All posts tagged: MAMUTT Arte

Fun Friday 06.01.12

1.    Bushwick Open Studios Starts Party >> Live Street Artists Doing Live Street Art! (Brooklyn)
2.    El Celso and La Luz (Brooklyn)
3.    Don Pablo Pedro at English Kills (Brooklyn)
4.    Street Art Pop Up Store (Brooklyn)
5.    Bishop 203 “Happy Torments” (Brooklyn)
6.    Dennis McNett Invites You to the Wolfbat Studios (Brooklyn)
7.    Pink Cloud (Brooklyn)
8.    Olek at Flanders Gallery (Raleigh, NC)
9.    Darkclouds does the Same Old Same Old in Boston
10.    Jef Aerosol at 30 (France)
11.    “Pandamonium” at Signal Gallery in London
12.    Herakut’s “After The Laughter” at London’s Shea & Ziegler Gallery
13.    Jon Burgerman’s “I Want To Eat Myself” (Jersey)
14.    Black Book Gallery hosts Eelus “Curious” tonight in Denver, CO.
15.    L.I.C.K. Gallery “4 of a Kind” w/ REGA, EVOKER, MikeDie and Chris RWK (Queens)
16.    Andreco and Ericailcane in Morocco (VIDEO)
17.    Pixel Pancho in Mexico City with MAMUTT Arte by Filmaciones de la Ciudad (VIDEO)

In NYC there are certain rites of Summer that mark the onset of the new season. The beaches get cleaned of condoms and medical waste every year just in time for Memorial Day Weekend for example. Children playing in spraying fire hydrants on hot days – always splendid.

Water related activities remind us of another favorite Summer rite of hormones; Wet T-shirt contests! Also, saucy libertinas with short, fresh sun dresses going up or coming down the subways’ stairs on a windy platform without knickers, that’s always a pruient plus. And shirtless boys showing off by doing tricks on bikes, skateboards, or anything really – generally making fools of themselves- another Summer tradition.

And of course Bushwick Open Studios.  This is the 6th Edition and we have loved every one.

Someone told us there are 500 open studios this year;
a. Bushwick has arrived, but you knew that
b. Artists can’t do math so don’t trust any numbers you hear for the next two days. Or is that three days?

Naturally, there will be plenty of Street Art as the scene continues to flourish and here are our recommendations …

Bushwick Open Studios Starts Party >> Live Street Artists Doing Live Street Art! (Brooklyn)

Street Artist Gilf! curates the BOS official opening reception with fellow Street Artists Bishop 203, QRST, Sheryo, The Yok, Willow, ND’A, Hellbent and Gilf! getting up live on the street. Dancing shoes are recommended. Also, clif bars.

Gilf! on the streets of Bushwick. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more information regarding the Official Opening Party click here.

El Celso and La Luz

El Celso invites you to his studio to give you a personal demonstration of his project La Luz.

El Celso on the streets of Williamsburg. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information on El Celso’s studio click here.

Don Pablo Pedro at English Kills

Loveably stylish and morally degenerate Don Pablo Pedro will be showing at English Kills Art Gallery at the Annex.

Don Pablo Pedro on the streets of Bushwick. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Street Art Pop Up Store

Robin Grearson presents a Street Art Pop Art Store with artists including ASVP, Bethany Allard, Chris Stain, Criminy Johnson, Daniel Feral, Elle, Enzo & Nio, Gilf!, Hellbent, Jon Burgerman, LNY, Moustache Man, Nathan Pickett, ND’A, QRST, Quel Beast, Royce B.

Enzo & Nio on the streets of Bushwick. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding Street Art Pop Up Store click here.

Bishop 203 “Happy Torments”

Sharp, bold, independent Bishop 203 is one of Brooklyn’s Angels.

Bishop 203 on the streets of Bushwick. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information on Bishop 203 show click here.

Dennis McNett Invites You to the Wolfbat Studios

Dennis McNett, the master printer, puppet maker, pied piper, and maker of magic has scared many with his Street Art creatures popping out as you turn a corner. Now you are invited into the magical kingdom of Dennis McNett Wolfbat Studios. You won’t be disappointed.

Dennis McNett on the streets of Williamsburg. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information on Dennis McNett’s Wolfbat Studio click here.

Pink Cloud

Visit Pink Cloud, Abel Macias’ studio and you might end up with free art. Who knows?

Pink Cloud on the streets of Williamsburg. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information on Pink Cloud’s studio click here.

BOS has so much more than we can list here; Performances, music, fashion and a plethora of studios to visit. For a complete listing of events, calendar, schedules and BOS Directory click here.

Olek at Flanders Gallery (Raleigh, NC)

Well-behaved women rarely make history and Street Artist Olek is a prime example of that axiom.  She’s part of a group exhibition aptly entitled “Make Ends Meet” at Flanders Gallery in North Carolina. Show opens today.

