All posts tagged: Dmote

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.22.18

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.22.18

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Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Boy Kong, Cane Morto, Dmote, El Sol 25, Hower, Invader, Joe Iurato, Logan Hicks, Pixel Pancho, Resistance is Female, Rime, Sean9Lugo, Smells, UFO 907, Vhils, Vik, Voxx Romana, XSM, and Zimad.

Top image: Joe Iurato and Logan Hicks. The Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

VHILS. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

VHILS. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

#resistanceisfemale (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ZIMAD (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Invader (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907. Dmote. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907. Smells. Dmote. Hower. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cane Morto in Lisbon. We are excited that we will be working with these vandals in Moscow for The Artmossphere Biennale in August. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Granny robber, food stealer Paul Ryan makes it to the street, courtesy #streetPSA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist. Indeed, what’s your favorite way to dull your pain? Do tell… (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sean 9 Lugo…modern days saints… (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Boy Kong (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Creepy… (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rime for VIK (photo © Jaime Rojo)

XSM (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Voxx Romana (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Brooklyn, NYC. July 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 03.06.16

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.06.16

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Armory Week : The art fairs are happening in NYC and folks are finding new, original and purely derivative ideas from the commercial shows that swarm with fans and lookyloos. The few folks we spoke with say that sales have been average to slow with guests carefully considering before purchasing, with the occasional big splurger. It could be that the market has been in an unspoken soft period for the last year or so due to a weak economy or the tumultuous political landscape in this election year. Nonetheless, there is nothing like the hivelike high you can get swimming through rivers of art fans at a New York fair, periodically bumping into a peer or a tanned celebrity.

Meanwhile, we have some dope street stuff for you from Jersey City to Morocco to Italy and Switzerland. Here’s our our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Atomiko, Bifido, C215, Dmote, Bradley Theodore, Dylan Egon, El Anatsui, Fintan Magee, MSK, Obey, Otto “Osch” Schade, PK, Post, Rime, Sean9Lugo, Sharon Lee De La Cruz, Space Invader, and Toner.

Our top image: C215 at The Medina, Djama El Fna Central Square in Marrakech. (photo © Jaime Rojo) In the prolific work of French master stencilist C215 cats appear with some regularity. It is very fitting then to have found this kitty in the wild in a city where hundreds of cats roam the streets without a particular home to go to. While not officially kept as pets the cats are being fed next to doorways. Many of them struggle for food and are visibly in need of some medical care but you will see very some happy felines comfortably bathing under the warm Moroccan sun.

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C215 at The Medina, Djama El Fna Central Square in Marrakech. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Fintan Magee in Jersey City. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Fintan Magee in Jersey City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Space Invader  in Jersey City for Mana Urban Arts Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rime / MSK  in Jersey City for Mana Urban Arts Projects. PK added at a later time. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Obey / Toner / MSK in Jersey City. Mana Urban Arts Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Obey / Rime / Post / MSK in Jersey City. Mana Urban Arts Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Post in Jersey City. Mana Urban Arts Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rime in Jersey City. Mana Urban Arts Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Atomiko in Jersey City for Mana Urban Arts Project. The ENX wolves were painted at an earlier time and featured on BSA already. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dylan Egon in Jersey City. Mana Urban Arts Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bifido’s new work in Caserta, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

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Ruby Bridges stencil in Hunts Point by Sharon Lee De La Cruz AKA Maripussy inspired by the iconic Norman Rockwell painting depicting a seminal event in the USA during the civil rights movement. Ruby Nell Bridges Hall is an American activist known for being the first black child to attend an all-white elementary school in Louisiana during the 20th century. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dmote /RVCA in Hunts Point, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dmote /RVCA in Hunts Point, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Otto “Osch” Schade in Aargau, Switzerland. (photo © Urban Art International)

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Sean9Lugo in Jersey City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hey there, bear. Sean9Lugo in Jersey City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bradley Theodore in Jersey City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A monumental tapestry by El Anatsui at the Palais El Badii for the Marrakech Biennale 6 in Marrakech, Morocco. It is made entirely of metal bottle caps. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Anatsui’s monumental tapestry at the Palais El Badii for the Marrakech Biennale 6 in Marrakech, Morocco. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Anatsui’s monumental tapestry at the Palais El Badii for the Marrakech Biennale 6 in Marrakech, Morocco. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Anatsui’s monumental tapestry at the Palais El Badii for the Marrakech Biennale 6 in Marrakech, Morocco. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Anatsui’s monumental tapestry at the Palais El Badii for the Marrakech Biennale 6 in Marrakech, Morocco. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Water Bearer at The Medina, Djama El Fna Central Square in Marrakech, Morocco. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Queens Hit “Top To Bottom” by New Mural Project in L.I.C.

