Street Art Festival

Andreco: Reclaiming Air and Water for Delhi, India “Climate 05”

Andreco: Reclaiming Air and Water for Delhi, India “Climate 05”

An Art, Science and Climate Action project by Andreco

Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)

ANDRECO painted the air pollution with the air pollution itself,” say organizers in the 20 million strong New Delhi – which was declared the world’s most polluted capital, according to Reuters this month.

And the statement isn’t hyperbole, according to AIR-Ink, the company that made his ink, which is “the first ink made entirely out of air pollution,” they explain on their website.

Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)

The unique art-making material is part of the Italian Street Artist / Activist’s most recent installment of his Climate ArtProject, which he orchestrated on the streets here in New Delhi for the St+Art Festival this year. Part of a global, multi-city installation and demonstration, “Climate 05 – Reclaiming Air and Water”.

Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)

The mural, people’s march and public talks are a hybrid of activism, art and science, ANDRECO tells us. His goal is for residents in Delhi to focus on the consequences of the climatic changes and the air water pollution in their city.

“In particular the project takes inspiration by the latest studies on the Air quality and the condition of the Yamuna river,” he tells us, “and it aims to underline the best practices for air and water remediation and climate change adaptation and mitigation.”

Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)

We have published previous editions of this project and it is always good to see the images of people participating in the demonstration and march with flags, a physical commitment to the expressed goals of standing in solidarity with Mother Earth, her natural systems, and our responsibility to preserve them.

“The mural at the Lodhi Art District in Lodhi Colony, Delhi represents an artistic translation of the studies about air and water remediation,” says a press release from organizers. “The wall painting symbolizes the transition of toxic smoke and greenhouse gases, coming from unregulated emissions from industrial pollution, emissions from vehicles and crop burning, into a healthy environment with clean clouds. The transition is made possible due to the tree that stands in the middle of the wall.”

Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)

Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)

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New Works St+ART Lodhi 2019 – Courtesy Martha Cooper

New Works St+ART Lodhi 2019 – Courtesy Martha Cooper

St+Art Delhi continues apace with an ever-expanding roster of artists and financial/commercial/municipal partners five years after we first began writing about it, and photographer Martha Cooper brings us today some of the newest installations and shots that she recently discovered while there.

A mural program at heart, many of the artists invited here bring a decorative character to the districts of Shahpurjat, Khirki Village and Hauz Khas Village also have roots in illegal graffiti and Street Art back home, and during their youth.

Yip Yew Chong. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Over the years that list has included an international and local array of artists invited to paint at Lohdi Colony from all the continents – well maybe not Antarctica. Names have included ECB, Lady Aiko, local students Avinash and Kamesh, Suiko of Japan, Reko Rennie from Australia, Lek & Sowat from France, Kureshi from India, Inkbrushnme from India, Dutch artist Niels Shoe Meulman, Swiss duo Never Crew, Tofu from Germany, Mattia from Italy, Artez from Serbia, M-City from Poland, Ano from Taiwan…

Yip Yew Chong. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Notable here is the architectural framing convention for most of these murals- the distinctive facades of Lodhi Colony architecture that features a central archway and four windows divided by it on a semi-ornate face forward. Some of the arches begin on the ground while others have been bricked into windows. Each provides a view inside the entry or courtyard, while others are bursting out with limbs and trees that protrude through them to the street.

Originally designed by the British-born architect William Henry Medd in the late 1930s and early 1940s as part of a program to house certain populations, this unifying pattern sets the quiet neighborhood apart from others in the city.

Yip Yew Chong. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)

As Chief Architect to the Government of India during that period, Mr. Medd oversaw much of the design of the relatively new city as well as buildings like the Cathedral Church of the Redemption and Sacred Heart Cathedral, both of which reflect his affinity for the high arches that distinguish the period.

“It’s interesting to see how the very different artists have incorporated the arch into their murals,” says photographer Cooper. “The uniform size and shape of the walls unify the disparate collection and the arches give the whole area an exotic touch.”

Aravani Art Project. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)

As is her practice many of these images also skillfully incorporate the foot traffic and community who live here and who are beginning to associate these figurative, abstract and folk-inspired murals into their daily lives. Asking people to pose in front of the new paintings gives them context, somehow also bringing them alive in certain cases. At other times, her timing and eagle eye capture the passerby who unknowingly creates a serendipitous counterpoint to the new work.

“It’s a quiet neighborhood compared to the rest of Delhi,” Martha says, “making it a very pleasant place for an afternoon walking tour.”

Aravani Art Project. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Adele Renault. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sameer Kulavoor. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sameer Kulavoor. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Tellas. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Avinash Kamesh. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Avinash Kamesh. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sajid Wajid. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sajid Wajid. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
NeSpoon. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
NeSpoon. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Aaron Glasson. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Aaron Glasson. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Dwa Zeta. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sheryo & The Yok. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Daan Botlek. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Daan Botlek. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Andreco. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Georgia Hill & Hanif Kureshi. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
David Leitner. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
David Leitner. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Samantha Lo. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Bond. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
H11235. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
H11235. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
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No Borders: Murs Contra el Murs (Walls Against Walls)

No Borders: Murs Contra el Murs (Walls Against Walls)

This past Sunday, February 17 at La Plaza de las Tres Chimeneas ( Three Smokestacks Square) in Barcelona an international group of artists participated in the first “No Borders Festival.”

