All posts tagged: Times Square

Clément Martin : Wishes & Hopes for 2017

Clément Martin : Wishes & Hopes for 2017

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As we near the new year we’ve asked a special guest every day to take a moment to reflect on 2016 and to tell us about one photograph that best captures the year for him or her. It’s an assortment of treats for you to enjoy and contemplate as we all reflect on the year that has passed and conjure our hopes and wishes for the new year to come. It’s our way of sharing the sweetness of the season and of saying ‘Thank You’ for inspiring us throughout the year.

The self-possessed savoir faire of a Frenchman in New York is not so surprising, but try keeping up with photographer Clément Martin who literally slept on the streets of New York for a month and see how elegant you will remain. As the official photographer for conceptual street performance artists Boijeot & Renauld, Clément has been traveling and shooting on the street for the last three years in Tokyo, Brussels, Berlin, Venice, Paris, Zurich, Dresden, Basel, and of course New York. Since Times Square is such a famous place to be for New Year’s Eve Clément shares with BSA readers this scene of repose suitable for enjoying the spectacular view with opera singer Dan Cory singing Carmen classics in bed.


Artists: Boijeot & Renauld
Location: Times Square, New York
Photograph by Clément Martin

Each “performance” is unique, and for the New York one called “Hotel Empire” we used living units (a furniture assortment that includes beds, tables and chairs) to occupy public space in the city, setting up camp in various neighborhoods, regularly moving from one street to another.

The artists (and I) regularly move the furniture by hand from one stop to another and we offer all pieces of furniture- available to anyone who wants to take a nap, have a coffee or simply to chat. The performance brings intimacy in the public space, since the furniture can be (and really is) used by everyone.

You get to interrupt the city rhythm by sitting or laying down, but on a social interaction level, it also offers a chance to the people involved to create a shared memory

“Mental graffiti” some will call this.

What I’m sure of is that on this October day in Times Square we offered the opportunity to the man in this picture to live in this place that never sleeps for a few minutes- part of the 732 continuous hours we lived on New York City streets for this performance.

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Sharon Matt Atkins and Faile in Times Square : 15 for 2015

Sharon Matt Atkins and Faile in Times Square : 15 for 2015

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What are you celebrating this season? We’re celebrating BSA readers and fans with a holiday assorted chocolate box of 15 of the smartest and tastiest people we know. Each day until the new year we ask a guest to take a moment to reflect on 2015 and to tell us about one photograph that best captures the year for him or her. It’s our way of sharing the sweetness of the season and saying ‘thank you’ for inspiring us throughout the year.

Sharon Matt Atkins is Vice Director, Exhibitions and Collections Management at the Brooklyn Museum and has been responsible for organizing some amazing Street Art related shows in the last few years that brought the work of Street Artists to throngs of museum audiences. Matt Atkins organized the richly engaging FAILE: Savage/Sacred Young Minds this summer and the Stephen Powers: Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To a Seagull) installation currently on display. These two exhibitions with deep roots in graffiti and Street Art followed on the 2014 heralded successes of Dr. Atkins, who also organized Swoon: Submerged Motherlands and the Brooklyn presentation of Ai Weiwei: According to What?


Times Square, New York City
August 17, 2015
Artist: Faile
Photograph by Sharon Matt Atkins

My pick for 2015 has to be FAILE-related! I had the great pleasure working with them on their Brooklyn Museum exhibition, FAILE: Savage/Sacred Young Minds, which was on view July 10th – October 4th (big thanks to BSA for making the introduction years ago!).

FAILE’s exhibition featured their Temple along with their collaboration with BÄST, The FAILE and BÄST Deluxx Fluxx Arcade. They also created new paintings and sculptures for the exhibition. As if this wasn’t enough to keep them busy, they also worked with Times Square Arts on Wishing on You, a monumental, hand-carved, painted, and interactive prayer wheel situated in the heart of Times Square.

