All posts tagged: Ema

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.22.14

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.22.14

 

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It’s not all going to the dogs, peeps – it just looks like it sometimes. We start this week with a ferocious one from Zimer, and follow it by a chihuahua that it could probably eat for lunch. Dog eat dog, yo.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring ACNE, City Kitty, Crummy Gummy, EC13, Ema, FAS, Hitnes, Insurgency Inc., Irony and Boe, Kid Acne, Lajaxx, Myth, Not Art, Ozmo, Peter Kirill, Specter, and Zimer.

Top Image >> Zimer (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Irony and Boe Collaboration in East London, UK. June 2014 (photo © Gary Hunter)

Commentary from Gary Hunter, who sent this big dog from London:

“The chihuahua is partly a comment on changing demographic due to development overspilling from the spreading consumerism of nearby financial district Canary Wharf. Located just north of the Isle of ‘Dogs’ in East London the piece is facing ‘Barking’ a town in Essex, just by the A13 a main road in and out of London.

There also used to be a very big Spratt’s (a manufacturer originally from Cincinnati, Ohio) dog biscuit factory nearby, now warehouse apartment conversions. I photographed the ‘model’ (coincidentally called Hunter and owned by London artist Cate Halpin) in great detail in my studio on a very high end Hasselblad digital camera, to bring out every aspect. Irony and Boe then transposed it brick by brick for their painted artwork.

This work is part of ‘Changing Spaces’ a a community cohesion project in east London’s Tower Hamlet’s district, one of the city’s most deprived, yet diverse boroughs – facilitating understanding of the immediate environment, important history, trade and migration.” – GH

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FAS. Please help ID the rest of the tags. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Not Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pete Kirill tribute to the great Sophia Loren. (photo © Cesar Miesses)

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Artists Unknown. Save the elephants! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Specter and Ozmo collaboration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Myth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Lajaxx (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Insurgency Inc (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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City Kitty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Crummy Gummy. In Los Angeles, CA. “I’m a big fan of H.R. Giger and this piece actually made me a little sad. But I thought it was a cool way to reference his passing” Lisa V (photo © Lisa V)

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ACNE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hitnes wanted to create the perfect shade of color to highlight the eye of the bunny for the piece he did on a roof top in East Williasmburg this week. Here is how it all began…this plus a little water. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hitnes. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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EC13 New tile installation in Granada, Spain. June 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kid Acne (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kid Acne (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kid Acne (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kid Acne and Ema are from England and they are visiting NYC and wasting no time on the streets. At the same time they have been showing a very poor judgment with the placing of their pieces by going over many writer’s tags. We like them both but are surprised by their selection of places to wheat paste their art since they are not new to the streets of New York, indeed we might say that they are even veterans of the streets of NYC given this we think they should know better.

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Ema (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ema (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ema (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Summer 2014, Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Rue de Beauce Presents: Florence Blanchard AKA EMA: “Ephemera” (Paris, France)

EMA

A travers des compositions complexes incorporant des éléments inspirés de l’univers du graffiti, du tatouage et de la BD, Florence Blanchard explore les thèmes du symbolisme et de la science fiction. Par son oeuvre, elle immortalise des pensées furtives aspirant s’interroger sur la beauté du transitoire et sur le temps qui passe.

Pour sa prochaine exposition E P H E M E R A, elle donne forme et couleur à un univers précaire et fantastique. Visions oniriques teintées de sensualité et de mystère invitent à se recueillir au sein d’une interface transitoire, entre rêve et réalité. Des personnages imaginaires inspirés d’époques diverses et évoluant dans un décor abstrait nous content une ode narrative, anachronique et surréaliste.

Basée pendant 10 ans à New York, Florence Blanchard est une Pionnière dans l’univers du graffiti français au féminin. Elle adopte le nom Ema au début des années 90 et participe aux événements clés du hiphop américain. Ema expose dans les grandes capitales à New York, Paris, Berlin, Los Angeles. Elle prend part au projet Underbelly à New York, à la TED Women conference à Washington 2010 ainsi qu’à Art Basel Miami Beach.

