On the Street

Mr. Toll On The Streets

Mr. Toll On The Streets

Williamsburg streetwalkers have recently discovered a new cluster of Mr. Toll’s hand-painted clay sculptures on the streets of Brooklyn after a prolonged absence. His style has evolved a little, adding more detail and fluidity perhaps, and so have his subjects and interests. Prolific when he’s producing, he’s known to touch on difficult and topical issues such as immigration, environmental degradation, and systemic racism. His work sometimes has the punch of a political cartoon; direct and to the point but with a sense of humor.

Quality, craftsmanship, and a DIY ethos ; its all here with Mr. Toll.

Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Jaye Moon Builds Lego Housing Units on the Street

Street Artist Jaye Moon is doing a diminutive deed to alleviate New York’s ongoing housing crisis by leaving new buildings cradled in the limbs of trees, or wrapped around their trunks.

Street Artist Jaye Moon gets a hand from kids in Seoul, South Korea, where she has brought her distinctive tree houses from New York. December 2012. (photo © Jaye Moon)

Using Legos as building materials, the blocked geometry of her architectural construction is carefully considered and engineered to allow for the expansion of tree limbs and cautious to avoid damage. A Korea-born Brooklyn fine artist with gallery representation doing other work, Moon has more recently expanded her art practice to the street, and her multi-colored housing units have been catching the eye of curious New Yorkers – and thoroughly captivating their kids. Since we first discovered and debuted her work on the web in September 2011, she has also garnered a new collection of Street Art fans.

Jaye Moon. Seoul, South Korea. December 2012. (photo © Jaye Moon)

Moon says she chose Legos as a medium because they are ready-made objects that mimic industrial , mechanical uses and because they summon a certain childlike innocence and sense of play. When you discover one of her tree houses on the street, your mind jumps up to a fascinating miniature world above your head and your hand may reflexively reach to swing open one of the Lillipution doors or to tap your finger on a wee window. During a (aptly named) residency program last week in Seoul, Moon found a few small volunteers who offered to help with her latest Street Art installations. Experts on the intricacies of Legos, her young  assistants schooled her, which she says isn’t unusual. “Passersby love to join to help make my tree houses,” she says.

Jaye Moon. Seoul, South Korea. December 2012. (photo © Jaye Moon)

While Moon is not the first on the street to use the popular children’s building blocks – there have been a handful in recent years– she is the only one to take this architectural approach and to expand upon it so extensively. Each carefully planned construction is site specific and is carefully secured so that any attempts at removal will effectively destroy the piece. So while she is fascinated by the idea that housing could easily become mobile and portable, don’t try it with these installations. In addition to the ongoing housing project Moon has also been leaving colorful placards glued onto walls or under nooks, each spelling out phrases, secret missives, and colorfully vulgar words. But primarily for Jaye Moon right now, da house is in Brooklyn!

 

Jaye Moon. Seoul, South Korea. December 2012. (photo © Jaye Moon)

Jaye Moon. Seoul, South Korea. December 2012. (photo © Jaye Moon)

Jaye Moon. Seoul, South Korea. December 2012. (photo © Jaye Moon)

Jaye Moon. Seoul, South Korea. December 2012. (photo © Jaye Moon)

Jaye Moon in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaye Moon in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaye Moon in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaye Moon in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaye Moon in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaye Moon in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaye Moon in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaye Moon in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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LNY In South Korea with Tradition and GPS

As traditional cultures grapple with technological change that appears at lightening speed the most successful ones are neither rejecting nor accepting it fully: rather they are integrating. While broadcast television had a homogenizing effect on world culture for decades, today’s multi-channel, multi-platform electronic ecosystem affords people the chance to retain local flavor and customs while still texting and surfing and gaming and videoing their girlfriend on a skateboard.

LNY “The Road” Seoul, South Korea. December, 2012 (photo © LNY)

Brooklyn-based Street Artist LNY just returned from Korea, where he contemplated traditional and modern when creating his pieces on the street. He says he developed the new work as a direct reflection of what he observes as a “fractured state” in contemporary society, with consideration for what it may portend.

“Korea is the future,” he says as he recounts the conversations and kimbaps he had during his visit to Seoul, a city he says is riding the cusp of an economic wave.

“What really struck me was this dislocation between the past: myths, legends, magic, tradition, and the future: a country rising to the top of its hemisphere and a city that rivals Tokyo or New York in all aspects,” he says when describing new pieces. An adroit observer, LNY was also contemplating the now traditional colonialist attitude that a Westerner brings to a visit here, and how his own feelings were affected while trying to be clear-eyed.