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On view to coincide with the Brooklyn Museum exhibition, this project created the perfect synergy between their indoor installations and their ongoing commitment to creating surprising and captivating experiences in our urban environment.

~ Sharon Matt Atkins

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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FAILE “Wishing On You” At The Flashy Crossroads of NYC

FAILE “Wishing On You” At The Flashy Crossroads of NYC

FAILE Takes Times Square with Giant Prayer Wheel. Come Give it a Spin!

A folk-art pagoda sitting quietly in the basin of a valley richocheting with electronic propaganda and consumption worship, the newest public piece by Brooklyn’s street art duo FAILE has a few mysteries to reveal to the river of tourists flowing around it and through it. You may need a place to pray in this land of fake Muppets, Three Card Monte and thong-strung patriotic painted ladies. “Wishing On You” draws on European, Asian, and American forms and culture, a tribute to traditions, myths, and big screen adventure.

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Faile. Process shot at their studio in preparation for their Times Square installation in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Covered with images evocative of Times Square’s racier past and American dreams flooded in commercial fonts and appetizing invitation, this new rotating piece may remind you of their other prayer wheels and whet your appetite for their current enormous and interactive solo show at The Brooklyn Museum till October 4th. Try to rotate this hunk of pop and pulp and you’ll need a strong woman to help, but when you do, something glittering will surely happen. Promise.

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Faile. Process shot at their studio in preparation for their Times Square installation in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A marathon of preparation, here you can see some behind-the-scenes production shots leading up to the 12+ hour installation that began at 8 Sunday night and continued through the morning in time for the Faile Unveil at 11 am in 90 degree weather yesterday.

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Faile on the skids. Process shot at their studio in preparation for their Times Square installation in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Don’t tarry if you want to see this carved wood reminder of snake oil salesmen, saucy iniquity, and occasional divinity at NYC’s crossroads. “Wishing on You” is a limited run till September 1.

Join BSA In Conversation with Faile at Brooklyn Museum on September 24th.

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Faile. Process shot at their studio in preparation for their Times Square installation in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faile.”Wishing On You” In collaboration with Times Square Arts.  Times Square, NYC. August 17, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faile.”Wishing On You” In collaboration with Times Square Arts.  Times Square, NYC. August 17, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faile.”Wishing On You” In collaboration with Times Square Arts.  Times Square, NYC. August 17, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faile.”Wishing On You” In collaboration with Times Square Arts.  Times Square, NYC. August 17, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faile.”Wishing On You” In collaboration with Times Square Arts.  Times Square, NYC. August 17, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faile.”Wishing On You” In collaboration with Times Square Arts.  Times Square, NYC. August 17, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Patrick Miller and Patrick McNeil of Faile.”Wishing On You” In collaboration with Times Square Arts.  Times Square, NYC. August 17, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faile.”Wishing On You” In collaboration with Times Square Arts.  Times Square, NYC. August 17, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Faile “Wishing on You” a collaboration with Times Square Arts is currently on view at the Times Square Plaza on Broadway Plaza between 42nd and 43rd Streets. This exhibition will be on view until September 1st, 2015.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
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Images of The Week: 06.23.13

Here’s our weekly interview of the street, this week featuring Creepy, Chris RWK, David Smith, Enzo & Nio, How & Nosm, JR, Pennygaff, Shai Dahan, This is Awkward, Veng RWK, and Werds.

Top image > Enzo & Nio are now property managers? This is confusing. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pennygaff did this tribute as gravestone on the last remaining chunk of Monster Island, a very lively and engaging artists performance space/ gallery / hangout in Williamsburg, Brooklyn –  now demolished to make way for glass and steel highrises. Median rental cost of a 1 bedroom apartment in Williamsburg is $3,150, compared to about $1,500 10 years ago. That’s progress. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

David Smith hit up Williamsburg and Greenpoint with about 100 of these animals this week. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