Olek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Darkclouds does the Same Old Same Old in Boston

The New York Street Artist Darkclouds travels to Beantown to open a new show at the Lot Gallery. Check it. “Same Old, Same Old”.

Darkclouds (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Jef Aerosol at 30 (France)

Street Art Icon and Master, Jef Aerosol celebrates 30 years of stencils at Collégiale Saint-Pierre-Le-Puellier at Mairie d’Orléans, France.

Jef Aerosol on the streets of Bushwick. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Also happening this weekend:

“Pandamonium” A Group Exhibition at Signal Gallery in London is now open to the public. Click here for more details on this show.

Herakut‘s new solo show “After The Laughter” at London’s Shea & Ziegler Gallery is now open to the public. Click here for more details on this show.

Jon Burgerman‘s new show “I Want To Eat Myself” opening tonight at Carmine’s Pizza Factory in Jersey City, NJ. Click here for more details on this show.

Black Book Gallery hosts Eelus with a solo show titled “Curious” opening tonight in Denver, CO. Click here for more details on this show.

The new group show at L.I.C.K. Gallery in Long Island City, Queens titled “4 of a Kind” includes REGA, EVOKER, MikeDie and Chris RWK and it opens tomorrow. Click here for more details on this show.

Andreco and Ericailcane in Morocco (VIDEO)

 

Pixel Pancho in Mexico City with MAMUTT Arte by Filmaciones de la Ciudad (.

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Mexico City: High Art in Thin Air

Capital Soars with Huge New International Street Art Murals

An Amazing Week in DF with Interesni Kazki, El Mac, Saner, Sego, Roa, Herakut, Vhils, and Escif

Gazing out at the sweep of metropolis that is modern Mexico City, you’ll have to catch your breath once in a while. A culture known for it’s historic public murals of the 20th Century, it looks like a resurgence is at hand, but this time the muralist are international Street Artists, and the scale is soaring.

Escif (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

The project “All City Canvas” invited nine artists from around the world and locally to use some of Distrito Federal’s prime real estate as just that – a canvas. With cranes and rollers instead of ladders and cans, these are some of the largest works we’ve seen by some of these artists. Here’s Portugals’ Vhils on the Dolores Building near La Alameda, there’s Germany’s Herakut on the side of the oldest newspaper in Mexico El Universal, and look way up to see LA’s El Mac signature portrait on the side of the Hotel Reforma Avenue. After eleven months of work getting permission from building owners, convincing city leaders, and securing major corporate sponsors, the capital of Mexico now has a few more major public art pieces that will blow you away and the resulting collection further secures this city of 21 million as one of the growing hubs of the Street Art scene.

ROA (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

We spoke with the three guys who organized the festival to get an understanding of the logistics and their aspirations for the project. As organizers and innovators with ties to their own arts organizations in Mexico City, each one of these guys hustled to make it happen; Victor Hugo Celaya of ARTO, Roberto Shimizu of MUJAM,  and Gonzalo Alvarez of MAMUTT. Participating artists were Interesni Kazki (Ukraine), El Mac (USA), Saner (Mexico), Sego (Mexico), Roa (Belgium), Herakut (Germany), Vhils (Portugal) and Ecif (Spain).

Brooklyn Street Art: Often Street Artists are relegated to the buildings that are abandoned and in a state of decay. In this case, your program featured work on the sides of some of the most important buildings in Mexico City. How did you get permission to do this?
Victor Hugo Celaya:
Since the beginning, we wanted to offer an unique experience to the city so we took urban art to everybody – youth, businessmen, doctors, moms… In order to make a huge impact, we worked to obtain the best spots in Mexico City. Each of these buildings is seen by thousands of people each day and are all located in the city center of Mexico City. It was a difficult job, but in the end we got everything set up. The impact would not have been the same if we had painted other walls.

ROA (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

Brooklyn Street Art: Mexican culture has a proud tradition of public murals. How does the style of Street Art in 2012 differ from that tradition?
Roberto Shimizu: Obviously the Mexican history with mural painters and our cultural background, with artists like David Alfaro Siqueiros and Diego Rivera – played a big part while we were conceptualizing the project. Mexico City has the perfect moral background to invite the best urban artists in the world to intervene its walls to create huge murals. We wanted to  innovate and create a new link with the past with some of the renowned urban artists of our time.

Brooklyn Street Art: Did you have difficulty persuading building owners to allow this work on their property?
Gonzalo Alvarez: It was difficult to get to the owners, since these people are important business people that don’t have “a lot of time”. Nevertheless, after a lot of work and perseverance we got to show them the project.  Once we got to them, we realized they are great people who were interested in getting involved in new innovative projects for the city. At the end, all of them were very happy with the outcome of the festival.

