Gallery

Chris Jordan “Locost Queue” Debuts from a Tower in Queens

New Yorkers will stand in line for many things; heavily frosted confections from the Cupcake Cafe, the new iPhone 17, or the chance to rub against a sweaty stranger on a light-crazed dance floor while paying 8 dollars for a plastic cup of ice. Since the superstorm Sandy hit last month, many of us have stood in line for food and blankets, and since the banking superstorm hit in ’09, many more have passed hours on the unemployment line. While we stand, sometimes we can feel time passing, the hands of the clock slowly waving past us incrementally as we fill out our forms or scroll through our electronic devices.  Light artist Chris Jordan is illuminating and projecting our waiting plight in his new installation at the top of a 14 story tower of a former bank in Queens.

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You” Street view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I’ve been working overtime on this installation, which on the surface is incredibly simple,” he says of his piece entitled ‘Locost Queue’, which debuted in darkness in Long Island City last night.

The forms are photographed silhouettes of people from the local neighborhood, marching slowly across the four 11-foot diameter clock faces. Describing the low cost piece that will run for 3 months as part of a group exhibition curated and produced by No Longer Empty, Jordan reveals some of the back story effort and planning that went into making this glowing show above Queens.

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You”. For this installation Mr. Jordan fashioned a handmade four-way projector with a “reel” of silhouettes in continuous motion, projected on the four walls of the clock tower of the former Bank of Manhattan building. Indoor view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“This has been anything but simple to accomplish, due to numerous constraints – including having to haul all the gear up three stories by rope, through a narrow hatch,” he says as he describes the grimy ladder and port-holed room. With an extremely limited budget, the resourceful designer had to forgo the powerful high cost projectors he is accustomed to working with and devise a decidedly old-fashioned approach to light projection. Ironically, as one stands in this dust-covered belfry on a chilly winter night it looks completely appropriate for a tower built in 1927, two years before last century’s bank-caused depression.

“Despite the challenges,” he says proudly as he surveys the shadows inside the drafty illuminated room, “it’s running, and looking pretty fantastic.”

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You” Indoor view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You” Indoor view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You” Indoor view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You”. Tenth floor view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You”. Street view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

View of NYC from a broken panel on one of the clock faces. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris’ installation is part of the group exhibition titled “How Much Do I Owe You” curated and produced by No Longer Empty. To learn more details about this exhibition, the complete list of participating artists and about the programs and mission of No Longer Empty click here.

Viewing every evening from dusk to midnight through March 13, 2013.

This installation depicts a queue of people moving through the four clock faces at this historic clock tower in Queens Plaza. The speed correlates with the population increase of New York City.

Best viewing is from the park across the street from the building.

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White Walls Gallery Presents: New2 “In One Hand A Ghost, The Other An Atom” (San Francisco, CA)

New2

Complex Magazine‘s  Nick Schonberger got a sneak preview of Australian street artist New2‘s collage pieces that will compose his upcoming show at White Walls, “In One Hand a Ghost, the Other an Atom.” Each of New2′s collages is made of multiple layers of hand cut paper, the result being a super vivid and highly intricate take on the traditional style.

“[The collages] prove tremendous personal growth on the artist’s part since 941 Geary’s pioneering show. New2 is obsessed with traditional lettering, though in his technique allows himself freedom to explore more progressive forms.”

Come check out New2′s rad new work when the show opens December 15th from 7-11 pm, and don’t forget to RSVP on Facebook! If you’re not able to make it to the opening reception, the show will be on display until January 5th, 2013.

In One Hand a Ghost, the Other an Atom
A Solo Show by New2
Opening Reception – Saturday, December 15th, 7-11pm
On View Through January 5th, 2013
@ White Walls (www.whitewallssf.com)
835 Larkin St, San Francisco, CA

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Klughaus Gallery Presents: Rime & Toper “Snap Back – Dangerous Drawings About New York” (Manhattan, NYC)

Rime and Toper

RIME / TOPER
Snap Back – Dangerous Drawings About New York

Opening Reception: Saturday, December 15, 2012 from 6-10pm
Location: 47 Monroe Street New York, NY 10002
RSVP: rsvp@klughaus.net

In celebration of Klughaus Gallery’s one-year anniversary, we are thrilled to announce “Snap Back – Dangerous Drawings About New York,” a dual artist show featuring Brooklyn natives RIME (Jersey Joe) and TOPER. “Snap Back” will feature illustrations and paintings that integrate elements of the artists’ past experiences living in New York City; each piece is inspired by a personal story. “TOPER is one of my oldest friends and a very talented guy with a very interesting life experience,” says RIME. “This show aims to tap into our life experience coming up in New York.”

