L.A.

Soze Gallery Presents: “Graffuturism” A Group Exhibition (Los Angeles, CA)

Graffuturism

Graffuturism.com, opens in the new Soze Gallery location at 2020 E 7th St, Unit B, Los Angeles, CA, 90021.

Since Graffuturism’s inception as a public blog and private Facebook group in 2010, there have been two major group exhibitions that featured associated artists: “Rudimentary Perfection” in Glasgow and “Futurism 2.0″ in London. Both were successful in their curatorial intentions and created a sense of community and motion for the movement. Soze Gallery also has been an early advocate hosting solo exhibitions in 2012 by Jaybo Monk, Moneyless, Remi Rough, Dale Marshall, and a two-man show with Augustine Kofie

and Jaybo. Recognizing the significance of the Graffuturists, Soze Gallery also presented the opportunity for Poesia to curate this exhibition, which he chose to simply call ““Graffuturism.” This exhibition has been eagerly anticipated as the first group show to be curated by Poesia, because he is the founder of Graffuturism.com and also a well-respected graffiti artist with a twenty-year history. Ending up in this unique dual position as artist and commentator, it has fallen on him to be the cultural instigator and diplomatic facilitator of this renewed interest, practice and discourse surrounding what he calls “Progressive Graffiti,” which has also previously been called “Abstract Graffiti.” At this juncture in the three-year history of the website, as well as in the thirty-year history of this over-looked aesthetic trajectory within the Graffiti movement, Graffuturism.com has become a hub and Poesia the dedicated and consistent chronicler and theoretician. With the internet as his podium and round table, he has been historicizing and canonizing these artists, young and old, who have been creating art outside the norms of traditional graffiti, esoteric forms of painting and sculpture that veer outside of the proscribed boundaries into the experimental, the abstract, the poetic, and the hybrid.Artists that fall under the term Progressive Graffiti are generally innately gifted draftsmen, who aspire to a Master’s Level at their craft. Overall this movement could be classified as a “High Style New Millennial Aesthetic.” The art they produce is derived from a dialogue that ricochets around within a pin-ball matrix constructed of coordinates lying between the historical and the contemporary, including high and low influences, fine art and graffiti studies, scholarly and street pursuits, intellectual and visceral marks. Whether the resulting output is graffiti, painting, murals, design, sculpture or installations, the pictorial elements are mutated and transformed through each artist’s unique vision into a personal vocabulary of cross-pollinated styles. Whereas the Street Art movement of the mid-2000s tended to focus on figurative stencils and wheat-pastes, this group of artists on the whole is more concerned with hands-on, singular creation, whether within an academic or street setting. Unlike Post-Modernism, the resultant overall aesthetic is a seamless personal statement, not a collaged juxtaposition of historic styles.

Because of Poesia’s dual roles within the movement, he as been in the unique position to attract this international line up of esteemed contemporary artists, which includes many of the significant forefathers from the seventies and eighties. As a result, by including so many of these original Masters, he has created a chronological continuum within the line up, which defines this historical thread from its earliest days. Therefore this group show has developed into a “survey” that historicizes and canonizes each artist within the Progressive Graffiti thread, as well as within the larger Graffiti movement. One of the earliest, and possibly the most influential to most these artists, is Futura. In the early eighties, after a ten-year career as one of the early seventies writers, he broke away from one of graffiti’s most sacred traditions, the letterform as subject matter. At that point he began to paint in what became known as an “Abstract Graffiti” style. With his groundbreaking subway whole-car “Break,” as well as on the canvasses he was painting at the time, he pushed an atmospheric geometric style to the forefront of his work and began to experiment with a wide array of experimental spray can techniques that had not been seen before.

Around this same time, other early NYC writers, who had also started their careers in the seventies, began to experiment with new hybrid directions not based in pure graffiti traditions. In 1985, Carlos Mare began to combine abstraction and Wildstyle within the medium of sculpture, which over the past couple of decades has expanded to include other mediums under the term Urban Modernism. Haze also began to cross over into the fine art domain and over the years has created a body of work that might be referred to as Iconographic Minimalism. Doze Green was also a significant member of the early community of writers who crossed over with an experimental style that included the use of archetypal icons, poetic typography, figurative motifs and painterly styles. West was also another early intrepid explorer, adopting a gestural expressionist style, applying the muscle memory of train and wall painting to the canvas with his long whole-body marks and splashy, dripping strokes.

This exhibition has also united artists from the second generation who took off along the path forged by those early pioneers. These artists started to formulate their progressive aesthetics in the late eighties, such as Delta, the European three-dimensional geometric letterform pioneer turned pure abstractionist; New Yorker Greg Lamarche aka SpOne, who has been able to establish an abstract typographic collage aesthetic parallel to his foundation as a graffiti writer obsessed with the hand-written letterform; Part2ism was one of the earliest UK experimentalists in Hyperrealism, as well as co-founder of the Ikonoklast Movement in the UK with Juice126, which also came to include abstract colorist Remi Rough in the early-nineties.

Also beginning in the late eighties on the West Coast of the US, the Wildstyle-reductionist Joker was one of the first graffiti artists to paint purely geometric abstractions and pushed for its acceptance within the graffiti community by founding the Transcend Collective in 1991 with She1, who was an abstract writer in the UK. Poesia, became a key member of the collective in 1995, exploring a more hybrid, expressionistic approach to Wildstyle, as well as taking it into pure abstraction, which he is currently pushing in new directions, as well as reaching back to the Baroque painters and reinterpreting their masterpieces as graffiti-dissected new millennial re-paintings. Over in Europe, first in Paris then Italy during the same time period, Marco Pho Grassi started out as a wall and train painter but quickly started mixing in abstraction and more painterly expressionist techniques much like Poesia, yet totally unknown to each other. Then in the mid to late nineties, back in the US along the West Coast, other artists with alternative, experimental mind-sets, who were aware of recent developments, were coming out with brilliant, refined hybrid styles, such as Augustine Kofie and El Mac.