David Smith (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Veng and Chris from RWK (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Werds (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How & Nosm did a gig with a clothing brand and it debuted in Times Square this week. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This Is Awkward (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shai Dahan in Blackpool, England. (photo © Rakin Rahman)

Shai Dahan in Blackpool, England. (photo © Shai Dahan)

Shai Dahan in London, Engalnd. (photo © Shai Dahan)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Creepy at work. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Creepy (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Riverside Park, NYC. 2013 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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JR Debuts on Broadway and You Were the Star on This Stage

In a New York minute, the Curtain Opens and Closes on “Inside Out”

The daily snaking lines of now famous fans occupying a slice of the Times Square footprint had their last chance at the Big Time in NYC as last weeks show rolled to a close, and the large eyeball van rolled away. For days this limited engagement Broadway hit and circus-like attraction helped people in and out of the photo studio to have their portrait captured and possibly plastered directly as Street Art. The Parisian photographer and Street Artist JR, well known for creating large scale black and white installations that engage and celebrate everyday people knew that this high profile image-centric hub would be a draw, but the near-continuous lines must have been a surprise.

JR Inside Out Project. Times Square, NYC. May 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Here where Broadway crosses Seventh for five blocks and slow-moving upward-looking people swim in a sea of logos and interactive screens, where actual New Yorkers are outnumbered by tourists, there was something reassuring about the black and white polka dotted nostalgia of an old-timey mobile photo booth that gave Times Square a nostalgic “Guys and Dolls” revival feeling, even as electronic eyes from corporations, federal, state, and city agencies, and your neighbors phone all surveilled every smile, every preen in 2013. For this multi-day installation, many lucky pedestrians were invited to engage in public art and became the star, sometimes with the director of this production walking among them, helping plaster posters and posing for pictures himself.

JR Inside Out Project. Times Square, NYC. May 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pulling themselves away from bright furry full-sized cartoon characters and the Naked Cowboy, multitudes of photo-friendly Millenials lined up for their fifteen minutes and pulled along mom and dad and maybe grandma for a chance to be on the billboards of the Great Broad Way.

And then, in a New York minute, it was gone – another ethereal Street Art moment captured before it disappeared.

JR Inside Out Project. Times Square, NYC. May 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JR Inside Out Project. Times Square, NYC. May 2013. A team member helps with the photo booth. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A newly minted star descends the stairs. JR Inside Out Project. Times Square, NYC. May 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JR Inside Out Project. Times Square, NYC. May 2013. After a long time waiting in line the time for her close-up finally arrives. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JR Inside Out Project. Times Square, NYC. May 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JR Inside Out Project. Times Square, NYC. May 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JR Inside Out Project. Times Square, NYC. May 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JR Inside Out Project. Times Square, NYC. May 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Images of the Week: 05.12.13

Here’s our weekly interview of the street, this week featuring B.D. White, Col Wallnuts, Dan Witz, Greg LaMarche, Jon Hall, Josef Kristofoletti, JR, Mr. Penfold, Mr. Toll, and W.

The inaugural wall from a new program called “The Big Brush” by commercial outdoor advertising company Colossal went up this week in Brooklyn featuring a work by 1980s/90s New York graffiti writer SP One,  who is now better known as collage fine artist Greg LaMarche. The company figures at least tangentially into the street art scene by virtue of the sheer amount of work they provide for a large number of painting artists who create about 300 walls per year, all hand-painted. They even have an apprenticeship program for painters who would like to learn how to do this work. “Big Brush” will be unleashing a slew of new art on walls that are not zoned to be commercial, so they’re actually inching a little closer to Street Art than before.

For his part, LaMarche told us he was pretty blown away as he watched his original small collage go up over the course of a couple of days, painstakingly recreated on this same wall that had the D*Face piece not too long ago – with the view of the Williamsburg Bridge to the right. We can’t wait to see the video that was created, as we hear that some interesting techniques were employed in the shooting.