Best known for his explosive use of color combined with dynamic lettering and innovative characters, RIME started painting graffiti in Staten Island in 1991. He spent many years mastering his style throughout New York and New Jersey and had achieved international recognition for his distinct aesthetic by 2003. In 2005, RIME moved to Los Angeles to concentrate on fine art. It was also in 2005 that he became a member of the legendary crew MSK. This marks the first time in almost a decade that RIME will be headlining a show back in his hometown.

TOPER grew up painting alongside such legends as Dash Snow (SACE), REVS, DG, SETUP, SCOPE, and of course, RIME, after the two met growing up in Staten Island. TOPER’s name has been known and respected in the New York graffiti art scene since the mid-to-late 1990s as a writer known for his distinctive New York street-motivated style, a technique he is now channeling into his fine art.

Klughaus Gallery

47 Monroe St.

New York, NY 10002

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Soze Gallery Presents: “Graffuturism” A Group Exhibition (Los Angeles, CA)

Graffuturism

Graffuturism.com, opens in the new Soze Gallery location at 2020 E 7th St, Unit B, Los Angeles, CA, 90021.

Since Graffuturism’s inception as a public blog and private Facebook group in 2010, there have been two major group exhibitions that featured associated artists: “Rudimentary Perfection” in Glasgow and “Futurism 2.0″ in London. Both were successful in their curatorial intentions and created a sense of community and motion for the movement. Soze Gallery also has been an early advocate hosting solo exhibitions in 2012 by Jaybo Monk, Moneyless, Remi Rough, Dale Marshall, and a two-man show with Augustine Kofie

and Jaybo. Recognizing the significance of the Graffuturists, Soze Gallery also presented the opportunity for Poesia to curate this exhibition, which he chose to simply call ““Graffuturism.” This exhibition has been eagerly anticipated as the first group show to be curated by Poesia, because he is the founder of Graffuturism.com and also a well-respected graffiti artist with a twenty-year history. Ending up in this unique dual position as artist and commentator, it has fallen on him to be the cultural instigator and diplomatic facilitator of this renewed interest, practice and discourse surrounding what he calls “Progressive Graffiti,” which has also previously been called “Abstract Graffiti.” At this juncture in the three-year history of the website, as well as in the thirty-year history of this over-looked aesthetic trajectory within the Graffiti movement, Graffuturism.com has become a hub and Poesia the dedicated and consistent chronicler and theoretician. With the internet as his podium and round table, he has been historicizing and canonizing these artists, young and old, who have been creating art outside the norms of traditional graffiti, esoteric forms of painting and sculpture that veer outside of the proscribed boundaries into the experimental, the abstract, the poetic, and the hybrid.Artists that fall under the term Progressive Graffiti are generally innately gifted draftsmen, who aspire to a Master’s Level at their craft. Overall this movement could be classified as a “High Style New Millennial Aesthetic.” The art they produce is derived from a dialogue that ricochets around within a pin-ball matrix constructed of coordinates lying between the historical and the contemporary, including high and low influences, fine art and graffiti studies, scholarly and street pursuits, intellectual and visceral marks. Whether the resulting output is graffiti, painting, murals, design, sculpture or installations, the pictorial elements are mutated and transformed through each artist’s unique vision into a personal vocabulary of cross-pollinated styles. Whereas the Street Art movement of the mid-2000s tended to focus on figurative stencils and wheat-pastes, this group of artists on the whole is more concerned with hands-on, singular creation, whether within an academic or street setting. Unlike Post-Modernism, the resultant overall aesthetic is a seamless personal statement, not a collaged juxtaposition of historic styles.