Rue de Beauce – galerie d’art au format informel – invite régulièrement des artistes à se produire dans le salon d’un appartement parisien au cœur du Marais. Initiée par Michèle Bouhana et Angela di Paolo, la galerie s’est engagée dans la promotion de nouvelles tendances artistiques circulant entre Pop Surréalisme, Urban Art et Dessin contemporain.

RUE DE BEAUCE
présente
E  P  H  E  M  E  R  A

FLORENCE  BLANCHARD  

  

Vernissage : Dimanche 1er Avril 16h – 21h

Du 2 Avril au 10 Mai 2012 sur RDV

3 Rue de Beauce, 75 003 Paris

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Images of the Week 02.12.12

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring 131, Captain Baby, Dan Witz, Dekrd, Don’t Fret, Ema, Entes, Gaia, LNY, Miyok, ND’A, OverUnder, Pesimo, Shida, SSDD, Stikman, and Willow.

Dan Witz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Don’t Fret (photo © Jaime Rojo)

LNY looking wistfully askance. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Willow (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Miyok (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stikman experiments with a glass tile. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ND’A (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dekrd (photo © Jaime Rojo)

SSDD. We have been seeing these cozies all over the city. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shida (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Entes y Pesimo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Captain Baby (photo © Jaime Rojo)

EMA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

131 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

131 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Images of the Week 01.29.12

Images of the Week 01.29.12

The streets have been seeing an uptick in socio-political messages recently, whether because of the Occupy protests, or because artists are exercising their speech in low cost, low-tech, person-to-person methods. The very personal nature of this kind of messaging actually feels impactful when it catches your eye with a sense of intention, grabbing you by the ear and making you think. This week we have Street Art  commentary about housing, class inequality, the abuse of poser, erosion of privacy and fears of a police state. It makes sense that art on the streets is reflecting us back to ourselves.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street; this week featuring Buff Monster, Cash4, Cope, Dirty Teddies, Ema, Enzo & Nio, Essam, Faile, Hush, Ment, Shiro, XAM, and XXX.

ESSAM. A more conceptual culture-jamming series of new signs in certain New York neighborhoods is meant as a way to raise awareness by an Iraq war veteran turned civil libertarian, according to news reports published recently. This sign warns about alleged plans for Police surveillance drones could be ubiquitous in society. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Wolf rides, anyone? Faile (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hush gets to know some of the local neighbors while busy at work in San Francisco (© courtesy Hush)

Hush has been on the street in San Francisco this week (photo exclusively for BSA © courtesy of Hush). Stay tuned for a Hush special feature on Monday of his current show.

Ema (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The billionaire Mayor of New York is taking a hit here from this Street Art poster by Enzo & Nio. Styled as Marie Antoinette, Michael Bloomberg is portrayed as a haughty royal who is disconnected from the rabble, and cares not a wit. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A masters graff wall in Miami (photo © Jaime Rojo)

XAM is addressing the ongoing bank mortgage crisis in the US with this street sculpture installation on Skid Row in Los Angeles (photo © XAM)

Cash4 with Ment (photo © Jaime Rojo)

You see! XXX (photo © Jaime Rojo)

You can always spot the tourist dinosaurs with their fanny packs in Times Square. Dirty Teddies (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Images of the Week 01.08.12 Miami Special Part II

Here is the 2nd half of the Miami images we captured for you from the massive blocks long street installation party called Art Basel this year. Most of these pieces are legal, many are not. You can call them Street Art, but not all are actually on the street and many could also be classified as murals.

Now is a perfect window of opportunity to go see these as many will be buffed in the next few weeks and months, as property owners sell the buildings or decide they didn’t actually dig the art as much as they thought they would. Within a decade or so, this area in Miami will most likely be less enthused with and even hostile toward graffiti and Street Art in general, but the red carpet is laid out at the moment. Artists are flocking from all over the world to jockey for walls, hoping to be seen by potential fans and collectors, or at least to hang out with peers and make new friends. This is a moment on a timeline and, for right now, the colors, patterns, textures, messages and lucid dreams are pulsating on walls everywhere; a mountain of creativity set free.