“Basically it’s a re-creation of a collage I made last year – it was on the cover of a magazine from Paris called Graffiti Art magazine,” said LaMarche as he guided himself up and down in a cherry picker to get shots of his work. “So it’s crazy that it was on the cover of that magazine this spring and now it’s on the side of a building in Brooklyn. The last year or two has been pretty amazing. I’ve painted some large murals myself but to have some of my smaller work, the collage work, realized in this larger format is really incredible.

Greg Lamarche. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: The original work was made with all hand-cut small pieces that are glued to canvas, right?
Greg LaMarche: Onto a board, yeah. It’s funny because when we did the ratio calculations – the actual piece is 15″ wide by 20″ tall and the way they set this up the width was actually perfect. These guys are professional and they know what they are doing. And artists like this are a dying breed – it seems like there’s no challenge that they can’t handle.

JR. The culmination of the “Inside Out” project that drew to a close Friday in Times Square, NYC. Congratulations to all the volunteers. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

B.D. White (photo © Jaime Rojo)

W (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dan Witz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dan Witz. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Penfold (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Josef Kristofoletti. Panama City. (photo © Josef Kristofoletti)

Jon Hall (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Col Wallnuts (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. New York City. May 2013 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Top image > Greg Lamarche (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Chris Jordan : A Bold Light Artist Hits Iconic Icelandic Church

Rafmögnuð Náttúra: The Hallgrimskirkja Church in Reykjavik, Iceland

It’s not that light artist Chris Jordan didn’t find the sweeping supersonic jet-shaped façade of the church inspiring. He just wanted to make it visible again to the people in town.

Hallgrímskirkja, the Lutheran church in the center of Reykjavík, with it’s soaring steeple and outstretched wings it has been an architectural icon since it’s completion in 1986 and anyone first laying eyes on the largest Icelandic church is usually impressed by it’s command and design.  And yet, somehow even pivotal architecture can disappear before our eyes due to familiarity and it may take a visionary talent like Jordan to bring it back to our attention with animation, mapping, color, and pattern.

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” (photo © Enki)

From his home in New Yorks’ Chinatown, Jordan, who teaches interactive design at Baruch College and New York University, talks about his work in the same way that Street Art is often credited in the urban environment: art as activation.  “Activating is about changing people’s perceptions of overlooked or invisible spaces. A building can become an archetype, invisible, like for a New Yorker, for example, the Statue of Liberty. You look at it, and it disappears into the thousands of times you’ve already seen it. So for me, this light project was so exciting because here’s this massive landmark church that this whole town can’t see anymore.. made completely fresh and new. To see that reflected back at me through the faces of viewers was exhilarating.”

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” (photo © Enki)

That observation perhaps was the pinnacle of his Icelandic experience in February when he camped out in front of the church over four days in the back of a box truck with his collaborator Marcos Zotes, a handful of computers, three projectors, and a low budget. Together they created a series of site-specific video performances that brought to life Zotes’ idea for a project called Rafmögnuð Náttúra.

The two had met while Jordan was performing his 24 hour timelapse of Hurricane Irene inside an engineered cloud at New York’s Bring to Light Festival last October. Zotes asked if Jordan would like to collaborate on a project to illuminate the 150 foot wide façade of a church in for the Winter Lights Festival in Iceland.  Since Jordan has over the last decade created installations appearing at MoMA, The New Museum, The Whitney, The Museum of Natural History, The Chelsea Museum, in Times Square, and many unusual places in between, he had a good idea what cool stuff he would like to do. With the free help of other artists, software designers, and even NASA, Jordan brought a mind-blowing façade to the church that Zotes had only imagined.

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” (photo © Enki)

“We collaborated on how we could, with a very limited budget, create something spectacular for the festival,” explains Jordan.  “We knew that the majority of the budget would be going for projectors so we called our friends up to help us with creating animation sequences that could be mapped to the facade, in triple-HD resolution.”