Carles G.O’D. No Borders Festival. Barcelona, Spain. February 2019. (photo © Lluís Olive)

Called “Murs Contra el Murs”, which is Catalan for “Walls Against Walls”, the multi-mural festival intends to highlight the ongoing humanitarian crises of refugees and immigrants at international borders around the world.

Graffiti artists, Street Artists, painters, and illustrators came together to create new murals to speak to the issue and encourage debate and conversation. Artists included Btoy, Carles G.O’D, Dixon, Eledu, Enric Sant, Javier Arribas, Juanjo Surace, Julieta XLF, Kenor, Kram, Pincho, Roc Blackblock, Ruina, Saturno, Simón Vázquez, Tutzo, and Wati Bacán, among others.

Julieta XLF. No Borders Festival. Barcelona, Spain. February 2019. (photo © Lluís Olive)

NO BORDERS is a grassroots organization that was created to raise awareness about the refugees, to demand their acceptance, and to raise funds through debates, art and documentaries.

They say they want to raise the uncomfortable questions – which will undoubtedly lead to uncomfortable answers as well. To paraphrase the text on their website:

“Do we settle for a society that violates its moral and legal obligations to refugees? A refugee is a person who flees – Flees because he is on the losing side. Because he thinks, feels or prays differently than those who point him with their weapons.”

As usual, artists are bringing these matters to the street for the vox populi to debate.

Our sincere thanks to photographer Lluís Olive for sharing his shots of the walls with BSA readers.

Enric Sant. No Borders Festival. Barcelona, Spain. February 2019. (photo © Lluís Olive)
Enric Sant. No Borders Festival. Barcelona, Spain. February 2019. (photo © Lluís Olive)
El Rey de la Ruina. No Borders Festival. Barcelona, Spain. February 2019. (photo © Lluís Olive)
Juanjo Surace. No Borders Festival. Barcelona, Spain. February 2019. (photo © Lluís Olive)
Royal. No Borders Festival. Barcelona, Spain. February 2019. (photo © Lluís Olive)
Saturno Art . Eledu Works. No Borders Festival. Barcelona, Spain. February 2019. (photo © Lluís Olive)
Pincho. No Borders Festival. Barcelona, Spain. February 2019. (photo © Lluís Olive)
Kenor. No Borders Festival. Barcelona, Spain. February 2019. (photo © Lluís Olive)
Roc Black Block . Rubicon. No Borders Festival. Barcelona, Spain. February 2019. (photo © Lluís Olive)
TVTZO. No Borders Festival. Barcelona, Spain. February 2019. (photo © Lluís Olive)

For more information on the festival running through March 3rd that includes documentaries, panel discussions, workshops, and prints, please go to https://noborders.es/ and follow @nobordersrefugees on Instagram

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Painted Bird in New Delhi: Adele Renault in India

Painted Bird in New Delhi: Adele Renault in India


Belgian Street Artist Adele winged it over to New Delhi last week to bring one of her multi-feathered friends to this new wall in the Lodhi Colony.

With her mother as assistant (and photographer) the intensely detailed and passionate aerosolist hardly stopped while a steady parade of people and animals interrupted their daily travels to gander at the huge bird taking form in front of them.

Adele Renault. St+Art India. Delhi, Lodhi Colony, India. January 2019. (photo © Veronique Gillet)

January is the only cold month in Delhi, she tells us, so she felt quite lucky to be able to paint during a period of relative comfort. “I was greeted by stray dogs every morning,” she says.

Adele Renault. St+Art India. Delhi, Lodhi Colony, India. January 2019. (photo © Veronique Gillet)

“And I was fueled by fresh coconut water, chai, and amazing lunch boxes! It was so nice being in the trees with the birds and monkeys, and all school kids and rickshaw drivers stopping by all day long.”

Adele says she was thankful for a rare opportunity to spend quality time together with her mom Veronique and says they plan to continue their trip through India. We’re pleased to share her photos exclusively for BSA readers today.

Adele Renault. St+Art India. Delhi, Lodhi Colony, India. January 2019. (photo © Veronique Gillet)
Adele Renault. St+Art India. Delhi, Lodhi Colony, India. January 2019. (photo © Veronique Gillet)
Adele Renault. St+Art India. Delhi, Lodhi Colony, India. January 2019. (photo © Veronique Gillet)
Adele Renault. St+Art India. Delhi, Lodhi Colony, India. January 2019. (photo © Veronique Gillet)
Adele Renault. St+Art India. Delhi, Lodhi Colony, India. January 2019. (photo © Veronique Gillet)
Adele Renault. this was Adele’s favorite stray dog. He came to visit her everyday she told us. St+Art India. Delhi, Lodhi Colony, India. January 2019. (photo © Adele Renault)
Adele Renault. Young aspiring talent. St+Art India. Delhi, Lodhi Colony, India. January 2019. (photo © Veronique Gillet)
Adele with her mom Veronique. St+Art India. Delhi, Lodhi Colony, India. January 2019. (photo © Pranav Gohel)
Adele Renault. St+Art India. Delhi, Lodhi Colony, India. January 2019. (photo © Veronique Gillet)
Adele Renault. St+Art India. Delhi, Lodhi Colony, India. January 2019. (photo © Veronique Gillet)
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FIRST LOOK at Miami 2012: Walls, Street Art, Action!

