All posts tagged: Japan

Anthony Lister’s “Rude Words” in Tokyo Streets and Gallery Land Him in The Slammer

Anthony Lister’s “Rude Words” in Tokyo Streets and Gallery Land Him in The Slammer

AL: “Just spent 12 days in prison in Tokyo”

BSA: Fuck! Was the food as good as the art?

AL: Nope. The exhibition went great. The street stuff not so great. The food was terrible and was served cold.

Anthony Lister. Tokyo, Japan. February 2020. (photo © Anthony Lister)

And with that Anthony Lister summarized his experience to us on the streets, in the gallery and, unfortunately in a Tokyo slammer.

In town for the occasion of his first-ever solo exhibition in Japan, Listers’ new fascinating works wowed opening night February 7 on a dual bill with Brian Leo at the Megumi Ogita Gallery.

Anthony Lister. Tokyo, Japan. February 2020. (photo © Anthony Lister)

But oh the travails of a wandering art prankster. Prior to his trip to Japan, Mr. Lister was wondering if he would learn some rude words in Japanese while in Tokyo…we are certain that his stint in jail gave him opportunity to expand his Japanese vocabulary into something a bit more colorful.

The swashbuckling Lister shares with BSA readers some of his artistic interventions on the streets of Tokyo…quite possibly the cause of his 12 day hoosegow “residency”.

Anthony Lister. Tokyo, Japan. February 2020. (photo © Anthony Lister)
Boo! Anthony Lister. Tokyo, Japan. February 2020. (photo © Anthony Lister)
Anthony Lister. Tokyo, Japan. February 2020. (photo © Anthony Lister)
Anthony Lister. Tokyo, Japan. February 2020. (photo © Anthony Lister)
Anthony Lister. Tokyo, Japan. February 2020. (photo © Anthony Lister)
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WK Interact Makes Some Noise in Tokyo

WK Interact Makes Some Noise in Tokyo

French New Yorker and Street Artist WK Interact has just finished a new gig on a massive wall in Japan and he is about to help make some noise about it, so to speak. The Japanese band Noisemaker has a substantive following for their nu metal sound recalling the glossy punk stylings of 1990s and bands like Massive Attack, Green Day, and Rage Against the Machine and WK has created work to help them promote their new mini-album and tour kickoff next month.

WK Interact. Noisemaker. Shibuya, Japan. (photo courtesy of the artist)

The 12 meter wall in Shibuya features WK’s signature black and white urban military police-state nomenclature with an attractive female figure bossing in the foreground while holding a vintage recording device familiar to security and law enforcement. The Bands name is splashed in blood red behind her.

It took three days and a night to complete and WK tells us he had a very good time with the bands and the fans. Given that WK’s work on the street has nearly often contained elements of blurring chaotically chopped action, you smile when he tells you “the band was jumping on a trampoline in motion near the wall for their album cover.”

WK and the boys in the band celebrating the finished wall on social media.


BSA: What does the model’s pose and clothing signify to you?
WK Interact: The model is supposed to be one their fans who goes to many different concerts. She has a recording device that dates back to 1980 called a NAGRA. Many people these days carry their own listening device on their SMART phone. The idea is that she’s recording and transmitting to many other people. She is in her own world and listening and recording events is a passion for her – like buying clothes or surfing or traveling.

WK Interact. Noisemaker. Shibuya, Japan. (photo courtesy of the artist)

BSA: How is this wall significant to people in Japanese culture?
WK Interact: This specific place will be destroyed in the next two months and new construction will take over. It’s located four blocks from the Shibuya station and it is in the heart of a district with many different cool bars and shops. Many Japanese are sad to see spots like this vanish.

WK Interact. Noisemaker. Shibuya, Japan. (photo courtesy of the artist)

BSA: How would you describe the scene on the street in Shibuya?
WK Interact: The last time I visited Japan was 17 years ago and at that time I did an amazing opening at PARCO Museum. At the time JAPAN was the most advanced in terms of street wear and a prime environment for street art and graffiti. Tokyo has changed terribly as you almost see nothing in terms of expression from the street. None is visible. All the small little stores have vanished, the economy is not as good, and most of the big brands have taken over.