“We developed a workflow and a template for each animator to follow; then compiled the animations together into a final 15-minute composition. In addition, I contacted friends at NASA for solar imaging data, and created animations using graphic and solar elements. The dream was to have northern lights over the building with the accompanying solar data displayed. Although the solar and earth weather didn’t collaborate, the animations of the sun in a dark cold city on this Norse façade were very appropriate and powerful.”

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” (photo © Enki)

Jordan’s work over the years has included explorations into memory, and elements of photography, film, interactivity, and projections. We talked with Jordan about traveling to Iceland, transparent ideas, the importance of community, and what a light artist has to go through to reactivate an icon.

Brooklyn Street Art: Can you talk about the trip to Iceland?
Chris Jordan: We went to Iceland with just one day before the opening. The Icelandic people were incredibly accommodating, and set up three massive projectors inside a box truck, with a massive piece of glass mounted on it. The box truck became our projector-heated cabin in the center of Reykjavik for four days. Location is everything! It was a great setup. The projectors were aligned and from there I mapped the content using the software MadMapper by Garage Cube. Garage Cube are also friends of mine and they  helped me troubleshoot the tech issues the day before. The opening event had the band For a Minor Reflection accompany us, right after the mayor of Reykjavik introduced the festival to the audience.

But the day before this we went through myriad technical issues. Many times I thought this was going to either look horrible, or crash altogether. There was no budget for a backup computer, or to test the entire setup beforehand. Luckily, Iceland has an early sunset, so we gleaned a couple crucial extra hours to configure everything. The mapping was completed literally seconds before the mayor spoke. It all went off smoothly and the people that braved the intense horizontal-downpour cheered.

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” (photo © Enki)

Brooklyn Street Art: You managed to transform a landmark into a completely different light using your creativity.  Doesn’t that feel pretty powerful?
Chris Jordan: Yes. It was pretty fantastic we were able to do this on such a small budget. It absolutely required a community to make happen. When our main computer failed, the Icelandic underground came to the rescue. One person there offered graphics cards he’d had in a drawer. Another brought us snacks from a nearby cafe. That community effort is really what made this project powerful for me.

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” (photo © Enki)

Brooklyn Street Art: You were given no budget whatsoever, aside from a plane ticket and 3 projectors. How do you plan for a live performance with the inevitable technical issues?
Chris Jordan: Years and years of failure. I read an Edison quote the other day, “If you want to succeed, double your failure rate”.  I’m also a huge proponent of transparency, modularity, and scale. These tenets allow me to see unique solutions to problems, and find compelling solutions. Light art is still maturing as a public medium, as last November’s Occupy Wall Street “Bat-signal” projections attest. It’s a wide-open field for creative expression.

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” (photo © Enki)

Brooklyn Street Art: Without revealing your trade secrets, is it true you plan to introduce more community interaction into your future work?
Chris Jordan: Always. There’s an axiom I live by: “There is no art without politics”. You either choose to engage it, or you choose political apathy. This ties in with ideas around real-time performance and feedback. I hate the word “rendering”, as it equates to “pouring concrete” on ideas that demand continuing dialog. “Trade secrets” imply hoarding of knowledge. I only want to work with transparent ideas and accessible technologies that ‘spotlight’ the individual’s role in society through creativity. I try to live an open-source life.

Brooklyn Street Art: What role does community play in this project and in your philosophy?
Chris Jordan: I love interacting with communities and to give them the control to create dialogue. This fascinates me, and informs my work constantly. My next long-term outdoor installation is on Governor’s Island, where I’ll be engaging the broadest spectrum of people on the planet (New York) in playing and building, using buckets and stop motion photography. For me it’s all about the community. Without it, we are making monoliths to our egos.

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” (photo © Enki)

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” (photo © Enki)

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” (photo © Enki)

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan on the back of their box truck. (photo © Enki)

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” – Chris at work on his live creations. (photo © Enki)

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra”. Mission control trailer. (photo © Enki)

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” (photo © Enki)

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” (photo © Enki)

Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan “Rafmögnuð Náttúra” (photo © Enki)

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With very special thanks to Enki for sharing this incredible photographic story.