Street Art is already smacking up Miami walls – an aerosol advance committee of art in the streets to welcome the bacchanal of collectors, performers, artists, fans, galleries, hoodlums, charlatans, thumping beats, and very famous and important celebrities you have never heard of are all here for Art Basel and related fairs.

Just for you, we have some of the first images of the walls as they are going up…

..from Martha Cooper, who is on the ground documenting all the walls going up for Wynwood Walls as she has done officially for them for a few years now, and she talks about the new OBEY tribute to Wynwood Walls founder Tony Goldman who passed away this autumn, and shows us DAZE in action.

We also have on-the-beat stuff from photographer and BSA contributor Geoff Hargadon – who has an insatiable thirst for clever spots and a keen eye for capturing them. We’ll be bringing more from him to you later this week too.

Finally the ever clever twins How & Nosm offer you images of their just completed Wynwood Wall mural, a collabo with VHILS.

Herakut. Wynwood Arts District. Miami 2012. This seven story tall mural is part of Herakut’s Giant Story Book Project. The German Duo will be creating large scale murals across several cites to introduce characters from the children’s book the artists are in the process of creating. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Shepard Fairey/OBEY. Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Mimai 2012. “This Wall was a tribute to Tony Goldman with a central figure of him surrounded by people he admired and was inspired by -MLK, Warhol etc…” (photo and text © Martha Cooper)

Shepard Fairey/OBEY. Detail. (photo © Martha Cooper)

“The biggest and maybe most interesting wall this year is the one by OBEY. They completely re-did their first Wynwood wall from 2009. That one was all wheat pasted. This time they used a technique similar to that of Sten & Lex. They lightly pasted pre-printed sheets on the wall and then cut out the black parts with X-Acto knives, making a stencil. After spraying, the paper was peeled away, leaving the paint” – Martha Cooper

Shepard Fairey/OBEY. Detail. (photo © Martha Cooper)

MOMO gives it a modernist splash at Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Oh, wait, this may be the real splash; Krink at Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Krink . Nemel. Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

In an epic DAZE at Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

DAZE. Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Faith 47 throws on a head scarf and drapes herself across a Wynwood wall. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

DALeast. Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

How & Nosm . VHILS. “Cut Out For You”  Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © Martha Cooper)

How & Nosm . VHILS. “Cut Out For You” Detail.  Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © How & Nosm)

How & Nosm . VHILS. “Cut Out For You” Detail.  Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © How & Nosm)

How & Nosm . VHILS. “Cut Out For You” Detail.  Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © How & Nosm)

How & Nosm . VHILS. “Cut Out For You” Detail.  Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © How & Nosm)

How & Nosm . VHILS. “Cut Out For You” Detail.  Wynwood Walls. Wynwood Arts District, Miami 2012. (photo © How & Nosm)

 

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ALL the JOBURG Videos

Yesterday on Fun Friday we featured ROA in the first video from the I Art Joburg Festival. The festival took place this fall in Johannesburg, South Africa and featured people like Falko, Cameron Platter, ESPO, and Remed. Today we’re pleased to offer you the full compliment of all the videos that were directed, shot and edited during the festival. Much thanks to Ricky Lee Gordon, the organizer of the festival, who advanced all of these videos to us for BSA readers to enjoy.

See Monica Campana’s account of her visit to I Art Joburg here on BSA.

MARTHA COOPER

CAMERON PLATTER

ESPO

FALKO

REMED

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

BSA does not necessarily endorse any of the brands that appear in third party content and is not under any contractual obligation to do so.

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“Articulate: Baltimore” Hits the Streets

The City of Baltimore just got hit with its second large scale mural project in one calendar year as Articulate: Baltimore joined Open Walls Baltimore during a five week period this autumn.

Chris Stain . Billy Mode. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

A mixture of local artists and some Street Artists who are known internationally, the project is sponsored by a collection of public, private, and tourism development concerns as a way of activating a small selection of the city’s huge inventory of vacant spaces to “increase the visibility (of) the new westside district and encourage more visitors to frequent its venues”. With this sort of laser-sharp urban renewal employed in a very confined area, we may be witnessing the splintering of so-called Street Art festivals into more focused venues, employed in a more selective way to achieve specific ends.