Artists such as these had been forced to skirt the edges of graffiti culture as well as the fine art world for the past ten to thirty years. Due to the esoteric nature and hybrid aesthetics of their graffiti-based paintings, and their disparate locations around the globe, they had no way to band together or find an audience to support them because of the lack of enough interest in their local communities for their esoteric and singular aesthetics. On the other side of the tracks, they were also ignored by the fine arts establishment because of their association with graffiti culture and for unabashedly continuing their gallery-related practices under the term Graffiti, which they still did not entirely leave behind. But, as the world population grows and becomes more connected through the internet, these geographically disparate artists have found it easier to come together, work together, and share global opportunities with each other, rather than being confined to tiny local communities.

Now, as this historical thread comes of age and recognizes itself in the mirror of history and on the faces of its youth, as the pioneers of the culture are canonized and the younger artists are united, there are many more opportunities afforded them within the design market, auction houses and fine art world, as these communities continue grow in their recognition of the cultural value and influence of Graffiti and Street Art, as the most prevalent styles and art movements in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. This particular Graffuturist group exhibition, as well as the previous two, are significant steps in the growth of awareness and activity. This is a significant exhibition because it connects all the artists across the continuum of this overlooked historical trajectory back to these forefathers to finally make the connections and give the recognition due to Progressive Graffiti in all its current manifestations and their historical referents.

Across the board, 2012 has been an explosive year for Progressive Graffiti. The synchronicity of all these group exhibitions and solo shows can only emphasize that there is increased activity by the artists and an amplified interest in the audience. Futura had his first solo show in ten years, which attracted a massive turn out of the wealthy and the fashionable, as well as the highly-respected hardcore members of the graffiti community, which is a testament to his growing importance outside the culture, as well as cementing his stature within it. Following on the heels of the success of his solo show, Futura exhibited with two other crucial esoteric Old School Masters, Rammellzee and Phase2, in conjunction with the Modernist Master Matta in the exhibition “Deep Space” in NYC. This exhibit was particular significant because it canonized these three graffiti artists within the fine art pantheon by successfully illustrating their undeniable aesthetic accomplishments in relation to Matta’s masterworks. Rammellzee also had a banner year, being included in the “Vocabularies Revitalized” exhibition at the MoMA, as well as being given a complete retrospective at the Children’s Museum, both of which were in NYC, not even to mention his solo show at the Suzanne Geiss gallery in 2011 called “The Equation.”

In London, also significant in its curatorial aims to canonize and historicize, as well as it’s grand scope, was “Futurism 2.0,” which compared and contrasted the Futurists and the Graffuturists in an exhibition, book and documentary. Another group show of significance was BrooklynStreetArt.com’s exhibition “Geometricks” which held high the torch of Abstract Graffiti in it’s title and Progressive Graffiti in its roster, which included Hellbent (the curator), Augustine Kofie, Drew Tyndell, Momo, OverUnder and SeeOne. One of the most significant of the many murals and “in situ” collaborations painted this year by Graffuturist-related artists was the abstract mural painted on the Megaro Hotel by Agents of Change members Remi Rough, Augustine Kofie, Lx.One, and Steve More, which is currently the largest mural ever painted in London. Also, a slew of solo and duo exhibitions opened every month around the world by many of the artists associated with Graffuturism and Progressive Graffiti: Poesia, Dale Marshal, Part2ism, Remi Rough, Augustine Kofie, Jaybo Monk, Mark Lyken, Moneyless, Carlos Mare, She One, Matt W. Moore, Jurne, Greg Lamarche, Delta, Hense, Rae Martini, Marco Pho Grassi, and Graphic Surgery. In order to see the full scope of activities though, one would have to go back through Graffuturism.com for a complete review.

Above and beyond the growing interest in Progressive Graffiti is the expanding interest in the over-all culture as well during these first two decades of the new millennium. Massive museum exhibitions encompassing the full spectrum of subcultures and historical threads within the Graffiti and Street Art cultures have also opened to wide acclaim. The success of ticket sales for “Street Art” in 2008 at the Tate Modern in London and “Art in the Streets” in 2011 at the MOCA in Los Angeles revealed the mass cultural interest of these art movements and all the art forms that are connected to them. The fact that these two exhibitions happened at all signifies the growing acceptance by the fine art community as well.

These museum exhibitions, as well as the trend towards many other smaller historical exhibitions, such as “Deep Space” and “Futurism 2.0” at the end of 2012, and “Pantheon: A history of Art from the Streets of NYC” in 2011, indicate a new interest in the study of the history and cultural significance of these movements. Other indicators are the release of high quality scholarly books, articles and movies, such as “Abstract Graffiti” by Cedar Lewisohn in 2011; “Beyond Graffiti” published in ArtNews in 2011 by Carolina Miranda; the 2005 documentary “Next: A Primer on Urban Painting” by Pablo Aravena; and “The Feral Diagram 2.0: Graffiti and Street Art” published in 2012 by Daniel Feral. These are all testament to the growing enthusiasm of scholars, historians, and theoreticians to examine, define and record the fifty year history of graffiti and street art, and recently in particular the Progressive Graffiti thread. Like any misunderstood movement before these, such as rock’n’roll, comic books, and cinema, eventually the art forms, the audiences and the scholars united to finally recognize the movement’s undeniable cultural value, relevance and resonance in all their forms from the simple and visceral to the esoteric and intellectual.

Text by Daniel Feral

On Friday, Dec 14, 2012, the eponymously-titled “Graffuturism” exhibition curated by Poesia, the founder of Graffuturism.com, opens in the new Soze Gallery location at 2020 E 7th St, Unit B, Los Angeles, CA, 90021.

The complete artist list in alphabetical order by first name is as follows: 2501, Aaron De La Cruz, Augustine Kofie, Boris “Delta” Tellegen, Carl Raushenbach, Carlos Mare, Clemens Behr, Derek Bruno, Doze Green, Duncan Jago, DVS 1, El Mac, Eric Haze, Erosie, Franco “Jaz” Fasoli, Futura, Gilbert 1, Greg “Sp One” Lamarche, Graphic Surgery, Hense, Hendrik “ECB” Beikirch, Jaybo Monk, Joker, Jurne, Kema, Kenor, Lek, Marco “Pho” Grassi, Matt W. Moore, Moneyless, O.Two, Part2ism, Poesia, Rae Martini, Remi Rough, Samuel Rodriguez, Sat One, Sever, Shok-1, Sowat, Steve More, West, Will Barras.