Queens Hit “Top To Bottom” by New Mural Project in L.I.C.

The spirit of New Yorks’ 5 Pointz graffiti/Street Art holy place has popped up in the same Queens neighborhood where it was demolished in 2014, and since last summer more than 50 local and international aerosol artists have been hitting a new project “Top to Bottom”.

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Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The choice of “Top to Bottom”, a graffiti term that recalls 1970s trains painted their entire height, is no mistake as creative director James P. Quinn reveres the classic style and histories of those original writers like internationally and institutionally celebrated artists Crash and Daze, who have collaborated on a mural here.

Additionally, in yet another sign that the celebration of art on the streets is ever more ecumenical, Quinn and his project lead Geoff Kuffner are bringing the newer Street Artists who are expanding and  defining the current era for art in the streets like Case Ma’Claim and Rubin 415. Not surprisingly, both of these artists started in graffiti, as did nearly every name here.

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Case MaClaim (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I felt like a comfortable amount of space should be allocated to certain styles,” says Quinn as he describes the process of parceling out spots for the façade and roof of  the 124,000-square-foot former warehouse. Truthfully, he tells us, not all the surfaces and shapes are attractive to graffiti artists, so a variety of styles is best.

“I tried to fit them in where I felt that graff writers could enjoy themselves and do something expansive. There are only a couple of spaces here that fit the epic, horizontally spaced forms of style writing. There are a lot of strange shapes to navigate as a painter here, rather than easy space to develop style as a writer.”

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Cern (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Quinn and Kuffner give a couple of visitors a tour around the entire block on a gray day where heavy fog hangs in the air obscuring the top half of Manhattan and they excitedly recall stories about the many installations in this first project of their newly formed Arts Org NYC. Using the word “garden” often, Quinn reiterates that this project for them is a “proof of concept” for bigger projects that will spread further through the city. “Ultimately I’m approaching it as a mural project,” says Quinn, who has organized mural programs a number of times since the 1990s. “It’s just a beginning.”

Street Art has evolved into districts of murals in cities as a gentrification device in the last five years and despite the critique that it is often used for economic development, many urban art watchers would also agree that we’re in the middle of a renaissance of public/private art. Quinn says he wants to capture part of the public’s new interest and make it grow. “I’d like to leverage the current hype and acceptance of mural painting to open up doors to people – old women, young kids, everybody.”

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Cern (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The neighborhood itself feels like it is in transition but it is not clear where it is heading. With Silvercup Studios and the number 7 subway line nearby and MoMA PS1 within a 10 minute walk, a quick survey reveals mixed light industry, sweatshops, corner delis, and the occasional strip club. Below the off-ramp of the Queensboro Bridge, which sweeps past the “Top to Bottom” exhibition, you will see first and second generation immigrants from the areas’ latin and African communities walking by, and Quinn reminds you that the Queensbridge Projects where Hip-Hop storyteller NAS grew up is just a short walk from here.

Conversation turns to plans for more focused programming on the walls in Phase II, possible fine art shows with local gallery spaces, and ultimately a city-wide mural project that offers art and art-making to greater audiences, including school kids.

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DMOTE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I do feel like murals get focused in certain locations but I feel like the entire city as a whole is still suffering. Huge demographics aren’t getting the painting,” he says, invoking the civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. “I feel like my ‘I Have a Dream’ speech about this project is that I hope it gets to the point where 10 year-olds can have as much access to a neighborhood as developers.”

Does he think that projects like this are pawns for business interests to draw investments into the neighborhood and push poorer populations out? “You can debate whether or not we are opening the way for more shiny condos… but that shit is happening whether we do this or not. For me the importance is keeping us here; So we’re not totally pushed out 30-45 minutes away from here”

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DMOTE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Because of its proximity to the now destroyed 5 Pointz, where hundreds, perhaps thousands, of urban artists painted a much larger block repeatedly for two decades, we ask Quinn if he’s concerned with comparisons.

“I’ve always managed other projects like this in my own style and my own way. There are comparable aspects and I have nothing but a huge sensitivity and respect for Meres and 5 Pointz,” he says, referring to the artist and de facto director of the hallowed spot. “It’s comparable only because it’s a building and it’s in Long Island City. But this is only a jump-off. I want to do way more projects like this across the city.”

