All posts tagged: Burning Candy

BSA Film Friday: 07.11.14

BSA Film Friday: 07.11.14

Brooklyn-Street-Art-740-Auckland-Al-Fresco

 

BSA-Video-Friday3-Jan2014-b

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. Auckland’s Al Fresco Festival
2.”Where The Food Grows” by Noah Throop
3. Herakut: You Are A Marvel.
4. Pils – Automotywacja (Motivation)
5. Rowdy – “Black Cab To Rehab” by Creative Urban Industries

BSA Special Feature: Auckland’s Al Fresco Festival

A fresh look at Al Fresco and the pentameter of motion here as New Zealands own public/private community based street art festival came back for its second iteration this May. A nicely polished piece like this is the product of a lot of work, inspiration, and organizing and a shout out to Ross Liew and the Cut Collective and Cleo Barnett for good work.

Where The Food Grows by Noah Throop

“Having the hens on fresh pasture lets them express their chicken-ness”

Usually on our Film Friday section we include one short film or video not related to Street Art, Graffiti or Urban Art. Often it is a video to welcome the weekend and cheer you up with some silly, fun content. This time we’d like to share with you a short film about FOOD. Food right? Well food is a very complex topic, from what we eat to where we eat to where the food is grown and how it reaches our tables and eventually our mouths. At at time when small family farming is almost gone from our modern production of food and some city neighborhoods can’t even get access to a grocery store, here is a documentary portrait of a small family farm in Byron Bay, NSW Australia. It’s worth a conversation about where the food grows.

 

Herakut: You Are A Marvel. From LeBasse Projects

“We must all work to make the world worthy of it’s children.”

Agreed. By the way, Herakut is a marvel.

Pils – Automotywacja (Motivation)

Legal or illegal, dudes are still painting man. Remember all those trains back in the day NYC? This is  Polish rapper Pils singing about motivation in 2014, yo. Maybe he is in Rzeszów?

Disclaimer: we don’t know what the lyrics are saying so if there’s a swear word, sorry.

Rowdy – “Black Cab To Rehab” by Creative Urban Industries

And finally, a crocodile cartoon that will remind you of New York traffic.

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London Calling : Fresh Art from the Streets

London is looking alive and on top of things at mid-winter, with a great variety of materials and techniques, imaginative styles and of course varying results, according to your tastes. During a quick trip on a somewhat blizzardish day, photographer Geoff Hargadon found “tough conditions: snowy, cold as f***, and a camera battery that refused to stay charged.” Tough going for the intrepid Street Art photog you see. Of course the upside of inclement weather is that no one is outside to obscure your shot. Except the falling snow, that is.

Vhils (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

From the comfort of you warmly glowing flatscreen, this selection of pieces looks like Street Art in London is largely mural based, right now, as much of the scene continues to be. The players are more or less familiar to your eyeballs, with a few newbies on the scene.

Enjoy these exclusive shots just for BSA readers. And special thanks to Geoff for his heroism and for sharing these scenes with us.

Shok-1 with RemiRough (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Local favorite Stik shows what may be a lady in a burka in this coupling. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Stik (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Stik, simple, and effective. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Calm (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

This sculptural installation appeared during the London Olympics, the arrows of the gods falling like rain and piercing the side of this building. The installations around the city included javelins, shot puts, bows and arrows and is called “Gifts of the Olympic Gods”.(photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Nasa . Milo Tchais (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Obey looking completely graphic while the snow falls. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

This dude doing a head spin is by Run. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

finDAC (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Jimmy C (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

David Walker (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

El Mac (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

The Frenchman C215 is in the window (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Phlegm brings one of his creatures into the street dimension, looking like he is ready to inspect somebody’s backpack.  (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Phlegm (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Excellent use of the front of this bus by Phlegm. Might mess up the visibility though. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

ROA’s prickly friend looks startled. Could be excited about the new super sewer for London.  (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

D*Face crushes a car . Invader . Obey (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Burning Candy is awfully monochromatically romantic in a digital sort of way.  (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Burning Candy and a sliced screen series from BomK Liliwenn (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Canvaz. Sort of like Warhol portraits of Darger’s Vivian girls, but that’s just me. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Amigo . Malarky . Milo Tchais (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

 

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A Monster Mash on the Streets

“I have never seen a greater monster or miracle in the world than myself.”

Michel Eyquem, seigneur de Montaigne (1533–1592)

Seeing a monster on the street can make you pick up your pace a little.