Baltimore natives and well known Street Artists Chris Stain and Billy Mode get to do something at home for a change. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

The list of artists in Articulate: Baltimore includes artists Ways & J. Digital, Jessie Unterhalter & Katey Truhn, Indigo, HKS 181, Chris Stain & Billy Mode, Pixel Pancho, and 2501. Co-curated by Maryland-based artists Stefan Hauswald and Jesse James, the full collection covers roughly a two-block area that is very near the center of downtown.  The whole initiative appears to be one conceived with rejuvenation in mind, as public art often does for previously moribund areas. According to the website for Articulate, all of the artists realize that their work isn’t meant as a permanent installation and may be replaced at any time. “The artists expect their impact to be powerful but limited in duration— they expect that their work will be replaced over time, perhaps a matter of months or years.”

Many thanks to photographer Martha Cooper, who was there to capture official images of the installations, and she shares them here, including some that are exclusive to BSA.

Chris Stain . Billy Mode. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Combining the colorful 3-D letterforms of Mode and the stencil-styled portraiture of Chris Stain for Articulate, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Canada’s INDIGO. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

INDIGO. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

INDIGO. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Pixel Pancho. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Pixel Pancho. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Pixel Pancho. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Pixel Pancho. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Jessie Unterhalter and Katey Truhn bring a D.I.Y. aesthetic by using additional materials for a poppy hand-made collage effect. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Jessie Unterhalter . Katey Truhn. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie that’s 2501. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

2501. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

2501. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Having pink eye in this case is something good. HKS 181. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

HKS 181. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

WAYS – J. Digital. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

WAYS – J. Digital. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

WAYS – J. Digital. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

WAYS – J. Digital. Articulate, Baltimore 2012 (photo © Martha Cooper)

For more information about Articulate Baltimore click on the link below:

http://www.articulatebaltimore.org/

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“I Art Joburg” with Monica Campana in South Africa

Today we welcome Monica Compana to BSA to share with you her experiences during a recent Street Art/community program in Johannesburg, South Africa that took place in September. As one of the principal originators of Atlanta’s Living Walls festival, Campana brings a wizened eye to the events as they unfolded, and presents here what she observed and experienced. Special thanks to Martha Cooper, who shares with BSA images that display her personal vision of Joburg and some layouts from her new zine “Soweto/Sowebo”.

Considered one of the wealthiest cities in Africa, Johannesburg is not only rich in gold and diamonds, but also rich in arts and culture. In the month of September, Johannesburg hosted the largest mural project in the city and possibly even the continent.

I Art Joburg brought the artists Espo, ROA, Cameron Platter, Falko, Remed and graffiti photographer legend Martha Cooper to South Africa to create art in the streets, start a dialogue about street art in the city and to document a month where artists worked together alongside a commercial production team and community members to bring color to Joburg and Soweto.

ROA (photo © Martha Cooper)

“Color creates energy, energy creates inspiration and inspiration creates change. It is our responsibility to inspire ourselves to inspire others to inspire the change. Art is the remedy for this,” says Ricky Lee Gordon, organizer and curator of I Art Joburg.

Gordon’s carefully selected list of renowned street artists not only managed to put the festival amongst one of the best ones of the year, but also it created a chemistry between artists and community. With 6 murals installed around the Maboneng Precinct it hosted a night of lectures and the screening of Espo’s “Love Letters to You” documentary. The precinct is also referred to as “a place of light”, as it is a hub for young creatives and artists, and it also hosted a gallery exhibit by the participating artists.

ROA (photo © Monica Campana

To inspire kids from a local school, organizers created a workshop and a mural with kids in Soweto, a name synonymous in the northern hemisphere with the historic anti-apartheid black resistance movement that inspired so many artists in the 70s-80s around the world. The name Soweto has an auditory similarity to the neighborhood of Sowebo in Baltimore, which photographer Martha Cooper has been documenting as a personal passion for nearly a decade.

Already in Joburg to document all of the murals and exhibit her own work, she took the experience and project to a whole new level with the development of her zine titled: “Soweto/Sowebo.” Martha owns a house in South West Baltimore, also known as Sowebo, an area so affected by urban decay that it is often compared to Soweto in South Africa. Needless to say, when she  arrived in Soweto she immediately saw the similarities and she decided to create a zine honoring the richness of both cultures.  It was fascinating to see through her work how these two places, so far away from each other geographically in two completely different continents, could pass as one and the same.

ROA (photo © Martha Cooper)

Soweto/ Sowebo was not the only example of this wonderful dialogue. Each artist tried to leave something to the city of Joburg that would not only last for a long time visually, but something that could continue to spark some kind of dialogue. During my stay in Joburg I was able to spend quite a bit of time with ROA and Martha Cooper.  It was amazing to see how their easily  they interacted with the people on the streets of the city and even though they had been there for only about a week by the time that I arrived, Martha and ROA had already made dear friends in the neighborhood.

ROA and Falko (photo © Martha Cooper)

On the subject of friends we made: Bongani Mathebula, my Joburg tour guide, is the one that stole my heart. Seeing the city through the eyes of a local 25 year old artist was very inspirational. He told me that projects like I Art Joburg are what the city of Johannesburg needs – an outsider’s view and conversation starter to inspire the local community.

“Artists are like heroes. Art is crazy, people need to let that happen. More art, more crazy communication and growth,” says Bongani.