So here are more than 50 images in our interview with the street, this week featuring 2501, Adjust, AM, Andrew Schoultz, Art Basel 2011, AWR, Bask, Ben Eine, Bik Ismo, Buff Monster, C215, Chris Stain, Clown Soldier, Col, Cope, Dabs&Myla, Des, Ema, Emo, Entes Pesimo, Ethos, Ever, Florida, Gaia, Interesni Kazki, Jade Uno, Jaz, Joe Iurato, Liqen, Miami, Michael DeFeo, Neuzz, Nomade, Nomads, Nunca, Pancho Pixel, Pez, PHD, Pi, el Pancho, Primary Flight, Remote, Retna, Roa, RONE, Shark Toof, Shiro, Smells, Spagnola, Stormie Mills, Vhils, Wynwood Walls, and Zed1.

With special thanks to all the people who helped us out, showed us around and provided insight and background, especially the good folks from Primary Projects and Wynwood Walls.

Liqen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Liqen’s metaphoric mural of miserable corporate finance workers in a labyrinthine maze may have been the singular most powerful and timely image this year.   (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Liqen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

International star Vhils and crew created a few signature portraits using his very original method of destruction and creation, a low relief sculpture that emanates from the wall (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rone’s model looked skyward from a few locations on the street. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shiro (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Now, why is that? Smells Like Junk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ROA and Ben Eine hit up this little corner spot with Primary Flight. The unusual free-standing structure called “The Living Room” has played host to a number of graffiti, mural, and street artists over the last few years, and this year also featured a pop-up piano ensemble performance. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JAZ (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Neuzz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Assume Vivid Astro Focus killed this wall last year and it still looks fresh. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Famed duo Assume Vivid Astro Focus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

New Jersey’s Joe Iurato (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jade Uno . Entes Pesimo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia and C215 appeared frequently with one another this year on the street. This one is bookended by some Nomade posters (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia, C215 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bik Ismo, a custom hot rod, and of course a couple of appreciative dudes. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Zed1 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Despite relative domestic tranquility, sometimes Felix and Ana were not sure if they were seeing the same thing. Ever (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Retna stretched his alphabet tall, and tucked in many tributes to local friends. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Interesni Kazki . Liqen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki and Liqen combined forces on this mural referencing the world wide web. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki . Liqen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Interesni Kazki . Liqen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Michael DeFeo lit up a desolate spot under the highway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ethos (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Emo, PHD, Remote (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Emo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ema (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A killer repetition from Des (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dabs & Myla collaboration with AWR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Col on a bed of seafoam blue (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Stain brought some friends from New York and Baltimore. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This bull head popped out at discrete locations. Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bask bolted to a post. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stormie Mills (photo © Jaime Rojo)

One of the few blatantly political pieces from Spagnola, with additional commentary added by a third party. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This Shark Toof appears to be whispering something to Anthony Lister. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho kind of killed it.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pez is on multiple surfaces everywhere. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nunca (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nunca (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cope crushed repeatedly. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Clown Soldier stands guard at the gate. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Buff Monster . Cope (photo © Jaime Rojo)

2501 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Andrew Schoultz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Andrew Schoultz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

AM (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adjust (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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#7 Ema: 12 Wishes for 2012

#7 Ema: 12 Wishes for 2012



For twelve days we’re presenting twelve wishes for 2012 as told by an alternating roster of artists and BSA readers, in no particular order. Together, they are a tiny snapshot of the people who are part of the street art scene around the world today. Individually, each adds their personal expression of hope for tomorrow.