Especially if it is a dark windy autumn night and the block you are on has no working street light. And if the  leaves and garbage and random pieces of plastic are swirling in the air and clattering into cluttered little piles in the corners of doorways. Here’s an eclectic collection of spooks and skeletons and wild-eyed beasts created by today’s Street Artists and shot by photographer Jaime Rojo that may make your march along the footpath just a little more mysterious and monstrous as the wind picks up and you rush to your home for safety.

Dave Kinsey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Steiner (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Vampire Cloud (photo © Jaime Rojo)

John Lurie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

TY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nick Walker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

BRLRS (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Buff Monster (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Buff Monster (photo © Jaime Rojo)

You know, a lot of people around the office like Echidna but I always think she has an empty sort of expression on her face that makes me wonder what she’s thinking. Michael DeNicola (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nervous updates Barbarella. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Evil World (photo © Jaime Rojo)

MOR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lover (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Good to see that the Raven knows love when he sees it. Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Left Handed Wave looks like he might have had a couple while in costume. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

J (photo © Jaime Rojo)

J (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Burning Candy does a horror theme. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Tony’s Gallery Presents: Burning Candy “Fight Fire With Fire” (London, UK)

Burning Candy
brooklyn-street-art-burning-candy-tonys-gallery-4BURNING CANDY
Fight Fire with Fire
8th July – 25th August
Preview: 7th July

Fighting & Happiness, can they really go together? Well Chris Eubank used to talk about ‘the art of fighting’ and the cat & mouse scenerio endured by Police Departments and Graffiti Crews worldwide might just prove they can. Whilst London’s 2012 Olympics may appear to offer healthy competition, harking back to pitting one individual City or Country against each other, Burning Candy sense this one could be rigged and the only answer is to “Fight Fire With Fire.” The need to strike out or rise above conflict in a recreational sense is something that Burning Candy feel compelled to do. Their Art like most sporting events is defined by it’s location. Take the River Lea host to many a BC production, this may become more of an arena than the Olympic Stadium that it runs alongside. Burning Candy are coming indoors for a moment to take stock before the fight really begins…

Tony’s
68 Sclater st | London |E1 6HR
0203 5565201

info@tonysgallery.com

www.tonysgallery.com

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FUN FRIDAY 04.08.11

Fun-FridayThis weekend brings a Spring bounty of delicious  Street Art related openings in many cities across this great country of ours. But FIRST, this OLD SKOOL Romanic Boogie Down Production …

Pump Up the Sculpture Jam from SAM3

Sticker Phiends in AZ

Brooklyn-Street-Art-WEB-Sticker-Phiends-April-2011

Tempeh is a soy product and meat substitute originally from Indonesia. Tempe is a city in Arizona that is hosting the 4th giant Sticker Phiends show tonight. Stickers continue to grow in influence in Street Art and in private collections in black books and refrigerator doors and this is a cool show that gives them away and sells them. They have limited edition “Sticker Phiends” tee-shirts designed by Brooklyn street art collective Robots Will Kill. Also cold beer. Possibly tempeh too because Chris RWK is a good veggie.

brooklyn-street-art-mad-one

FREE HANDOUTS provided by our sponsors
ALL ART for $ale!
Limited Merch for $ale!
Drinks with ID – 21+

Opens at 8pm April 8th!
Cartel Coffee Lab
25 w. University Dr.
Tempe, AZ.
480-225-3899

Some of the names include:

Abcnt, Age, Dolla, DumperFoo, Dissizit/Slick, 123 Klan,Griffin One, Clown Soldier, Mad One, Mat Curran, MBW, 20 MG, Obey, Pez One (U.K.), Sike’, U.W.P., Seizer One

*********************************************************************

Martha Cooper Remixed

Brooklyn-Street-Art-WEB-Martha-Cooper-Remix-Carmichael-Aril-2011

How & Nosm interpret Martha Cooper’s original photo from the 1970s (both photos © Martha Cooper)

The Carmichael Gallery will be throwing a memorable opening party for Martha Cooper’s REMIX show and, lazy hyperbole aside, this one is one NOT to miss.