I hope to see more mural festivals happen in Joburg and Soweto. I know the artists who were part of the project were left wanting more. So, who knows? Maybe this really is just the start to a much bigger conversation in Joburg! Fingers crossed!

Remed (photo © Monica Campana)

Falko (photo © Monica Campana)

Espo (photo © Martha Cooper)

Espo (photo © Martha Cooper)

Espo (photo © Martha Cooper)

Espo (photo © Martha Cooper)

Martha Cooper’s “Soweto/Sowebo Zine” (photo © Martha Cooper)

Martha Cooper’s “Soweto/Sowebo Zine” (photo © Martha Cooper)

Martha Cooper’s “Soweto/Sowebo Zine” (photo © Martha Cooper)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Isaac Cordal in Zagreb and Vienna With His Little Men

The impersonal isolation of living inside a human hive, the unraveling of a threadbare social safety net, the militarization of the natural world, the impact of industrial activity on our environmental, and the brutal punches of a bankrupt monetary system set free.  How can Isaac Cordal address such weighty matters with such miniature sculptures?  Also, does he sleep?

Isaac Cordal from his new series on neighbors, or “Susjedi”.  /// MUU /// Muzej ulične umjetnosti. Zagreb. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

As has been true for decades, certain Street Artists use their work to directly or indirectly speak to the ills of society. Part of his studio work and his street practice, to varying degrees Cordal is determined to visually illustrate the impact of our external world engineering on the internal world of the individual through installations and staged scenes. What makes them particularly effective is placement; his involvement of his figures in pre-existing venues. He uses puddles of water, litter, municipal protuberances and holes in bricked buildings as pre-designed sets for his figures to interact with. Normally overlooked on your daily travels, their scale is suddenly altered by their relation to the sculptures.

Just back from trips to Zagreb, Croatia and Vienna, Austria, the artist shares these exclusive images with BSA readers of some of his latest works.

These September works in in Vienna were part of the BLK River Festival and the ones in Zagreb were for /// MUU /// Muzej ulične umjetnosti.

BLK River Festival, Vienna

Isaac Cordal. “Goldman Parachutes” BLK River Festival 2012. Vienna. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

 

Isaac Cordal. At the Studio. BLK River Festival 2012. Vienna. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. BLK River Festival 2012. Vienna. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. BLK River Festival 2012. Vienna. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. BLK River Festival 2012. Vienna. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. BLK River Festival 2012. Vienna. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

/// MUU /// Muzej ulične umjetnosti

“The first project in Zagreb was an intervention in a wall of bricks. I called it: Susjedi (it means neighbors in Croatian),” says Cordal.

Isaac Cordal. “Susjedi” /// MUU /// Muzej ulične umjetnosti. Zagreb. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. “Susjedi” /// MUU /// Muzej ulične umjetnosti. Zagreb. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. “Susjedi” /// MUU /// Muzej ulične umjetnosti. Zagreb. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

The second project in Zagreb was this cloud with raining men. This work is called Haarp´s Effects and speaks about climate weapons. More info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Frequency_Active_Auroral_Research_Program

Isaac Cordal. “Haarp´s Effects” /// MUU /// Muzej ulične umjetnosti. Zagreb. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. “Haarp´s Effects” /// MUU /// Muzej ulične umjetnosti. Zagreb. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. “Remembrances from Nature” Zagreb. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Thanks to Mr. Cordal for these exclusive images for BSA readers.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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FAME Festival Is Cinematically Human in Grottaglie, Italy

The Fame Festival doesn’t take itself too seriously, but you should. Now in its fifth year, the festival is run by one fella and his friends, offering interesting walls and an opportunity to work with local artisans in the “aesthetically depressed” areas of this beautiful town named Grottaglie. A dozen or so international artists descended here again this year as summer turned to fall to eat amazing food, paint huge walls, and to create pottery works and limited edition prints with their host, Angelo Milano, in his print shop called Studiocromie.

Erica Il Cane (photo © Henrik Haven)

Free from corporate sponsors or too many meddlesome civic interests, which can muddy the creative waters and contort presentation, FAME has reliably produced singularly striking work on the Streets: the kind of free-form ingenuity that could only result from a being in a positive environment. Artists who return from the experience report that Studiocromie and their peeps know how to make you feel right at home, complete with the dysfunctional human frailties we’re all prone to. Again this year some of the pieces that have come out of FAME have been remarkable for one reason or another – it also helps when the talent pool is so strong.

Erica Il Cane. Detail. (photo © Henrik Haven)

The lineup this year officially included;

ERICA IL CANE – Italy, INTERESNI KAZKI – Ukraine, BORIS HOPPEK – Germany, CONOR HARRINGTON – Ireland, 108 – Italy, LUCY MCLAUCHLAN – UK,  MONEYLESS – Italy, NUG – Sweden, Giorgio di Palma – Italy, AKAY – Sweden, CYOP E KAF – Italy, VHILS – Portugal, PAPER RESISTANCE – Italy,  JR– France, BRAD DOWNEY – US, and MOMO – US

Photographer and BSA contributor Henrik Haven was on hand the to cover FAME and he shares these exclusive images with BSA readers of works in progress by Erica Il Cane and completed walls by Vhils, Interesni Kazki and Conor Harrington. The videos are produced by FAME and they give an additional cinematic appreciation and humor to the entire experience.