Because of Poesia’s dual roles within the movement, he as been in the unique position to attract this international line up of esteemed contemporary artists, which includes many of the significant forefathers from the seventies and eighties. As a result, by including so many of these original Masters, he has created a chronological continuum within the line up, which defines this historical thread from its earliest days. Therefore this group show has developed into a “survey” that historicizes and canonizes each artist within the Progressive Graffiti thread, as well as within the larger Graffiti movement. One of the earliest, and possibly the most influential to most these artists, is Futura. In the early eighties, after a ten-year career as one of the early seventies writers, he broke away from one of graffiti’s most sacred traditions, the letterform as subject matter. At that point he began to paint in what became known as an “Abstract Graffiti” style. With his groundbreaking subway whole-car “Break,” as well as on the canvasses he was painting at the time, he pushed an atmospheric geometric style to the forefront of his work and began to experiment with a wide array of experimental spray can techniques that had not been seen before.

Around this same time, other early NYC writers, who had also started their careers in the seventies, began to experiment with new hybrid directions not based in pure graffiti traditions. In 1985, Carlos Mare began to combine abstraction and Wildstyle within the medium of sculpture, which over the past couple of decades has expanded to include other mediums under the term Urban Modernism. Haze also began to cross over into the fine art domain and over the years has created a body of work that might be referred to as Iconographic Minimalism. Doze Green was also a significant member of the early community of writers who crossed over with an experimental style that included the use of archetypal icons, poetic typography, figurative motifs and painterly styles. West was also another early intrepid explorer, adopting a gestural expressionist style, applying the muscle memory of train and wall painting to the canvas with his long whole-body marks and splashy, dripping strokes.

This exhibition has also united artists from the second generation who took off along the path forged by those early pioneers. These artists started to formulate their progressive aesthetics in the late eighties, such as Delta, the European three-dimensional geometric letterform pioneer turned pure abstractionist; New Yorker Greg Lamarche aka SpOne, who has been able to establish an abstract typographic collage aesthetic parallel to his foundation as a graffiti writer obsessed with the hand-written letterform; Part2ism was one of the earliest UK experimentalists in Hyperrealism, as well as co-founder of the Ikonoklast Movement in the UK with Juice126, which also came to include abstract colorist Remi Rough in the early-nineties.

Also beginning in the late eighties on the West Coast of the US, the Wildstyle-reductionist Joker was one of the first graffiti artists to paint purely geometric abstractions and pushed for its acceptance within the graffiti community by founding the Transcend Collective in 1991 with She1, who was an abstract writer in the UK. Poesia, became a key member of the collective in 1995, exploring a more hybrid, expressionistic approach to Wildstyle, as well as taking it into pure abstraction, which he is currently pushing in new directions, as well as reaching back to the Baroque painters and reinterpreting their masterpieces as graffiti-dissected new millennial re-paintings. Over in Europe, first in Paris then Italy during the same time period, Marco Pho Grassi started out as a wall and train painter but quickly started mixing in abstraction and more painterly expressionist techniques much like Poesia, yet totally unknown to each other. Then in the mid to late nineties, back in the US along the West Coast, other artists with alternative, experimental mind-sets, who were aware of recent developments, were coming out with brilliant, refined hybrid styles, such as Augustine Kofie and El Mac.

Artists such as these had been forced to skirt the edges of graffiti culture as well as the fine art world for the past ten to thirty years. Due to the esoteric nature and hybrid aesthetics of their graffiti-based paintings, and their disparate locations around the globe, they had no way to band together or find an audience to support them because of the lack of enough interest in their local communities for their esoteric and singular aesthetics. On the other side of the tracks, they were also ignored by the fine arts establishment because of their association with graffiti culture and for unabashedly continuing their gallery-related practices under the term Graffiti, which they still did not entirely leave behind. But, as the world population grows and becomes more connected through the internet, these geographically disparate artists have found it easier to come together, work together, and share global opportunities with each other, rather than being confined to tiny local communities.

Now, as this historical thread comes of age and recognizes itself in the mirror of history and on the faces of its youth, as the pioneers of the culture are canonized and the younger artists are united, there are many more opportunities afforded them within the design market, auction houses and fine art world, as these communities continue grow in their recognition of the cultural value and influence of Graffiti and Street Art, as the most prevalent styles and art movements in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. This particular Graffuturist group exhibition, as well as the previous two, are significant steps in the growth of awareness and activity. This is a significant exhibition because it connects all the artists across the continuum of this overlooked historical trajectory back to these forefathers to finally make the connections and give the recognition due to Progressive Graffiti in all its current manifestations and their historical referents.