brooklyn-street-art-martha-cooper-remix-carmichael-gallery

Photographs by Martha Cooper

with

Original remixes of these photographs in a range of media by Aeon, John Ahearn, Aiko, Bio, Nicer & B-Gee, Blade, Blanco, Mark Bode, Burning Candy, Victor Castillo, Cey, Cekis, Claw, Cosbe, Crash, Dabs & Myla, Anton van Dalen, Daze, Dearraindrop, Jane Dickson, Dr. Revolt, Shepard Fairey, Faust, Flying Fortress, Freedom, Fumakaka, Futura, Gaia, Grotesk, Logan Hicks, How & Nosm, LA II, Lady Pink, Anthony Lister, The London Police, Mare 139, Barry McGee, Nazza Stencil, Nunca, José Parlá, Quik, Lee Quinones, Kenny Scharf, Sharp, Skewville, Chris Stain, Subway Art History, Swoon, T-Kid, Terror161 and more.

Carmichael Gallery

5795 Washington Blvd
Culver City, CA 90232

April 9 – May 7, 2011

Opening Reception: Saturday, April 9, 6-8pm

Click on the link below for more information regarding this show:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=19900

Cern YMI in Greenpoint by Gandja Monteiro

ROA at White Walls in SF

Brooklyn-Street-Art-WEB-ROA-White--Aril-2011

Image of ROA in Salton City (© and courtesy of White Walls)

In San Francisco ROA will have his opening at the White Walls Gallery with his iconic paintings of nature’s marginalized animals in large scale. Ever the hard worker, ROA paints non stop year round all over the globe on surfaces that are challenging, like this one on the side of a mobile home. If you have only seen his art on line and if you are in San Francisco this Saturday, it’s your turn!

For more information about this show contact the gallery.

White Walls Gallery

835 LARKIN ST.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA. 94109

Phone: 415.931.1500

Chor Boogie in Washington DC

While the Rich Man Party of NO! brings the country to a halt in the Capitol, Chor Boogie will be bringing much needed healing color to Washington DC at The Fridge Gallery.

brooklyn-street-art-WEB-Chor-boogie-the-fridge-gallery

The Fridge Gallery Presents: Chor Boogie “This Aint No Place For No Hero” (Washington, DC)

For more information about this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=19952

Chor Boogie is an artist, a conceptual genius, a street romantic, a master of illusion and technique, Chor Boogie is an original. His works can be described as having healing effects by his unique and unmatched use of color, which brings greater meaning and understanding to his works. Every vibrant piece has a story attached to it. Chor Boogie’s colorful paintings are attracting A-list celebrities, art galleries and museums. Originally from San Diego, the artist known as Chor Boogie currently resides in San Francisco but is an internationally known artist and has traveled extensively to exhibit his work around the world.

The Fridge is located at

516 8th Street, SE

REAR ALLEY

Washington, DC 20003

David Ellis and Blu in a collaboration of a loop video from 2009

Yo Son the Boyz from Queens are Comin out With New Jams Next Month!

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Carmichael Gallery Presents: Martha Cooper “Remix” (Culver City, CA)

Martha Cooper
brooklyn-street-art-martha-cooper-remix-carmichael-gallery

Photographs by Martha Cooper

with

Original remixes of these photographs in a range of media by Aeon, John Ahearn, Aiko, Bio, Nicer & B-Gee, Blade, Blanco, Mark Bode, Burning Candy, Victor Castillo, Cey, Cekis, Claw, Cosbe, Crash, Dabs & Myla, Anton van Dalen, Daze, Dearraindrop, Jane Dickson, Dr. Revolt, Shepard Fairey, Faust, Flying Fortress, Freedom, Fumakaka, Futura, Gaia, Grotesk, Logan Hicks, How & Nosm, LA II, Lady Pink, Anthony Lister, The London Police, Mare 139, Barry McGee, Nazza Stencil, Nunca, José Parlá, Quik, Lee Quinones, Kenny Scharf, Sharp, Skewville, Chris Stain, Subway Art History, Swoon, T-Kid, Terror161 and more.

Carmichael Gallery

5795 Washington Blvd

Culver City, CA 90232

April 9 – May 7, 2011

Opening Reception: Saturday, April 9, 6-8pm

For Immediate Release:

Carmichael Gallery is pleased to announce Martha Cooper: Remix, an expansive group show featuring highlights from Martha Cooper’s photographic archive and works by over 50 artists who have created their own unique interpretations of her iconic, historically significant imagery. There will be an opening reception for the exhibition on Saturday, April 9 from 6 to 8pm with Martha Cooper and several of the participating artists in attendance. The exhibition will run through May 7, 2011.

