding! The New Year has been rung in and your head has stopped ringing, so it’s back to work – and back to Images of the Week, our weekly interview with the street. This week we’re bringing you incredible new work from Miami. In fact there is so much there since Art Basel hit a month ago that we’re gonna split it over 2 (or 3!) episodes of Images of the Weeks. With all this art on the streets surrounding you, it feels like a prosperous way to start 2012.

So here’s our first part interview with the Streets of Miami, today featuring 2501, Above, Adjust, Aiko, Anthony Lister, B., Ben Eine, CFYW, Chu, Cope, Dabs & Myla, Dan Witz, Date Farmers, Faile, Fila, Hargo, How & Nosm, Interesni Kazki, Jaz, Jeff Soto, JR, Kenny Sharf, Kenton Parker, Know Hope, La Pandilla, Liqen, Logan Hicks, LRG, MDR, MPR, Pez, Pixel Pancho, Retna, REVOK, ROA, Robots, Rone, Saner, Sego, Shark Toof, Shepard Fairey, Spencer Keeton, Tati, and Vhils.

With special thanks to all the people who helped us out, showed us around and provided insight and background, especially the folks from Primary Projects and Wynwood Walls.

JR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dan Witz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

HARGO (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Above (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ben Eine and Spencer Keeton (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ben Eine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ben Eine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Fila (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Know Hope (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Roa and Kenton Parker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

2501 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shark Toof (photo © Jaime Rojo)

GAIA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

GAIA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

TATI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

RONE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

REVOK (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Anthony Lister (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Anthony Lister and Ben Eiene (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Free Humanity, Anthony Lister, Pez, Wealthy, Cope, Chu, Adjust and Revok (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pez, MPR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Retna, Robots, MDR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Retna (photo © Jaime Rojo)

La Pandilla (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sego and Saner (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sego and Saner (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sego and Saner (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Vhils (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Vhils (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dabs & Myla, LRG (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kenny Scharff (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kenny Scharff (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kenny Scharf did an installation for Wynwood Doors/Walls similar to his installation earlier in the year at LA MOCA.  Trailer Interior (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kenny Scharf’s trailer interior (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kenny Scharf’s trailer interior (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Logan Hicks (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Faile. Bast (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Faile, and a little bit of Kenny Scharf. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How & Nosm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Date Farmers (photo © Jaime Rojo)

b. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jeff Soto (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Black Book Gallery Presents: Galo, 2501 and Ottograph “666 Dollar Show” (Denver, Colorado)

666 Dollar Show
brooklyn-street-art-galo-black-book-gallery
Opening Reception March 4th at 7pm
Artists will be in attendance
Open to the public

The March exhibition at Black Book Gallery is going to be a powerhouse display of three well-established, international street artists: OTTOGRAPH, GALO and 2501, all accomplished in their craft and all bringing their big style and influence to Denver.

Big style is not just a metaphor. Ottograph, Galo and 2501 all work large. 2501, for example, reads spacious surfaces like animate objects and then gives them the dignity of character they deserve with paint. Born in Milan as Jacopo Ceccarelli, the name 2501 marks a deliberate style shift and focus on blending wall painting, paint on canvas, sculpture and video. Circulating between Milan, Sao Paulo and Berlin, 2501’s work is best recognized in massive, highly detailed mural paintings. They are pretty amazing and give new meaning to the term, ‘urban renewal.’

Ottograph, also a large-scale muralist, has been slinging paint since the age of ten. Starting out in Amsterdam, where he is from, and then moving on to become an internationally sought after artist, Ottograph has established himself squarely in the middle of the global street and graffiti art movement. Simultaneously though, Ottograph has bridged the fine art gap with his work, an advantage that comes with age and time dedicated to painting. The Modern Art Museum of Antwerpen (Belgium) is home to a giant Ottograph mural. Ottograph’s contribution to street art extends beyond his own work, as he is also a community leader, having organized several cooperative painting commissions and operating the website “I Paint Everyday” www.ipainteveryday.com to encourage the tedious, yet necessary practice of serious painting.

Hailing from the same underground culture in Amsterdam, street artist Galo, will be the third of the group showing at Black Book Gallery in March. Originally from Italy, Galo moved to Amsterdam in 1998 to start his career and fell into opportunity after opportunity to paint. This is where Galo developed the bulk of his artistic abilities and a network that would take him on a world-class tour of painting, spanning ten years and four continents. Galo now resides in Italy and has recently opened the first official street gallery in Turin, The Galo Art Gallery (Ottograph was commissioned to deck the interior out). Galo’s signature characters are recognizable by their bulbous eyes, long jaws and open-teeth smiles, most of the time intertwined into a tessallation-like graphic, spanning whatever surface it is that catches Galo’s attention. In part, he is known for his willingness to tag anything in sight.

Phone:
303-941-2458

General Info:
info@theblackbookgallery.com

Orders:
orders@theblackbookgallery.com

Black Book Gallery is located on the West side of Santa Fe Dr. Santa Fe is a North bound one-way street. Meter free parking is available on both sides of street.

Gallery Address:
555 Santa Fe Dr. Denver, Colorado 80204

Hours:

Tuesday – Friday
2pm – 6pm

Saturday
12pm – 6pm

Please follow and like us:
Read more