Artists

BSA Interviewed in Graffiti Art Magazine Issue #56 About Exhibition “Martha Cooper: Taking Pictures”

BSA Interviewed in Graffiti Art Magazine Issue #56 About Exhibition “Martha Cooper: Taking Pictures”

We’re honored to be featured in the new issue of Graffti Art Magazine #56 in an interview about our exhibition at Urban Nation in Berlin right now, Martha Cooper: Taking Pictures.

Graffti Art Magazine: Can you tell us about Urban Nation and about this unprecedented collaboration with Martha Cooper to create this impressive Martha Cooper: Taking Pictures retrospective?  

Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo: In Berlin, the Urban Nation Museum has a core mission to educate visitors about the many movements of art in the streets globally. We opened it in 2017 alongside a director, 7 curators, and 165 artists representing five decades and many countries. This first solo show is the museum’s third, presenting a retrospective exhibition of seven decades of Martha Cooper’s photographic career.  

Graffti Art Magazine: What narrative do you propose with respect to Martha Cooper’s work through this documentary exhibition?  

Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo: The narrative is a world-renowned photographer with roots in ethnology who has traveled the world for 6 decades, shooting peoples’ creativity. Her pivotal documentation of early graffiti and Hip Hop is well-known and cherished, and we want visitors to experience it in the context of a life’s work. The most extensive career survey ever exhibited, it’s culled from Martha’s archives, personal artifacts, and collections. It’s an absorbing display of photographs, black books, ephemera, original works by artists, a video installation, and hundreds of her well-known and unseen shots.  

Graffti Art Magazine: What role do you think Martha Cooper has played in the global urban art scene?  

Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo: Martha’s unpretentious, revelatory view of a previously hidden subculture unquestionably humanized the practice of graffiti – she gave it a heart and a name. Shooting with the gritty determination of a New York City newspaper photographer, she was also a formally educated and well-traveled ethnographer when she first captured the people, techniques, and graffiti practices. Her photographs from Subway Art with Henry Chalfant made their book the “Bible” of the graffiti writers worldwide for the decades that followed.  

Graffti Art Magazine: If you had to highlight one memorable moment of this collaboration with Martha Cooper, what would it be?  

Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo: We have two: The first one was our overwhelming sense of discovery during a weekend in her studio – she entrusted us with all her archives, books, ephemera, and artifacts that would eventually help us tell the story of her life. The second one was the Zoom meeting early in the pandemic with Martha and us in New York and Michelle Houston and Reinaldo Verde from YAP in Berlin. After months of trans-Atlantic communications, we virtually toured all ten sections of the exhibition together. Martha loved what she saw, and that’s when we knew the exhibition would be a success.    

Graffti Art Magazine: What are your 3 most iconic photos by Martha Cooper?

Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo: It’s hard to choose but we might say
1. Dondi painting at the New Lots Train Yards in Brooklyn. 1980.
2. Subway Art “The Cadets” 1977-1980.
3. Street Play Lil Crazy Legs. Riverside Park, Manhattan. 1983. Hip Hop Files

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BSA Images of The Week: 06.20.21

BSA Images of The Week: 06.20.21

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week! Today is PRIDE DAY in NYC and Father’s Day in many parts of the world. Congratulations to us all, queer and/or fathers. We’re happy to show you what we’ve been finding as the spring now stretches into Officially Summer. At night in some neighborhoods, you’ll hear a smattering of fireworks as youthful hooligans are already lighting them – anticipate the 4th of July holiday. A sign of our crazy summer ahead; behold the bang-pop-ratatat-tat-bang-bang-swizzle-shizzle-pop now erupting regularly in empty lots and dead-end streets.

It’s great to see so many kids and youth and adults on bicycles now that the City has made myriad networks of safe pathways throughout the five boroughs. If we could get the police to hand out tickets to car drivers, even school bus drivers, sometimes using the bike lanes to circumvent others and put riders in danger.

The street art and graffiti scene are thick, and you don’t want to miss it here this time of year. While some complain that “vandalism” is reaching 1970s levels, many are happy to see a rotating display of artworks on the city skin at a time when so much of our local cultural and entertainment options have been killed or neutered. The institutional and commercial arts will all come back to New York, we have no doubt. Often, the renaissance begins in the streets.