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DMOTE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As the business partners walk past new pieces by DMote, Li-Hill, Icy & Sot, and Jick, the topic of the historically strained relationship between graffiti writers and Street Artists appears to be addressed head-on by the project by the inclusion of all manner of painter. The guys say that it is less of an issue than some people would have you think. As a long-time artist and muralist and curator of projects like this, Quinn says he’s over the supposed rivalry of the two camps, and sees mainly just one camp these days.

“I don’t know what the fans of graffiti or Street Art have any problem with. To me it’s all awesome.”

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DMOTE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Alexandre Keto (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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EGS (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Binho (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Binho (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Cekis (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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NEVER and Dirty Bandits (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sean9Lugo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Zumi (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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PORK (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rubin415 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rubin415 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Key Details (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Li Hill (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Li Hill (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Yes Two (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pixote (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kans115 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Daze . Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Erasmo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

For more about ArtsOrg please go to www.artsorg.nyc.
#ArtsOrgNYC and @artsorg on Instagram
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><<>>><>Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><<>>><>

 

This article is also published on The Huffington Post 

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MSK Crew and the 2013 Summer Family Reunion in Brooklyn

MSK Crew and the 2013 Summer Family Reunion in Brooklyn

Before we lose the warmth of the sun we wanted to reflect on one of the largest graffiti shows curated under one theme that was mounted this summer right on the streets of Brooklyn by members of the long-running graffiti crew known as Mad Society Kings, or MSK. It’s a Summer tradition for many families to convene at a selected location to enjoy a familial get-together and as the writers and painters of MSK consider themselves a very tight family spanning a few generations, they, like many American families, decided to have their own Family Reunion.

Naturally there were lawn chairs, aerosol cans, and razor wire.

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FASR MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gathering across three sprawling blocks in Bushwick just ahead of the July 4th holiday and while the Houston Wall in Manhattan was poised for takeover by members Pose and Revok, all the MSK uncles and aunts and cousins gathered before corrugated metal and cinder block walls in the still-industrial neighborhood to create a pre-fireworks display of their own. Adding to the reunion feeling, many of the folks seemed to be from out of town and had traveled a distance so you really got the idea that pretty soon there would be a kickball game, a pig rotating on a spit, and grandma MSK wheeling by handing out colorful pinwheels on sticks to the kiddies.

What made this reunion so remarkable was not just the variety of styles on display but the unanimity of the theme; each piece was dedicated to their recently departed brother, the writer NEKST, who passed away in the winter months.  Graffiti culture and community murals have been intertwined for as long as anyone held a spray can, with lists of the departed sometimes on display in a neighborhood for years as memorial, so the outpouring of love and creativity on these walls really was at its best.

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El Kamino MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We decided to wait until the dog days and the picnics were officially over to turn the spotlight on these walls and say goodbye to all the great memories of Summer 2013 on the streets of Brooklyn, and to give witness to the power of memories that we all have of people we’ve lost. These tributes are rendered in an explosion of color and styles – but all with the same idea, with the same name, with the same person in mind. Themed shows like this also allow the viewer to compare and contrast and better appreciate the more subtle and obvious differences in style, technique, and approach.

The results are a stellar sampler of some of the best graffiti writers working today on the streets.  Full of force, character, attitude, color, shape, dimension and craftsmanship, here is a selection by photographer Jaime Rojo for you to see. All of them are still up in Bushwick if you are out on a bright Saturday – they are just a short walk from the L train on the Morgan stop.

 

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Cease MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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TRAV MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Omens MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rime MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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REVOK MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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POSE MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Vizie MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Skrew MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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DMOTE MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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DMOTE MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steel MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Owns MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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KC ONE MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Navy8 MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Wane COD MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dabs & Myla MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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MSK . NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

 

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Sydney’s “OutPost Project” ReCap

Our sincere thanks to BSA reader and New Yorker Spencer Elzey, who took a trip to Sydney at the beginning of the month and had the opportunity to check out the Outpost Project Street Art festival. Here’s his report.

Overview and a warning. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Cockatoo Island is the Governor’s Island of Sydney. The ferry leaves Circular Quay, motors beside the shimmering tiles of the Sydney Opera House, sweeps underneath the arching Harbor Bridge and the tourist who pay $200 for a chance to climb the upper deck above. Twenty minutes later, a large “No Trespassing” sign begins to become in focus. We have arrived at the Outpost Project.