LNY “The Road”. Detail. Seoul, South Korea. December, 2012 (photo © LNY)

“Like the moment when you take a small bus, packed with people, jetting around old streets. The bus is being guided by GPS and four cameras that give the driver a 360 degree view of his vehicle while he watches TV on the same device that is hanging next to the steering wheel,” he recounts with some wonder and a sense of irony. “All of this is happening while I’m going to paint next to an old temple in a remote neighborhood where the kids get a better education than most American college students. At the same time they are afraid of the shamans and animals that I’m painting because the culture looks down upon these old myths.”

His pieces are full of myth and symbolism, with simple storytelling and psychological underpinning. Transmitted through personal networks on handheld electronic devices, they could not be more hand-made and contextual. It is good when the work reflects the culture and the experience. “This is where the work is coming from and I wanted to share it with you guys,” he says. We’re pleased to share it with BSA readers.

LNY “The Secret” Seoul, South Korea. December, 2012 (photo © LNY)

LNY “The Secret”. Detail. Seoul, South Korea. December, 2012 (photo © LNY)

LNY “Independence” Seoul, South Korea. December, 2012 (photo © LNY)

LNY “Independence”. Detail. Seoul, South Korea. December, 2012 (photo © LNY)

LNY “The Palace” Seoul, South Korea. December, 2012 (photo © LNY)

LNY “The Mountain” Seoul, South Korea. December, 2012 (photo © LNY)

LNY “The Mountain”. Detail. Seoul, South Korea. December, 2012 (photo © LNY)

LNY “Magpie” Seoul, South Korea. December, 2012 (photo © LNY)

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Miami Recap ’12 : Brand New Art in the Streets

Shots from the weekend here by photographer, artist and frequent BSA contributor Geoff Hargadon. He caught a lot of new pieces as they were being installed, as well as some newly fresh ones.

Heads were rolling as soon as Anthony Lister hit the ground in Miami. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

These tires on the back of large vehicle looked like they were going to burst loose, which alarmed some and thrilled others. Rob “Bear” Fogle. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Obey was there to meet people at the dead end of the tracks.  Shepard Fairey (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Obey .  Shepard Fairey (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Obey .  Shepard Fairey (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

People took a break on the grass in front of the wall-sized Tony Goldman tribute at Wynwood Walls by hepard Fairey (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Artists are often asked to give their work for free. You don’t typically see signs like this for accountants or plumbers. ISO… (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Invader (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Cash For Your Warhol has something new in Miami this year. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

CFYW (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

The ever more conceptual Cash For Your Warhol takes it to a abstract level here, purposely obscuring his own message while placing the real thing in relief. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Action shot of one of Paris’ early stencil artists, Speedy Graphito, at the Art Miami fair. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Melbourne’s REKA on tour and in town. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Os Gemeos. Detail. The Brazilian Twins were represented by their Brazilian Gallery at the Main Fair: Art Basel this year. From the Street to the Glitz. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

A Nathan Vincent and Alex Emmart collab exhorts you to behave at Fountain via Mighty Tanaka Gallery. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Asif’s Guns. A pop-up with cardboard replicas of the machines that kill. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Asif’s Guns (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Banksy. Is the guard there to protect or to reclaim stolen goods? (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

While there was some mindlessly pompous chatter surrounding the heralded display of actual walls by Banksy at the Context fair, the sometimes vandal’s work was surprisingly unremarkable to most attendees, who glanced at it and kept walking.  If anything, the security guards helped garner a little interest. It is illuminating to find that outside of the hyper-excited Street Art fandom bubble that we are often in, an actual Banksy work doesn’t have as much magnetism that you might expect.

The walls (or pieces of walls) that were on display are said to have been stolen and the artist is said to be angered about it, but no arrests have been made and no property seized. Since the majority of graffiti or Street Artists are not wont to ask for permission to do their thing, most understand that no “rules” are typically invoked to protect their work on the street, or off it. Now that Banksy’s work is so high profile and sells at auctions and is in museums, it’s like putting a luxury watch or crystal vase on a wall out in the public – its market value is just too tempting for certain individuals. While this is an unsavory outcome to some, it’s not likely to change much.

“I am not a fan of what Bankrobber did, but, presuming it’s not some elaborate collaboration, I’m amused by the fact that Banksy doesn’t control it, and how his work is being displayed: among people who apparently don’t care about it nor did they come to see it… where Banksy is not necessarily the center of attention,” says Hargadon, remarking that one piece is shown behind a velvet rope.