ROA. Detail. (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

Brooklyn Street Art: Is there a graffiti/Street Art “scene” in certain areas of D.F.?
Victor Hugo Celaya: DF is one of the biggest cities in the world – the 2nd biggest, so it is a natural hub for the urban art scene. The movement is very alive at the moment and it is giving Mexican artists an opportunity to show themselves to the world. With this project we wanted to make a statement to the world, that urban art is not only for young people that live in and around big cities – it’s for everybody – doctors, politicians, business people, Moms, merchants… For example, the intervention of the W Hotel, which is located in one of the most “posh” neighborhoods in the country, was very disruptive because nobody could have imagined an urban artists painting a huge mural on the same terrace where they usually eat their lunch or have their business meetings.

SEGO (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

Brooklyn Street Art: In the last few years we have been seeing many international Street Artists traveling to large cities around the world doing commissioned work for local festival organizers. How do these traveling artists affect the art scene in the local Mexican context?
Gonzalo Alvarez:
This was also very important to us when we were conceiving “All City Canvas”. First we wanted to show young artists that if you do a good job doing what you like, you can actually earn money and travel around the world. You can take your art to other cultures and if you are good enough, you could influence someone else.

Secondly, many artists in Mexico have no money to travel to other countries, and many of their influences  come from the pictures they see on the Internet. To have this world-known urban artist in Mexico City was an unique opportunity for these young artists to watch, compare and learn their techniques.

SEGO. Detail. (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

Brooklyn Street Art: Can you talk about the vibrant youth culture in Mexico City and how it responds to this kind of work?
Roberto Shimizu: Yes, Mexico is a young country, and more than half of the population is under 30 years of age. We noticed how important cultural events like this are for the young people. Each day thousands of young Mexicans congregated outside of the buildings the artists were painting – they wanted to watch the work and to understand the artistic process of the artwork. Also we offered a series of conferences called WORDS and a gallery exposition called WORKS to offer different points of view of the urban art scene. What we found is that young people in Mexico are very keen to learn and participate in these kinds of projects.

Also on the other hand, the feedback from the Mexican youth is very honest and direct. If you are doing something wrong they will let you know –  also they’ll let you know if you are doing something right.

Vhils. (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

Vhils. Detail. (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

Sego and Vhils process shots. (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

Herakut (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

Herakut (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

SANER (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

SANER. Detail. (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

Interesni Kazki (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

Interesni Kazki (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

El Mac (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

El Mac. Detail. (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

For more information about the “All City Canvas” project, please click here.

MAMUTT (www.mamutt.mx)

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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All City Canvas: Festival de Arte Urbano in Mexico City (Mexico City)

All City Canvas

 

ALL CITY CANVAS es un festival de arte urbano, a nivel internacional, que busca unir esfuerzos del movimiento alrededor del mundo, en un solo lugar durante una semana.

La ciudad sede, en este caso, la Ciudad de México, ofrecerá sus mejores espacios para que nueve de los artistas más reconocidos del movimiento de arte urbano intervengan espacios únicos e históricos de la ciudad.

Además, durante la semana del festival, se llevará a cabo una serie de conferencias impartidas por expertos en el tema, que ayudarán a contextualizar el trabajo que se realiza en las calles.

Finalmente, una reconocida galería de la ciudad expondrá obras de los artistas invitados y algunos otros talentos locales.

ARTISTS:

En esta primera edición de ALL CITY CANVAS, México fue seleccionado como sede del festival por ser, históricamente, un referente artístico y cultural. Este contexto histórico convierte a México en un importante punto de interés para la nueva generación de artistas que llevan años tomando las calles y los muros de las principales capitales del mundo para plasmar sus obras.

A finales de abril, los ojos del mundo estarán puestos en el corazón de la ciudad más grande del mundo y México se convertirá en uno de los focos principales de la escena del arte urbano.

El festival ALLC ITY CANVAS presentará del 30 de abril al 5 de mayo a 9 de los mejores artistas internacionales y nacionales, con amplias muestras de arte urbano, usando como lienzos algunos edificios icónicos de la Ciudad de México, creando una sinergia entre nuestras tradiciones y una nueva visión global. Es un festival inclusivo, que busca llevar el arte a superficies emblemáticas para crear murales de gran escala dentro del espacio urbano único que ofrece una de las ciudades más grandes del mundo. Así, la ciudad participará activamente, dejando un gran antecedente en la calle de lo que es el Arte Urbano en la actualidad.

Este proyecto ha sido la visión y trabajo de jóvenes mexicanos que asumieron la misión de voltear los ojos del mundo hacia México, insertándose en la historia, en un momento en el que es esencial mostrar de manera creativa y comunitaria la vitalidad, energía, magia, mezcla de razas y amor por la identidad mexicana en el espacio público. La Ciudad de México ofrece el escenario perfecto de una urbe con raíces históricas, arquitectura de gran visibilidad, ciudadanos abiertos a experiencias estéticas y una tradición artística de gran influencia.