Anthony Lister. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

The island, who’s past includes an old Imperial prison and one of Australia’s largest shipyards, welcomes each street art enthusiast with a detailed information brochure. The inner cover contains a fairly easy to follow map of what lies ahead. Right away three large inflatables (imagine a small grounded hot air balloon) greet you adorned with Anthony Lister’s iconic caricatures. The info packet says it best when describing the images; the “superheroes are never indomitable conquerors or unequivocal villains.” Straddled by two of these is a large piece by Belgium artist, and frequent Brooklyn talent, ROA.

ROA. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Follow the art around the corner through a mural-lined alley between two buildings and some familiar styles present themselves including the stick-figure arms by Perth Street Artist Creepy.

Creepy and Daek. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

The second floor of one of these buildings is the current home to a large private collection of work by Banksy. The OI YOU! Collection had an interesting start, but where it currently stands is 22 pieces by Banksy. Intermixed are items by Faile, Swoon and others. The husband and wife team collecting behind OI YOU!, George Shaw and his wife Shannon Webster, sold both of their cars and re-directed a home improvement loan to feed their need for owning more street art.

Kid Zoom…and documentation of the destruction of three Holden Commodores. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Inside the main building, known as the Industrial Precinct, MOX (Mark Cawood) is hard at work. After over 120 hours of intricate stencil cutting, his diligence is well on its way toward a completed final product. At the end of the hall, behind the small traffic jam of mangled cars, is a life size recreation of the childhood home of Street Artist and fine artist Kid Zoom.

Kid Zoom. “Home” The artist recreate a scale reproduction of his childhood home from early adolescent memory… (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Located deeper within the hall of the Industrial Precinct are two other impressive arrays; NEXT by T-World and Pastemodernism 3. Both of these installations, while serious in their scope, were whimsical at heart. The NEXT collection, overseen by “Melbourne-born T-shirt messiah Eddie Zammit,” asks 20 artists to assemble over 1,500 T-shirts to display. Local shout-outs included Barcade in Williamsburg and Katz’s Deli on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Pastemodernism 3, now in it’s third year at OUTPOST, is the self-proclaimed “largest celebration of ‘paste-ups’ in Australia.” Over 100 artists had a part in this collaboration.

A view of the T Shirt installation. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Traversing the Artery, a limestone lined subterranean tunnel, one passes by a “rogue gallery of 30 hand picked Australian street artists” including HA HA, Ghostpatrol, Numskull, Dmote and Yok, just to name a few.

The Art Gallery in the Tunnel. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Upon exiting, you end up back at the beginning, next to the “No Trespassing” sign and amongst a collection by Will Coles. His concrete cast items, usually adorned with a word or two, are lifelike enough even the Seagulls seemed a bit confused.

Will Coles. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Will Coles. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

New Rock Crew. 1976 Classic School Bus. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

New Rock Crew. 1976 Classic School Bus. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

New Rock Crew. 1976 Classic School Bus. Anthony Lister balloon on the background. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Shannon Crees. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Phibs. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Mini Graff. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Max Berry. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

We couldn’t read the artist’s signature. Please let us know if you know who this artist is. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Hazzy Bee. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

HA HA on the left and Shida on the right. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Ears. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Joseph Allen Shea and Marty Routdlege Curate: “Self Est” (Sydney, Australia)

Self Est

 

Self Est. is a four day art event exploring contemporary art from alternative backgrounds. This first installment of Self Est. (short for Self Established) investigates the study of letterforms and pavement-based education. Self Est. presents art created outside the traditional academy that has infiltrated the institution. 

These art forms may be self-taught, intuitive or born from marginal activities such as commercial art, graffiti or skateboarding. Taking motivation from these auxiliary artistic pursuits these artists bring unconventional and unique twists to fine art and are being recognised by galleries and institutions.