Today’s wish comes from EMA, the French graffiti writer turned Street Artist and fine artist who spent one decade living in Brooklyn. Whether it’s cans on a decaying wall or finely brushed ink on an acid-free textured paper stock, the no-nonsense dreamer has only one wish for 2012;

“Stay Proud”

EMA’s photo plainly illustrates the changing nature of the ongoing conversation on the street in Brooklyn. © Ema

Read more with BSA and EMA in 2011 here:

“Breuckelen”, We Go Hard : Street Artist EMA

EMA Talks about Brooklyn: “A Place Like No Other in the World”

Street Artist EMA “Back Talk” Conversation

 

 

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Fun Friday 12.16.11

 

1. Play a New Holiday Video Game from Chris Uphues – “Holiday Jingle Rocket”
2. “Rezolution”, a group show at Hive Gallery Tonight (Phoenix, AZ)
3. “Paranormal Hallucinations” at Pandemic (Brooklyn, Yo!) (Saturday)
4. David Choe and DVS1 for Nuart 11 (VIDEO)
5. “Images of the Year 2011” From Brooklyn Street Art (Video)
6. VINZ FEEL FREE. Don’t be afraid. Feel Free (VIDEO)

Play a New Holiday Video Game from Chris Uphues – “Holiday Jingle Rocket”

Street Artist Chris Uphues uses his signature characters to create this very entertaining game for you to play with while chugging eggnog and rum today as you drink and drive at your keyboard. Try to keep your sled flying over the houses without being hit by giant blobs of snow! It’s a winter blast!

Make sure to click on the link below to play the game:

http://www.megadoug.com/xmasgame/

“Rezolution”, a group show at Hive Gallery Tonight (Phoenix, AZ)

Chip Thomas AKA Jetsonorama and a number of other artists open today in a group show that is getting a lot of pre-buzz here and on Twitter and FB. It should be a great scene tonight at The Hive.

Chip Thomas and Breeze. (photo © Chip Thomas)

For further information regarding this show click here

“Paranormal Hallucinations” at Pandemic (Brooklyn, Yo!) (Saturday)

Pandemic Gallery has a new show “Paranormal Hallucinations” opening Saturday. including, among others, Deuce 7, Swampy and Egyptian Jason.

Swampy. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A very fun group show to end out the season before everybody goes into the holiday haze, featuring some unsung gems in the Street Art and graffiti scene, as well as others, including CHARLIE MARKS  R.I.P, LLEW  payote, Deuce Seven, Egyptian jason, Matt CRABE, Josh and Amy Shandick, Mikey Big Breakfast, Conrad Carlson, G II, Ryan C. Doyle, Mikey I.T., Tamara Santibanez, Othello Gervacio, Mike. P, and Swampy (above).

For further information regarding this show click here

David Choe and DVS1 for Nuart 11 (VIDEO)

David Choe and DVS1 (Photo Courtesy of Nuart11 © Mookie Mooks)

 

“Images of the Year 2011” From Brooklyn Street Art (Video)

It’s been an excellent year for Street Art all over the world and we’ve had the pleasure of seeing a lot of great stuff from big names to the anonymous. Eye popping, brain-teasing, challenging, entertaining, aspirational and inspirational – it’s all happening at once.  We’ve been walking the streets, meeting the artists, going to shows, curating shows, speaking to audiences, providing walls, and asking questions. It ebbs and flows but never stays the same. With the rise of the Occupy movement this autumn, we’re already seeing an uptick in the number of people taking their messages to the street with a renewed intensity.

VINZ FEEL FREE. Don’t be afraid. Feel Free (VIDEO)

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“Images of the Year 2011” From Brooklyn Street Art (VIDEO)

It’s been an excellent year for Street Art all over the world and we’ve had the pleasure of seeing a lot of great stuff from big names to the anonymous. Eye popping, brain-teasing, challenging, entertaining, aspirational and inspirational – it’s all happening at once.  We’ve been walking the streets, meeting the artists, going to shows, curating shows, speaking to audiences, providing walls, and asking questions. It ebbs and flows but never stays the same. With the rise of the Occupy movement this autumn, we’re already seeing an uptick in the number of people taking their messages to the street with a renewed intensity.

Left to Right: Shepard Fairey in Manhattan, D*Face in LA, Ludo in Chicago, JR in the Bronx, Barry McGee at LAMoCA, Mosstika in Brooklyn. All photos © Jaime Rojo

Let’s take a look at some of our favorite shots, whether from a rooftop in Bushwick, Brooklyn, a block-long wall in Miami, or the “Art in the Streets” show at LA MoCA. As you sample this eye-candy platter, dig the staccato soundtrack made of sounds culled from Brooklyn’s streets by electro duo Javelin, who spent a day in the Red Hook neighborhood collecting sounds and then mixed them in the back of their car. This is the kind of D.I.Y. ingenuity that is fueling the fire in artists neighborhoods all over the world, with people taking their stories and skills directly to the streets. With Javelin as the perfect auditory partner here’s 90 shots by photographer Jaime Rojo from 2011.

