All posts tagged: Battle of Brooklyn

Happy New Year! BSA Highlights of 2010

Year-in-review-2010-header

As we start a new year, we say thank you for the last one.

And Thank You to the artists who shared their 11 Wishes for 2011 with Brooklyn Street Art; Conor Harrington, Eli Cook, Indigo, Gilf, Todd Mazer, Vasco Mucci, Kimberly Brooks, Rusty Rehl, Tip Toe, Samson, and Ludo. You each contributed a very cool gift to the BSA family, and we’re grateful.

We looked over the last year to take in all the great projects we were in and fascinating people we had the pleasure to work with. It was a helluva year, and please take a look at the highlights to get an idea what a rich cultural explosion we are all a part of at this moment.

The new year already has some amazing new opportunities to celebrate Street Art and artists. We are looking forward to meeting you and playing with you and working with you in 2011.

Specter does “Gentrification Series” © Jaime Rojo
NohJ Coley and Gaia © Jaime Rojo
Jef Aerosol’s tribute to Basquiat © Jaime Rojo
***

January

Imminent Disaster © Steven P. Harrington
Fauxreel (photo courtesy the artist)
Chris Stain at Brooklyn Bowl © Jaime Rojo

February

Various & Gould © Jaime Rojo
Anthony Lister on the street © Jaime Rojo
Trusto Corp was lovin it.

March

Martha Cooper, Shepard Fairey © Jaime Rojo
BSA’s Auction for Free Arts NYC
Crotched objects began appearing on the street this year. © Jaime Rojo

April

BSA gets some walls for ROA © Jaime Rojo
Dolk at Brooklynite © Steven P. Harrington
BSA gets Ludo some action “Pretty Malevolence” © Jaime Rojo

May

The Crest Hardware Art Show © Jaime Rojo
NohJ Coley © Jaime Rojo
The Phun Phactory Reboot in Williamsburg © Steven P. Harrington

June

Sarah Palin by Billi Kid
Nick Walker with BSA in Brooklyn © Jaime Rojo
Judith Supine at “Shred” © Jaime Rojo

July

Interview with legend Futura © Jaime Rojo
Os Gemeos and Martha Cooper © Jaime Rojo
Skewville at Electric Windows © Jaime Rojo

August

Specter Spot-Jocks Shepard Fairey © Jaime Rojo
“Bienvenidos” campaign
Faile studio visit © Jaime Rojo

September

BSA participates and sponsors New York’s first “Nuit Blanche” © Jaime Rojo
JC2 © Jaime Rojo
How, Nosm, R. Robots © Jaime Rojo

October

Faile “Bedtime Stories” © Jaime Rojo
Judith Supine © Jaime Rojo
Photo © Roswitha Guillemin courtesy Galerie Itinerrance

November

H. Veng Smith © Jaime Rojo
Sure. Photo courtesy Faust
Kid Zoom © Jaime Rojo

December

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Day 6: FINAL: General Howe’s “Battle of Brooklyn 2010”

brooklyn-street-art-battle-of-brooklyn-2010-2-WEB-banner-template

This historic week for Brooklyn and the U.S. is being marked daily by New York Street Artist General Howe at the sites where the actual “Battle of Brooklyn” took place exactly 234 years earlier. Brooklyn Street Art is pleased to bring you daily updates on the plundering of boundaries between Street Art, performance art, and historical land-marking along with live social media updates by Kianga Ellis. All week we will travel around Brooklyn tracing the troop movements as General Howe stages small-scale battle scenes to connect us with history and possibly examine the childhood pastime of playing “war”.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-27

“Largest battle of the entire Revolutionary War”

On this same ground, in these neighborhoods and streets that have names that are the same or similar to what they were 234  years ago today, the army of George Washington suffered it’s biggest loss.

Today the installations by Street Artist General Howe came to a booming crescendo as we raced after him across Brooklyn, erecting all manner of art pieces to commemorate the day when the American army was surrounded and nearly decimated. The largest battle fought in North America up to that point, the American Continental army suffered greatly – outnumbered, surrounded, and overpowered by the high-tech professional Brits and Hessians.

On this day, August 27th, hundreds of soldiers were killed and hundreds more taken prisoner down to the Wallabout Bay (Navy Yard). During the night on the 29th the remaining Patriots escaped across the river by boat to Manhattan while the Brits hunkered down only a few hundred yards away.