Exhibition – THURSDAY 17th

6 – 8pm

kind of – gallery

72 Oxford Street, Darlinghurst 

DMOTE, New York (USA) 

Dmote is known worldwide for his contributions to the outlawed art of graffiti. Using this education as a springboard Dmote honedhis skills in the commercial arts and is regarded by many for his graphic work for some of the worlds largest youth brands.These trades have honed his craft and given new inspiration for fine art painting where one can trace his lineage of knowledge through letterforms, subcultural iconography (skulls), street scenes (torn bill posters) and print media (pornography).

www.dmote.net   

HORFÉ, Paris (FR) 

Horfé (also spelt Horphée) has a potent history of Graffiti bombing from the streets and subways of paris and Europe. Horfé’s loose letterforms and unmistakeable hand-styles separate him from what is considered to be a conservative graffiti style.Horfé’s abstracted lettering often splurges and morphs creating organic scenes of fantasy, horror and death. Horfé’s maturing direction as an icon for parisian graffiti has pushed him into exhibiting works indoors with recent shows in Paris, London & Sweden.

www.topsafelondon.com  

ROID, London (UK) 

London born Graffiti writer Roid (Aste-roid) is currently one of the most watched graffiti writers in the world. Roid was an early adaptor quickly being noticed for his unique letter styling and typographic treatments. Under a previous alias Roid was recognized globally as a strong contributor to the European graffiti scene covering off all available aspects of the sport-like art form. After what seemed to be a hiatus into another dimension, Roid returned to shock the graffiti community with ground breaking techniques and retro inspired lettering concepts. Roid’s current style disregards traditional graffiti processes and explores geometry, space and the abstracted influence of electronic music.

Exhibition – FRIDAY 18th

6 – 8pm

GALLERY A.S.

55 Brisbane Street, Surry Hills 

BEN BARRETTO, Perth (AUS) 

Ben Barretto grew up filtering his creativity through his pursuits as a sponsored skateboarder while re-interpreting civic planning and structures. Although completing art school Barretto’s installations retain a motivation, intuitiveness and resourcefulness that comes from creating from what’s at hand, techniques acquired while riding upon four urethane wheels.

JEFF CANHAM, San Francisco (USA) 

Jeff Canham trained at New Bohemia Signs in San Francisco in the antiquated trade of hand sign painting. The handstyles and toxic paints used to render letters and icons deliver, now superseded by technology, give a result much more versatile and human than the majority of advertising we witness today. Canham transfers this apprenticeship to great effect in his fine art paintings on wood to advertise emotional and environmental informed concepts.

www.jeffcanham.com

Conversations – SATURDAY 19th

12 – 1.30pm 

Gallery A.S

55 Brisbane St, Surry Hills 

A discussion and Q and A with Self Est. artists and experts on unconventional sources for fine art.

Ben Barretto (AUS) – artist

Jeff Canham (USA) – artist

Fred Forsyth (UK) – director of Topsafe & Crack & Shine

Cameron Macauliffe (AUS) – public art expert

Painting, BBQ and Beers Finale – SATURDAY 19th

4 – 9pm 

Kippax & Lt Riley St, Surry Hills

In progress wall painting by Roid, Horfé, & Jeff Canham

elfest.com.au

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“Outpost: Art From The Streets” Sydney’s Own Mega Street Art Festival

The Outpost Project begins in two days on a former military outpost, Cockatoo Island, the largest island in Sydney Harbour in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. This city really knows the value of the Street Art scene and celebrates the contributions of artists to the cultural wealth of the people who live there.

The entire island is basically porn for Street Artists, and right now about 150 are readying work their magic ways on the industrial spaces. Artists like ROA, Ethos, KidZoom, Anthony Lister, Everfresh Collective, Os Gemeos, Swoon, Faile, and Banksy are on the bill and a number of other projects will be taking place simultaneously, including a Pro/Am skateboarding exhibition, a region art gallery, DJs, artist battles, and pop-up bars.  The island becomes a canvas, and there is no admission. Um, are you coming?

Kid Zoom will be dominating the Turbine Shed with his project Kid Zoom: “Home”. Right now his home is split between Brooklyn and Perth, so he’s kind of a hometown boy. (photo © Jaime Rojo)


Another Brooklyn/Australia native, Anthony Lister will pepper the island with his signature characters  grinning larger than life transposed on enormous balloons. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

DMOTE will be involved in multiple projects but primarily on his own panel installation demonstrating new leaps and techniques he’s implementing in his ever-evolving style. (photo © Andrius Lippa)

Ben Frost is curating “Pastemodernism 3″ where every inch of surface area will be covered in wheatpasted posters from a slew of hand-picked artists. Probably the most populated exhibition of OUTPOST, “Pastemodernism 3” will include over 250 artists, both local and International. (photo © Andrius Lippa)