ALL CITY CANVAS es un festival que desde su concepción ha sido inclusivo, trabajando con la autoridad, la iniciativa privada, la comunidad, con los estudiantes y los medios. Ha buscado impulsarse mostrando una cara positiva, apostando en el talento y energía del país. Es una apuesta por el arte en el espacio público, lo cual es y ha sido un concepto muy presente en la historiografía del arte en este país; en principio con tono revolucionario pero desde diferentes movimientos y con variantes en la manera de abordarlo, ha sido siempre una constante. Desde los muralistas, se tenía clara esta postura frente al arte; José Clemente Orozco se refirió así del muralismo: “La forma más desinteresada, ya que no puede ser escondida para beneficio de unos cuantos privilegiados. Es para la gente. Es para todos”.

Después del muralismo, el movimiento estudiantil de los años 60’s, en el que se manifestaba el descontento político, recurriendo a imágenes que se plasmaban en carteles, grafiti y fotografía llena de simbolismo. Movimientos artísticos conocidos como el Grupo, que a principios de los 70’s diseñaban pancartas y murales con variaciones de iconografía militante clásica para transmitir mensajes de disidencia o el No Grupo, que con imágenes populares y juegos de lenguaje criticaban el elitismo de las instituciones de arte, entre otras cosas. En el mundo, durante estos años, se gestionaba el manifesto de los Situacionistas, que se basaba en crear acontecimientos con significado que revirtiera el pre establecido por el sistema capitalista y de gobierno. En México surgió la neográfica y diversas técnicas de reproducción y transferencia de imágenes. Se organizaban happenings y trabajos muralísticos en comunidades campesinas e indígenas por el Taller de Investigación Plástica; se hacían exposiciones callejeras por parte de fotógrafos independientes como las del grupo Peyote y el de Narrativa Visual, del cual se desprendería el grupo Março con Alejandro Olmedo, Mauricio Guerrero y Sebastián, originadores de un manifesto Marxista inspirado en el Dadaísta. Todos coincidían en una postura clara ante el espacio público, ubicándolo como símbolo de democracia que planteaba cambiar el entorno diario a través del arte para poder dar un mensaje.

En los años 80’s crece el grafiti junto con algunas acciones de intervención que funcionaban como testimonios de eventualidades e inconformidades, como por ejemplo la toma del Balmori en la colonia Roma, en dónde, ante una campaña de demolición posterior al terremoto del 85, el edificio fue “tomado” al ser pintados los cristales y así evitando que fuera demolido. Esta acción marcó un momento muy importante en la regeneración urbana.

La postura del reclamo y la apropiación del espacio público con un mensaje, es algo que ha estado muy presente en la historia de la ciudad y sigue siendo actual. El festival apuesta y celebra el actuar en espacios estratégicos para establecer un diálogo entre la arquitectura, la imagen, el espacio y el observador, para así transmitir un mensaje que lleve a algún tipo de reflexión.

Con disciplina de trabajo, experimentación de técnicas y herramientas innovadoras, los artistas y sus murales nos harán dialogar y revalorar el espacio, nos mostrarán cómo un edificio se activa y transforma. Nos presentarán ideas de temas actuales a partir de lo que la ciudad les provoque e inspire, a través de su talentoso lenguaje plástico para experimentar con la estética que llevan años trabajando y  perfeccionando.

Esta experiencia la podremos tener in situ, al pie de los edificios intervenidos o a través del otro espacio público que ofrece Internet, ya que se podrá interactuar durante los días del festival a través de diversas redes sociales, con el contenido que se generará durante esa semana.

ALL CITY CANVAS creará una comunidad sólida en un espacio público: físico cerca de las PAREDES intervenidas por los artistas y virtual en el mundo online. Se presentará en espacio de galería PIEZAS, de la obra a pequeña escala que estos artistas producen, disponible para venta. Y se hablará al respecto en PALABRAS, desde el punto de vista de expertos que han dedicado su vida a registrar, teorizar, publicar y/o experimentar este arte espectacular.

Se presentará a la Ciudad de México como un museo al aire libre, con arte monumental y público, que de manera visual e interactiva, será un Festival para todos.

Click HERE to learn more about ALL City Canvas

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Mexico City : A New Surrealist Face for Street Art

Comic, surrealist, role-playing psychological explorations, with a tip of the hat to Breton, Carrington, and Lucha Libre, among others.

Pixel Pancho (photo © XAM)

Mexico City culture can be as varied and diverse as it is homogeneous, with a respect for tradition and, when it comes to artistic expression, a catalyst for exploration. André Breton is reported to have described Mexico as “the most surrealist country in the world,” where painters like Leonora Carrington and Frida Kahlo unhinged their imaginations from the limitations of the material world. As these new images on the streets of Mexico City taken by Brooklyn architectural street artist XAM show, the love for a psychic automatism continues into the public sphere.