Stay hungry, FAME.

Erica Il Cane. Detail. (photo © Henrik Haven)

Angelo remarks on the FAME website what his take on the festival has been as he sets up the video below, “It’s been an intense couple of weeks here at FAME, three artists at the same time and it was a hell of a mess. This is what happened with KING Erica il Cane. Here’s my advice to all artists around, both new and old, watch him doing what he does, and how he does it. You won’t get as good as he is, you won’t end up painting such a huge wall in just two days, but at least you can take notes: have fun and don’t think about the whole art world bullshit.”

Erica il Cane “Gipsy Disagio” @ Fame 2012

Erica Il Cane (photo © Henrik Haven)

Erica Il Cane (photo © Henrik Haven)

Erica Il Cane (photo © Henrik Haven)

Vhils (photo © Henrik Haven)

Is Vhils ticklish? Climb into the back of a crowded car and find out.

Conor Harrington (photo © Henrik Haven)

Conor Harrington (photo © Henrik Haven)

Conor Harrington. Detail (photo © Henrik Haven)

You ever notice that Conor eats a lot? Dang!

Interesni Kazki (photo © Henrik Haven)

 Interesni Kazki. Detail. (photo © Henrik Haven)

The harrowing and hilarious video helps explain why Interesni Kazki needed 12 days to complete the piece. Angelo describes it as “an extreme amount of bad luck”.

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Living Walls Atlanta 2012 Complete, Women Define the Show

Atlanta just finished the Living Walls festival, a collection of 30 female Street Artists who came for 10 days to create 18 new works around the city. The third festival in as many years, the event is equal parts inspiration and perspiration, and with a team of about 60 volunteers and 30 local businesses all working together to support the artists in whatever capacity is needed, it is largely non-commercial.

“You really don’t need much money to do this, just lots of heart and dedication. Taking back your public space, humanizing it, and reactivating it without selling anything to the public, is something that money can’t buy,” bemuses co-founder Monica Campana, and the point couldn’t be a finer one if it were a razor tipped Sharpie.

Hyuro (photo © Martha Cooper)

Hyuro’s mural from afar. (photo © Martha Cooper)

While Street Art festivals are seeming to blossom in cities around the globe that want to enliven the local cultural values (and possibly real estate values), more scrutiny is beginning to be paid by the watchers of the Street Art scene to see if mainstream acceptance will simply mean an enhanced currency stream for opportunists. In some cases Street Art festivals are looking like they’re getting ready to start moving some serious “lifestyle” product as events are being branded by sneakers and energy drinks. Of course, we’ve seen this movie before, along with it’s accompanying feelings of confliction.

Fefe (photo © Martha Cooper)

Living Walls has always had as a core component a series of lectures and panels dedicated to education and discussion about the role of art and artists in the public sphere. But that’s not the focus of everyone who throws one of these shindigs.

“I believe that there are some festivals that want to promote the scene, the street artists, and who  want to engage their communities via art. I also think that there are a whole other set of street art festivals that are using this movement to market a product and capitalize on it,” says Campana.

Fefe (photo © Martha Cooper)

Occasionally a wall in one of these festivals runs afoul of local tastes, as was the case for Street Artist Hyuro, whose line up of a female figure in various stages of undress brought at least one ornery feller out of the woods, or the recent depiction of two bears by ROA in Rochester that reminded some observers of a sexual position known best by it’s numeric moniker. Often you can look at these aesthetic flare-ups as a welcome opportunity for sophomoric jokes by teenage boys, selective umbrage by self appointed morality guards who rush passed the soup kitchen line to wave an angry finger, or the animated outrage of a story-hungry local newsreader reporting live on the scene. For a large part, surprisingly, many of the artists tell stories of Atlanta neighbors bringing food, their kids, sometimes a paintbrush.

For Alexandra Parrish, one of the festivals small army of volunteers, Living Walls and all of the raw youthful enthusiasm of the new D.I.Y. Street Art scene represents hope in an American city that she sees as having been abandoned, drained dry in the face of lowered economic prospects. “Since the 1990s, there’s been an overwhelming creative void in the city, as sort of ‘art-flight’,” says Parrish. “Many who galvanized the art scene in Atlanta left when it got too rough. Then, something like Living Walls comes around – with no money, no rhyme, no reason, in the midst of an urban sprawl least likely to care.”

Tika (photo © Martha Cooper)

In an economy that also feels abandoned and ever shifting downward in search of a new baseline, you can see a certain jadedness in the Millenial generation you wouldn’t have seen a few years ago, but here is a new ruggedness too.  Alexandra looks at the attitudes and the relentless efforts that a loosely woven group of art kids have made with little funding to create a genuine lifeblood. “Three years later, with the help of countless local businesses, foundations and individuals, it is overwhelmingly clear to us that yes, people do care.”