La Pandilla returns to Miami again. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Chanoir and El Xupet Negre (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Occupy All The Streets…with parties. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

En Masse collective took over a wall in their monochromatic way(photo © Geoff Hargadon)

The Bask Truck was giving out free stickers from a leggy art lover (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

DWOT . All Nation Team from Vancouver was doing some night work in the Miami heat. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

DWOT . All Nation Team. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Dabs & Myla collab with Craola and Witnes. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

 

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FIRST LOOK at Miami 2012: Walls, Street Art, Action!

Street Art is already smacking up Miami walls – an aerosol advance committee of art in the streets to welcome the bacchanal of collectors, performers, artists, fans, galleries, hoodlums, charlatans, thumping beats, and very famous and important celebrities you have never heard of are all here for Art Basel and related fairs.

Just for you, we have some of the first images of the walls as they are going up…

..from Martha Cooper, who is on the ground documenting all the walls going up for Wynwood Walls as she has done officially for them for a few years now, and she talks about the new OBEY tribute to Wynwood Walls founder Tony Goldman who passed away this autumn, and shows us DAZE in action.

We also have on-the-beat stuff from photographer and BSA contributor Geoff Hargadon – who has an insatiable thirst for clever spots and a keen eye for capturing them. We’ll be bringing more from him to you later this week too.

Finally the ever clever twins How & Nosm offer you images of their just completed Wynwood Wall mural, a collabo with VHILS.

Herakut. Wynwood Arts District. Miami 2012. This seven story tall mural is part of Herakut’s Giant Story Book Project. The German Duo will be creating large scale murals across several cites to introduce characters from the children’s book the artists are in the process of creating. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Shepard Fairey/OBEY. Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Mimai 2012. “This Wall was a tribute to Tony Goldman with a central figure of him surrounded by people he admired and was inspired by -MLK, Warhol etc…” (photo and text © Martha Cooper)

Shepard Fairey/OBEY. Detail. (photo © Martha Cooper)

“The biggest and maybe most interesting wall this year is the one by OBEY. They completely re-did their first Wynwood wall from 2009. That one was all wheat pasted. This time they used a technique similar to that of Sten & Lex. They lightly pasted pre-printed sheets on the wall and then cut out the black parts with X-Acto knives, making a stencil. After spraying, the paper was peeled away, leaving the paint” – Martha Cooper

Shepard Fairey/OBEY. Detail. (photo © Martha Cooper)

MOMO gives it a modernist splash at Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Oh, wait, this may be the real splash; Krink at Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Krink . Nemel. Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

In an epic DAZE at Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

DAZE. Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Faith 47 throws on a head scarf and drapes herself across a Wynwood wall. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

DALeast. Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

How & Nosm . VHILS. “Cut Out For You”  Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

How & Nosm . VHILS. “Cut Out For You” Detail.  Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © How & Nosm)

How & Nosm . VHILS. “Cut Out For You” Detail.  Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © How & Nosm)

How & Nosm . VHILS. “Cut Out For You” Detail.  Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © How & Nosm)

How & Nosm . VHILS. “Cut Out For You” Detail.  Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © How & Nosm)

How & Nosm . VHILS. “Cut Out For You” Detail.  Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © How & Nosm)

 

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ALL the JOBURG Videos

Yesterday on Fun Friday we featured ROA in the first video from the I Art Joburg Festival. The festival took place this fall in Johannesburg, South Africa and featured people like Falko, Cameron Platter, ESPO, and Remed. Today we’re pleased to offer you the full compliment of all the videos that were directed, shot and edited during the festival. Much thanks to Ricky Lee Gordon, the organizer of the festival, who advanced all of these videos to us for BSA readers to enjoy.

See Monica Campana’s account of her visit to I Art Joburg here on BSA.

MARTHA COOPER

CAMERON PLATTER

ESPO

FALKO

REMED

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

BSA does not necessarily endorse any of the brands that appear in third party content and is not under any contractual obligation to do so.

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Specter Under a Bridge in Chicago

Street Artist Specter stuffed himself with Turkey and hit up a wall under a bridge in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago last week to help Pawn Works with their ongoing project. You would think these guys would take a break for the holiday, but at least the weather was cold and bleak and depressing, so that was a plus. Truth is, Specter is an imaginative twister of perception; a thinking artist who likes to experiment with pre-definitions of art and messaging, so it can be rewarding to spend a day watching him work.