Of course the Mexicans are not strangers to art on the streets; “great Latin American muralists” is a phrase almost synonymous with Mexico and names like Rivera, Orozco and Siqueiros coming to mind. Political advocacy and populist criticism of social policy on the walls here is similarly a tradition respected by the culture. Now a century after the revolution and birth of the modern Mexico, the experience of Los Capitalinos, as the residents of Mexico City are called, is affected daily by surrealism, pop culture and global capitalism swimming alongside folk and historical symbology, and a bit of anarchy. It’s all part of one fabric, a rich and varied textile that we export to you here.

Ben Eine (photo © XAM)

Says XAM of his experience, “Barcelona, NYC, Amsterdam, and Paris are all similar in a way when it comes to street art – you can walk around and come across work on the streets fairly easily, but traversing the barrios of Mexico city is much different. I guess in some way you can compare it to San Francisco, Chicago or Los Angeles – there is quality work to be found. The city differs from all mentioned in that it appears to be young when it comes to street art by having a small group of participants.”

“I was hosted by both MUMUTT Arte and Museo del Juguete Antiguo Mexico, who are both responsible for providing concrete canvases in Mexico City for artist such as ROA, M-City, Pixel Pancho, and fresh stuff from the locals like Saner, Sego and the MOZ crew. Mexico City DF has the most museums in the world and MUMUTT and Museo del Juguete are largely responsible for adding street art to the vast archive of amazing work. They escorted me around to locations they provided for the above artists – It is evident that everyone brought their A-game. The weathered concrete walls made wonderful surfaces for imagery such as Dronz & Koko’s character, offering hallucinatory candy at the toy museum to Ben Eine’s work that speaks about class issues on a worksite for a future mall.”

Ben Eine (photo © XAM)

Pixel Pancho (photo © XAM)

Pixel Pancho (photo © XAM)

Liqen (photo © XAM)

Jaz (photo © XAM)

Saner (photo © XAM)

Saner (photo © XAM)

Saner in collaboration with Bastardilla (photo © XAM)

Samurai . Ceci (photo © XAM)

Roman (photo © XAM)

Roman . Acute (photo © XAM)

ROA (photo © XAM)

Meah (photo © XAM)

Broken Crow (photo © XAM)

MCity (photo © XAM)

MCity (photo © XAM)

Moz Crew (photo © XAM)

Moz Crew (photo © XAM)

Moz Crew (photo © XAM)

Kokor . Dronz (photo © XAM)

Bimek . Done (photo © XAM)

Bue (photo © XAM)

Ever (photo © XAM)

SBTG. The artist worked on this piece on commission to promote an event sponsored by a shoe company. We like the placement. (photo © XAM)

Click on the links below to read our previous stories of MAMUTT Arte and MUJAM and to learn more about their work in Mexico City:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/2011/09/20/m-city-in-m-city-polish-stencillist-in-mexico/

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/2011/05/07/video-premiere-broken-crow-in-mexico/

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/2011/03/04/broken-crow-a-mexican-travelog/

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/2011/03/09/broken-crow-a-mexican-travelog-part-ii/

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/2011/02/05/roas-magic-naturalism-street-arts-wild-kingdom-in-mexico/

 

 

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Fun Friday 02.17.12

Woo Hooooooooo! Street Art and graffiti shows are hopping tonight ya’ll! With shows in Chinatown, Dumbo, and Williamsburg, you’re going to have to take the train and the bus if you want to catch it all.

1. Cake and Don Pablo Pedro at Mighty Tanaka (DUMBO)
2. “All Talk” Group Show at Pandemic (Williamsburg, BK)
3. “Snowblind” at Klughause (Chinatown)
4. “Ocean Size” at Kunsthalle Galapagos Gallery SATURDAY 2/18 (DUMBO)
5. “What I Know,” curated by Jason Andrew
6. ” The Permanent Collection Volume II: My Own Private Serpico,” English Kills Gallery
7. Kraftwerk Retrospective at MOMA in April
8. William Thomas Porter – Splendid Cycles (VIDEO)
9. Connor Harrington “Black Herds of the Rain” (VIDEO)
10. JAZ in Mexico City with MAMUTT (VIDEO)
11. Nuria Mora in South Africa (VIDEO)

Cake and Don Pablo Pedro at Mighty Tanaka (DUMBO)

We’ve interviewed Cake this week, and Don Pablo Pedro when he wasn’t in shows, and we can assure you that “Inside Out” is about all the disgusting little bits you keep inside. Tonight they’re out at Mighty Tanaka.