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New Image Art Gallery Presents: Saner “Catharsis” Curated by Medvin Sobio (West Hollywood, CA)

SANER

“A tragedy, then, is the imitation of an action … with incidents arousing pity and fear, wherewith to accomplish its catharsis of such emotions.”
– Aristotle

Opening Saturday October 27, 2012, with a body of new work, New Image Art is pleased to present “Catharsis,” a new solo exhibition by Mexico City artist SANER, Curated by Medvin Sobio of 33third Los Angeles/Mid-City Arts.

Catharsis in the Poetics of Aristotle is defined as an emotional, corporal, mental & spiritual purification.  Through the experience of compassion and fear, the spectators of the tragedy experience a purgation of emotion, a purification of the soul, a reconfiguration of desires and passions; a new revolutionary formation of desire.
Catharsis represents the final act in a cycle of solo exhibitions Saner has been developing, where each one has looked to generate an emotional change over the spectator, guiding the viewer towards a path of rebirth, freedom & purification.
In this, the final act, the viewer is the element that gives life to the exhibition.  Catharsis will be a space that will remain wrapped in a psycho magical act of healing.  With an installation, performance piece, paintings, & works on paper; this collective act of creation, of encounter & confrontation is what will generate the liberation of the spectator.ABOUT SANER

Edgar “Saner” Flores is an urban artist, muralist, professor, illustrator & graphic designer.  Raised by his parents in Mexico City and surrounded by rich color and tradition, Saner developed an interest in drawing and Mexican Muralism early on.  “I visited Oaxaca a lot when I was growing up because my mother is from there, and certain traditions which they carried out there really caught my attention.”  He began expressing himself on paper and through graffiti art, later going on to earn a degree in graphic design from the Universidad Autonoma de Mexico.
His lively & humorous images of masked characters on public walls, found objects and other canvases are influenced by Mexican custom and folklore, color, mysticism, masks, and skulls.  A mix of these lifelong interests and passions has led him to become the artist he is today.  “The masks that I use are traditional masks from Mexico.”  The jaguars, coyotes, skulls, and other recurrent characters appear in my work because that parallel world is the real self, the real face. “
Saner’s work has been featured in galleries in Mexico, the United States, London, Berlin and Barcelona.  Recent projects & exhibitions include “Kidnap Express,” Mid-City Arts Los Angeles, “Nose Job,” Eric Firestone Gallery East Hamptons NY, “The Bone yard Project,” Tucson Arizona, “The Bone yard: Return Trip,” Pima Space & Air Museum, “The Wynwood Walls,” Miami/Art Basel.  He has collaborated with Kidrobot, Vans, G-Shock, HQTR Canada, Pineda Covalin, Persigna Store, Bacardi, Adidas Mexico, Televisa, and many others.

ABOUT NEW IMAGE ART

Marsea Goldberg, founder and director of New Image Art in Los Angeles, started the gallery in 1994 at her 10×10 design studio. Since then, the gallery has grown to attract a global cult following, grabbing the interest of art lovers and collectors worldwide. Renowned for it’s discriminating eye and solid curatorial skills, New Image Art Gallery continues to show the works of established and emerging artists coming out of the street, skate, fine art, and surf scenes. Over the years, the gallery has launched or mobilized the careers of Shepard Fairey, Ed Templeton, Jo Jackson, Chris Johanson, Rebecca Westcott, Retna, Neck Face, Cleon Peterson, Faile, Tauba Auerbach, The Date Farmers, and Bäst just to name a few.

ABOUT MEDVIN SOBIO

 

One half of the visual arts collective, Viejas Del Mercado, Medvin Sobio has Curated, produced, and consulted on various large scale mural & public art projects.  He currently serves as Art Director at Mid-City Arts Gallery & 33third Los Angeles, the largest street art supply retailer in the United States.  In 2011, he was selected as Co-Curator of Wynwood Walls, the outdoor street art museum founded by Tony Goldman & Jeffrey Deitch.  Was Co-Producer & Co-Curator for The Boneyard Project & brought on as a Consulting Producer on the HERE COMES THE NEIGHBORHOOD Docuseries which explores the power of public art.  A significant component of his advocacy is dedicated to multi-dimensional cultural awareness via art exhibitions and events.  He strives to encourage awareness of the culture that the artists have emerged from and their relevance to various stratums of American culture.
7920 Santa Monica Blvd. West Hollywood CA 90046   P 323 654 2192
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Carmichael Gallery Presents: “Disambiguation” A Group Exhibition (Culver City, CA)

Disambiguation

Sixeart (photo courtesy of the gallery)

Carmichael Gallery

Disambiguation

Carlos Mare, Rae Martini, Remi/Rough, Sixeart

Carmichael Gallery

5797 Washington Blvd

Culver City, CA 90232

September 8 – October 6, 2012

Opening reception: Saturday, September 8, 6-9pm.

Carmichael Gallery is pleased to present Disambiguation, a group exhibition featuring new works by Carlos Mare, Rae Martini, Remi/Rough and Sixeart. The exhibition will be on view in the Los Angeles gallery space from September 8 to October 6, 2012, with an opening reception on September 8 from 6-9pm.

The spirit of the street, the communities that are created and gathered therein, and the subsequent movements that are formed and fostered have assisted in setting the foundations for the work of the artists presented in Disambiguation. Years of experience sharing their vision in a public forum combined with daring experimentation in form and material has resulted in four exciting contemporary abstract interpretations of the traditional graffiti form.

New Yorker Carlos Mare captures the moving human form in both two and three-dimensional form. By applying his study of Modernist and Futurist masters Marcel Duchamp, Wilfredo Lam and Kazimir Malevich to his observations of the gestures and attitude of b-boy veterans such as Ken Swift, Mare has honed a practice that translates the patterns, rhythms and beats of dance and modernism into sculpture and drawing.

Italian painter Rae Martini is equally inspired by Futurism and its obsession with the machine. His formative past as a young graffiti artist translates into abstract works that emulate the grit and texture of the streets, often using fire and dirt to create the desired effect. The dual presence of intricately patterned layers and pure minimalism is achieved by a persistent process of adding to and substracting from the initial image, creating a surface reminiscent of a storied urban wall.