Aliens, robots, skulls, femme Fatales, cats, cartoons, nationalism, existentialism – the new are runs the gamut and if it upsets the audience, it doesn’t run for long. Catch it while you can

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Acne, Adam Fujita, Captain Eyeliner, City Kitty, Degrupo, Demure, Eugene Delacroix, Jeremy Novy, Lunge Box, Matt Siren, Modomatic, One Rad Latina, Plannedalism, Raddington Falls, Royce Bannon, Russian Doll NYC, SacSix, Sara Lynne-Leo, Save Art Space, Sticker Maul, The Creator, and Vy.

Jeremy Novy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sticker Maul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty. After Eugene Delacroix. Portrait of a Woman in Blue Turban, ca. 1827. Dallas Museum of Art. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Russian Doll NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lexy Bella (photo © Jaime Rojo)
One Rad Latina (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Royce Bannon and Matt Siren (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lunge Box (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Creator on the left unidentified artist on the right. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Adam Fu (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Demure (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raddington Falls (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Save Art Space (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Degrupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Vy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sac Six (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Modomatic (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captain Eyeliner (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Acne (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Plannedalism (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Lil Hill in Brooklyn, a New Mural for “World Environment Day”

Lil Hill in Brooklyn, a New Mural for “World Environment Day”

Canadian/Brooklynian street artist Li-Hill revisits the mural format periodically in between making sculptural installations on the street and in gallery settings, tackling the occasional residency, formal painting exhibition, perhaps the odd commercial job. This year, for World Environment Day, he lent his talent to GreenPoint Innovations to create a work focusing on climate change and food systems instability.

Lil-Hill with Green Point Innovations. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Using his language of transmuting forms progressing along a visual timeline, here Li-Hill slightly alters the faces of local kids to preserve their anonymity and captures the forms in kinetic movement from left to right.

“Featuring Brooklyn’s youth, this mural champions the leading role that young people play ensuring a more sustainable future, ” say @GreenPoint.EARTH organizers.

Lil-Hill with Green Point Innovations. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lil-Hill with Green Point Innovations. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lil-Hill with Green Point Innovations. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lil-Hill with Green Point Innovations. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lil-Hill with Green Point Innovations. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Film Friday: 06.18.21

BSA Film Friday: 06.18.21

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening:
1. “FAME”, the Italian Street Art Festival Documentary
2. Jersey City Artists at Work Painting for the first Mural Festival Here
3. “UNSATISFYING” Looks at Frustration with Smart Whimsy

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BSA Special Feature: “FAME”, the Italian Street Art Festival Documentary, Not the American Teen Drama Film

Everyone likes to declare that they were the first in graffiti and street art, before it was cool, when it was cool, before there was even a name for it, when things were pure, and pure genius. Everyone and everything after them and then are just shit. And gurrrrll, you better claim that legacy.

For FAME, launched during the late 2000s in Grattaglie, Puglia, Angelo Milano was always the center of a scene he created, enticing international street artists with promises of collaborations, big walls, big opportunities, big plates of delicious local cuisine. With his festival, he formed a club of exclusivity, and once successful, he slammed the door shut on the legacy, never again repeated. Later he became a gallery owner who sells artworks of most of them plus a new crop.

Lusciously self-aggrandized as an “evil genius” in this documentary, co-produced with Giacomo Abbruzzese, the swanning and sexy comic Milano brings himself into the middle of it all – and it all goes with him.

Jose Mertz at Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. Via Tost Films

A quick behind the scenes view of artist Jose Mertz last week in Jersey City, shot and edited by Tost Films. Most impressive perhaps is the techniques he uses to wash with color, gradually and subtly building mass and form of wild creature indeed.

UNSATISFYING” Looks at Frustration with Smart Whimsy

Parallel Studio produces this short animated film that brilliantly captures those situations when we experience the frustration of failing at performing small tasks. It’s annoyingly adorable, and everyone can relate.

Sort of satisfying, really.

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A Land of Mirrors for Pener: Bartek Świątecki Paints Hometown in Poland

A Land of Mirrors for Pener: Bartek Świątecki Paints Hometown in Poland

25 years in the game, Pener routinely lets his mind travel to encompass possibilities, then channels them abstractly through a series of echoing geometric forms with aerosol and brush. Here in his hometown of Olsztyn, Poland, he says he imagined the possibilities that young minds inside an elementary school could contemplate.