Cake. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here

“All Talk” Group Show at Pandemic (Williamsburg, BK)

“Some of New York City’s boldest anti-heros, cynics and preachers” – Say no more! Tell me where to sign. “All Talk” is the new group show at Pandemic Gallery opens today with the participation of: Aakash Nihalani, Andrew H. Shirley, Cassius Fouler, Destroy & Rebuild, Gabriel Specter, Isabel Lasala, J. Ralph Phillips, Jenna Hicock, Jesse Edwards, Map, Merk, and NohJColey.

Aakash Nihalani (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

“Snowblind” at Klughause (Chinatown)

We’re gonna start calling it SLUGHOUSE because their first 3 shows have been heavy hitters for such a small scrappy gallery at the foot of the Manhattan Bridge, near a Police Precinct, and yet in damn near darkness. The concept for tonights show is cool, but what’s cooler is CARNAGE, the magazine by Ray Mock, one of the best graffiti photogs on the street today. Oh, also, Martha Cooper is in the show. See ya there!. “Snowblind” opens today with the participation of Martha Cooper, Ray Mock, Alexander Richter, Mike P, Bob Barry,  Oscar Arriola, Graham Shimberg, Michael Fales, and Jesse Edwards.

For further information regarding this show click here.

“Ocean Size” at Kunsthalle Galapagos Gallery SATURDAY 2/18 (DUMBO)

Yo, we checked this one out as it was going up yesterday – It’s worth it and Toronto based Street Artist and fine artist Troy Lovegates just killed it with this brand new piece which we’re showing you a detail of below.

Troy Lovegates. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Also happening this weekend

“What I Know,” curated by Jason Andrew – The Bushwick arts leader who makes art happen, Mr. Andrew curates a 40 person show at NYCAMS (New York Center for Art and Media Studies), opening tonight. Download the PDF here

English Kills Gallery Permanent Collection opening Friday night : ” The Permanent Collection Volume II: My Own Private Serpico,” the second installment of works from the English Kills Permanent Collection featuring David Pappaceno, Don Pablo Pedro, Cleon Peterson, Steven Thompson, Brent Owens, Vilaykorn Sayaphet, Hiroshi Shafer, Joe Borelli, Frank Stella, Peter Dobill, Andy Piedilato, Jim Herbert, Tyrome Tripoli, Kevin Brady, Jenn Brehm, Kevin Regan, Giles Thompson, Jeff Clark, Mike Olin, Shane Heinemeier, Dan Taylor, Lenny Reibstein, Tescia Seufferlein, Andrew Ohanesian, Andrew Hurst, Austin Thomas, Evan Ryer, Gary Cullen

 

Kraftwerk Retrospective at MOMA in April – Tickets on Sale Wed 2/22

The live presentation “Kraftwerk-Retrospective 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8″ will explore their pioneering electronic music and each of their eight, groundbreaking studio albums with a unique set of projected images (some in 3-D ):

The music called electronic was basically created by Kraftwerk, who began four decades ago and whose influence and flat out appropriated music appears in work by these artists, to name a few: Jay-Z, Coldplay, Afrika Bambaata, Chemical Brothers, Pink Floyd, Fatboy Slim, New Order, Fergie, Ladytron, Missy Elliott, Franz Ferdinand, Thompson Twins, and yes, McDonna.

William Thomas Porter – Splendid Cycles (VIDEO)

Creater and builder of the famous “F*ck Bike 001” now on view at the Museum of Sex show “F*ck Art”, here is a video following William Thomas Porter around on his preferred form of transportation.  “I wouldn’t call them mutants,” he says of his bike caricatures, “because that would make them sound ugly. It’s more like creating this… splendid form.”

Connor Harrington “Black Herds of the Rain” (VIDEO)

JAZ in Mexico City with MAMUTT (VIDEO)

Nuria Mora in South Africa (VIDEO)

 

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Fun Friday 10.21.11

Fun-Friday

1. RADICAL! at Munch Gallery Tonight
2. Ryan Ford at Factory Fresh Tonight
3. Get Your Smashing Pumpkins on At Crest Arts Saturday
4. Rob Andrews at English Kills Saturday
5. Skullphone Curates “Pure Logo” at New Image Art Saturday (LA)
6. Homo Riot at Hold Up Gallery (LA) (NSFW)
7. Loving You Was Crazy Shit (VIDEO) by Swedish Street Artist Nils Petter Löfstedt
8. SEGO in Mexico City (VIDEO)

RADICAL! at Munch Gallery Tonight

Albany based Street Artist Radical! has his first solo show, “Upside Down Frowns” opening  today at the Munch Gallery in Manhattan.