The scenes and scenester included here: 5 Pointz, 907Crew, Sadue, Gen2, Oze108, Droid, Goya, UFO, Aakash Nihalini, No Touching Ground, Aiko, Martha Cooper, Anthony Lister, Boom, INSA, Miami, Primary Flight, LA Freewalls, Los Angeles, Kim West, Kopye, L.E.T., Purth, Lisa Enxing, Baltimore, Banksy, LA MoCA, Barry McGee, Blek le Rat, Broken Crow, Albany Living Walls, Chris Stain, Billy Mode, AD HOC Arts, Chris Uphues, Monster Island, Wynwood Walls, Creepy, Brooklyn Street Art, Jaime Rojo, Steven P. Harrington, Dabs & Myla, How & Nosm, Vhils, Dain, D*Face, ECB, El Sol 25, Elbow Toe, EMA, The London Police, Kid Acne, Will Barras, Enzo & Nio, Faile, Bast, Faith 47, Gaia Clown Soldier, General Howe, Hellbent, Herakut, Invader, JA JA, Jaz, Cern, Joe Iurato, Welling Court, John Baldessari, JR, Kenny Scharf, Knitta Please!, LMA Cru, LUDO, Mosstika, ND’A, IRGH, Labrona, Overunder, Nick Walker, NohjColey, Nomade, Occupy Wall Street, Os Gemeos, Veng, Chris, RWK, QRST, Radical!, Rambo, Retna, Gifted, Demon Slayers, Read, Booker, Read More Books, ROA, Shepard Fairey, Shin Shin, Wing, Skewville, Specter, Swampy, Sweet Toof, Swoon, Toofly, Various & Gould, VHILS, XAM, YOK, Pantheon Projects

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Images of the Week 12.04.11

Our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Billi Kid, Dain, Ema, Fumero, Iwazaru, Kikazaru, Labrona, Lisa Enxing, ME, Miyok, Mizaru, and ND’A.

An urban diorama is not something you run into everyday. In fact, unless you usually run into air conditioners that stick out of buildings, it would be pretty unlikely you’d run into this one. This is our first encounter with a fully formed diaroma on the streets of New York, made by putting a piece of plexi glass over the end of an air conditioner casing. The building itself looks like it’s getting ready to be demolished, but this pleasant little pastoral pokes it’s head out into the sidewalk, more or less commanding you to stare inside. Larger ones like this are available for you to view at the Museum of Natural History. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Whoa! Careful there, Junior. Could be slippery. Artist Unknown. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Here is Lisa Enxing’s take on the Japanese maxim “Hear no Evil, Speak no Evil, See no Evil”.  She replaced the Three Wise Monkeys; Mizaru, Kikazaru and Iwazaru with her stenciled and hand colored Geishas. What are their names we wonder? We get the message. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“E” is for EMA. French Street Artist Ema was recently in Brooklyn. Kind of gives you pause for reflection. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

EMA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Okay, qui a pris ma brie?” EMA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

EMA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dang, Dain is at it again! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Labrona has a couple soldiers in the trenches. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Labrona (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Billi Kid brings those Manhattan gams to the street with another installment of the leggy flowery series. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ND’A (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ND’A (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Fumero hit the street with echoes of Thanksgiving in mind with this hand colored family portrait. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

An instant hit, the non-chalance of the pepper spraying police officer who walked up a row of silent students protesting at the University of California like he was dusting a row of corn with insecticide, this image has inspired street art of course. Why not? It has it’s own Tumbler page, after all. Street art here is by Miyok, Me. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Here are a few of our favorites from the site;

Oh, say can you seeeeeeeee?

Uniforms are going to be totally hot next season.