Martha Cooper, Photographer of Art on the Streets for Six Decades

Written by Steven P. Harrington, this article is featured in tasj vol ii – issue v.

The daughter of a Baltimore camera store owner, Martha Cooper’s romance with photography began in the 1940s when bobby-soxers and penny loafers were the sign of edgy youth culture. Her dad, an amateur photographer himself, gave his small girl a camera and together they hit the streets in search of adventure. “Yeah, my father used to take me out and we would take pictures. That’s what I thought photography was…we were just looking for pictures,” she recalls. Six decades later, Cooper is still looking for pictures; meanwhile, many works from her archive are cited as pivotal recordings of the birth of hip-hop culture and its plastic art form, graffiti.
During the cultural upheavals of the 1960s, Cooper earned a Bachelors of Art degree in Iowa, taught English for the Peace Corps in Thailand and rode a motorcycle from Bangkok to obtain a graduate degree at Oxford. As a freelancer and staff photographer in Japan, Maryland and Rhode Island in the early 1970s she moved to the media and art center of New York City to catch bigger fish. Landing a job on the staff of The New York Post in 1977, she discovered that the resistant and competitive boys club of photographers there were reluctant to countenance this scrappy young woman shooting hard news stories and Studio 54 celebrities.
Hungry for discovery, Cooper would spend her time to and from assignments in bombed-out neighborhoods, where she took pictures of kids entertaining themselves with games they devised on the street, often with the humblest of materials. It was during one of those trips that she stumbled on graffiti and the members of its community. She met a young boy who suggested she photograph the work she was seeing, then showed her a stylized drawing of his name, or piece, in his notebook.
Then he asked her if she wanted to meet “The King”.
Following this lead to Brooklyn, Cooper met Dondi, the citywide-famous graffiti writer who kept a published photo of hers in his black book because its background contained one of his graffiti throw-ups. Cooper quickly realized that she had stumbled into a lively street culture and became an avid student of the teen writers she befriended. By the time she took her last news picture for the New York Post in 1980, her primary desire was to capture as many pieces, tags, and trains as she possibly could find. Today, she remarks on her near-obsessive devotion to documenting New York’s graffiti: waking before dawn to hit the street, waiting five hours for a freshly painted #2 train to pass with the sun at her back and countless secret adventures with vandals in train yards, evading transit police in order to pursue a shot.
Joining efforts with fellow graffiti photographer, Henry Chalfant, Cooper proposed putting together a book of their documentation. The pair endured multiple rejections from publishers while lugging around a big “dummy” book with their pictures glued to the pages. Eventually, however, they landed a deal and Subway Art was published in 1984. Although not an immediate success, it came to sell half a million copies and established itself as a holy book for fans, aspiring artists and art historians worldwide. By the time the 25th anniversary edition was published in 2009, generations of graffiti and street artists had been influenced by it and the hip-hop culture Cooper and Chalfant had captured had gone global.

In the intervening years, Martha Cooper never stopped shooting. Her love of serendipity on the street and the exploration of cultures led her to publish thousands of photos in books such as R.I.P.: Memorial Wall Art, Hip Hop Files 1979-1984, We B*Girlz, Street Play, New York State of Mind, Tag Town, Going Postal, and Name Tagging. Her work has been exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide and published in numerous magazines including National Geographic, Natural History, and Vibe. While she is still shooting graffiti, street art and the occasional break dance competition today, Cooper’s current project involves documenting people and events in Sowebo, a drug-riddled neighborhood in her birthplace of Baltimore.

Steven P. Harrington is editor-in-chief of BrooklynStreetArt.com and co-author (with Jaime Rojo) of Brooklyn Street Art and Street Art New York, both by Prestel Publishing. He and Jaime Rojo are also contributing writers on street art for The Huffington Post.

About Carmichael Gallery:

Founded in 2007 by husband and wife team Seth and Elisa Carmichael, Carmichael Gallery focuses on a select group of artists breaking ground in painting, mixed media, photography and sculpture. Their annual program consists of a series of solo and group exhibitions that document the progress of these artists.

For information on current, past and upcoming shows, visit www.carmichaelgallery.com. For additional information and press materials on this show, please contact the gallery at art@carmichaelgallery.com and

+1 323 939 0600 and Andi Baker at andi@carmichaelgallery.com.