© Jaime Rojo

© Jaime Rojo

The Battle Of Brooklyn begins here in a watermelon patch where hungry British soldiers had stopped to eat the fruit just below Greenwood Cemetery and The Red Line Inn. The Patriots caught them and fired on them and the rest of the war unfolded from here. (General Howe: Greenwood Cemetery Area.) (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe: Greenwood Cemetery Area. The Battle Of Brooklyn begins here in a watermelon . Below the Cemetery and The Red Line Inn there was a watermellon patch. The Britsh soldiers were hungry and stop to eat. The Patriots saw them and fired on them and the rest of the war unfolded from here (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe describes August 27th:

The Action:

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-27-August-MAP

With an outstanding flanking maneuver begun the previous day, the British outsmart the American defense. Simultaneously, full-blown combat begins near a tavern close to the Greenwood Cemetery.  As fighting ensues, many Patriot soldiers flee across the Gowanus Creek to a fortified location in Brooklyn Heights.

The Maryland 400 stay behind to hold off the British while their American comrades escape. A crucial battle takes place at the Vechte house, a farmhouse now known as the Old Stone House located in modern-day Park Slope. Many Patriot soldiers make it to safety thanks to this dedicated unit from Maryland, but some Americans are killed and drowned by the British in the Gowanus Creek. By the end of this day, the largest battle of the entire Revolutionary War will be fought and conclude in a devastating defeat for the Americans. About 300 Patriot soldiers are killed and over 1,000 captured. On the night of August 29, 1776, General George Washington personally leads an astonishing evacuation of the entire American army across the East River to Manhattan.

The Landscape: Greenwood Cemetery, Crown Heights, Prospect Park, Park Slope, Gowanus and Brooklyn Heights

General Howe: Americans retreated across the Gowanas and had to swim since the bridge was set on fire causing many soldiers to perish by drowing (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe: Americans retreated across the Gowanus and had to swim since the bridge was set on fire causing many soldiers to perish by drowning (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

Gowanas Canal. Brooklyn, NY (© Jaime Rojo)
Gowanus Canal. Brooklyn, NY (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe: At The Old Stone House 400 Americans from Maryland were defending from this position and distracting the British while the Patriots fled across the Gowanus for safety (© Jaime Rojo)

At The Old Stone House the “Maryland 400” defended from this position and distracted the British while Patriots fled across the Gowanus for safety. General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

Old Stone House in Park Slope, Brooklyn. NYC (© Jaime Rojo)

The actual Old Stone House in Park Slope, Brooklyn. NYC (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe. (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe. (© Jaime Rojo)

The Corner of Atlantic Ave and Court Street in Brooklyn is a former location of a fort where General George Washington was observed how the Battle of Brooklyn was unfolding. General Howe: (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe:The Corner of Atlantic Ave and Court St. in Brooklyn is a former location of a fort where General George Washington was observing how the Battle of Brooklyn was unfolding (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

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This six-day event is shared live with the public complete with historical quotes, the General’s musings, and twitpics by Kianga Ellis on

Twitter (www.twitter.com/kiangaellis) (subject hashtag “#RevWar” if you like)

and Foursquare (www.foursquare.com/user/kiangaellis)

>>>>>>>>><><><><><>>><><><>><>><<<>>><<>

HuffPost-ButtonSee our interview with General Howe, “WAR ON APATHY” on The Huffington Post

Link to other days in the Battle of Brooklynjust click the date.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-22
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-23
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-24
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-25
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-26
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-27

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Day 5: General Howe’s “Battle of Brooklyn 2010”

brooklyn-street-art-battle-of-brooklyn-2010-2-WEB-banner-templateThis historic week for Brooklyn and the U.S. is being marked daily by New York Street Artist General Howe at the sites where the actual “Battle of Brooklyn” took place exactly 234 years earlier. Brooklyn Street Art is pleased to bring you daily updates on the plundering of boundaries between Street Art, performance art, and historical land-marking along with live social media updates by Kianga Ellis. All week we will travel around Brooklyn tracing the troop movements as General Howe stages small-scale battle scenes to connect us with history and possibly examine the childhood pastime of playing “war”.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-26

20,000 Flanking Almost Every Side on the Eve of Battle

Today Street Artist General Howe installed soldiers at the Jamaica Pass (Evergreen Cemetery) where only 5 Patriots had been stationed to guard and were captured by the original General Howe’s forces, who had marched up the Kings Highway. And you thought that Kings Highway was just a subway stop on the D train on the way to the beach. In fact, Washington’s troops were becoming surrounded on all sides except the water.