Attention to the formal elements of fine art, in particular that of Minimalism, is central to the work of Remi/Rough. His color palette is selected through deceptively simple arrangements of lines and angles that bring a variety of hues into unexpected encounters with each other. By working on canvas and sculpture, he transports the movement and style of train writing into the gallery space.

Sixeart’s mixture of psychedelic abstraction and comic book-inspired figuration has become an essential element of the urban fabric in his hometown of Barcelona. His work has a childlike innocence combined with an almost hallucinogenic sense of second sight. “Sinister tragicomedy with notes of psychopathology and touches of acid” is one definition the artist himself has offered of his unique style. “My own universe of characters comes from a happy childhood and a close contact with mother nature,” he explains. The dreamlike quality of his work shows an affinity with Surrealist artists such as Joan Miró, another native of Barcelona.
About the artists:

Carlos Mare

Carlos Mare was born in New York, NY in 1965. He was a notable member of the golden age of subway graffiti in the 1970s and 1980s, painting under the moniker “Mare”, an abbreviation for “Nightmare”. He wrote alongside many of the style masters of his generation, among them Kel First, Dondi White, Crash, Kase2 and Noc167. This experience, along with his interest in modernizing the graffiti art form, has led him to reinterpret the concepts and aesthetics of style writing. Recent exhibitions include Martha Cooper: Remix, a group exhibition at Carmichael Gallery in 2011, Art Is Study: 36 Years of Process and Practice at Pratt Gallery, New York City and Physical Graffiti: Art of the B-boy Dance at Skalitzers Contemporary Art, Berlin, both in 2012. Mare has also designed several awards, including the B-Boy SPY Award for the Rock Steady Crew, the 2005 and 2007 Red Beat Battle Awards, and the award for the annual BET/Black Entertainment Awards show.

Mare currently lives and works in New York.

Rae Martini

Rae Martini was born in Milan in 1976. His first sketches at the age of 12 led to a career in street and train bombing that began in the late 80s and has lasted a dozen years. The development of both his graffiti and fine art is documented in 24 Carat Dirt, a 208 page hardcover book edited by Damiani and accompanied by a short film. The project was sponsored by clothing and lifestyle brand WeSC. Martini exhibited at the 54 Venice Biennale International Art Show Special Project, Pavilion Italy – Lombardia, Palazzo della Regione, Milan, Italy and participated with the Graffuturism group for In Situ during Art Basel Miami Beach, 2011. Additional  exhibitions have taken place at the Don Gallery, Milan, the Unruly Gallery, Amsterdam (2012), Castel Nuovo – Fondazione Valenzi, Naples (2010), Museum Recoleta, Buenos Aires (2008), Santa Maria della Scala Museum, Siena (2008), MAC – Contemporary Art Museum of San Paolo (2008) and PAC Museum – Contemporary Art Pavilion, Milan (2007).

Martini currently lives and works in Milan.
Remi/Rough

Remi Morgan, alias Remi/Rough, was born in South London in 1971. Since his debut art show in 1989, he has gone on to exhibit in London, Paris, Perth, Tokyo, Santander, Los Angeles, Miami, San Francisco, Vancouver, Hong Kong, Berlin, Ibiza and more. Remi is a founding member of artist collective Agents of Change and took part in their award-winning Ghost Village Project in 2009. His work has appeared in the books Graffiti World, Abstract Graffiti and Untitled III. In 2008, Remi was invited to speak on the history of UK graffiti in front of a sell-out auditorium at the Tate Modern as part of the museum’s street art exhibition. The following year saw the publication of his first monograph, Lost Colours and Alibis, which he followed up with How to use colour & manipulate people in 2012.

Remi/Rough currently lives and works in London.

Sixeart

Sergio Hidalgo, alias Sixeart, was born in Barcelona in 1975. Having painted from an early age, he has developed a highly personal visual language that comprises a host of recurring figures and animals. In addition to making sculpture, screen prints and works on canvas, he has collaborated with fashion designers to create clothing based on his distinctive style. In 2008, Sixeart was commissioned by the Tate Modern in London to paint a mural on the building’s iconic river façade alongside fellow artists Os Gemeos, Faile, Blu, Nunca, and JR. This was the first major public museum display of street art in London. Recent solo exhibitions have taken place at Alice Gallery, Brussels and N2 Galeria, Barcelona.

Sixeart currently lives and works in Barcelona.

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Hold Up Art Gallery Presents: Eddie Colla. Hugh Leeman and V Young D “Epilogue” (Los Angeles, CA)

Epilogue

The Bay Area’s most prolific vandals, Eddie Colla, D Young V, and Hugh Leeman create a fully immersive installation inspired by America’s gun loving culture, its corporate behemoths, and a financial meltdown. Reclaimed billboards, fire stencils, carbon soot emissions, and hand painted assault rifles take the place of canvas and oil paint at this timely Los Angeles exhibit. Know more, see here epiloguela.com “Epilogue” opens Saturday, September 8th at Hold Up Art Gallery in downtown Los Angeles, 2 blocks south of the Geffen Contemporary MOCA, 358 E. 2nd St.

Show opening Saturday September 8th, 7p.m. PST
Eddie Colla, D Young V, Hugh Leeman

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Perry Rubenstein Gallery Presents: Shepard Fairey “Americana” (Los Angeles, CA)

Shepard Fairey

AMERICANA
New Paintings by Shepard Fairey

RECEPTION: Saturday, August 25th
7pm – 10pm

Perry Rubenstein Gallery (LA) presents a special project by Shepard Fairey and Neil Young in celebration of the recent release of Young’s new album with Crazy Horse, “Americana,” which features reinterpreted classic, American, folk songs. Fairey has created eleven new paintings, each one inspired by the songs, such as Oh Susannah, This Land Is Your Land and Clementine. The new Shepard Fairey paintings will be on view to the public at Perry Rubenstein Gallery in Los Angeles starting August 25th. In addition, Shepard will have a limited quantity release of the Americana Print Edition Box Set at the opening on August 25th at Perry Rubenstein Gallery. The Box Set will include a collection of screen print versions of all the new paintings, more info and official release date on the prints to come shortly, so STAY TUNED!