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Martha Cooper, Photographer of Art on the Streets for Six Decades

Martha Cooper landed in LA yesterday and will spend the next week installing her photos and their remixed new versions beside them, even flanking hers like stereo speakers. Since the press release has gone out we thought we’d share with you the bio written by Steven P. Harrington and the promo photo by Jaime Rojo which will appear in a special issue of The Art Street Journal dedicated entirely to her to come out this week.

brooklyn-street-art-Jaime-Rojo-Martha-Cooper

Martha and Pablo at home, with a portrait of her sitting on a train car with camera in hand painted by Os Gemeos overlooking the scene. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Martha Cooper, Photographer of Art on the Streets for Six Decades

Written by Steven P. Harrington, this article is featured in The Art Street Journal vol ii – issue v.

The daughter of a Baltimore camera store owner, Martha Cooper’s romance with photography began in the 1940s when bobby-soxers and penny loafers were the sign of edgy youth culture. Her dad, an amateur photographer himself, gave his small girl a camera and together they hit the streets in search of adventure. “Yeah, my father used to take me out and we would take pictures. That’s what I thought photography was…we were just looking for pictures,” she recalls. Six decades later, Cooper is still looking for pictures; meanwhile, many works from her archive are cited as pivotal recordings of the birth of hip-hop culture and its plastic art form, graffiti.

During the cultural upheavals of the 1960s, Cooper earned a Bachelors of Art degree in Iowa, taught English for the Peace Corps in Thailand and rode a motorcycle from Bangkok to obtain a graduate degree at Oxford. As a freelancer and staff photographer in Japan, Maryland and Rhode Island in the early 1970s she moved to the media and art center of New York City to catch bigger fish. Landing a job on the staff of The New York Post in 1977, she discovered that the resistant and competitive boys club of photographers there were reluctant to countenance this scrappy young woman shooting hard news stories and Studio 54 celebrities.

Hungry for discovery, Cooper would spend her time to and from assignments in bombed-out neighborhoods, where she took pictures of kids entertaining themselves with games they devised on the street, often with the humblest of materials. It was during one of those trips that she stumbled on graffiti and the members of its community. She met a young boy who suggested she photograph the work she was seeing, then showed her a stylized drawing of his name, or piece, in his notebook.

Then he asked her if she wanted to meet “The King”.

Following this lead to Brooklyn, Cooper met Dondi, the citywide-famous graffiti writer who kept a published photo of hers in his black book because its background contained one of his graffiti throw-ups. Cooper quickly realized that she had stumbled into a lively street culture and became an avid student of the teen writers she befriended. By the time she took her last news picture for the New York Post in 1980, her primary desire was to capture as many pieces, tags, and trains as she possibly could find. Today, she remarks on her near-obsessive devotion to documenting New York’s graffiti: waking before dawn to hit the street, waiting five hours for a freshly painted #2 train to pass with the sun at her back and countless secret adventures with vandals in train yards, evading transit police in order to pursue a shot.

Joining efforts with fellow graffiti photographer, Henry Chalfant, Cooper proposed putting together a book of their documentation. The pair endured multiple rejections from publishers while lugging around a big “dummy” book with their pictures glued to the pages. Eventually, however, they landed a deal and Subway Art was published in 1984. Although not an immediate success, it came to sell half a million copies and established itself as a holy book for fans, aspiring artists and art historians worldwide.

By the time the 25th anniversary edition was published in 2009, generations of graffiti and street artists had been influenced by it and the hip-hop culture Cooper and Chalfant had captured had gone global.

In the intervening years, Martha Cooper never stopped shooting. Her love of serendipity on the street and the exploration of cultures led her to publish thousands of photos in books such as R.I.P.: Memorial Wall Art, Hip Hop Files 1979-1984, We B*Girlz, Street Play, New York State of Mind, Tag Town, Going Postal, and Name Tagging. Her work has been exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide and published in numerous magazines including National Geographic, Natural History, and Vibe. While she is still shooting graffiti, street art and the occasional break dance competition today, Cooper’s current project involves documenting people and events in Sowebo, a drug-riddled neighborhood in her birthplace of Baltimore.

********************

Steven P. Harrington is editor-in-chief of BrooklynStreetArt.com and co-author (with Jaime Rojo) of Brooklyn Street Art and Street Art New York, both by Prestel Publishing. He and Jaime Rojo are also contributing writers on street art for The Huffington Post.