Things start to get bad for everyone right about now. ” the people of Long Island were caught in a maelstrom between the two armies–their houses, fields, and gardens burned or pillaged by one side or the other.  As the Provincial Congress finally took drastic action to starve Howe’s forces, the local farmers had been allowed to keep only a bare minimum of food, while the rest of their crops were destroyed.”*

"The Evergreen" Cemetery (© Jaime Rojo)
“The Evergreen” Cemetery (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe explains what took place:

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-26-August-MAP

The Action: With tension and anticipation rising, approximately 9,000 Patriot soldiers stand guard at several natural access points to the villages of Brooklyn. The British army begins a covert attack by flanking the Americans on their left side by traveling east to the Jamaica Pass, near modern-day Broadway Junction. With surprising ease, 20,000 British soldiers advance through the Jamaica Pass prepared to overwhelm the Americans by morning.

The Landscape: Park Slope and Broadway Junction/Cemetery of the Evergreens

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

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This six-day event is shared live with the public complete with historical quotes, the General’s musings, and twitpics by Kianga Ellis on

Twitter (www.twitter.com/kiangaellis) (subject hashtag “#RevWar” if you like)

and Foursquare (www.foursquare.com/user/kiangaellis)

>>>>>>>>><><><><><>>><><><>><>><<<>>><<>

* Quote from The Battle for New York The city at the heart of the American Revolution by Barnet Schecter

HuffPost-ButtonSee our interview with General Howe, “WAR ON APATHY” on The Huffington Post

Link to other days in the Battle of Brooklynjust click the date.Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-22
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-23
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-24
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-25
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-26
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-27

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Day 4: General Howe’s “Battle of Brooklyn 2010”

brooklyn-street-art-battle-of-brooklyn-2010-2-WEB-banner-template

This historic week for Brooklyn and the U.S. is being marked daily by New York Street Artist General Howe at the sites where the actual “Battle of Brooklyn” took place exactly 234 years earlier. Brooklyn Street Art is pleased to bring you daily updates on the plundering of boundaries between Street Art, performance art, and historical land-marking along with live social media updates by Kianga Ellis. All week we will travel around Brooklyn tracing the troop movements as General Howe stages small-scale battle scenes to connect us with history and possibly examine the childhood pastime of playing “war”.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-25

“Consolidation of allies”

Today we traveled with General Howe within Red Hook to recall and honor the skirmishes and dead that began to pile up; also to stuff papers with proclamations by the actual General Howe in Park Slope. That political animal, the British General Howe whom our intrepid street artist has taken his name from, used propaganda in this handbill to try to convince new Americans living in Long Island to switch it up and be nice subjects of the King of England.  In his handbill, he promised that all would be forgiven, generous General that he was;

Twisting their status as freedom lovers into dolts who had been duped, he offered those who were ” forced into rebellion, that on delivering themselves up at the head quarters of the army, they will be received as faithful subjects; have permits to return peaceably to their respective Dwellings, and meet with full protection for their persons and property.”*

Nice, right? Well don’t be so quick to judge because Mr. General  absorbed the militia from four Kings County (Brooklyn) towns.  Oh, snap! Brother’s got a silver tongue!

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe the Street Artist explains what was happening August 25th:

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-25-August-MAP

The Action: General Howe releases a proclamation as a hand bill soliciting support for the British in their pursuit to reclaim the colonies. Howe entreats both Loyalists and slaves who are promised freedom in exchange for fighting on the British side. German soldiers, hired by the British, arrive to assist in the war. Patriot soldiers from Manhattan and New Jersey continue to flow into Fulton Ferry to reinforce the American forces in Brooklyn.

The Landscape: Brooklyn Heights, DUMBO and Park Slope

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe’s gentle parody of himself shows his soldiers on a log of wood against a graffitied corrugated metal fence with razor wire. This nested self referential paste up is next to the proclamation by the original General Howe. Confused yet?  (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

“Read all about it! Todays’ insert tells how to surrender to the King!” General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

Sometimes irony is serendipity. General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn-Street-Art-WEB-HoweProclamation-1

* Quote from The Battle for New York The city at the heart of the American Revolution by Barnet Schecter

twitter logo

foursquare-logo

This six-day event is shared live with the public complete with historical quotes, the General’s musings, and twitpics by Kianga Ellis on

Twitter (www.twitter.com/kiangaellis) (subject hashtag “#RevWar” if you like)

and Foursquare (www.foursquare.com/user/kiangaellis)