The “Americana” project developed as a result of Shepard Fairey’s relationship with Neil Young and his long-time manager Elliot Roberts. Fairey created a portrait of Young for the artist’s May Day show in 2010, based on his view of the musician as a social commentator philosophically aligned with people like Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, and Joe Strummer. Young and Roberts then asked Fairey to design the art, CD and DVD packaging for the 25th anniversary of Young’s Bridge School charity. Fairey states, “Neil really liked the art and I was thrilled he asked me to collaborate by making paintings inspired by the songs on his “Americana” album. I’m a huge fan of Neil’s music in general, but when I heard the album I realized how much the subject matter of several songs reflected the aspirations and tragedies of those pursuing the American dream tied into issues relevant to the 99% movement which I have been supporting.”

Fairey says he listened to the music and lyrics to come up with concepts for visual representations of the songs. Then for each song, Fairey presented Young with ideas about a visual image that would best capture the meaning and/or protagonist/s in each song. The artist enjoyed hearing how Neil interpreted aspects of the songs that moved him the most musically and lyrically. Fairey states, “I showed Neil sketches, and then we discussed the ideas and refined them. He was very open to my ideas and encouraged me to go with what inspired me the most. Latitude for interpretation is something that Neil utilizes and seems to value as an important way for the listener/viewer to personalize their interaction with art and music. I also was excited about this project because the concept of re-interpreting pre-existing songs filtered through Neil’s unique sensibility parallels what I have often tried to do as a visual artist by building upon iconic images that are an accessible part of the cultural dialogue.”

Each of the new Fairey paintings resonate powerful messages presented in the songs, some depicting a hopeful outlook on the pursuit of a better tomorrow, while others reflect the hardships that come in trying to achieve that dream. One painting related to Clementine, which captures the words of a mourning lover whose “darling,” the daughter of a California Gold Rush miner, drowned. Here she is represented by the levitating body of a young woman draped in white, with the text “And Gone.” Another painting is related to the 1848 minstrel song Oh Susannah that features a dungaree-wearing banjo player with the text “DON’T YOU CRY FOR ME.” Other works feature a wanted poster (Travel On); an iconic image of Queen Elizabeth embroidering an American flag (God Save the Queen); and, a lonely tree, stripped bare of its leaves, in a desolate landscape (Tom Dula).

For Young and Crazy Horse’s rendition of the famous 1940 Woody Guthrie song known to every school-aged child in America, This Land Is Your Land, written in response to Irving Berlin’s God Bless America, Fairey has depicted the hopeful face of a youth, set against a dramatic Western Landscape. Three rows of sharp, barbed wire cross the boy’s path with the text “NO TRESSPASSING / THIS LAND IS MY LAND.” The text is derived from a variant verse Guthrie added as a social commentary during a 1944 recording session. Fairey’s paintings are mixed media on canvas, including techniques such as stenciling, collage, and screen-printing. All of the paintings measure closely to the 30 x 44 inch dimension, which is one of Fairey’s standard choices of size. “Americana” is Neil Young with Crazy Horse’s first album together in nine years and is being released on June 5 on Reprise Records.

Perry Rubenstein Gallery
1215 N. Highland Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90038
T (310) 395-1001 / F (310) 395-1019
http://www.perryrubenstein.com

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Fabien Castanier Gallery Presentes: RERO “IMAGE NOT AVAILABLE” (Studio City, CA)

RERO

 

Fabien Castanier Gallery is proud to present IMAGE NOT AVAILABLE , the first solo exhibition in the USA by French artist RERO.For the past 3 years, RERO has established his work through his innovative approach to street art. First introduced to the street as a teenage graffiti writer,  he eventually felt limited by a spray can and began exploring imagery through the use of typography. His work retains those values of graffiti- which remains at the very core- the confrontation, the aesthetics of destruction and the idea of appropriation. The forms of his letters, always in Verdana font, become the image. With his distinct visual style, RERO often inhabits disused and dilapidated spaces to explore the concept of “negation of the image”, presenting minimalist statements that combat our modern overdose on images and messages.

RERO challenges our understanding of intellectual property, images and computer terminology, through the use of words and phrases with a stark black line crossing them out. Using expressions such as “Trade My Mark”,  “Error 404” and “This Image is Free Copyright”, the artist seeks to provoke questions from the viewer to establish their own positions as to their meaning. The use of the strike-through furthers his exploration of negation, as it suggests a notion of denial or censorship.

RERO’s site-specific works enter the gallery space through a variety of media. His works on canvas emulate the abandoned walls where he often intervenes, where there is no distinctive brushstroke or human trace, instead marked by time and by texture. Similarly, he encases vintage leather bound books in resin, his way of making them “fossils” of the 21st century. For IMAGE NOT AVAILABLE , RERO will be exhibiting works on canvas, sculptures, works on paper and resin books alongside several installations.

RERO was born in 1983 and studied graphic design at London College of Communication. He has shown his work in numerous exhibitions and art fairs across Europe. He lives and works in Paris.

FABIEN CASTANIER GALLERY:
12196 VENTURA BLVD. STUDIO CITY, CA 91604
P. 818.748.6014  | CONTACT@CASTANIERGALLERY.COM| WWW.CASTANIERGALLERY.COM
GALLERY HOURS TUESDAY–SATURDAY 11–7PM, SUNDAY-MONDAY 11–5PM.


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Cyrcle Brings Summer to LA

You knew it would eventually get here, right?

Cyrcle (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

Ahhhhhhhhhhhh, Summer. How do I love thee? Let me count the ways…  green grass, rolling sideways down a hill in Prospect Park and feeling dizzy at the bottom, park benches and a book, 55 city swimming pools, rooftop parties and films, flip flops, rose bushes, beer from the Turkey’s Nest in a big styrofoam cup, softball games, free out door concerts (hip-hop, merengue, rock, and the philharmonic), bike riding, the Cyclone roller coaster on Coney Island, a nap under a tree, stoop sales, 5 packs of tube socks on sale at street festivals, free Shakespeare in Central Park, Dominican card games on folding tables on the sidewalk, a whole day of aerosol spraying on a huge wall, every body-type on Brighton Beach, grilled notdogs, frisbees, the smell of coconut oil, the sound of birds, kids, and the icecream truck jingle.