Bartek Świątecki AKA Pener. Mirror/Land. Olsztyn, Poland. (photo © Darek Brodowski)

While painting this new “Mirror Land,” he was in a land of mirrors psychologically. He says he prefers to explore the “possible tension between our subconscious and conscious abilities that oscillate between reality and illusion.”

That’s a lot for kids to vocalize, granted, but he says he still engaged them when they watched and asked questions.

“Those were wonderful moments to hear them trying to solve what the wall depicts and hides,” he says.

Bartek Świątecki AKA Pener. Mirror/Land. Olsztyn, Poland. (photo © Darek Brodowski)
Bartek Świątecki AKA Pener. Mirror/Land. Olsztyn, Poland. (photo © Darek Brodowski)
Bartek Świątecki AKA Pener. Mirror/Land. Olsztyn, Poland. (photo © Darek Brodowski)
Bartek Świątecki AKA Pener. Mirror/Land. Olsztyn, Poland. (photo © Darek Brodowski)
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Dragon 76 “Coexist” Theme for Jersey City Mural Festival 2021

Dragon 76 “Coexist” Theme for Jersey City Mural Festival 2021

Japan-born Queens-based muralist Dragon 76 admires New York, where he has lived for the last five years, because of its diversity and inclusiveness, among other things. As a result, his artworks often gravitate toward a similar theme as he has worked his way from being a graffiti artist from Shiga to being a musician and a commercial graphic artist and muralist. For the Jersey City Mural Festival, Dragon 76 focused on persons of various identities and genders playing music, a piece he calls “Coexist.”

Dragon 76. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dragon 76. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dragon 76. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dragon 76. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dragon 76. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dragon 76, assistant and pizza. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dragon 76. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dragon 76. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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The Conflicted Wonderings of Wasted Rita at URVANITY ART 2021

The Conflicted Wonderings of Wasted Rita at URVANITY ART 2021

Positioned as an ironic truth-teller with a sense of humor, Portuguese visual artist, illustrator, and street Artist Wasted Rita uses her droll texts and lo-fi illustrations to skewer societal and structural hypocrisies and make you smile. With insights on targets like racism, fascism, wealth inequality, misogyny, male privilege, advertising, patriarchy, you’ll quickly want to join in and write your own.

Wasted Rita. Urvanity Art 2021. Window installation at COAM Madrid. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)

When she brings it outside and displays it in urban or natural settings, glowing against the night sky, for example, the words are lifted and more closely considered. On display in Madrid during the Urvanity Art show last month, a new set of fans had a chance to be charmed by Wasted Rita’s wit.

Wasted Rita. Urvanity Art 2021. Window installation at COAM Madrid. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Wasted Rita. Urvanity Art 2021. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
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Alice Pasquini And UNO Create Mural for Equality of Men & Women, and Respect in Rome

Alice Pasquini And UNO Create Mural for Equality of Men & Women, and Respect in Rome

Today’s new piece by street artists/collaborators Alice Pasquini and UNO is high above your head, but the people it depicts are walking the same streets with us every day.

Alice Pasquini and UNO. Rome, Italy. (photo courtesy of Alice Paquini)

The result of a springtime education program for students to discuss issues of gender equality, violence against women, and the empowerment of society to take positive steps forward – the mural represents the results of many discussions with 60 or so students, teachers, a journalist, a photographer, experts, and activists.

Alice Pasquini and UNO. Rome, Italy. (photo courtesy of Alice Paquini)

Inaugurated on June 8th at Liceo Classico Luciano Manara in Rome, Pasquini and UNO are proud to combine their talents. They say the mural title is translated generally as “’A mural for Equality: Equal Rights, Gender Differences” and is by the Municipality of Rome; Participation, Communication, and Equal Opportunities Department.

Alice Pasquini and UNO. Rome, Italy. (photo courtesy of Alice Paquini)

For more on the project please see Alice Pasquini’s Instagram and UNO’s Instagram

 

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BSA Images Of The Week: 06.13.21

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.13.21

Last week we brought you the first annual Jersey City Mural Festival with generously scaled murals and unbridled color. Muralism isn’t new but mural festivals are now a dominant vehicle or platform of expression on the streets where artists get up and create community. We have always championed the cause of the artist and cheer when they are given the opportunity to work – better even if they get properly paid for the work that they do.