>>>>>>>>><><><><><>>><><><>><>><<<>>><<>

HuffPost-ButtonSee our interview with General Howe, “WAR ON APATHY” on The Huffington Post

Link to other days in the Battle of Brooklynjust click the date.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-22
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-23
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-24
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-25
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-26
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-27

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Day 3: General Howe’s “Battle of Brooklyn 2010”

brooklyn-street-art-gen-howw-battle-banner082010This historic week for Brooklyn and the U.S. is being marked daily by New York Street Artist General Howe at the sites where the actual “Battle of Brooklyn” took place exactly 234 years earlier. Brooklyn Street Art is pleased to bring you daily updates on the plundering of boundaries between Street Art, performance art, and historical land-marking along with live social media updates by Kianga Ellis. All week we will travel around Brooklyn tracing the troop movements as General Howe stages small-scale battle scenes to connect us with history and possibly examine the childhood pastime of playing “war”.Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-24

“American Forces Dig In While Quietly Circled”

Today we followed the General to Park Slope to stage some skirmishes on the hill as a sense of doom settled in. It wasn’t just the gray rainy miasma that cloaked Brooklyn today, or the giant leafy pumpkin plants that hovered over the mini-troops, but it was General Howe’s descriptions of how the Patriots nervously tried to fortify positions while the British began to appear in new locations all the time, as they began to make their path toward the elevated hills of “The Heights” to look down upon the land.

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

Not only that but Washington wrote in a letter today to Putnam (his man in command) that he was pretty ticked off about the way some of the trigger-happy fools in the Patriots crew had the bad habit of shooting willy-nilly in an undisciplined way all over the place, sometimes just for the hell of it.  If you read The Battle for New York The city at the heart of the American Revolution by Barnet Schecter, you’ll find that George hated horsing around with guns because he thought it was wasteful of valuable bullets and distracting for everybody, “as we know not the hour of the enemy’s approach to our lines but have every reason to apprehend that it will happen sudden & violent, whenever attempted; we shall have our men so scattered & (more then probable) without ammunition, that the consequences must prove fatal to us.”

General Howe talks about what happened on August 24th:

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-24-August-MAP

The Action: Plagued by second thoughts about General Howe’s strategy, Washington reshuffles the command in Brooklyn putting the popular Israel Putnam in command. However, “Old Put” is ill equipped both experientially and temperamentally for the task. Among the American forces digging in for whatever is to come are the Maryland 400 comprised of six companies of soldiers from Maryland. This group of 400 will be the last soldiers to hold the line during the Battle of Brooklyn, providing cover while the rest of the Americans retreat.

The Landscape: Park Slope

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

A new wheat-paste by General Howe looks a lot like a coloring book page, while a strategically placed feather is placed over a bit of vulgar language. (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
AWOL, lost, or just looking for some quiet time alone. General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

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This six-day event is shared live with the public complete with historical quotes, the General’s musings, and twitpics by Kianga Ellis on

Twitter (www.twitter.com/kiangaellis) (subject hashtag “#RevWar” if you like)

and Foursquare (www.foursquare.com/user/kiangaellis)

>>>>>>>>><><><><><>>><><><>><>><<<>>><<>

HuffPost-ButtonSee our interview with General Howe, “WAR ON APATHY” on The Huffington Post

Link to other days in the Battle of Brooklynjust click the date.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-22
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-23
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-24
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-25
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-26
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-27

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Day 2: General Howe’s “Battle of Brooklyn 2010”

brooklyn-street-art-gen-howw-battle-banner082010This historic week for Brooklyn and the U.S. is being marked daily by New York Street Artist General Howe at the sites where the actual “Battle of Brooklyn” took place exactly 234 years earlier. Brooklyn Street Art is pleased to bring you daily updates on the plundering of boundaries between Street Art, performance art, and historical land-marking along with live social media updates by Kianga Ellis. All week we will travel around Brooklyn tracing the troop movements as General Howe stages small-scale battle scenes to connect us with history and possibly examine the childhood pastime of playing “war”.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-23

“Gen. Washington Assesses Threats”

Not much of a ground battle in Red Hook and Flatbush Pass today, as Street Artist General Howe staged battles where Patriot troops first began seeing the arriving British, who were well equipped with better technology. As they encounter one another, almost by chance, minor skirmishes occur on this day in 1776. Ironically, the majority of deaths are because of faulty equipment, including cannons that misfire and kill Patriots.