Across the board, 2012 has been an explosive year for Progressive Graffiti. The synchronicity of all these group exhibitions and solo shows can only emphasize that there is increased activity by the artists and an amplified interest in the audience. Futura had his first solo show in ten years, which attracted a massive turn out of the wealthy and the fashionable, as well as the highly-respected hardcore members of the graffiti community, which is a testament to his growing importance outside the culture, as well as cementing his stature within it. Following on the heels of the success of his solo show, Futura exhibited with two other crucial esoteric Old School Masters, Rammellzee and Phase2, in conjunction with the Modernist Master Matta in the exhibition “Deep Space” in NYC. This exhibit was particular significant because it canonized these three graffiti artists within the fine art pantheon by successfully illustrating their undeniable aesthetic accomplishments in relation to Matta’s masterworks. Rammellzee also had a banner year, being included in the “Vocabularies Revitalized” exhibition at the MoMA, as well as being given a complete retrospective at the Children’s Museum, both of which were in NYC, not even to mention his solo show at the Suzanne Geiss gallery in 2011 called “The Equation.”

In London, also significant in its curatorial aims to canonize and historicize, as well as it’s grand scope, was “Futurism 2.0,” which compared and contrasted the Futurists and the Graffuturists in an exhibition, book and documentary. Another group show of significance was BrooklynStreetArt.com’s exhibition “Geometricks” which held high the torch of Abstract Graffiti in it’s title and Progressive Graffiti in its roster, which included Hellbent (the curator), Augustine Kofie, Drew Tyndell, Momo, OverUnder and SeeOne. One of the most significant of the many murals and “in situ” collaborations painted this year by Graffuturist-related artists was the abstract mural painted on the Megaro Hotel by Agents of Change members Remi Rough, Augustine Kofie, Lx.One, and Steve More, which is currently the largest mural ever painted in London. Also, a slew of solo and duo exhibitions opened every month around the world by many of the artists associated with Graffuturism and Progressive Graffiti: Poesia, Dale Marshal, Part2ism, Remi Rough, Augustine Kofie, Jaybo Monk, Mark Lyken, Moneyless, Carlos Mare, She One, Matt W. Moore, Jurne, Greg Lamarche, Delta, Hense, Rae Martini, Marco Pho Grassi, and Graphic Surgery. In order to see the full scope of activities though, one would have to go back through Graffuturism.com for a complete review.

Above and beyond the growing interest in Progressive Graffiti is the expanding interest in the over-all culture as well during these first two decades of the new millennium. Massive museum exhibitions encompassing the full spectrum of subcultures and historical threads within the Graffiti and Street Art cultures have also opened to wide acclaim. The success of ticket sales for “Street Art” in 2008 at the Tate Modern in London and “Art in the Streets” in 2011 at the MOCA in Los Angeles revealed the mass cultural interest of these art movements and all the art forms that are connected to them. The fact that these two exhibitions happened at all signifies the growing acceptance by the fine art community as well.

These museum exhibitions, as well as the trend towards many other smaller historical exhibitions, such as “Deep Space” and “Futurism 2.0” at the end of 2012, and “Pantheon: A history of Art from the Streets of NYC” in 2011, indicate a new interest in the study of the history and cultural significance of these movements. Other indicators are the release of high quality scholarly books, articles and movies, such as “Abstract Graffiti” by Cedar Lewisohn in 2011; “Beyond Graffiti” published in ArtNews in 2011 by Carolina Miranda; the 2005 documentary “Next: A Primer on Urban Painting” by Pablo Aravena; and “The Feral Diagram 2.0: Graffiti and Street Art” published in 2012 by Daniel Feral. These are all testament to the growing enthusiasm of scholars, historians, and theoreticians to examine, define and record the fifty year history of graffiti and street art, and recently in particular the Progressive Graffiti thread. Like any misunderstood movement before these, such as rock’n’roll, comic books, and cinema, eventually the art forms, the audiences and the scholars united to finally recognize the movement’s undeniable cultural value, relevance and resonance in all their forms from the simple and visceral to the esoteric and intellectual.

Text by Daniel Feral

On Friday, Dec 14, 2012, the eponymously-titled “Graffuturism” exhibition curated by Poesia, the founder of Graffuturism.com, opens in the new Soze Gallery location at 2020 E 7th St, Unit B, Los Angeles, CA, 90021.