Rafmögnuð Náttúra, a concept by Marcos Zotes created by Marcos Zotes and Chris Jordan

We would also like to recognize the other creators and contributors to the project:
Animators Thessia Machado, Noa Younse, Andrea Dart and Steven Tsai
Performer Coco Karol
Videographers Azmi Mert Erdem and Raghul Sridharan
Photographer Enki
and the music group For a Minor Reflection

 

 

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Hush “Twin” Opening Tonight at New Image Gallery (Barring Rapture)

“That’s Great, It Starts With An Earthquake”

Well folks it’s the End of the World, as we know it. How’re you feeling? Actually, according to a certain sect of clairvoyant Christians today is Judgement Day, and the end of the world is not until October, so you should still forget about that Christmas Layaway Plan you have at Walmart.

New York subways and buses have been pummeled for weeks with pulp novel style posters impugning the good name of the Devil and overweight puff pastry people from the Midwest have been milling around Times Square in sensible shoes telling us that repenting from our sins is pretty much going to be the only way out of the Late Great Planet Earth. As usual, these wild eyed tourists never make it out to Brooklyn, so our borough is going now to Hell – which will be big news to the Hasidic population.

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HUSH (photo © Todd Mazer)

For those of you unwashed who are still here after the 6 o’clock earthquakes roll through each time zone across God damned America we bring you the gloriously sanctified beauty of “Twin”, the new HUSH show at that den of iniquity called New Image Gallery in God forsaken West Hollywood.

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HUSH (photo © Todd Mazer)

“Tagging, Graf, Street Art and art; each is always a choice, an action,” HUSH told us a couple of years ago when discussing his work, and his open approach to borrowing from comic books, graffiti, and traditional Japanese iconography is what makes his work modern.

Internalizing and interpreting the energy from Krazy LA has been a dream for a free  expressionist like HUSH, who likes to throw everything at the wall – tagging, painting, collage, – deconstructing and reconstructing until it achieves balance.  “I’m big on progression and I’m always looking at how to take my work forward, pushing it while still retaining pointers back to previous works,” says the artist. With a number of shows and countries and street pieces under his belt, the British native is also quietly achieving a mastery of his technique, as urban turns urbane in the finely sprayed misty glow surrounding these peaceful idyllic visages, rising from the blue cacophony.

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HUSH (photo © Todd Mazer)

Marsea Goldberg, a wild and fine former Brooklyn gal, has been looking out for and championing the new talent on the graffiti/Street Art/fine art scene at New Image since the mid nineties, including artists like Bäst, Cleon Peterson, Clare Rojas, Date Farmers, Ed Templeton, Jo Jackson, Neck Face, Os Gemeos, and Retna, so she knows what she is looking for and knows how to create a charged environment for artists to stretch in.

Hush is a fantastic artist and he has a down to earth, hard working vibrant spirit,” Marsea explains, “I’ve liked his work for a long time – The first time I saw his work was at the “Cans Festival” which Banksy put on in London 4 years ago. When I saw his colorful, ornate murals in the long tunnel I was beyond impressed. The interesting thing about Hush’s art is the combination of influences.”

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HUSH (photo © Todd Mazer)

For his part, HUSH is taking the opportunity seriously, “It’s great to be at New Image because of its history… I’ve always admired the rawness and energy of the place and Marsea’s commitment to whatever this art movement is.”

As his work mutates and configures across mediums, one might wonder how much of this has meaning to him and whether it is an involuntary stream of favorite symbols and techniques combined and recombined. “I feel like my works have matured and I’m creating my own visual language, even though it’s probably only me who understands it,” he says smiling.