LA based Street Artists Cycle have done tributes to winter and spring already here. Now photographer and BSA guest contributor Carlos Gonzalez brings you Summer from the Cyrcle crew at their spot in the Arts District of Downtown Los Angeles. It’s part of the LA Freewalls Project, naturally, and we thank Carlos for sharing with BSA readers these images of the new installment.

Cyrcle (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

Cyrcle (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

Cyrcle (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

Cyrcle (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

Cyrcle (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

Cyrcle (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

To see the photo essay on Cyrcle Spring Interlude click here.

To see the photo essay on Cyrcle Winter Interlude click here.

Thank you to Carlos for his beautiful photography. Check him out on Facebook.

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Arrested Motion Curates: “City of Fire” A Group Art Exhibition. (Beverly Hills, CA)

City of Fire

Please join Stephen Webster jewelry and Arrested Motion as they launch the exciting new exhibition City of Fire on June 5th from 7-10 pm. City of Fire will include: Cyrcle., Thomas Doyle, Ron English, James Jean, Kid Zoom, Dave Kinsey, Mars-1, Patrick Martinez, Pedro Matos, REVOK, Rostarr, SABER, Andrew Schoultz, Jeff Soto, Judith Supine, TrustoCorp, Mark Dean Veca, Nick Walker, and Adam Wallacavage. Please contact me for all press preview appointments and inquiries regarding the event. Please RSVP at rsvpbh@stephenwebster.com

Stephen Webster

202 N. Rodeo Drive

Beverly Hills, CA 90210

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ThinkSpace Gallery Presents “Wild at Heart: Keep Wildlife in The Wild” A Group Show and Benefit. (Culver City, CA)

ThinkSpace

‘Wild At Heart: Keep Wildlife In The Wild’
Over 110 artists join forces to help bring awareness to our world’s endangered species

Co-curated by Andrew Hosner and Amanda Erlanson

20% of all proceeds go to Born Free USA

Reception with the artists: Sat, May 26th 5-9PM
On view May 26th through June 9th

Thinkspace is proud to present “Wild at Heart: Keep Wildlife in the Wild,” an exhibition to raise awareness about the precarious predicament of wild creatures around the world, and to benefit efforts to protect them in their natural habitat. Featuring a stellar cast of more than 110 artists from all corners of the art world, this exhibition brings together some of the most profound and innovative voices making art today. In recognition of the imperiled state of much of the world’s wildlife, each artist will apply their own unique perspective to our relationship with the fascinating creatures with whom we share our planet.

As the natural world becomes increasingly impacted by shifting climate, human greed and diminishing resources, protecting those creatures that still roam free becomes ever more vital to the soul of humanity. For even if we could continue to exist without wildlife, the spirit-crushing sadness that our species would take upon itself would surely rob all joy from life. Those majestic, miraculous, elemental beings which we admire from afar are at the root of who we are as people – from the woodland protagonists of our childhood storybooks, to the metaphors we use to describe ourselves as adults, to the animal spirits that visit us in our dreams. As we take steps to protect them from those who would rob them of their freedom, we also improve our own species’ chances to persist far into the future, both by preserving the natural world we all share, and by cherishing the sacred genesis of our imagination and symbology.

In appreciation of the magnificent creatures with whom we share the planet, Thinkspace will donate 20% of the sale price of each piece of art to Born Free USA and the Animal Protection Institute, which operate jointly as a non-profit organization that advocates worldwide for the ethical treatment and protection of wild animals, and also maintains a large sanctuary for rescued primates. To honor the animals closest to our hearts, the gallery will be accepting donations of old blankets to donate to area shelters so dogs don’t have to sleep on cold hard concrete, as well as other used and new pet supplies. The opening will feature the release of a gorgeous limited edition screenprinted poster especially created for the exhibition by the incomparable Aaron Horkey. We hope you will join us on May 26th to celebrate and defend the wild things that fill our lives with wonder and mystery.