The complete artist list in alphabetical order by first name is as follows: 2501, Aaron De La Cruz, Augustine Kofie, Boris “Delta” Tellegen, Carl Raushenbach, Carlos Mare, Clemens Behr, Derek Bruno, Doze Green, Duncan Jago, DVS 1, El Mac, Eric Haze, Erosie, Franco “Jaz” Fasoli, Futura, Gilbert 1, Greg “Sp One” Lamarche, Graphic Surgery, Hense, Hendrik “ECB” Beikirch, Jaybo Monk, Joker, Jurne, Kema, Kenor, Lek, Marco “Pho” Grassi, Matt W. Moore, Moneyless, O.Two, Part2ism, Poesia, Rae Martini, Remi Rough, Samuel Rodriguez, Sat One, Sever, Shok-1, Sowat, Steve More, West, Will Barras.

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Weldon Arts Gallery Presents: Robyn Hasty AKA Imminent Disaster in Collaboration with Alex Pergament “Dark Corners, Savage Secrets” (Brooklyn, NYC)

Robyn Hasty

DARK CORNERS, SAVAGE SECRETS

Referred to as perverse, neurotic, or bestial, our sexuality is often inhibited by fear and judgment. In “Dark Corners, Savage Secrets,” Robyn Hasty, in collaboration with Alex Pergament, reveals the most intimate moments of her sexual relationships, openly tearing apart these inhibitions in an interactive exhibition of photography, sculpture, and performance. Questioning the le- gitimacy of our socially-dictated taboos about sex, Hasty invites her audience to reveal their hesitations about sexual candor and transcend them.

Tucked away within a found wood installation, suitcases open to reveal nude photos taken clandestinely in the MoMA’s painting galleries, collodion tintypes suggest scenes of sexual dominance and vulnerability, and a nook with a slide projector allows the viewer to advance through an explicit slideshow of Hasty having sex with her partner. Opening night, the large-scale anthropo- morphized headdresses shown in her tintypes come to life atop semi-nude women chained to the gallery walls.

By offering up these intimate moments to the public eye,

Hasty defies our entrenched taboos about sexual transparency. Whether her work debases the moments of intimacy it records or whether this exhibition reveals a fundamentally

human connection is left to the judgment of the viewer. Will we choose to reinforce these taboos or to resist them?

Robyn Hasty, a.k.a. Imminent Disaster, has rafted the Mississippi River with the Miss Rockaway Armada, crossed the Adriatic Sea on a junk boat to attend the 2009 Venice Biennale, designed and built the sets for Jeff Stark’s “Sweet Cheat,” designed murals with the Philadelphia Mural Arts program, and collaborated with Swoon. Her work has been exhibited throughout the US and internationally. She has been featured on NPR for “Homeland,” a project which led her across 15,000 miles of the United States taking wet-plate collodion portraits. Her work has also appeared in The New York Times, New York Magazine,The Wall Street Journal, Juxtapoz, and The Village Voice. In 2013, she will be a resident at the Bronx Museum of the Arts.

Weldon Arts is a contemporary gallery in Bushwick promoting the work of emerging and street artists, and cre- ating a dialogue with the public about the relationship between art, culture and community. For more information, visit www.weldonarts.net.

Opening Reception: Saturday, December 15, 6–9pm
Exhibition Dates: December 15, 2012–January 12, 2013
Location: 181R Irving Ave., Bushwick, Brooklyn.
Hours: Friday and Saturday 12-6pm, and by appointment.
Directions: L to Dekalb Ave.; M to Knickerbocker Ave.; gallery is located between Stockholm St. and Stanhope St.

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Low Brow Artique Presents: “First Worldwar in Silkscreen” A Group Exhibition. (Brooklyn, NYC)

Low Brow Artique

XOXO in Sao Paulo had asked different artists in each of the cities to recruit artists to do  an edition of 20 silk screen prints all 11x 17″, 5 prints of the edition by each artist available for each of the 4 cities (1 print edition of 20 by each artist, 5 available for each of 4 cities=20). All the prints at Lowbrow will be under 50$ and will make a great presents for the holiday season!

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5 Pieces Gallery Present: “Brett Amory – Lil’ Homies”. (Berne, Switzerland)

5 Pieces Gallery is pleased to show these brand new works by outstanding American painter Brett Amory. This exhibition will run at 5piecesgallery.com from December 16th 2012 to January 15th 2013. Please reserve works by December 15th 2012.