All my shingle ladie, all my shingle ladies…

 

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Kid Acne and Ema “UNCLEAR GROUND/ TERRAIN VAGUE” (FR)

EMA and Kid Acne: New Installation at The Pilori Museum

If you have ridden the train across the US or Europe or China you realize that just on the margins of everyday life is a wildly different view of your city, your town, your country, your life. Main Street intersects with rail lines as necessary, but this means of shipping freight and people is relegated to the backyards, tunnels, industrial backwaters of our urban-suburban sprawl. You can see the skeletons, the fibrous sinews of our man-made corpus, bared and unmasked. With time and neglect, you see how quickly the tainted soil and acidic rain colludes to reclaim the earth, swiftly filling emptiness with grasses, bushes, trees and new life; balancing our imbalance.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Still-video-JiPe-Corre

Still from video below by JiPÉ Corre ©

As we are wont to do, this is a side of our world where some run to discover beauty. Street Artists Kid Acne and Ema have an installation in Niort, France that sees this beauty, augments it and frames it. Having spent earlier years rummaging around these abandoned places with graff writers, the two have a romance with these steel streams and rusty tributaries that that elevate here, and collaborate with.

Kid Acne shares these photos with BSA readers from “Le 4eme Mur” in Niort, France. The title of their installation is “Unclear Ground/ Terrain Vague” and it will be on view until October 29.

brooklyn-street-art-kid-acne-ema-niort-france-10-11-web-4Kid Acne and Ema (photo © Kid Acne)

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Kid Acne and Ema (photo © Kid Acne)

Artists’ Statement:

Unclear ground/ Terrain vague is an installation currently on view in Niort (Fr) at the Pilori Museum until the 29th of October. This show is curated by Winterlong Galerie, and is a collaboration between Kid Acne and Ema.’

‘Unclear Ground takes inspiration from creating something out of nothing and seeing beauty in the mundane. From derelict factories, to abandoned wastelands and disused railways – for the past 2 decades both Ema & Kid Acne have utilised these forgotten spaces to create their art, injecting them with a splash of colour and giving them a new lease of life. This collaborative installation mixes various media including painting, silkscreening  and sewn fabrics. The title refers to the uncertainty experienced in creating a new piece of work – exploring the unknown to find something new.

Combining influence from graffiti, science fiction and comic books, this exhibition invites us to explore the world around us, proving the age old saying – “seek and you shall find”. Kid Acne. Ema

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Kid Acne and Ema (photo © Kid Acne)

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Kid Acne and Ema (photo © Kid Acne)

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Kid Acne and Ema (photo © Kid Acne)

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Kid Acne and Ema (photo © Kid Acne)

Check out this black and white video by JiPÉ Corre (part of the installation) traveling along train tracks and walking paths, complemented by atmospheric sounds and washes. It transforms neglect into a meditation.

For information and images visit the artists’ sites at:

http://florenceblanchard.com/

http://www.kidacne.com/blog/

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Anthony Lister Talks to BSA : Analysis and Constant Consideration

“I’m like a hairdresser I guess.”

Painter Anthony Lister is also a Street Artist. His surreal pop and celebrity culture-infused abstractions are candy encrusted apples which may have something sharp inside. Many are figurative studies and wire frames bending wildly into characters who cavort and mock with blunt swipes of color, overlaid by costumed sexual role play… or is that a personal projection?  Did I mention elegance, defiance, wit? Wait, there is so much here!  Truth is, his work can be a cock-eyed psychological tempest, jarring to the head, strangely sweet.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A decade of discovery under his superhero belt, Mr. Lister continues to analyze and build his creative practice and it always includes work inside the gallery and outside on the street. He’s currently preparing for his solo show in Sydney called  “Bogan Paradise” at Gallery A.S. At the same time he’s part of a group show with a gaggle of his Aussie expats on view at 941 Geary in San Francisco for “Young and Free”, including Kid Zoom, Dabs & Myla, Dmote, New2, Ben Frost, Meggs, Ha-Ha, Reka, Rone, Sofles and Vexta.  Not to mention his participation in our show last month in Los Angeles at C.A.V.E. with Thinkspace, “Street Art Saved My Life : 39 New York Stories“.