REKA. EVERFRESH STUDIO. The crew whose stellar lineup includes Phibs, Meggs, Rone, Reka, Sync, Prizm, Wonderlust, Stabs and Makatron will be tackling the East Apron Cliff Face with a tongue-in-cheek statement of the anti-graffiti rhetoric of yesteryear. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Street Artist Creepy: Project Ugly will sit gazing over the harbour displaying 20 panels from interstate street artists, including an onsite live painting on an industrial scale by Sydney figure Sprinkles and as well, Brisbane based Shida. Amongst the pre-created collection will be Above (San Francisco), Creepy and Daek (Last Chance Studios, Perth) and Drypnz (NZ). (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Yok. Artery, located in the Dog Leg Tunnel will greet patrons upon first landing – being a sample of the creative tone to come including Meggs, Haha, Rone, Yok and Drewfunk amongst other featured Outpost Artists. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Also included will be the Oi You! Collection featuring the largest private collection of Banksy’s, amongst works by David Choe and Herakut. As well, live painting by Sao Paulo artist Ethos and Belgian monotone muralist Roa.

Banksy is going to participate, but how? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ETHOS. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Herakut. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ROA. (photo © Jaime Rojo)


From the press release:

“The crown jewel of Sydney harbour, Cockatoo Island, a former military outcrop and penal colony will be transformed this November. In conjunction with the Sydney Harbour Federation Trust, witness the island wide invasion as aMBUSH Gallery launches a curatorial take-over – transforming the industrial monument into a battlefield of street-art. The Outpost Project will be the Southern-hemisphere’s largest Street Art Festival to date, with a projected 90, 000 visitors over the course of 5 weeks. Amongst a myriad of forums, educational programs, aMBUSH will bring to the table the nexus of content featured on the island.”

For further information and a complete list of participating artists, events and schedule please visit the sites below:

http://outpost.cockatooisland.gov.au/

http://www.ambushgallery.com/

 

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Anthony Lister Talks to BSA : Analysis and Constant Consideration

“I’m like a hairdresser I guess.”

Painter Anthony Lister is also a Street Artist. His surreal pop and celebrity culture-infused abstractions are candy encrusted apples which may have something sharp inside. Many are figurative studies and wire frames bending wildly into characters who cavort and mock with blunt swipes of color, overlaid by costumed sexual role play… or is that a personal projection?  Did I mention elegance, defiance, wit? Wait, there is so much here!  Truth is, his work can be a cock-eyed psychological tempest, jarring to the head, strangely sweet.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A decade of discovery under his superhero belt, Mr. Lister continues to analyze and build his creative practice and it always includes work inside the gallery and outside on the street. He’s currently preparing for his solo show in Sydney called  “Bogan Paradise” at Gallery A.S. At the same time he’s part of a group show with a gaggle of his Aussie expats on view at 941 Geary in San Francisco for “Young and Free”, including Kid Zoom, Dabs & Myla, Dmote, New2, Ben Frost, Meggs, Ha-Ha, Reka, Rone, Sofles and Vexta.  Not to mention his participation in our show last month in Los Angeles at C.A.V.E. with Thinkspace, “Street Art Saved My Life : 39 New York Stories“.

The artist took some time recently to talk to Brooklyn Street Art about his practice;

Brooklyn Street Art: How much of one of your painted portraits is autobiographical? In other words, what portion of Mr. Lister is super hero, super model, furtive schoolboy, or Homer Simpson?
Anthony Lister: I don’t really think about myself when I paint. My figurative works are more like reflections of characteristics I absorb from real life day to day.

Brooklyn Street Art: If you were to wear colored glasses, which color do you think you would most likely screen the world through?
Anthony Lister: Pink, like John Lennon.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Francis Bacon said, “The creative process is a cocktail of instinct, skill, culture and a highly creative feverishness.” Would you drink that cocktail?
Anthony Lister: Nice words. I agree.

Brooklyn Street Art: What role does analysis play in your creative process when bringing a painting to fruition?
Anthony Lister: Analysis is the outcome of considered processing. Constant consideration is crucial.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: A big piece you did on Metropolitan in Brooklyn – you reworked that face a couple of times over a period of months, producing what appeared as a slowly morphing image. Were you covering up tags, or were you unhappy with the original, or maybe combating the effects of age with a little nip and tuck?
Anthony Lister: When I re-work street paintings I think of it like I am a hairdresser. When something is in the public it has a different existence to something living privately in a residence. I’m like a hairdresser I guess.