Here’s the evidence, an onslaught of walls shot by the dear Ms. Martha Cooper and expressly picked by her for BSA. We’re happy to share the bounty with you and this small interview with Monica. Ultimately these are fruits of labor by some who didn’t wait for permission to create a scene. It should be a surprise that they are accomplishing something that many urban planners and masters of industry have found illusive in cities during these harrowing economic times.

Says Parrish, “Our scrappy organization has somehow put Atlanta back on the map.

Tika atop her double walled portrait (photo © Martha Cooper)

Brooklyn Street Art: Because you worked closely with the community and a large team of volunteers, do the artists feel welcomed to the event?
Monica Campana:
Living Walls is an all-volunteer organization of about 60 people who act as staff or artists assistants – whatever role is needed. There are also about 30 different local restaurants that helped feed the artists during their 10-day stay in Atlanta, not counting the sponsors who hosted the artists and events during the conference. So many people are a part of each conference every year that it truly makes it a community project.

The whole city wants to welcome the invited artists, and during production week everyone will try to make an effort to make the artist feel welcome. Sometimes they show up to the events we are hosting or stop by the walls with water or food. During a giant family-style dinner given by a friend, one artist told me that she had heard we were nice in Atlanta but she was really not expecting this level of nice… I guess we really reinforce the “Southern Hospitality” concept here.

Sten & Lex (photo © Martha Cooper)

Brooklyn Street Art: How are festivals like this going to affect the greater Street Art scene, given that they are large, organized, and authorized?
Monica Campana:
Festivals of this kind are definitely affecting the street art scene, positively and negatively. I believe that as long a street art festival works with its community, educates, promotes conversations in their communities about street art/graffiti origins and its motivations, as long as it reactivates spaces and helps create community, then it’s all good. Street art should remain illegal, but I also believe that organized street art festivals can help as a platform for dialogue about this craft.

Sten & Lex (photo © Martha Cooper)

Brooklyn Street Art: Organizers spoke initially of this being the first and largest organized festival of female street artists together. Does that include festivals like the “B*Girl Summit” in 2005 and the rest of the “B-Girl Be” events of the late 2000s ?
Monica Campana: When we decided to mainly focus on female street artists for this year’s conference, we researched as much as we could to see if this had been done before. We found art shows, showcasing only girls in the street art world – we found graffiti jams only showcasing female graffiti writers- we found b-girl festivals – but we were not able to find a street art conference that showcased only women.

This was a conference with 5 days of events, the creation of 18 pieces of public art, and lectures discussing urbanism and gender roles in public spaces. Living Walls 2012, focusing on only female street artist, was the first of it’s kind as of yet – and hopefully it’s not the last one.

Members of the Atlanta community helped with a number of murals, like this one by Olive 47 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Brooklyn Street Art: Having primarily women on the scene this year, how was the work and the environment of Living Walls Atlanta affected?
Monica Campana: Working with primarily female artists gave LW a very different sensitivity. I don’t want to sound stereotypical, but in the past the guys have been more wild than the girls. This year it was amazing to see how the girls would wake up early, stick to their schedule, would be more aware of keeping things cleaner and safe.

The work on the streets also had a different feel and artists experimented with new materials, like yarn, colored powder, balloons and even hair weaves. Some murals even continued from their walls onto the ground. I feel like this year the artists wanted to push themselves more and experiment with their space in new ways.

Olive 47 (photo © Martha Cooper)

Brooklyn Street Art: Are you up for another year of Living Walls?
Monica Campana: Yes! This is the first year that I finished the conference wanting to start the next one right away. Every year it is so hard and so much work but we really are a family, and I cannot wait to continue working with everyone and planning for the next conference. I’m motivated by so many motivated and talented. We’re already planning to have next years desired lineup by this October.

Mon Ellis (photo © Martha Cooper)

Molly Rose Freeman (photo © Martha Cooper)

“Every day I wake up thinking about all the art we are putting on the streets, all the conversations being sparked by the art, all the love and hard work each artist puts into leaving something so great in our city.” – Monica Campana

Molly Rose Freeman (photo © Martha Cooper)

Martina Merlini (photo © Martha Cooper)

Martina Merlini (photo © Martha Cooper)

Jessie Unterhalter and Katie Truhn (photo © Martha Cooper)

Jessie Unterhalter and Katie Truhn (photo © Martha Cooper)

Indigo (photo © Martha Cooper)

Indigo (photo © Martha Cooper)

“It is a great feeling to know that we might be inspiring others. Here is the thing though…what Living Walls does for Atlanta, it can be easily done in any other city. I encourage everyone that wants to promote street art and the creation of new public spaces in their communities to do something like Living Walls.” – Monica Campana

EME (photo © Martha Cooper)

EME (photo © Martha Cooper)

Art Hs (photo © Martha Cooper)

Miso (photo © Martha Cooper)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Nuart Presents: Nuart Plus International Street Art Summit (Stavanger, Norway)

Nuart Plus

NUART PLUS
STAVANGER NORWAY : 27/28/29 SEPT

Nuart Plus, one of Europe’s first international Street Art summits kicks off this year!
Thurs Sept 27- Sat 29th Sept sees a host of industry professionals, creatives, authors and critics descend on Stavanger to discuss, dismantle and fight their way through issues surrounding Street Art, advertising, urban development and related issues.
http://www.nuartfestival.no/nuart-plus

Three days of keynote talks and presentations, panel debates with visiting artists, film premieres, street art tours and more. See full program attached.