 

 

Specter. Pilsen, Chicago. November 2012 (photo © Pawn Works Gallery)

“The weather during a Chicago winter is not ideal outdoor working weather,” reports Seth, but says they were thrilled to work with Specter on the Thanksgiving Day holiday anyway. “Layered up, with gloves gripping brushes and scarf over his face Specter was hard at work this past weekend as people buzzed by and even a little snow began to come down lightly,” he says of the new piece done in conjunction with Art in Public Places.

And we send a shout out to Alderman Danny Solis, who is the main force behind the project, helping many of the artists procure space to create their work.

Specter. Pilsen, Chicago. November 2012 (photo © Pawn Works Gallery)

Specter. Pilsen, Chicago. November 2012 (photo © Pawn Works Gallery)

Specter. Pilsen, Chicago. November 2012 (photo © Pawn Works Gallery)

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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“Articulate: Baltimore” Hits the Streets

The City of Baltimore just got hit with its second large scale mural project in one calendar year as Articulate: Baltimore joined Open Walls Baltimore during a five week period this autumn.

Chris Stain . Billy Mode. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

A mixture of local artists and some Street Artists who are known internationally, the project is sponsored by a collection of public, private, and tourism development concerns as a way of activating a small selection of the city’s huge inventory of vacant spaces to “increase the visibility (of) the new westside district and encourage more visitors to frequent its venues”. With this sort of laser-sharp urban renewal employed in a very confined area, we may be witnessing the splintering of so-called Street Art festivals into more focused venues, employed in a more selective way to achieve specific ends.

Baltimore natives and well known Street Artists Chris Stain and Billy Mode get to do something at home for a change. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

The list of artists in Articulate: Baltimore includes artists Ways & J. Digital, Jessie Unterhalter & Katey Truhn, Indigo, HKS 181, Chris Stain & Billy Mode, Pixel Pancho, and 2501. Co-curated by Maryland-based artists Stefan Hauswald and Jesse James, the full collection covers roughly a two-block area that is very near the center of downtown.  The whole initiative appears to be one conceived with rejuvenation in mind, as public art often does for previously moribund areas. According to the website for Articulate, all of the artists realize that their work isn’t meant as a permanent installation and may be replaced at any time. “The artists expect their impact to be powerful but limited in duration— they expect that their work will be replaced over time, perhaps a matter of months or years.”

Many thanks to photographer Martha Cooper, who was there to capture official images of the installations, and she shares them here, including some that are exclusive to BSA.

Chris Stain . Billy Mode. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Combining the colorful 3-D letterforms of Mode and the stencil-styled portraiture of Chris Stain for Articulate, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Canada’s INDIGO. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

INDIGO. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

INDIGO. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Pixel Pancho. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Pixel Pancho. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Pixel Pancho. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Pixel Pancho. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Jessie Unterhalter and Katey Truhn bring a D.I.Y. aesthetic by using additional materials for a poppy hand-made collage effect. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Jessie Unterhalter . Katey Truhn. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie that’s 2501. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

2501. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

2501. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Having pink eye in this case is something good. HKS 181. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

HKS 181. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

WAYS – J. Digital. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

WAYS – J. Digital. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

WAYS – J. Digital. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

WAYS – J. Digital. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

For more information about Articulate Baltimore click on the link below:

http://www.articulatebaltimore.org/

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“I Art Joburg” with Monica Campana in South Africa

Today we welcome Monica Compana to BSA to share with you her experiences during a recent Street Art/community program in Johannesburg, South Africa that took place in September. As one of the principal originators of Atlanta’s Living Walls festival, Campana brings a wizened eye to the events as they unfolded, and presents here what she observed and experienced. Special thanks to Martha Cooper, who shares with BSA images that display her personal vision of Joburg and some layouts from her new zine “Soweto/Sowebo”.

Considered one of the wealthiest cities in Africa, Johannesburg is not only rich in gold and diamonds, but also rich in arts and culture. In the month of September, Johannesburg hosted the largest mural project in the city and possibly even the continent.

I Art Joburg brought the artists Espo, ROA, Cameron Platter, Falko, Remed and graffiti photographer legend Martha Cooper to South Africa to create art in the streets, start a dialogue about street art in the city and to document a month where artists worked together alongside a commercial production team and community members to bring color to Joburg and Soweto.

ROA (photo © Martha Cooper)

“Color creates energy, energy creates inspiration and inspiration creates change. It is our responsibility to inspire ourselves to inspire others to inspire the change. Art is the remedy for this,” says Ricky Lee Gordon, organizer and curator of I Art Joburg.