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HUSH (photo © Todd Mazer)

“It’s funny – I’ve had this work in my head for the last few years but it’s just fitting into the story now. I think I’ve got until the year 2014 in paintings now but I’ll have to take you through it in real time… I’m looking forward to showing how it all pans out in the future though.” We would love to stick around here on Earth to see how his work turns out in ’14, but there is someone knocking on the door…

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HUSH (photo © Todd Mazer)

Photographer Todd Mazer captured the artist working outside this week on the “Barracuda” wall where Saber and Shepard Fairey did their near iconic flag interpretations. And through Todd’s lense we get to see Hush tagging the gallery walls and the installation underway.

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HUSH (photo © Todd Mazer)

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HUSH “Twin” (photo © Todd Mazer)

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HUSH “Twin” (photo © Todd Mazer)

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The plumbs have just blossomed, but not yet the Sakura. Almost Blue Geishas at the height of springtime’s charm. HUSH, “Twin” at New Image Gallery (photo © Todd Mazer)

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HUSH “Twins” (photo © Todd Mazer)

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This is where it all began for HUSH, who is shown tagging the walls of New Image before “Twins” (photo © Todd Mazer)

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HUSH “Twins” (photo © Todd Mazer)

New Image Art Gallery

7908 Santa Monica Blvd.

West Hollywood, CA 90046

323.654.2192


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Fun Friday 12.18.09

“I Want My Ninja Turtles, and Turn Mommy’s Lights Back On!”

RUN DMC puts BSA in the Holiday Spirit, yo.

MOMO at Nelly Duff

A wheat-pasted fixture on construction sites (usually overhead) in Brooklyn for many years, Momo is now selling work online.
A wheat-pasted fixture on construction sites (usually overhead) in Brooklyn for many years, Momo’s bright geometric overlayed shapes are understated and mute somehow. They don’t seem to have any agenda in their cheerful modernist abstract sort of way.  Now Momo is offering some on the Nelly Duff website.- just click the pic and check them out.

New York Holiday Sightssssss 2009

If you are not from this city, you may not have an opportunity to just walk the streets and see the lights, smell the smells, get yelled at for being in my f*&king way! Ahhhhhhhhhhhh, it’s the holiday spirit, peeeepul!

This guy caught NYC at an exciting time of year and made a pretty good collection of the things you’ll see if you were a tourist in ’09. It includes Rockefeller Center, Madison Square Garden, Macy’s windows, Radio City Music Hall, Lord & Taylor Windows, Saks Fifth Avenue windows and light show, Fuse, Sixth Avenue, Downtown Manhattan, Time Warner Center, Empire State Building, The UNICEF Snowflake, JAF Station Post Office, Grand Central Terminal, Times Square and the Haydenettes Skating Team.  Warning: In this video there are no street-walkers, crackheads, or homeless shelters….

TrustoCorp Sign Sighting

Someone sent us this pic from the West coast.  Looks like TrustoCorp doesn't it?  Hmmmm.
Someone sent us this pic from the West coast. Looks like TrustoCorp doesn’t it? Hmmmm. P.S. BSA doesn’t encourage vandalism. It’s totally not in the Christmas spirit.

Bells are Ringing in My Ears!

Free Print of Manhattan from Jailbreak!

Artist Karen O’Leary made this Manhattan map and married it with a barcode.
Artist Karen O’Leary made this Manhattan map and married it with a barcode. Their extending the contest for a free poster for BSA readers till Dec. 25.  Hooray!

CASIO DEATHBEAT

This isn’t holiday related, but I still feel a little warm and fuzzy at the end.

Don’t ask me who Casio is, I’ve never heard of them, but this video is strangely futuristic, low-fi, and even romantic at the end with the flocks of birds. People have been taking pictures of these birds that swarm around over certain buildings at dusk in Brooklyn for years.  It looks like it is shot around Brooklyn with a cell phone.

They say it was filmed with a vhs-c and dubbed online with a webcam.  Help me out, people, that was English right? Okay I know Casio is the synth, so don’t hit me, but the video portion, dunno. All I know is, you don’t need the latest hi-tech gadgetry to make cool things. Also, it is mercifully short for todays’ short attention spans.

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