Amory began the Waiting series in 2001 with paintings based on photographs the artist has taken of ordinary city architecture and random people who he saw daily but never spoke to. He feels especially drawn to individuals who look lost, lonely or awkward—those who don’t appear to fit in socially. As the title suggests, the Waiting series depicts how people are distracted by constant internal dialogue, preoccupation with memories of the past and/or concern for the future, never able to live in the present moment. Amory’s work attempts to visually represent this concept of disconnection, detachment, and anticipation, conveying the idea of transient temporality that exists in the moments of our daily lives.

At first, the series, depicted travelers waiting underground. But as the paintings evolved, the people ceased to be exclusively travelers, and began to emphasize figures selected from anonymous snaphots of city streets. Although the experience of waiting remains, the perception of it has changed from one of mundane task to one leavened with transcendence.

The series has also charted the evolution of an artist—the reductive elements of the compositions provide an outward echo of the inner states of the figures. By reducing the elements of the painting as far as possible, a frozen moment is extended.

Lastly, I have developed favored motifs in the series, a kind of visual music, such as repetition of a human image, to show not only the passage of time but of the human being through it.

16 December 2012 – 15 January 2013: Brett Amory – ‘Lil Homies’

5 Pieces Gallery
Alpenstrasse 53
3073 Guemligen, Berne
Switzerland

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Josua Liner Gallery Presents: Dave Kinsey “Everything At Once” (Manhattan, NYC)

Dave Kinsey

Joshua Liner Gallery is pleased to present Everything at Once, an exhibition of over thirty intense, high-energy paintings and works on paper by Los Angeles-based artist Dave Kinsey. This is Kinsey’s second solo exhibition with the gallery.

As the show title suggests, Kinsey attempts to convey a world gone mad with media, perpetual conflict, and a sense of the mounting struggle between the urban and natural worlds. Kinsey creates this new body of work through a brash synthesis of materials, textures, and aesthetics, conjuring multilayered abstractions with traces of figuration which create dynamic transformations of images within images.

Akhal-Teke (War Horse), a large mixed-media work on canvas layers fragments of a galloping horse interposed with hard-edged bands of bright color and pooled washes of darker hues, evocative of deep internal conflict. Congotropolis layers transparent outlines of human and primate skulls with the profile of a classical figure head, playing up the similarity and contrast of competing species, surrounded by a frenetic atmosphere of high-contrast color. In Metropolis, Kinsey strips away all figurative elements and introduces an exclusively abstract approach to his work—a graphic composition of intersecting planes, blasts of color, and bursts of geometric line. In addition to these and other paintings, smaller collage works will be on view as well as a study of hands interpreted from classical images in ink and acrylic on paper.

Through his work, Kinsey explores themes of data domination and distortion, political upheaval, and the search for genuine identity in an age of virtual (or illusory) reality. According to the artist, “Collectively, the developed world is swimming in modern media; we’re learning to navigate this landscape every day while becoming unwittingly addicted, for better or worse. And that’s simultaneously exhilarating and a little scary. Throw in climate change and you’ve got a scenario worthy of our attention.”

Reception Thursday December 13 from 6-9pm

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The Superior Bugout Presents: “Kids Eat For Free” A group Exhibition. (Brooklyn, NYC)

Kids Eat For Free

What: Kids Eat for Free
When: Thursday December 13, 2012 from 6 to 10pm
Where: The Tender Trap 245 South 1st street between Roebling and Havemeyer
How much: FREE

On Thursday December 13, 2012 The Superior Bugout presents the opening night of “Kids Eat for Free” with artwork from North Carolina’s infamous NGC crew.  Artists FISHGLUE, MTN, RODA and Thomas Bachman share their photos, sculptures, and diatribes of tales from their travels and mischief.  Much of the work appeared in Miles Michaels’ 1480 Gallery in Detroit, MI earlier this year in August, and has now traveled with additional new work to Brooklyn.

The artists’ work documents the past Summer, traveling across America’s northeast corridor, southern and mid-western states and New York City stealing freight train rides and paint.  Along the way they’ve reworked the visual landscapes of the towns they passed through with colorful signage, roller pieces, and urban scrawlings.  The show will be on display throughout the new year.