Guests and Keynote speakers include
Carlo McCormick (US) – Tristan Manco (UK) / Ron English (US) / Saber (US) / Jordan Seiler (US) / Jon Burgerman (UK) / The Wa (FR) / RJ Rushmore (US) / Evan Pricco (US) / Kristi Guldberg (NO) / Eirik Sjåholm Knudsen (NO) / Marion Højris Jensen (DK) / John Xc (UK)


Nuart is proud to announce the latest addition to what’s fast becoming one of the most talked about events on the international street art calendar.

This three-day international Street Art Summit inaugurates the new PLUS series, a component of the festival that aims to bring together the public, artists and creative professionals in an environment of exploration, innovation and discovery.

Open to the public, Nuart PLUS is a professional gathering that explores the ever-strengthening links between creativity and our urban environment. Featuring a mix of keynotes, panels and presentations, the Nuart PLUS summit is a 3-day conference aimed at elaborating a cohesive view of the current trends within groundbreaking artistic mediums and proposing visions for the future.

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DAY 1 – Mental space
Day 1 will investigate the relationship between street art, the urban environment and advertising. For decades street artists have not only co-opted the visual strategies of advertising but also the physical billboards that advertisers use. Day 1 explores the corporate visual elements that surround us, how do they affect the way we engage and behave in society and what are street artists contributing to this arena?

DAY 2 – Physical space
Our second day is perhaps the most comprehensive, with a keynote address from renowned cultural critic Carlo McCormick as well as presentations, panel debates and discussions from a broad range of guests. Physical Space will tackle the complex relationship between Street Art, Urban Planning and our physical environment. Street Art and Graffiti now plays a prominent role in the cultural landscape and consciousness of a city. Can it and should it be assimilated. In other words, how can street art play a role in producing the city and society we wish to live in?

DAY 3 – Virtual space
Virtual Space will explore Street Art’s life on the web by exploring the growing relationship between the street, the artist and the Internet. With rapid photo and film uploading sites, dedicated street art forums, social media sites, blogs, mobile apps and other sharing platforms, Street Art and its life on the Internet is now a multi-authored environment. Can we see specific changes in art practices and expressions due to this?

Full day program with keynotes, panels etc.: http://www.nuartfestival.no/nuart-plus

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FILMS:

Thursday Sept 27. Kl 1700. Sf Kino
POPAGANDA. “The Art & Crimes of Ron English”.
With a live introduction and post film Q&A with Ron English, moderated by Juxtapoz Editor in Chief, Evan Pricco (US)

The modern day Robin Hood of Madison Avenue, subversive artist Ron English is on a mission to liberate all billboards. He paints, perverts, infiltrates, reinvents and satirizes modern culture on hundreds of pirated billboards. Popaganda chronicles the evolution of an artist who offers an alternative universe where nothing is sacred, everything is subverted and there’s always room for a little good-natured fun.


Saturday Sept 29. Kl 1700. Sf Kino
EXIT THROUGH THE GIFTSHOP
Introduction to the film from author and Banksy confidente Tristan Manco (UK)

This is the inside story of Street Art – a brutal and revealing account of what happens when fame, money and vandalism collide. Exit Through the Gift Shop follows an eccentric shop-keeper turned amateur film-maker as he attempts to capture many of the world’s most infamous vandals on camera, only to have a British stencil artist named Banksy turn the camcorder back on its owner with wildly unexpected results.

One of the most provocative films about art ever made, Exit Through the Gift Shop is a fascinating study of low-level criminality, comradeship and incompetence. By turns shocking, hilarious and absurd, this is an enthralling modern-day fairytale… with bolt cutters.

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TOURS

THURS 27. STREET ART TOUR
STREET ART TOUR : ART AND ADVERTSING WiTH JORDAN SEILER (US) AND RJ RUSHMORE (US)
Join us for what’s probably one of the most unusual Street Art tours ever presented. Following on from the days discussions regarding who controls our mental/visual public space, Art V’s Advertising and the power plays in our utrban environment, Jordan Seiler (US), founder of the groundbreaking PublicAdcampaign and Rj Rushmore (US), founder of the highly respected Street Art site Vandalog will be your guides.

FRI 28. STREET ART TOUR #02
STREET ART TOUR #02 : LANDMARKS, WITH TRISTAN MANCO (UK)
Our second and final tour of the week will explore the work produced over the years in and around the city center and will take in several of the pieces created for this years event. Street Art and Graffiti now plays a prominent role in the cultural landscape and consciousness of a city. How can street art play a role in producing the city and society we wish to live in?

Hosted by world renowned Street Art expert and author Tristan Manco (UK), the tour will depart shortly after the final Nuart Plus talk of the day.

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