********************

brooklyn-street-art-martha-cooper-remix-carmichael-gallery

Photographs by Martha Cooper

Martha Cooper ; Remix

with

Original remixes of these photographs in a range of media by Aeon, John Ahearn, Aiko, Bio, Nicer & B-Gee, Blade, Blanco, Mark Bode, Burning Candy, Victor Castillo, Cey, Cekis, Claw, Cosbe, Crash, Dabs & Myla, Anton van Dalen, Daze, Dearraindrop, Jane Dickson, Dr. Revolt, Shepard Fairey, Faust, Flying Fortress, Freedom, Fumakaka, Futura, Gaia, Grotesk, Logan Hicks, How & Nosm, LA II, Lady Pink, Anthony Lister, The London Police, Mare 139, Barry McGee, Nazza Stencil, Nunca, José Parlá, Quik, Lee Quinones, Kenny Scharf, Sharp, Skewville, Chris Stain, Subway Art History, Swoon, T-Kid, Terror161 and more.

Carmichael Gallery is pleased to announce Martha Cooper: Remix, an expansive group show featuring highlights from Martha Cooper’s photographic archive and works by over 50 artists who have created their own unique interpretations of her iconic, historically significant imagery. There will be an opening reception for the exhibition on Saturday, April 9 from 6 to 8pm with Martha Cooper and several of the participating artists in attendance. The exhibition will run through May 7, 2011.

Click on the link below to read BSA interview with Martha Cooper:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=19366

Carmichael Gallery

5795 Washington Blvd

Culver City, CA 90232

April 9 – May 7, 2011

Opening Reception: Saturday, April 9, 6-8pm



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Images Of The Week 01.09.11 : From Miami With Love, Part 2

Images Of The Week 01.09.11 : From Miami With Love, Part 2

Brooklyn-Street-Art-IMAGES-OF-THE-WEEK_05-2010

Following up on Part 1 last Sunday, here are more amazing kick-arse photos from the various street artists who took over Wynwood in Miami last month.  This weeks interview on the streets of the Miami features work by Burning Candy, Clare Rojas,Dustin Spagnola, Fumero, Invade, Joe Iurato, Kid Acne, LMA Cru, Mark of the Beast, Michael DeFeo, Miguel Paredes, ML, Nunca, OverUnder, Shepard Fairey, Skewville, VyalOne, and 305=2011=131,Vincent Luca,Shadowman,Luciano 3.

brooklyn-street-art-obey-jaime-rojo-01-11

Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-clare-rojas-jaime-rojo-01-11Clare Rojas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-clare-rojas-detail-jaime-rojo-01-11Clare Rojas Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-305-2011-131-jaime-rojo-01-11305=2011=131. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-burning-candy-jaime-rojo-01-11Burning Candy (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-burning-candy-kid-acne-jaime-rojo-01-11Burning Candy, Kid Acne and Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-fumero-jaime-rojo-01-11Fumero (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-invader-jaime-rojo-01-11Invader (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-joe-iurato-jaime-rojo-01-11Joe Iurato (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-lma-cru-jaime-rojo-01-11LMA Cru (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-mark-of-the-best-ishmael-jaime-rojo-01-11Mark Of The Beast Ishmael and Dustin Spagnola (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-miguel-paredes-jaime-rojo-01-11Miguel Paredes (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-miguel-paredes-detail-jaime-rojo-01-11Miguel Paredes. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-michael-defeo-jaime-rojo-01-11Michael Defeo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ML-jaime-rojo-01-11Vincent Luca,Shadowman and Luciano 3 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-nunca-jaime-rojo-01-11Nunca (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-overunder-jaime-rojo-01-11Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-skewville-jaime-rojo-01-11Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-VyalOne-Mark-of-the-beast-jaime-rojo-01-11VyalOne and Dustin Spagnola (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Images of the Week 12.12.10

Images of the Week 12.12.10

Brooklyn-Street-Art-IMAGES-OF-THE-WEEK_05-2010

Our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Burning Candy, Deeker, DsCreet, Earl Greyhound, Goya, Jimmy Snatch, KARMA, Kill, Nineta, Paul Richard,Plasma Slug, Shin Shin, Skewville, Tek33, and UFO

brooklyn-street-art-burning-candy-tek33-dscreet-jaime-rojo-12-10-web-1

Burning Candy Tek 33 and Dscreet at Factory Fresh Gallery (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Burning Candy Tek 33 and Dscreet at Factory Fresh Gallery (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A cluster of original pencil drawn faces by an anonymous artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Whatever you say, Paul! Paul Richard (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A B&W photograph of a boy by an anonymous artist. And by the way, Brooklyn trio Earl Greyhound Rocks! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Deeks offers this withering assessment: “Good For Nothing”. And there’s a little pink Plasma Slug too. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Skewville sayz: “You are not in Kansas anymore” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Goya and UFO (photo © Jaime  Rojo)