UPDATED ARTIST LISTING:
Aaron Horkey http://jackywinter.com/rock-of-eye
Adam Caldwell www.adamhuntercaldwell.com
Ako Castuera http://thinging.wordpress.com
Allison Sommers www.allisonsommers.com
Amy Dover www.amydover.com/HOME.html
Amy Sol www.amysol.com
Ana Bagayan www.anabagayan.com
Andrea Offermann www.andreaoffermann.com
Andrew Hem www.andrewhem.com
Anthony Clarkson www.anthonyclarksonart.com
Aron Wiesenfeld www.aronwiesenfeld.com
ARYZ www.aryz.es
Asylm www.asylm.com
Ben Strawn www.whalefishstudios.com
Benjamin A. Vierling www.bvierling.com
Brad Woodfin www.bradwoodfin.com
Brooke Grucella www.phoenixartspace.com/members/504
Bumblebee www.flickr.com/photos/theuglyyou
Caitlin Hackett www.caitlinhackett.com
Catherine Brooks http://thearborgeistproject.tumblr.com
Chet Zar www.chetzar.com
Christina Mrozik http://christinamrozik.com
Craig “Skibs” Barker www.skibsart.com
DABS MYLA www.dabsmyla.com
DAL www.daleast.com
Dan Lydersen www.danlydersen.com
Dan-ah Kim www.dkim-art.com
Darla Jackson http://darlajacksonsculpture.com/home.html
David Jien www.davidjien.com
David MacDowell www.macdowellstudio.com
Derek Gores www.derekgores.com
Douglas Miller http://douglasmillerart.com/home.html
Drew Young http://dyoung.co
Edwin Ushiro www.mrushiro.com
Ekundayo www.ekundayo.com
Erik Siador www.eriksiador.com
Esao Andrews www.esao.net
Frank Gonzales www.frankgonzales.net
Fuco Ueda www.fucoueda.com
Fumi Nakamura www.miniminiaturemouse.com
GAIA http://gaiastreetart.com
Ghostpatrol www.ghostpatrol.net
Guy McKinley www.flavors.me/guymckinley
Henrik A. Uldalen www.henrikaau.com
Isaac Cordal http://isaac.alg-a.org/
Jacub Gagnon www.jacubgagnon.com
Jason Thielke http://jasonthielke.com
Jasper Wong http://radness.jasperwong.net
Jennifer Davis www.jenniferdavisart.com
Jeremy Hush http://hushillustration.blogspot.com
Jessamyn Patterson www.facebook.com/jessamyn.j.patterson
Jesse Hotchkiss www.jessehotchkiss.com
Jessica Joslin www.jessicajoslin.com
Jillian Ludwig www.jillianludwig.com
Joao Ruas www.feral-kid.com
John Brosio www.johnbrosio.com
John Malloy http://johnmalloy.com
Jolene Lai http://enelojial.com
Jonathan Wayshak www.scrapbookmanifesto.com/
Josie Morway www.josiemorway.com
Julie West www.juliewest.com
Katherine Brannock www.katherinebrannock.com
Kelly Allen http://kellyallen.com
Kelly Vivanco www.kellyvivanco.com
KiSung Koh http://www.kisungkoh.com/
Kikyz 1313 http://1313.mx
Know Hope http://thisislimbo.com
Laura Bifano www.laurabifano.com
Leontine Greenberg www.leontinegreenberg.com
Lindsey Carr www.littlerobot.org.uk
Linnea Strid www.linneastrid.se
Liqen http://liqen.tumblr.com
Lucrezia Bieler http://bieler-beerli.com/main
Luke Chueh www.lukechueh.com
Mari Inukai www.mariinukai.com
Martin Wittfooth www.martinwittfooth.com
Mary Iverson http://maryiverson.com
Matt Doust http://tinyurl.com/7l6qhc3
Matthew Grabelsky www.grabelsky.com
Megan Wolfe http://megwolfe.net
Mia Brownell www.miabrownell.com
Michael Ramstead http://michaelramstead.com
Mike Alvarez www.michaelalvarezart.com
Mike Brown www.michaelvbrown.com
Naoto Hattori www.wwwcomcom.com
Nimit Malavia www.nimitmalavia.com
Pakayla Biehn www.youshouldtakecare.com
Paul Barnes www.paul-barnes.com
Pedro Matos www.pedromatos.org
Phil Hale http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phil_Hale
Philippe Baudelocque http://baudelocque.com
Rebekah Bogard www.rebekahbogard.com
Regan Rosburg www.reganrosburg.com
Reinier Gamboa www.reiniergamboa.com
Rob Sato www.robsato.com
Robert Proch www.robertproch.com
Rodrigo Cifuentes www.rodrigocifuentesotherness.blogspot.com
Rodrigo Luff http://artofrodrigo.blogspot.com
Rose Sanderson www.rosesanderson.com
Sarah Muirhead http://cargocollective.com/sarahmuirhead
Scott Belcastro www.scottbelcastro.com
Seamus Conley www.seamusconleystudio.com
Sean Chao www.seanchao.com
Sean Mahan www.seanmahanart.com
Shark Toof http://sharktoof.com
Sheryo http://sheryoart.tumblr.com/
Simon Prades www.simonprades.com/cms
Souther Salazar www.southersalazar.com
Stella Im Hultberg www.stellaimhultberg.com
Tasha Kusama www.tashakusama.com
Tessar Lo www.tessarlo.com
The Yok www.theyok.com
Timothy Karpinski http://timothykarpinski.com/
Tom Haubrick www.haubscomix.com
Wayne White www.waynewhiteart.com
White Cocoa http://dearcatherine.com
Xiau-Fong Wee www.xiaufong.com
Yosuke Ueno www.spaceegg77.com

Thinkspace Art Gallery | 6009 Washington Blvd. | Culver City, CA 90232 | (310) 558-3375

Hours: Wednesday – Friday 1PM-6PM, Saturday 1PM -8PM

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Size Matters: INSA Kills Biggest L.A. Free Wall

The great thing about a California King Size mattress is you can fit six people on it comfortably. Five if you need to accommodate beer, corn chips, coffee cake, and a bong.

The point is California is a quintessential long-ass big-ass state that rivals many entire countries in terms of the size of the overall economy, the miles of beach, quantity of Mexicans, and metric tons of silicone injections. That’s why it hardly surprises us when Daniel Lahoda reports that recently his LA Freewalls project crossed the 100th wall mark and that INSA just completed the biggest project so far. Clocking in at 9,300 square feet, the Street Artist covered more space with paint than the Kardashian sisters use preparing for a poolside photo shoot. But these results are spectacular and the scale is quite fitting for this city.

Our thanks to collaborator and photographer Todd Mazer, who doesn’t just capture the action here. He rhapsodizes with it before revealing the full project at the end. Enjoy the largesse.

INSA (photo © Todd Mazer)

INSA (photo © Todd Mazer)

INSA (photo © Todd Mazer)

INSA (photo © Todd Mazer)

INSA (photo © Todd Mazer)

INSA (photo © Todd Mazer)

INSA. Wow, that’s a big set of cans. Which ones would you take? (photo © Todd Mazer)

INSA (photo © Todd Mazer)

INSA (photo © Todd Mazer)

INSA (photo © Todd Mazer)

INSA (photo © Todd Mazer)

INSA (photo © Todd Mazer)

INSA (photo © Daniel LaHoda)

INSA had a mission to complete on the walls of this building. He also has a philosophy and a work ethic when doing his craft. Click on the link below to read how he came about to see this project completed:

http://www.insaland.com/blog/mission-to-la/

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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LA + Auckland Honor Askew One, Graffiti and Street Artist

It’s not often that a major city gives a spotlight to a graffiti / Street Artist and issues a formal proclamation about it, but that is exactly what happened Saturday in Los Angeles. AskewOne, a native of one of LA’s sister cities, Auckland, New Zealand , was honored by the City as his new mural “Under the Influence” was unveiled as part of the LA Freewalls Project.

“It’s much more likely in this city that a graffiti artist will be arrested than be recognized for positive contributions to the community”, as LA Taco reports, but really when you consider the major inroads that the LA Freewalls Project has made into the dialogue around the value of Street Art in LA’s local politics, it can’t be entirely surprising. It probably helps that the image itself incorporates the American flag into the composition– sort of disarms that whole negative rant that some politicos use when lumping Street Artists together with other social scourges like drug addiction, domestic terrorism, and the Ice Capades, doesn’t it?