That said, we still admire the small, uncommissioned, one-off pieces, and we’ve always documented that in whatever city we go to: In a way, that is what we actually consider to be street art. Unsanctioned and undercover, you’ll discover the most curious missives as you hike from mural to mural. Don’t miss them! Enjoy.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring 7 Souls Deep, Adrian Wilson, Below Key, Drecks, Early Riser NYC, Ghaston Art, Hiss, Lunge Box, Miyok, Modomatic, Mort Art, Night Owl, Outer Source, Timothy Goodman, Tyler Ives, and Turtle Caps.

Timothy Goodman (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Timothy Goodman (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Modomatic (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Modomatic (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Modomatic (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Modomatic (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Adrian Wilson with The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drecks (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drecks (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drecks (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lunge Box and 7 Souls Deep on the right. This isn’t a collab. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hiss (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tyler Ives (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tyler Ives (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ghaston Art with Mort Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Early Riser NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Miyok (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Outer Source, Night Owl, Below Key (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Outer Source, Night Owl, Below Key, Turtle Caps (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Outer Source, Night Owl, Turtle Caps (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Punk New Yorker. Spring 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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My Dog Sighs “Inside”: A Hidden, Staged Exhibition in  Portsmouth, UK

My Dog Sighs “Inside”: A Hidden, Staged Exhibition in Portsmouth, UK

My Dog Sighs is the name of a flawed human being and street artist. Come inside.

My Dog Sighs. Inside. Portsmouth, UK. (photo © Paul Gonella / Strong Island)

According to his descriptions of the artist’s new “Inside” installation in the UK’s only island city of Portsmouth (pronounced PORT-smith), there will be tours in this secret location – ever so because the atmospheric and theatrical work is not officially sanctioned and is staged in an abandoned building.

My Dog Sighs. Inside. Portsmouth, UK. (photo © Paul Gonella / Strong Island)

So it will be a bit of magic when you discover that the British street artist has spared no expense nor level of preparation – including consulting with a sound design team and lighting design team to create his inner world as explained by his own characters. “Street artists are often perceived as ghosts,” he says and goes on to explain that these creatures are somewhat ghosts as well and representative of his inner ‘Quiet Little Voices.’

My Dog Sighs. Inside. Portsmouth, UK. (photo © Paul Gonella / Strong Island)

Whether playful or melancholic, these creatures are strangely familiar to attendees of these tours. The entire project is one which he hopes to develop into a documentary and a textbook for teachers to provide “young people with the creative tools needed to find hope in difficult situations,” showing “how they can use art to empower their local communities.”

Tickets to go Inside will be announced through My Dog Sighs’ mailing list, available on his website www.mydogsighs.co.uk. You can also follow him on Facebook or Instagram for more updates.

My Dog Sighs. Inside. Portsmouth, UK. (photo © Paul Gonella / Strong Island)
My Dog Sighs. Inside. Portsmouth, UK. (photo © Paul Gonella / Strong Island)
My Dog Sighs. Inside. Portsmouth, UK. (photo © Paul Gonella / Strong Island)
My Dog Sighs. Inside. Portsmouth, UK. (photo © Paul Gonella / Strong Island)
My Dog Sighs. Inside. Portsmouth, UK. (photo © Paul Gonella / Strong Island)
My Dog Sighs. Inside. Portsmouth, UK. (photo © Paul Gonella / Strong Island)
My Dog Sighs. Inside. Portsmouth, UK. (photo © Paul Gonella / Strong Island)
My Dog Sighs. Inside. Portsmouth, UK. (photo © Paul Gonella / Strong Island)

Inside

Friday 16 July – Sunday 1 August

An undisclosed location in Portsmouth.

Admission: £10 adults / £5 concession / Children are free (but are they really?)

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BSA Film Friday: 06.11.21

BSA Film Friday: 06.11.21

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening:
1. “Bubble Tea” with Sofles
2. Doug Gillem Discusses Stereotypes in Street Art
3. Vero Rivera in Columbia, SC. Via Tost Films

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BSA Special Feature: “Bubble Tea” with Sofles

Sofles gives us such beautiful Fridays – with a jump in his step and a flair in the sweep of his arm. It’s bubble time!