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A Death Panel of some sort. Kill (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nineta (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dashing through the snooooww.  ShinShin (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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KARMA “Be Kind To One Another Because Most Of Us Are Fighting A Hard Battle” Dublin, Ireland (photo © Jimmy Snatch)

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Images Of The Week 11.21.10

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Our Weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring; ASVP,  Burning Candy, Cake, Castro, Chris Stain, Clown Soldier, Deekers, DsCreet , Ellis G., Fumero, Futura ,Gaia ,Goya ,Hush , Imminent Disaster ,Infinity ,K-Guy , Kirby ,KRSNA ,OverUnder ,QRST ,Quel Beast ,Samson ,Showpaper ,Skewville , Sten & Lex ,Tek33 ,VUDU ,  and XAM

brooklyn-street-art-faile-bast-WEB-jaime-rojo-11-10-webphoto © Jaime Rojo

The block party in Bushwick provided by Factory Fresh Gallery and the app called All City turned out a number of new Brooklyn Street Art pieces on a block long installation, complete with friends, fans, and a taco stand. Included in the offering was this surprise collab with Faile and Bast, auspiciously appearing the morning of the event like a pre-Christmas gift wrapped in razor wire. The news of the piece travelled fast and while Ad Deville couldn’t find his red carpet, he did post a velvet rope to hold back the crowd. That didn’t stop Futura from climbing on top of his car to get the perfect shot.

brooklyn-street-art-WEB-futura-bast-faile-jaime-rojo-11-10-web1Futura takes a photo of the Bast and Faile collaboration at the Factory Fresh Block Party (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faile-bast-detail-jaime-rojo-11-10-webBast and Faile detail © Photo © Jaime Rojo

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A box of chocolates from many of the newer Street Art confectioners; ASVP, Cake, Overunder, Quel Beast, Clown Soldier, Fumero, Krsna, QRST  (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-cake-qrst-clown-soldier-overunder-fumero-asvp-jaime-rojo-11-10-webDetail Photo © Jaime Rojo

brooklyn-street-art-chris-stein-jaime-rojo-11-10-web Chris Stain busted out a new piece (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-gaia-samson-castro-jaime-rojo-11-10-web Gaia, Samson, Castro Photo © Jaime Rojo

brooklyn-street-art-imminent-disaster-goya-ellis-g-jaime-rojo-11-10-webImminent Disaster, Goya, Ellis G Photo © Jaime Rojo

brooklyn-street-art-kirby-mike-jaime-rojo-11-10-webBurning Candy, Tek33, Dscreet (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-deekers-jaime-rojo-11-10-webDeekers is hanging out on the corner watching the rest of the proceedings (photo © Jaime Rojo)

And here we move to a British invasion of sorts with Geishas and Primates from Hush and K-Guy respectively.  XAM has been installing some pretty cool looking bird houses around town equipped with LED lights on their porches that illuminate when the sun sets. Infinity and VUDU’s pieces for the Showpaper box project adds to the conversation on the street with a beaming signal tower atop the box.

brooklyn-street-art-k-guy-jaime-rojo-11-10-3-webK-Guy’s recent “Primates” piece, including this one that appears to be pretty fresh, have been appearing around Brooklyn suddenly. Apparently its meaning is reference to the growing perception of hypocrisy in the Catholic church, particularly as pertains to pedophilia coverups, its position on contraception, gay rights, among other issues.  brooklyn-street-art-k-guy-jaime-rojo-11-10-12-web

K-Guy (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-hush-jaime-rojo-11-10-9-webHush (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-hush-jaime-rojo-11-10-10-webHush (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-infinity-vudu-jaime-rojo-11-10-webInfinity and Vudu piece for “Community Serviced” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-infinity-vudu-detail-aime-rojo-11-10-webInfinity detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-xam-jaime-rojo-11-10-webXAM “CSD Dwelling Unit 1.6” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-xam-jaime-rojo-11-10-close-webClose up of the birdhouse by XAM  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-samson-sten-lex-jaime-rojo-11-10-webSamson, Sten & Lex (photo © Jaime Rojo)

And finally the 800 pound pink gorilla in the group, Samson from Albany, began his audacious cityscape project directly beside his hero/shero Sten & Lex. The neighbor next door liked it so much Samson will be back to continue the piece – which is part of a much grander scale piece on urban decay, development, and renewal that he hopes to stage in the future.