WK Interact likes to capture the severe men in uniform wherever he goes. Noisemaker. Shibuya, Japan. (photo courtesy of the artist)

WK Interact. Noisemaker. Shibuya, Japan. (photo courtesy of the artist)

WK Interact. Noisemaker. Shibuya, Japan. (photo courtesy of the artist)

WK Interact. Noisemaker. Shibuya, Japan. (photo courtesy of the artist)

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Specter in Vladivostok, Nahodka and Tokyo

Street Artist and fine artist Specter hails from Brooklyn but has been traveling a lot and has been creating some interesting work in Russia and Tokyo, two places not typically mentioned during Western discussions of the street art scene – but we’d be remiss to miss.

“I was invited to Russia from my friend Pasha Shugurov who runs the artist collective 33plus1,” he says as he discusses the new piece called “Chromatin Structure”.

Specter “Chromatin Structure”. Vladivostok, Russia. (photo © Specter)

For the artists in our audience who were doodling in the margins of their science textbook during class, the chromatins are the combination of DNA and proteins that make up the contents of the nucleus of a cell.  The work is installed in Sister City Park. Also in the town of Nahodka, a port city in Primorsky Krai, he painted a geodesic dome with art students from the university there.

While in Tokyo Specter returned to some of the faux realism that we have become familiar with in his work in the last few years, recreating a façade that blends seamlessly, yet attracts your attention. The “Bodega Window” here is in the Harajuku Fashion District known for the chic shops and slick shoppers.

Specter “Chromatin Structure” in progress. Vladivostok, Russia. (photo © Specter)

Specter “Chromatin Structure” in progress. Vladivostok, Russia. (photo © Specter)

Specter. Geodesic Dome done in collaboration with art students from the university in Nahodka, Russia. (photo © Specter)

Specter “Bodega Window” in the Harajuku Fashion District of Tokyo, Japan. (photo © Specter)

Specter “Bodega Window” in the Harajuku Fashion District of Tokyo, Japan. (photo © Specter)

Specter’s project in Vladivostok was made possible from a grant from the US Consulate in Vladivostok and curator Kendal Henry.

 

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JB Rock Creates a Quiet Storm in Arcidosso, Italy.

Italian Street Artist JB Rock created a giant wave last week on a 32 feet high by 65 feet tall wall in the small and quiet Tuscan town of Arcidosso, Italy. Participating in Alterazioni 2012, the town’s Art and Music festival, the artist used 15 different stencils of clenched fists and other hand gestures, repeating them more than 200 times to create his “Quiet Storm”. He says that part of his inspiration comes from the Japanese printmaking aesthetic, and this one in particular is in the style of the 19th Ccentury Master-Printer Hokusai.

JB Rock (photo © Alessandro Baldoni)

JB Rock (photo © Alice Ghinolfi)

 

The Great Wave off Kanagawa“, Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849)

 

Learn more about JB Rock HERE.

 

 

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Martha Cooper, Photographer of Art on the Streets for Six Decades

Martha Cooper landed in LA yesterday and will spend the next week installing her photos and their remixed new versions beside them, even flanking hers like stereo speakers. Since the press release has gone out we thought we’d share with you the bio written by Steven P. Harrington and the promo photo by Jaime Rojo which will appear in a special issue of The Art Street Journal dedicated entirely to her to come out this week.

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Martha and Pablo at home, with a portrait of her sitting on a train car with camera in hand painted by Os Gemeos overlooking the scene. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Martha Cooper, Photographer of Art on the Streets for Six Decades

Written by Steven P. Harrington, this article is featured in The Art Street Journal vol ii – issue v.