Accompanying the artwork will be an experimental sound set with MIND DETRGNT BKF playing eclectic samples and sounds from his vast collection of tape cassettes.

The Superior Bugout seeks to bring a synergy of sight and sound, combining visual elements of the streets with contemporary sound visionaries. The party aesthetic comes from Brooklyn based multimedia artist Andrew H. Shirley, who’s work “Fuck Bike #001” is currently on display in the window of The Museum of Sex in New York City.

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Montana Gallery Presents: C215 “Orgullecida” (Barcelona, Spain)

C215

C215 (Francia)

Inauguración Miércoles 12 de Diciembre del 2012.
Exposición del 13 de Diciembre al 02 de Febrero del 2013.

“Trato de interactuar con lo que me rodea, motivo por el cual intervengo la calle aportando elementos y personajes que tienen una estrecha relación con las calles. Me gusta enseñar ciertos aspectos y personas que la sociedad trata de mantener ocultas, como la gente sin techo, los fumadores, los granujas buscavidas, o la peña del barrio en los parques, por ejemplo.”

Christian Guémy, también conocido como C215, es un artista callejero parisino cuyo trabajo gira entorno al stencil graffiti. Nació en 1973, empezó a pintar en 2005 y se podría decir que, a día de hoy, es uno de los stencil artists más productivos dentro de la escena del street art .

Cada una de sus plantillas, con las que te has podido cruzar en las calles de ciudades tan diversas como Nueva Delhi, Londres, Estambul, Roma, Barcelona o Paris, tienen un significado especial por el sitio en el que han sido realizadas. Un singular estilo que nos ofrece impactantes retratos de gente corriente, representados con un aire digno y orgulloso, cargados de expresividad y que inciden por este motivo en el particular hecho de que se trata de individuos a los que la sociedad ha dado la espalda.

Montana Gallery presenta ahora la primera exposición en solitario de C215 en la ciudad de Barcelona, y en la que nos muestra una serie de instalaciones con objetos reciclados y pintados, en un intento de explorar el amor a través de la feminidad.

Montana Gallery
Barcelona

Carrer Comerç, 6
08003 Barcelona
T/F: (+34) 932 680 191

gallery@montanacolors.com

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Munch Gallery and Just Seeds Present: ‘Sowing the Seeds of Love’ A Group Exhibition (Manhattan, NYC)

Just Seeds

Justseeds Sowing the Seeds of Love
Opening Reception: Friday December 7th, 7-9 pm
Exhibition runs December 7-23, 2012
 ‘Sowing the Seeds of Love’ by collective group, Justseeds, is the newest exhibition in conjunction with Munch Gallery. Each artist has created a unique piece specifically for the gallery, and all original work will be accompanied by limited edition work. The exhibition will also include a site-specific collaborative mural. We are excited to present the first Justseeds group exhibition in New York City.
Artists include:
Jesus Barraza, Kevin Caplicki, Melanie Cervantes, Santiago Doesntsitstill, Alec Dunn, Molly J Fair, Thea Gahr, Nicolas Lampert, Josh MacPhee, Fernando Marti, Colin Matthes, Dylan Miner, Roger Peet, Jesse Purcell, Pete Railand, Favianna Rodriguez, Shaun Slifer, Chris Stain, Meredith Stern, Mary Tremonte, Bec Young.
Justseeds is a union of 24 artists, who bring together their individualistic opinions to collectively establish a certain perspective on their worldly views. Justseeds continues to collaborate with artists and other collectives from around the world, and the artwork is a forward attempt in discovering the issues and compliances of the human spirit in this world.
Founded in 1998, and originally the graphics distribution project of Josh MacPhee, Justseeds made the transformation into a worker-owned cooperative in 2007 – the original network being largely in place through past collaborations and friendships. In May 2010, Justseeds moved their distribution center from Portland to a new and larger base in Pittsburgh. Justseeds is a conglomerate of creative minds, whose artwork offers viewpoints on different social, environmental and political stances.
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Munch Gallery
245 Broome Street (between Orchard and Ludlow Streets)
New York, NY 10002
212.228.1600
Wednesday through saturday 12-7 pm
Sunday 1-6 pm
And by appointment
Subway: F or M to Delancey/Essex Street or D to Grand Street
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