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Fun Friday 11.19.10

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Hush “Found” Show – New York Debut Tonight

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“I’ve always been an artist in some form, or certainly always creative – it’s a lifestyle, I don’t think you choose art, its something you do, it is life. Well my life,” Hush explains to BSA. This week he’s been putting work up in the Lower East Side of Manhattan and tonight is his NYC solo exhibition debut at The Angel Orensanz Foundation For Contemporary Art. We’re not missing it.

172 Norfolk Street
New York, NY 10002
Tel: 212.529.7194

And there is a free print giveaway- read the details here: http://hushstudio.blogspot.com/

Rae McGrath at Brooklynite Saturday: Unconventional Conviction

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The gallery is completely re-painted and Rae is standing on his head waiting for it to dry. Unconventional is right – the last two years as a ringmaster and co-proprietor of Brooklynite Gallery have put him squarely in the middle of a tornado of punchy Street Art and a panoply of personalities – always with a very defined focus, high level of quality, and total conviction. As a curator, marketer, and host, this modern carny is a font of new ideas and angles, backed up with straight up elbow grease.

Now Rae is taking a minute or two to let people see what snaps his elastic mind when it comes to making art. You can see how the curator and the artist merge in this poppy geometric collection; Bast, Miss Bugs, Dain, Ana Peru Peru Ana, Various & Gould and others each have a shout out. It’s all here; the dense graphic punch, the vibrant blue collar reverence, the deliberate slicing and refracting off a funhouse mirror ball.  Always a surprise and always a reward, artist Rae MaGrath’s debut is bound to be a funkadelic bootilicious jam.

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‘UNCONVENTIONAL CONVICTION” this Saturday November 20 6 to 9 pm at Brooklynite Gallery on 334 Malcom X Blvd, Brooklyn,  NY 11233.  Tel 347 405 5976

Bushwick Block Party Saturday

Tacos!  And freshly painted street art by some of your favorite names on a street in Brooklyn. What’s not to like?

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Factory Fresh and app maker All City Street Art are throwing a party for you and all you have to do is show up on the block Saturday afternoon.

Brooklyn Street Artists Paint a 200 foot wall and the Burning Candy Crew debut their new film!

• Live painting
• Calexico taco cart
• DJs
• Art for sale from participating artists
• Burning Candy’s Dots film premiere

More info at the Factory HERE

Richard Hambleton New York — in London

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James Brown was the Godfather of Soul, Aretha is the Queen of Soul, Michael was the King of Pop, and Jennifer Lopez is a judge on a TV talent show. Now we learn that one of New York’s first recognized street artists, having blanketed the L.E.S. with disconcerting shadow figures in the 1980s, is actually called “The Godfather of Street Art”.  Thank Allah you don’t have to be the one in charge of handling these honorariums because you know that has got to be a thankless task. On the occasion of “Richard Hambleton New York”, The Dairy Gallery released this video.

Richard Hambleton. Image Courtesy of the Dairy Gallery

And Speaking of Dairy, Have You Seen the new Ron English Cow Painting?

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Factory Fresh In Collaboration With All City Presents: Bushwick Block Party (Brooklyn, NY)

Block Party
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Brooklyn Street Artists Paint 200 Foot Wall, Burning Candy Crew Debut Film at Bushwick Block Party

All City, the international street art and graffiti app, is partnering up with Factory Fresh gallery in Bushwick, Brooklyn to open up 200 feet of wall and turn it over to Brooklyn street artists. Chris Stain, Gaia, Skewville, Imminent Disaster and several guests artists will be tackling the project. Tek33 and Dscreet of London’s Burning Candy crew will also be in town painting and premiering their film Dots.

All City Block Party
Saturday, November 20
2:00 PM, Dots premiering at 7 PM
Factory Fresh – 1053 Flushing Avenue – Bushwick, Brooklyn

* Live painting
* Calexico taco cart
* DJs
* Beer
* Art for sale from participating artists
* Burning Candy’s Dots film premiere

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