Gordon’s carefully selected list of renowned street artists not only managed to put the festival amongst one of the best ones of the year, but also it created a chemistry between artists and community. With 6 murals installed around the Maboneng Precinct it hosted a night of lectures and the screening of Espo’s “Love Letters to You” documentary. The precinct is also referred to as “a place of light”, as it is a hub for young creatives and artists, and it also hosted a gallery exhibit by the participating artists.

ROA (photo © Monica Campana

To inspire kids from a local school, organizers created a workshop and a mural with kids in Soweto, a name synonymous in the northern hemisphere with the historic anti-apartheid black resistance movement that inspired so many artists in the 70s-80s around the world. The name Soweto has an auditory similarity to the neighborhood of Sowebo in Baltimore, which photographer Martha Cooper has been documenting as a personal passion for nearly a decade.

Already in Joburg to document all of the murals and exhibit her own work, she took the experience and project to a whole new level with the development of her zine titled: “Soweto/Sowebo.” Martha owns a house in South West Baltimore, also known as Sowebo, an area so affected by urban decay that it is often compared to Soweto in South Africa. Needless to say, when she  arrived in Soweto she immediately saw the similarities and she decided to create a zine honoring the richness of both cultures.  It was fascinating to see through her work how these two places, so far away from each other geographically in two completely different continents, could pass as one and the same.

ROA (photo © Martha Cooper)

Soweto/ Sowebo was not the only example of this wonderful dialogue. Each artist tried to leave something to the city of Joburg that would not only last for a long time visually, but something that could continue to spark some kind of dialogue. During my stay in Joburg I was able to spend quite a bit of time with ROA and Martha Cooper.  It was amazing to see how their easily  they interacted with the people on the streets of the city and even though they had been there for only about a week by the time that I arrived, Martha and ROA had already made dear friends in the neighborhood.

ROA and Falko (photo © Martha Cooper)

On the subject of friends we made: Bongani Mathebula, my Joburg tour guide, is the one that stole my heart. Seeing the city through the eyes of a local 25 year old artist was very inspirational. He told me that projects like I Art Joburg are what the city of Johannesburg needs – an outsider’s view and conversation starter to inspire the local community.

“Artists are like heroes. Art is crazy, people need to let that happen. More art, more crazy communication and growth,” says Bongani.

I hope to see more mural festivals happen in Joburg and Soweto. I know the artists who were part of the project were left wanting more. So, who knows? Maybe this really is just the start to a much bigger conversation in Joburg! Fingers crossed!

Remed (photo © Monica Campana)

Falko (photo © Monica Campana)

Espo (photo © Martha Cooper)

Espo (photo © Martha Cooper)

Espo (photo © Martha Cooper)

Espo (photo © Martha Cooper)

Martha Cooper’s “Soweto/Sowebo Zine” (photo © Martha Cooper)

Martha Cooper’s “Soweto/Sowebo Zine” (photo © Martha Cooper)

Martha Cooper’s “Soweto/Sowebo Zine” (photo © Martha Cooper)

 

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MOMO Paints New Mural in Chicago

Still on his global 2012 painting tour the maximal minimalist MOMO was in Chicago over the last week with Seth and Nick from Pawn Works Gallery to paint a large mural under mostly grey skies while the crippling Superstorm named Sandy jacked a third of the country.

“Chicago was great,” MOMO tells us, not just because of the opportunity to paint a huge wall in his signature style and because he got to hang with a friend who had been stranded by the storm at the O’Hare airport, but because he got a taste of some of the city’s local delicacies with the Pawn Works crew.

“We did our best to share the Chicago experience,” says Nick while he talks about procuring premium encased meats form Hot Doug’s, breakfast at Art’s Drive-In, and tacos from secret hot spots all over the city. Call it Chicago hospitality.  Judging the still-thin MOMO teetering on the edge of the cherry picker, this sort of modern mural making really burns the calories!

Special thanks to photographer Marc Moran for these photos exclusively for BSA readers.

MOMO (photo courtesy of Pawn Works Gallery © Marc Moran)

MOMO (photo courtesy of Pawn Works Gallery © Marc Moran)

MOMO (photo courtesy of Pawn Works Gallery © Marc Moran)

MOMO (photo courtesy of Pawn Works Gallery © Marc Moran)

MOMO (photo courtesy of Pawn Works Gallery © Marc Moran)

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