Askew One for LA Freewalls Project (photo © Todd Mazer)

“AskewOne is one of the world’s preeminent public artists, and one of the most accomplished contemporary graffiti writers,” says Daniel LaHoda, who spearheads LA Freewalls and who also hosted the inauguration of the new LALA gallery Saturday night with many of today’s best known Street Artist’s work on the walls. According to an official press release, the now famous LA mural moratorium will soon be lifted and “Kamilla Blanche, Senior Deputy for Arts and Culture, and the Director for Sister Cities, is excited about the possibilities to expand Los Angeles’ place as the national epicenter of public art.”

BSA is very pleased to be able to share with you these images of the new piece as shot by photographer Todd Mazer.

Askew One for LA Freewalls Project (photo © Todd Mazer)

Askew One for LA Freewalls Project (photo © Todd Mazer)

Askew One for LA Freewalls Project (photo © Todd Mazer)

Askew One for LA Freewalls Project (photo © Todd Mazer)

Askew One for LA Freewalls Project (photo © Todd Mazer)

To learn more about Los Angeles Sister Cities Program click here.

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Fun Friday 04.20.12

1. ROA at StolenSpace “Hypnagogia” (London)
2. Katowice Street Art Festival 4/20-29 (Poland)
3. LALA Gallery Inauguration Saturday (Los Angeles)
4. Herakut “Loving the Exiled” at 941 Geary (San Francisco)
5. Marsea Gives You the “High Five!” at New Image Art Saturday (LA)
6. Erica Il Cane  “Una Vita Violenta” at Fifty24MX Gallery (Mexico City)
7. Brett Amory “Waiting 101” at Outsiders Gallery (Newcastle, UK)
8. OLEK in Barcelona with Botero (VIDEO)
9. C215 “About Copyrights” (VIDEO)
10. The Bushwick Trailer (VIDEO)

ROA at StolenSpace “Hypnagogia” (London)

With his current show, now on view at the StolenSpace Gallery in London, ROA will demonstrate how you can be asleep and awake at the same time. His solo show “Hypnagogia” opens today to the general public and offers a dissected view of ROA’s fantastic world of animals and beasts. ROA’s hand crafted book “An Introduction To Animal Representation” by Mammal Press is on sale at The Old Truman Brewery on 91 Brick Lane. Hurry there are only only 125 tomes being offered.

Roa (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Katowice Street Art Festival 4/20-29 (Poland)

Katowice, a Silesian city in Southern Poland celebrates Street Art with their own Street Art Festival, now on its second year, from April 20 through April 29. The gray, concrete architecture that dominates this town will be imbued with color, shapes and fantasy with the help of this city most prominent daughter, OLEK aided by an illustrious list of first rate of fine and Street Artists including Mark Kenkins, Escif, Boogie, Moneyless, Ganzeer, Ludo, Mona Tusz, Swanski, 0700 Team, Tellas, Dan Witz, Hyuro, M City, ROA, Goro, Kilo, Nespoon, Aryz, 108, Wers, Ciah-Ciah, Etam Crew, Otecki, Razpajzan, Sepe, Chazme, CFNTX Crew, Onte, Jezmirski, Terry Grand, Dast, Impact, Malik, Turbos and Mentalgassi.

Olek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this festival click here.

LALA Gallery Inauguration Saturday (Los Angeles)

The West Coast continues to assert itself as a power house in the art world and as a Street Art mecca with the inaugural show of LALA Gallery. A brand new gallery conceived by Daniel Lahoda, the mind and soul and legs of LA Freewalls Project.

LALA’s line up of artists for this first show augurs an auspicious beginning and a successful life which we hope last for a long, long time. “LA Freewalls Inside” is the title of this show and artists included are: Anthony Lister, Askew One, Becca, Cern, Chris Brand, Cryptik, Cyrcle, Dale VN Marshall, Dan Witz, Daze, Dee Dee Cheriel, Evan Skrederstu, How & Nosm, Insa, Jaybo, Kim West, Kofie, Lady Aiko, Ludo, Mear, The Perv Brothers, Poesia, Push, Pyro, Ripo, Risk, Ron English, Saber, Shepard Fairey, Swoon and Zes.

Dan Witz. Detail of his installation “The Prisoners” on the walls of LALA. (photo © Dan Witz)

Askew One for LA Freewalls Project. (photo © Todd Mazer)

For further details regarding this show click here.

Herakut “Loving the Exiled” at 941 Geary (San Francisco)

Herakut, the indefatigable German collective are a busy duo with an impressive craft and a mastery of the can and paint brushes. Never compromising their artistic output regardless of their environment or medium they set their collaborative standards high with an output rich in earthy colors. Their palette of ores, reds, grays, oranges, blues, browns and yellows give birth to a universe of characters that are  fantastic and mysterious and in pursuit of you, the spectator. In San Francisco at 941 Geary Gallery Saturday the reception will be open for the artists and you at “Loving the Exiled”.

Hera at work in preparation for the show. (photo courtesy © Jennifer Goff)

Akut at work in preparation for the show. (photo courtesy © Jennifer Goff)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Group Show “High Five!” at New Image Art Saturday (LA)

HIGH FIVE! the new group show at New Image Art Gallery in Los Angeles opens tomorrow and the artists include Alia Penner, Ashely Macomber, Curtis Kulig, Deanna Templeton, Maya Hayuk and Vanessa Prager.

Curtis Kulig AKA Love Me (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Also happening this weekend:

Tomorrow, Saturday April 22 will be the last day to see Erica Il Cane show “Una Vita Violenta” at the Fifty24MX Gallery in Mexico City.  The gallery will also participate with Erica Il Cane at the Zona Maco Mexico Arte Contemporaneo Art Fair in Mexico City. April 18 – April 22. For further details about “Una Vita Violenta” click here. For more details about Zona Maco, Mexico Arte Contemporaneo Art Fair click here.

Brett Amory solo show “Waiting 101” At the Outsiders Gallery in Newcastle, UK opens today to the general public. Click here for more details about this show.

OLEK in Barcelona with Botero (VIDEO)

Still working on that scarf you’ve been knitting for OLEK’s birthday? You missed it.

C215 “About Copyrights” (VIDEO)

The Bushwick Trailer (VIDEO)

Starring: Bishop 203, Veng and Never

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