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Radical! in Coney Island, Brooklyn. Summer 2011 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more information regarding this show please click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=25600

Keith Schweitzer of MANY filmed and edited this time lapse of Radical! getting up in Coney Island:

Ryan Ford at Factory Fresh Tonight

Ryan Ford’s solo show “Don’t Try To Play Me Like An Indoor Sport” opens today at Factory Fresh in Bushwick, Brooklyn. We are very happy to see this esteemed gallery back after a long Summer hiatus.brooklyn-street-art-WEB-ryan-ford-factory-fresh-gallery

From the gallery’s press release: “An artist known for comic symbolic abstraction, Ford delves a bit deeper into his psyche while titillating the mind with streaks of quiet violence and provocative tranquility”

For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=25621

Get Your Smashing Pumpkins on At Crest Arts Saturday

This Saturday is for carving pumpkins and the right place to do this venerable Autumn tradition is in the garden patio at Crest Hardware in Williamsburg. Franklin the Pig will be hosting and probably eating pumpkin guts that spill out of your jack-o-lantern. There’s a carving contest too and you’ll have some pre-Halloween fun before going out to get smashed.

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Says Joe the Impresario: “Come on by, have a glass of cider (with rum, if you want) check out the creativity and enjoy what fall should be all about”

For more information regarding this event click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=25682

Rob Andrews at English Kills Saturday

Performance and Visual Artist Rob Andrews’ solo show “Door Work” opens on Saturday at English Kills in Bushwick, Brooklyn. Promptly at 8:00 PM Mr. Andrews will begin his performance of Ant-Bird 2.

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From the gallery’s press release: “Ant–Bird 2, is a ritual designed to open a spiritual and metaphysical door using the power of blood, sweat, spit, and the vocal power of a human chorus”

For more information regarding this show please click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=25672

Skullphone Curates “Pure Logo” at New Image Art Saturday (LA)

In Los Angeles, New Image Art Gallery group show “Pure Logo” opens on Saturday. This show is curated by Skullphone.

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From the gallery’s press release: “PURE LOGO explores the omnipresence, necessity, form and functionality of logos as they metamorphose to communicate within increasingly brief discourses”

For more information regarding this show please click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=25672

Homo Riot at Hold Up Gallery (LA) (NSFW)

El Angeleno Bad Boy Homo Riot solo show “Fist Pump” opens on Saturday at Hold Up Gallery.

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Homo Riot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

From the the gallery press release: “Homo Riot’s message started out as a “fuck you” to the supporters of Prop 8, but has morphed into something larger and more profound; seen now as an emblem of pride and strength to the gay community”

Photographer and BSA collaborator Carlos Gonzales visited the artist’s studio while he was prepping for his show and he shares these behind the scenes images with BSA readers: Possibly NSFW.

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Homo Riot (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Homo Riot (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Homo Riot (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Homo Riot (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

For more information regarding this show please click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=25660

Loving You Was Crazy Shit (VIDEO) by Swedish Street Artist Nils Petter Löfstedt

SEGO in Mexico City (VIDEO)

A new video from Gonzalo Alvarez at MAMUTT and Filmaciones de la Ciudad

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Jetsonorama on the Rez, ROA in Mexico (Video)

On the Navajo Reservation the built environment tends more toward the horizontal than say, Manhattan.  The similarity is that the man made structures for both are constructed on soil first belonging to the proud tribes of people we now call “Native Americans”.

brooklyn-street-art-jetsonorama-navajo-reservation-2 Mary Reese, by Jetsonorama (photo © courtesy of the artist)

Arizona based Street Artist Jetsonorama calls the Navajo Rez home and it is here where he plans most of his installations of wheat-pastes.  The flat lands and sun parched structures, sometimes crumbling back into the dust, provide a suitable open-air gallery for his photos.  The images are not somber, rather they are pulsing with life and possessing some urgency as if to remind you that these places are very alive and life stories are unfolding here.

These recent pieces are at the Cow Springs Trading Post. Judging from the scene, not much trading takes place there nowadays but Jetsonorama enlists its walls one more time to display the inhabitants of the area.

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“Deshaun”, Jetsonorama.  (photo © courtesy of the artist). “While installing at cow springs, we met a local youth named Deshaun.  His skateboard broke while he was showing us a trick.  We’re going to get him another one but he doesn’t know that yet.  Thanks for the love Deshaun” Jetsonorama

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Bryson with his nephew Owen. Jetsonorama (photo © courtesy of the artist)

ROA EN MEXICO : Un Video Nuevo

Belgian Street Artist ROA visited Mexico in January (see “ROA’s Magic Naturalism”) and now we have a video of his large installation in Mexico City. Whether in the detritus of the big metropolis or the bucolic country landscape, his unique and now iconic images of dead and alive animals rendered in perfect monochrome palette are never out of tune with their surroundings. Perhaps one key element in achieving this sense of context is ROA’s insistence on using as subjects the animals native to the land where he is painting.