Our Expectations of Street Art’s Role in Projecting and Reflecting Values

It is not a surprise that street art reflects the culture back to itself, including elements that some will find objectionable or disgusting – this has always been true. As the so-called “culture” of street art becomes professionalized and monetized and regarded as legitimate by institutions and commercial interests like brands, we continue to hear that it is now being, to some extent, more closely examined. Doug Gillen of FifthWall TV explores criticisms of one artist’s work – FinDac – in regard to Asian tropes and stereotypes.

People have mentioned FinDac’s work for the last half-decade at least, so it is interesting that a current heated awareness regarding identity politics is pushing the conversation further. Truthfully, stereotypes about blacks, gays, the police, media, the military, women, men, religious institutions, politicians, sex roles, gender roles, political parties, geopolitics… have always been on display in myriad forms in street art and graffiti. It can be a worthwhile exercise when we begin to examine them in greater detail.

Vero Rivera in Columbia, SC. Via Tost Films

A commission for a suburban coffee shop mural, this hand painted work by Vero Rivera is a few steps removed from the street art and graffiti scene that first sparked out interest decades ago. The dynamics are different, but the spirit of creativity is the same.

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Community and Street Aesthetics Popping at Jersey City Mural Festival 2021

Community and Street Aesthetics Popping at Jersey City Mural Festival 2021

You know the shy kid at the party who won’t hit the dance floor even if Jesus himself begged him – and then he hears his jam and suddenly starts doing flips, tricks, and power moves?

Woes. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

That’s what it felt like last week when all the funk-tech-floral-social-abstract-steez planets spun together into a powerful 2021 solar system at the Jersey City Mural Festival. How many times did you hear the word community, as if we’ve all been starved of it?

And the aesthetics were solid – you would not have guessed how sweet some of these combinations could be – with just enough curation to let the sparks crackle in the gritty oil-coated zones that are surrounding the MANA Contemporary compound. This most diverse generation is now freely tossing any rules and hierarchies out the window; these inheritors of the winds now gathering speed.

Ron English. The artist added a new detail on top of the right building but it was obsucured with the scaffolding use to complete the piece. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The first annual Jersey City Mural Festival brought together dozens of street artists, mural artists, graffiti writers, photographers, and art lovers to this new New Jersey. This festival in another year would have been a festive event just like any other festival – formulas have been discovered for how to mount public cultural events like these around the world – and we’ve been to many.

But this time, the energy was extra charged by the undeniable fact that we’re all emerging to a familiar yet changed world formed by fear, death, insecurity, and longing. Artists were elated to see their peers once again doing what they love doing most: painting outdoors. There is a recognition from the artists, and everybody around that life is precious and the scars left on us by the Pandemic made this event a jubilant one.

Ron English. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The collection of artworks presented here are only a fraction of all the works painted during the festival. Half a dozen of murals were still not completed when we departed. We hope to bring you the rest soon.

The festival unfolded over several days of painting and rain and an oppressive heatwave on two locations in Jersey City. Both locations are the remnants of Jersey City as an industrial powerhouse. The complex in Newark Ave, Mana Contemporary, is now an art center with several galleries, exhibition spaces, and artists’ studios. The complex on Coles Street still conserves its industrial grit. Still, a storage company has replaced the factories, and empty buildings in the decay process appear ready to be demolished.

The Jersey City Mural Festival was presented by Mana Public Arts and the Jersey City Mural Arts Program with the imprimatur of Jersey City Mayor Steven M. Fulop, the city’s Municipal Council, and the Office of Municipal Affairs.

Ron English. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
L’Amour Supreme. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
L’Amour Supreme. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Imagine 875. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Max Sansing. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raul Santos. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
H. Doyle. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jason Naylor. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BMike. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Beau Stanton. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Beau Stanton. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jesse Kreuzer. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PAWN. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Krave Art. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Eyez. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Queen Andrea on top still at work on her mural. Rorshach in the middle and Jahru on the bottom tier. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Queen Andrea on top still at work on her mural. Rorshach in the middle and Jahru on the bottom tier. Details. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jahru. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jahru. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jahru. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Boy Kong and Kirza Lopez. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Boy Kong and Kirza Lopez. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Joe Waks. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Elle. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Riiisa Boogie. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jose Mertz. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jose Mertz talks about his mural.

Crash. Detail. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Crash. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Overview at Coles Street. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We would like to thank the organizers and production team for all their assistance during the duration of the festival and to Mario at Tost Films for helping man the lift for our final photo session.

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