Brooklyn Street Art: You have spoken about your work as reality, or a reaction to realities. What realities are you depicting these days?
Anthony Lister: I just finished a body of work for a solo show in Sydney. This next body of work is about contemporary Australian culture. The exhibition is titled “Bogan Paradise.”

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: When you consider the Street Art scene that evolved around Melbourne, how would you characterize its nature in a way that differentiates it from the work in other cities around the world?
Anthony Lister: No different. This whole street art thing has sprung up post the turn of the digital revolution so it is on the Internet quick and the artists who inspire others and the ones who are easily inspired are constantly swimming in the same aesthetic pools of consciousness. Not to mention that most of the prominent artists travel lots so it is easy to see work of the same artist in multiple cities around the world at the same time.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: The titles you give your gallery pieces are entertaining, instructive, illustrative. Do you ever want to place a placard near a piece you’ve done on the street – just to make sure the message gets across?
Anthony Lister: No. My street practice is less thoughtful and therefore needs less commentary.

Brooklyn Street Art: When is a painting complete?
Anthony Lister: When it tells me so.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in Manhattan (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in Miami for Primary Flight. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in Los Angeles. LA FreeWalls (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Anthony Lister in Los Angeles LA FreeWalls (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Cry me a rainbow, Anthony Lister in Los Angeles. LA FreeWalls (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in Venice Beach CA. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in San Francisco for Young and Free at 941 Geary (photo © Andrius Lypia)

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Want to see more work? Just “Lister” it.

www.anthonylister.com

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Aussies Run Wild in San Francisco

New Images from the “Young, Free and Wild” Show

They are a friendly group, these Street Artists from Australia, all gathered and spread out on walls organized with 941 Geary Gallery and White Walls in San Francisco, a sort of summer camp for escaped ex-pats. Aside from a bit of jet lag here and there, the energy is high and the artists have been banging out brand new work for the show, with the walls on the street whenever possible.

brooklyn-street-art-Andrius-Lipya-Luke-McKinnon-san-francisco-1-webThe installation inside the 941 Geary Gallery in San Fran. (photo © Andrius Lipya)

Among the group are names from the scenes in Melbourne and elsewhere – selected for their contribution to the Street Art story over the last few years, including Anthony Lister, Kid Zoom, Dabs & Myla, Dmote, New2, Ben Frost, Meggs, Ha-Ha, Reka, Rone, Sofles And Vexta. Of course, many of these same cats represent straight out of BK too, but it’s nice to see the countrymen/women get together for an Aussie wall blastacular.

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Anthony Lister at work in the SF September sunshine. (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Anthony Lister. (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Going for a finer mist, Mr. Lister. (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Kid Zoom. (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Ha Ha. (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Ha Ha reprises one of his best known pieces. (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Ha Ha. (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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The installation underway inside the 941 Geary Gallery in San Francisco. (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Ben Frost, New2 (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Meggs prepping a stencil.  (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Meggs.  (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Dmote.  (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Rone.  (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Rone.  (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Myla of Dabs & Myla.  (photo © Andrius Lipya)

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Oh, fine, and Y’Self?  (photo © Andrius Lipya)

“Young and Free: Contemporary Australian Street Artists” is currently  on view at the 941 Geary Gallery in San Francisco. For more information on this show click on the link below:

http://www.youngandfreeart.com/

Young & Free
Through October 22nd, 2011
941 Geary
San Francisco, California

Special thanks to Andrius Lipya for sharing with BSA these exclusive photos, and to talented writer and organizer Luke McKinnon for being such a pal.

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Fun Friday 09.09.11

Fun-Friday

1. Freedia Video Exhortation
2. Guy Denning at Brooklynite Gallery Pop Up
3. LUDO in a Solo Show tonight “Metamorphosis” at High Roller Society (London)
4. YOUNITY is YOU! See the Goddesses Saturday in Yonkers (NYC)
5. Pandemic Says Goodbye to Summer with “Heat Beaten” Group Show
6. Australian Street Artists in San Francisco’s 941 Geary
7. “His Wife & Her Lover” at Primary Projects (Miami)

Okay everybody GET UP! Before we get cookin’ on too many projects today let’s everybody get up and do a dance to Friday and to life and the creative spirit that’s running through every person right now! This ain’t no rehearsal peepul. Miss Freedia gonna show us how to work it.