The artist took some time recently to talk to Brooklyn Street Art about his practice;

Brooklyn Street Art: How much of one of your painted portraits is autobiographical? In other words, what portion of Mr. Lister is super hero, super model, furtive schoolboy, or Homer Simpson?
Anthony Lister: I don’t really think about myself when I paint. My figurative works are more like reflections of characteristics I absorb from real life day to day.

Brooklyn Street Art: If you were to wear colored glasses, which color do you think you would most likely screen the world through?
Anthony Lister: Pink, like John Lennon.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Francis Bacon said, “The creative process is a cocktail of instinct, skill, culture and a highly creative feverishness.” Would you drink that cocktail?
Anthony Lister: Nice words. I agree.

Brooklyn Street Art: What role does analysis play in your creative process when bringing a painting to fruition?
Anthony Lister: Analysis is the outcome of considered processing. Constant consideration is crucial.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: A big piece you did on Metropolitan in Brooklyn – you reworked that face a couple of times over a period of months, producing what appeared as a slowly morphing image. Were you covering up tags, or were you unhappy with the original, or maybe combating the effects of age with a little nip and tuck?
Anthony Lister: When I re-work street paintings I think of it like I am a hairdresser. When something is in the public it has a different existence to something living privately in a residence. I’m like a hairdresser I guess.

Brooklyn Street Art: You have spoken about your work as reality, or a reaction to realities. What realities are you depicting these days?
Anthony Lister: I just finished a body of work for a solo show in Sydney. This next body of work is about contemporary Australian culture. The exhibition is titled “Bogan Paradise.”

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: When you consider the Street Art scene that evolved around Melbourne, how would you characterize its nature in a way that differentiates it from the work in other cities around the world?
Anthony Lister: No different. This whole street art thing has sprung up post the turn of the digital revolution so it is on the Internet quick and the artists who inspire others and the ones who are easily inspired are constantly swimming in the same aesthetic pools of consciousness. Not to mention that most of the prominent artists travel lots so it is easy to see work of the same artist in multiple cities around the world at the same time.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: The titles you give your gallery pieces are entertaining, instructive, illustrative. Do you ever want to place a placard near a piece you’ve done on the street – just to make sure the message gets across?
Anthony Lister: No. My street practice is less thoughtful and therefore needs less commentary.

Brooklyn Street Art: When is a painting complete?
Anthony Lister: When it tells me so.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in Manhattan (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in Miami for Primary Flight. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in Los Angeles. LA FreeWalls (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Anthony Lister in Los Angeles LA FreeWalls (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Cry me a rainbow, Anthony Lister in Los Angeles. LA FreeWalls (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in Venice Beach CA. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in San Francisco for Young and Free at 941 Geary (photo © Andrius Lypia)

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Want to see more work? Just “Lister” it.

www.anthonylister.com

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“Breuckelen”, We Go Hard : Street Artist EMA

They say you don’t know what you have till it’s gone, and Street Artist EMA is lately having a hankering for the People’s Republic of Brooklyn, even though she’s in Scotland now after a decade in BK. It was a period of great personal change, challenge, and inspiration for her development as a person and as an artist.  That’s why her current show is called “Breuckelen”.

brooklyn-street-art-copyright-EMA-Breuckelen-recoat-gallery-web-10EMA (photo © EMA)

From spraying graffiti in the street in the early 1990s to gallery shows and back and forth, EMA is one of the many artists who sees her expression as a part of a continuum.  Now she’s showing ink drawings that blend influences from Art Deco, science, fiction, and graffiti for this solo show called “Breuckelen”, a reference to the Dutch name it had in the 1600s.

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EMA (photo © EMA)

In preparation for her show opening Friday, EMA gives us a look at the action in her studio. Explains EMA, “This year marks the 10th anniversary of my move to New York. To celebrate that, I am doing a year round of artistic projects on that theme.”

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EMA (photo © EMA)

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EMA (photo © EMA)

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EMA (photo © EMA)

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EMA (photo © EMA)

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EMA (photo © EMA)

For more information about “Breuckelen” click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=24122

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