The daughter of a Baltimore camera store owner, Martha Cooper’s romance with photography began in the 1940s when bobby-soxers and penny loafers were the sign of edgy youth culture. Her dad, an amateur photographer himself, gave his small girl a camera and together they hit the streets in search of adventure. “Yeah, my father used to take me out and we would take pictures. That’s what I thought photography was…we were just looking for pictures,” she recalls. Six decades later, Cooper is still looking for pictures; meanwhile, many works from her archive are cited as pivotal recordings of the birth of hip-hop culture and its plastic art form, graffiti.

During the cultural upheavals of the 1960s, Cooper earned a Bachelors of Art degree in Iowa, taught English for the Peace Corps in Thailand and rode a motorcycle from Bangkok to obtain a graduate degree at Oxford. As a freelancer and staff photographer in Japan, Maryland and Rhode Island in the early 1970s she moved to the media and art center of New York City to catch bigger fish. Landing a job on the staff of The New York Post in 1977, she discovered that the resistant and competitive boys club of photographers there were reluctant to countenance this scrappy young woman shooting hard news stories and Studio 54 celebrities.

Hungry for discovery, Cooper would spend her time to and from assignments in bombed-out neighborhoods, where she took pictures of kids entertaining themselves with games they devised on the street, often with the humblest of materials. It was during one of those trips that she stumbled on graffiti and the members of its community. She met a young boy who suggested she photograph the work she was seeing, then showed her a stylized drawing of his name, or piece, in his notebook.

Then he asked her if she wanted to meet “The King”.

Following this lead to Brooklyn, Cooper met Dondi, the citywide-famous graffiti writer who kept a published photo of hers in his black book because its background contained one of his graffiti throw-ups. Cooper quickly realized that she had stumbled into a lively street culture and became an avid student of the teen writers she befriended. By the time she took her last news picture for the New York Post in 1980, her primary desire was to capture as many pieces, tags, and trains as she possibly could find. Today, she remarks on her near-obsessive devotion to documenting New York’s graffiti: waking before dawn to hit the street, waiting five hours for a freshly painted #2 train to pass with the sun at her back and countless secret adventures with vandals in train yards, evading transit police in order to pursue a shot.

Joining efforts with fellow graffiti photographer, Henry Chalfant, Cooper proposed putting together a book of their documentation. The pair endured multiple rejections from publishers while lugging around a big “dummy” book with their pictures glued to the pages. Eventually, however, they landed a deal and Subway Art was published in 1984. Although not an immediate success, it came to sell half a million copies and established itself as a holy book for fans, aspiring artists and art historians worldwide.

By the time the 25th anniversary edition was published in 2009, generations of graffiti and street artists had been influenced by it and the hip-hop culture Cooper and Chalfant had captured had gone global.

In the intervening years, Martha Cooper never stopped shooting. Her love of serendipity on the street and the exploration of cultures led her to publish thousands of photos in books such as R.I.P.: Memorial Wall Art, Hip Hop Files 1979-1984, We B*Girlz, Street Play, New York State of Mind, Tag Town, Going Postal, and Name Tagging. Her work has been exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide and published in numerous magazines including National Geographic, Natural History, and Vibe. While she is still shooting graffiti, street art and the occasional break dance competition today, Cooper’s current project involves documenting people and events in Sowebo, a drug-riddled neighborhood in her birthplace of Baltimore.

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Steven P. Harrington is editor-in-chief of BrooklynStreetArt.com and co-author (with Jaime Rojo) of Brooklyn Street Art and Street Art New York, both by Prestel Publishing. He and Jaime Rojo are also contributing writers on street art for The Huffington Post.

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Photographs by Martha Cooper

Martha Cooper ; Remix

with

Original remixes of these photographs in a range of media by Aeon, John Ahearn, Aiko, Bio, Nicer & B-Gee, Blade, Blanco, Mark Bode, Burning Candy, Victor Castillo, Cey, Cekis, Claw, Cosbe, Crash, Dabs & Myla, Anton van Dalen, Daze, Dearraindrop, Jane Dickson, Dr. Revolt, Shepard Fairey, Faust, Flying Fortress, Freedom, Fumakaka, Futura, Gaia, Grotesk, Logan Hicks, How & Nosm, LA II, Lady Pink, Anthony Lister, The London Police, Mare 139, Barry McGee, Nazza Stencil, Nunca, José Parlá, Quik, Lee Quinones, Kenny Scharf, Sharp, Skewville, Chris Stain, Subway Art History, Swoon, T-Kid, Terror161 and more.