ROA was invited by the art promoter MAMUTT ARTE in collaboration with the Antique Toy Museum Mexico (MUJAM). In the country for 3 weeks, ROA left  about 15 murals in various locations like Mexico City, Guanajuato and Puebla and also collaborated with Mexican artists Saner & Sego.

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VIDEO Premiere : Broken Crow in Mexico

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Video-Still-Broken-Crow-en-mexicoHere it is – a fantastic documentary-style short about Street Art duo Broken Crow’s first trip to Mexico City and some of the stencil based installations they undertook as guests of MAMUTT Arte and the Antique Toy Museum of Mexico (MUJAM). We don’t usually see this level of sophistication in a graffiti/Street Art video, so these guys are taking it up a notch.

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As you may remember from the two missives (1) (2) we posted in March for their Mexican Travelog, Broken Crow painted a total of five murals in different locations in D.F. The new video, which we proudly debut here, shows some of their work along with a very personal insight into their relationship as friends and painting partners. The larger piece entitled “Robot Thief” drew a regular crowd during it’s installation, while some of the smaller pieces were a more personal scale.

Congratulations to the Broken Crow gents and to Filmaciones De La Ciudad for making such a compelling and insightful piece. Enjoy.

Another point of interest in the video is the placement of “Robot Thief” next to a huge installation by Street Artist ROA, who also worked with the esteemed team of Roberto Shimizu of MUJAM and Gonzalo Alvarez of Mamutt Arte during his visit to Mexico previously. With friends/fans/promoters like Shimizu and Alvarez, international Street Art is quickly gaining a solid foundation in a city already blessed with a rich arts and cultural scene, historical and modern.

Music by CAV3 cav3.bandcamp.com/

Check out BrokenCrow.com

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Broken Crow: A Mexican Travelog Part II

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Broken-Crow-Mexican-Travelog-header2

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Broken-Crow-WEB-Mexico-copyright-Broken-Crow-lion-animationHere’s an update for the trip to Mexico City by Street Art duo Broken Crow, who have been hitting up some walls in this gigante city of 30 million.

Guests of El Museo del Juguete Antiguo México (The Antique Toy Museum) in collaboration with MAMUTT Arte, John Grider and Mike Fitzsimmons are taking in the local color and creating some of their own.

Says John about the lion and lion cub piece they worked on all day Tuesday, “Today we’re painting the perfect spot for the perfect stencil.”

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Broken Crow process shot (photo © Broken Crow)

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The brand new finished piece by Broken Crow. (photo © Broken Crow)

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A cell phone shot of the owl that will be watching over cars in the basement parking lot. Broken Crow (photo © Broken Crow)

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Broken Crow. When you are in Mexico City you really can’t pass up an opportunity to see a live Luchadores match. (photo © Broken Crow)

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We’re really looking forward to seeing this finished piece after the scaffolding comes down today. (photo © Broken Crow)

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A couple of friends who are waiting for their place on stage. (photo © Broken Crow)

With special thanks to Roberto Shimizu of MUJAM and Gonzalo Alvarez of Mamutt Arte

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All images copyright of and courtesy of Broken Crow

www.toymuseummexico.com

www.koralie.net
http://www.supakitch.com/
http://www.brokencrow.com/

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Broken Crow : A Mexican Travelog

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Broken-Crow-Mexican-Travelog

Minneapolis Street Art duo Broken Crow are in Mexico City for the first time to install a number of new pieces with Street Artists SupaKitch and Koralie.  Guests of El Museo del Juguete Antiguo México (The Antique Toy Museum) in collaboration with MAMUTT Arte, John and Mike invite the BSA family to tag along with these impromptu snaps as they discover inspiration on the streets of D.F.  So far they are pretty blown away by the stuff they’ve seen in the museum and in the streets.  It will be exciting to see how it affects their output on walls.

With special thanks to Roberto Shimizu of MUJAM and Gonzalo Alvarez of Mamutt Arte

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John calls this “Your Morning Inspiration”Brooklyn-Street-Art-Broken-Crow-Mar2011-Our-new-friends

A look inside a closet at the Antique Toy Museum

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“El Enmascarado de Plata” (The Silver Masked Luchador)

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Roberto and Mike mugging for the camera. What’s the Spanish translation for mind on the money and money on the mind”?

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A little blurry but it’s a cool detail from a larger piece Mike found in the museum.

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Here’s the view down from the scaffolding as Broken Crow was scoping out the new gigante piece they started today.  We’ll show you the progress on the next Mexican Travelog!

BSA>>>>><><><>><>>>BSA>>>>><><><>><>>>BSA>>>>><><><>><>>>BSA>>>>><><><>><>>>

All images copyright of and courtesy of Broken Crow

www.toymuseummexico.com

www.koralie.net
http://www.supakitch.com/
http://www.brokencrow.com/


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