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe. Patriot soldiers in Red Hook exchange cannon fire with British war ships. (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe explains what happened on August 23rd:Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-23-August-MAP

The Action: General George Washington and his army are uncertain of how and when the British will attack. Some minor skirmishes take place in the area of the Flatbush Pass. Patriot soldiers in Red Hook exchange cannon fire with British war ships. Washington fears that Howe will move his naval fleet upriver, blocking off escape routes north. Few perish on this day. The fatalities and injuries of Patriot soldiers that do occur result from the misuse of their own arsenal.

The Landscape: Red Hook and Flatbush Pass (Prospect Park)

General Howe Fashioned a "Canon" Made Up Of Found Objects (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe Fashioned a "Cannon" made of found objects. (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe. Big Casualties Resulte Due To Malfunction Of The Patriot's Arsenal (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe. The majority of fatalities and injuries of Patriot soldiers that do occur result from the misuse of their own arsenal. (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe. Some minor skirmishes take place in the area of the Flatbush Pass. (© Jaime Rojo)

twitter logo

foursquare-logo

This six-day event is shared live with the public complete with historical quotes, the General’s musings, and twitpics by Kianga Ellis on

Twitter (www.twitter.com/kiangaellis)

and Foursquare (www.foursquare.com/user/kiangaellis)

>>>>>>>>><><><><><>>><><><>><>><<<>>><<>

HuffPost-Button

See our interview with General Howe, “WAR ON APATHY” on The Huffington Post

Link to other days in the Battle of Brooklynjust click the date.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-22
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-23
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-24
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-25
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-26
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-27

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DAY 1: General Howe’s “Battle of Brooklyn 2010”

battle-bannerThis historic week for Brooklyn and the U.S. is being marked daily by New York Street Artist General Howe at the sites where the actual “Battle of Brooklyn” took place exactly 234 years earlier.  Brooklyn Street Art is pleased to bring you daily updates on the plundering of boundaries between Street Art, performance art, and historical land-marking along with live social media updates by Kianga Ellis. All week we will travel around Brooklyn tracing the troop movements as General Howe stages small-scale battle scenes to connect us with history and possibly examine the childhood pastime of playing “war”.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-22

“His Majesty’s Forces Arrive”

To begin the week the General went down to the waterfront where Staten Island connects to Brooklyn with New York’s youngest bridge, the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge. This narrow pass through which all ships must go to get into New York City was the shore where over 20,000 British soldiers arrived today.

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe explains the events of this day thusly:

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-22-August-MAPThe Action: Before dawn on August 22, 1776, thousands of British soldiers land on the shores of Brooklyn, known then as Long Island. The British immediately control the entire coast from where the Verrazano Bridge is located today to Jamaica Bay. American loyalists by the hundreds welcome the large, bright-red mass of British soldiers. Aware that the long anticipated invasion had begun, Patriot riflemen withdraw into the hills burning fields and killing livestock as they flee. British General William Howe, Commander in Chief of His Majesty’s Forces in America, orders his troops to head north toward the Flatbush Pass, located in modern-day Prospect Park.

The Landscape: Dyker Beach Park, Fort Hamilton Park, Coney Island and Flatbush Pass (Prospect Park)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
Amazingly, the history books remark on how the British soldiers were shocked by the fruitful bounty of food they discovered on the shoreline when they arrived in 1776 – and today’s installation reveals that it is currently apple season at the same location. Looking at these soldiers, the term “Big Apple” comes to mind. General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
Pointing out to the Atlantic Ocean at an incoming ship, this soldier discovers Marty Markowitz has put up a sign of welcome. General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
While based on historical fact, the installations inject improvisational touches from an active childhood imagination. Here General Howe fashions a pizza box as a ship with sails on Coney Islands’ beach. (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)
General Howe (© Jaime Rojo)

twitter logo

foursquare-logo

This six-day event is shared live with the public complete with historical quotes, the General’s musings, and twitpics by Kianga Ellis on

Twitter (www.twitter.com/kiangaellis) (subject hashtag “#RevWar” if you like)

and Foursquare (www.foursquare.com/user/kiangaellis)

>>>>>>>>><><><><><>>><><><>><>><<<>>><<>

HuffPost-ButtonSee our interview with General Howe, “WAR ON APATHY” on The Huffington Post

Link to other days in the Battle of Brooklynjust click the date.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-22
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-23
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-24
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-25
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-26
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Battle-Brooklyn-August-27

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