Carmichael Gallery is pleased to announce Martha Cooper: Remix, an expansive group show featuring highlights from Martha Cooper’s photographic archive and works by over 50 artists who have created their own unique interpretations of her iconic, historically significant imagery. There will be an opening reception for the exhibition on Saturday, April 9 from 6 to 8pm with Martha Cooper and several of the participating artists in attendance. The exhibition will run through May 7, 2011.

Click on the link below to read BSA interview with Martha Cooper:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=19366

Carmichael Gallery

5795 Washington Blvd

Culver City, CA 90232

April 9 – May 7, 2011

Opening Reception: Saturday, April 9, 6-8pm



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Street Artist Don John’s Experience in Tokyo

As we listen to, watch, and read the cautiously optimistic developments at the nuclear power plant in Japan and consider the ever-growing estimates of the number of people lost during the last week and a half, we send our condolences and support and reflect on our fragility and survival. In ancient times populations fell victim to natural disasters as we do today. While we are better prepared in many ways, that preparation is tempered now as we watch our outstanding technological advances turn into our nightmare, compounding the severity of damage rendered by the natural world. As leaders in Japan talk about using this crisis to learn, we reflect on nuclear facilities, deep water oil rigs, and technologically lethal implications of our own creation.

(Please see 5 ways to help at the end of this posting)

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Tokyo at Night (photo © Don John)

Street Artist Don John lives in Copenhagen but happened to be on vacation in Tokyo when the calamitous earthquake and ensuing tsunami struck the coast of Japan. Nearing the end of holiday there with his girlfriend, some of his recent wheat pasted portraits had just appeared on streets in the Shibuya area of Tokyo.

brooklyn-street-art-don-john-tokyo-03-11-4-web Don John (photo © Don John)

The imagery for these pieces, developed far before the earthquake, in some ways mirror the shocked and saddened visages of the citizenry. Nonetheless, Don John reports that most people in Tokyo took the unfolding events in stride and reached out to one another and strangers to assist in a time of uncertainty and need. See some of his observations further down the page.

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Don John (photo © Don John)

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Don John (photo © Don John)

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Don John (photo © Don John)

“We were amazed about how friendly and helpful Japanese people are, even in a situation like this. All trains stopped in Tokyo after the earthquake and we had 5 kilometers to walk back to our hotel. This super friendly guy offered to walk with us all the way to make sure that we found it. Having been around the people that are affected by this disaster makes it even more terrible to follow the developments in the news.” ~ Don John

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Don John (photo © Don John)

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Don John (photo © Don John)

From Sarah Milner Barry at New York University News, here are 5 ways you can help our brothers and sisters in Japan:

Text REDCROSS to 90999 or JAPAN to 80888

Each text to REDCROSS will provide $10 for the Red Cross, and each JAPAN text will send $10 to the Salvation Army. If texting JAPAN, make sure you respond YES when you receive a “thank you” message. It doesn’t get much simpler than that.

Visit the Google crisis response site

The site provides an aggregate of different websites accepting online donations, including the International Medical Corps, UNICEF and the Japanese Red Cross Society. The website is also continuously updated to provide the latest information about the crisis.

Donate via iTunes

Apple has created a simple donation page on the iTunes homepage where you can send money to the Red Cross in just a few clicks.

Spread awareness on Twitter

Here are some key hashtags to remember:
#Jishin: focuses on general earthquake information
#Anpi: confirms the safety of individuals or places
#Hinan: lists evacuation information
#311care: provides medical information for the victims
#PrayforJapan: shows general support and best wishes for victims of the crisis

Attend NYU’s vigil for Japan on Tuesday, March 22 at 7 p.m. at Gould Plaza, on 4th Street between Greene Street and Washington Square East.