Guy Denning at Brooklynite Gallery Pop Up

Opening last night in a smoke filled ripped up storefront below Canal and above City Hall was this shrine filled show of meditations on 9/11, and the places we go amidst the memories and the rubble. Rae from Brooklynite spoke about the balance you try to strike when presenting a show like this, and they have probably hit it. Mixing headlines, languages, and the metaphor of purgatory with the anguish, longing, celebration and poetry that somehow coexist, Denning does a tender justice to us all.

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For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=23974

LUDO in a Solo Show tonight “Metamorphosis” at High Roller Society (London)

LUDO’s been working in the laboratory, and tonight you are allowed to enter it.

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LUDO (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=23927

YOUNITY is YOU! See the Goddesses Saturday in Yonkers (NYC)

The YOUNITY Art Collective group show “Goddess Hood” opens on Saturday  at the Yonkers Public Libray and boasts a really impressive line up of contemporary female artists working today in NYC. Some say that the female energy is what is going to lead us through the times ahead, and if so, these artists with rock solid connection to the street have lanterns in hand: Lichiban, Swoon, Sofia Maldonado, Krista Franklin, Marthalicia, Diana McClure, Faith 47, lmnop, Lady Alezia, and Alice Mizrachi

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LMNOP (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=24291

Pandemic Says Goodbye to Summer with “Heat Beaten” Group Show

Williamsburgs Southside hub of authentic street culture and a charming Joie de Smartass brings you another fun event and show – “Heat Beaten”.

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Sofia Maldonado (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=23982

Australian Street Artists in San Francisco’s 941 Geary

In San Francisco the Australians have staged an ART invasion both on the streets and with a show at the 941 Geary Gallery. If you were wondering why the Australians are at the forefront of Street Art please turn your electronic gadgets off and get up and go see some hot art with: Anthony Lister, Kid Zoom, Dabs & Myla, DMote, New2, Ben Frost, Meggs, Ha Ha, Reka, Rone, Sofles and Vexta.

brooklyn-street-art-anthony-lister-jaime-rojo-street-art-los-angeles-08-11-webAnthony Lister (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=24112

“His Wife & Her Lover” at Primary Projects (Miami)

In Miami things get heated at Primary Projects group show : “His Wife & Her Lover”.  To find what happens to either the wife, the lover or the husband put your high heeled boots on, comb your hair, spray some cologne on and wish for the best.

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Mark Jenkins (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=23938

Check out Primary Flight teaser video art directed by Primary Flight c0-founder Chris Oh and shoot by Peter Vahan. “Good Night and Farewell”

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941 Geary Gallery Presents: “Young and Free” Contemporary Australian Street Artists (San Francisco, CA)

young and free

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“I like renegades – there’s something so attractive about their natural instinct to defy convention.” Anon.

Some call Australia the ‘lucky country’, but we’ve always made our own fate. From a rebellious pas we’ve forged an identity steeped in cunning ingenuity, creative discontent and unorthodox flair. We’ve staged rebellions over rum, gained notoriety and won Nobels. We invented cask wine and Wi-Fi and we’ve won countless world titles. There may not be a lot of us, but we’ve always packed a punch.

So it is no surprise that with nothing more than a can of paint and a glint in their eye Australians are taking the street art scene by storm. It’s time for the rest of the world to sit up and take notice.

Young & Free will be the most significant exhibition by Australian street artists ever seen in the United States. The show will feature fresh work by thirteen of Australia’s finest urban art guerrillas – from the already internationally acclaimed to the burgeoning up-and-comers.

This tribe of artists comes from a variety of backgrounds: brilliant new work by notorious 80’strain painters through to the sublime subtlety of a modern day Rembrandt armed with a spray can. Young & Free is a reflection of Australia’s thriving street culture with a strong grounding in the past and a firm focus on the future. These artists are modern day bushrangers, patrolling the lanes from Melbourne to Manhattan.

This show features a mix of direct sprays, stencils and paste-ups, representing the rich and varied groundings from which these artists have grown. No matter their age, medium or style, the Young & Free artists all share one thing in common: they want to give the urban landscape a fresh coat of paint.

There are many similarities between Australia and San Francisco. Both have famous bridges, internationally established street art cultures and, of course, trams. What is different is our beginnings. Australia’s criminal foundations have seeped into our national persona – Aussies are born with a spirit of rebellion. As the opening lines from our national anthem proclaim, ‘Australians all let us rejoice, for we are Young & Free.’

The cans have been capped, the wheat paste stirred, and the stencils packed: this is the most important Australian street art exhibition ever, mate.

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