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Aid Japan, Artists Do Their Part

Our knowledge of human’s fragile existence is reinforced by the twin natural disasters of earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Our man made folly is compounded by the explosions at the nuclear power plant there – causing us to question the hundreds of nuclear plants around the world. It is times like this that our words have to match our actions, and if we say we want to alleviate suffering now is a good time to make certain that our collective efforts reach those that are desperate for help.

Our brothers and sisters in Japan are going to need help so, if you can, please pledge to the Red Cross:

https://american.redcross.org/site/Donation2?idb=0&5052.donation=form1&df_id=5052

Artists and designers have immediately jumped to task with these starkly stunning pieces below to get the word out about how to help. You can always count on creatives to use their tools and talents to lend a helping hand and respond in the best way that they know how.

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Poster on Flickr by Twistedfork

From Artist Twistedfork: Love & Aid

“I thought I had to do my part. 🙂 A poster-ish illustration I made to inform people on how to donate.”

Donate to Red Cross in Facebook:
www.causes.com/campaigns/154523

You can also donate through Paypal:
www.paypal-donations.com/campaign_12.html

brooklyn-street-art-Stay-Strong-aid-Japan-Kent Ng

Stay Strong Japan! by Kent Ng

FatCap the web-based resource on grafitti and street art culture reached out to Japanese artist Suiko and asked some questions about the current situation in Japan as well as suggestions on how our community can help and send aid.

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Suiko Image Courtesy of FatCap © Suiko

What has it been like for the past 4 days as the damage unveils itself?

My town has no damage because it’s far away from the epicenter. However, my friends who live in the stricken area are still in shelter. I hear that they’re living without electricity…

How have people in Tokyo been living their lives?

Also in Tokyo, the aftershock still continues and people can’t settle down their minds. I was going to go to work in Tokyo the day after tomorrow, but all schedules are postponed

Click on this link to go to FatCap site to continue reading this interview and to see more images…

London based Pure Evil Gallery released the print below “Hokusai Tsunami” available for purchase with the proceeds going to the relief efforts in Japan.

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Click on the link below to purchase the print or just to donate

http://www.pureevilclothing.com/tsunamiprint.html

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Ryan Hageman on Flickr

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Miguel Michan

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Upper Playground And Good Smile Co. Present: David Choe and James Jean “LA Secret Studio” (Tokyo, Japan)

David Choe
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Good Smile Co. and Upper Playground Present:
“LA SECRET STUDIO”
Works by David Choe and James Jean

Tokyo, Japan [10/17/10] — Good Smile Co. with support from Upper Playground are pleased to present the work of two of contemporary art’s finest talents, David Choe and James Jean in Tokyo, Japan. The show gets the name ‘LA Secret Studio’ from the large warehouse studio set up in Los Angeles by David Choe, James Jean and Good Smile Co. – under the idea that the artists would be able to create in the large studio without the constraints of space and distractions of the public. The show will feature a display of some of David and James’ most famous works, clips from a documentary film, limited edition prints of their work, and a display of new pieces created in the LA Secret Studio which have never been publicly seen before.

The respective careers and backgrounds of David Choe and James Jean mirror the differences and similarities between their artist styles with an uncanny ability. Where David dropped out of art school at early age and fueled his artwork by the experiences he picked up as nomadic traveller, James worked diligently at the theory behind his craft to become known for his exquisite illustrations and won a multitude of awards for his commercial work. Artistically, Jean takes deliberate and almost ornate strokes in his work and creates with a refined intricacy, where Choe paints with violently wild lines of vivid colors which portray immediate emotions. But both paths and styles have led to very similar success with each of them becoming staples in the fine art world – and although each artist possesses a unique and immediately recognizable style, the undeniable genius behind both of their work has become inherently similar.

The exhibition will occur at Parco Factory (Shibuya Parco, Part 1, 6th Floor) in Tokyo, Japan on October 29th, 2010 and runs daily until November 14th, 2010.

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