Closing

“Space Invaders” at National Gallery of Australia

“Space Invaders” at the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra  is open for one more month as it presents a survey of the vigorous homegrown and international street art movement that has developed over the past ten years in the Pacific Rim. Home to well known and upcoming street artists like Anthony Lister, MISO, Kid Zoom and Creepy, Australia contributes a distinctive voice to a developing school and vocabulary.

With this show the National Gallery joined the ever expanding list of major art institutions recognizing and meditating on the importance and influence of Street Art as an art form and art movement. Once again the public is involved in the conversation about what Street Art is and where is it going- through the protected confines and altering prism of a formal art institution.

Below an excerpt from the Gallery’s web site:

“Drawn entirely from the collection of the National Gallery of Australia, the first Australian institution to have collected this type of work, Space invaders: Australian . street . stencils . posters . paste-ups . zines . stickers surveys the past 10 years of Australian street art. Featuring 150 works by over 40 Australian artists, this exhibition celebrates the energy of street-based creativity and recognises street stencils, posters, paste-ups, zines and stickers as comprising a recent chapter in the development of Australian prints and drawings..

Space invaders looks at artists and their iconic street-based works at the point of their transition from the ephemeral to the collectable and from the street to the gallery”

Brooklyn-Street-Art-HaHa-Neds-Head-Nat-Gallery-Australia-Jan2011

HaHa “Ned’s Head Triptych” (detail) (courtesy National Gallery of Australia)

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Masthead--Nat-Gallery-Australia-Jan2011

The current show name borrows from the French street artist, who borrowed from the video game.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-LIster-Mr-Evil-Head-Nat-Gallery-Australia-Jan2011

Lister “Mr. Sinister” 2010 (detail) (courtesy National Gallery of Australia)

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Jumbo-Nat-Gallery-Australia-Jan2011

Jumbo “X-Ray Man-machine” (detail) (courtesy National Gallery of Australia)

National Gallery of Australia
GPO Box 1150
Canberra ACT 2601
AUSTRALIA

  • Recorded information +61 2 6240 6501
  • General information +61 2 6240 6411

National Gallery of Australia Website  http://nga.gov.au/Home/Default.cfm

Space Invaders features stencils, posters, paste-ups, zines and stickers and will run until February 27 2011. If you are in the area and would like to visit the Gallery below is a list of upcoming events related to the show and the participating artists:

This Thursday (Jan 27) there is an artist talk with Mini Graff as she talks about her work featured in the exhibition.

This Saturday (Jan 29) there is a vinyl sticker printing workshop for teens
Print your own vinyl stickers with Sydney street artist Mini Graff. Translate your ideas onto vinyl stickers using screenprinting techniques. Please note that this program is at Megalo Print Studio + Gallery in Watson.

Sunday (Feb 6) there will be a screening of BOMB IT (DVD, 2007, not rated, 93 mins)
An explosive documentary about graffiti, the controversial art form shaping international youth culture today. By award-winning director Jon Reiss.

Participating artists for “Space Invaders” include:

AEON
AZLAN

BYRD
CIVIL
DEVIANT
DLUX!
DODD James
DOYLE Adrian
GHOSTPATROL
HAHA
HOLLENBACH Misha
JUMBO
KEATING Ash
LISTER
MAKATRON
MARCSTA
MEEK
MEGGS
MINI GRAFF
MISO MONKEY
NUROK
OKIPA
OPTIC
PHIBS
PRISM
PROOF
PSALM
REKS
RONE
SIBLEY, DAN
SIM Robert
SIXTEN
STARK Al
SYNC
TWOONE
VEXTA
XERO
YOK

ZAP

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“Relish” A Silver Car And Great Hamburgers. The Kitchen Is Now Closed.

So OK. This is not Street Art. We know that. But it’s Brooklyn, and it’s always changing. Today we’re saying goodbye and thanks to a local diner that we relished.

When we first moved to Williamsburg in 1999 it was all crack vials and condoms and burning cars. And that was just our studio! Nobody wanted to come visit us from Manhattan – they couldn’t be convinced that there was a lively artist bohemia pulsating in this abandoned industrial neighborhood.

Billyburg had few places to go out at night or to eat at, so most socializing and parties were in studios or on roofs. But what it lacked in quantity it pretty much made it up with quality: The converted mechanics garage Galapagos had $4 beers and a fire-eating bartender, eclectic DJ’s, assorted local artists and artisans in scruffy clothes, and the sunken floor that created a reflecting pool. “Diner”, still there today (although a lot more expensive than it used to be) was a reliable dive to walk in, have a legendary pork chop and beer, and watch the bartender goad someone into dancing on the counter. The pint sized Planet Thailand on Bedford Ave had only four or six tables but the kitchen was fast and you could order your food ahead of time and take it home. And on the North Side there was, and still is, Thank God, Pete’s Candy Store – a bar made in a converted you-know-what that had beat up old furniture and Bingo on Sunday’s and local singer-songwriters on the stool in the backroom. Thanks to Tammy Faye’s son, now it has church on Sunday.

Until last month there was also Relish on Wythe Ave. across from the burly motorcycle repairman with the German Shepard who made you cross the street with his barking. For most of it’s existence we loved Relish for their great not too expensive brunch offerings and their amazing $8 dollar hamburgers; the best antidote for hangovers. The owner was always hanging out and chatting with the customers. The wait staff was friendly with the rare exception of the occasional starlet-to-be with an icy stare and no patience. The garden was open for you to come in and sun bathe if you’d wish with a small statue of the Virgin Mary there, perched in her half shell and keeping an eye on the grounds and making sure patrons and movie shoots didn’t get out of control.

After the image you can read the farewell letter that the owner typed old fashion style on a typewriter and posted on one of the doors. Then you can see Kelis’ video shot there a few years ago.

Relish. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)
Relish. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-relish-932-web

brooklyn-street-art-relish-933-web

brooklyn-street-art-relish-934-web

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DON PABLO PEDRO: Shocking Blue in Bushwick

DON PABLO PEDRO: Shocking Blue in Bushwick

Don Pablo Pedro

Don Pablo Pedro and his blue friend (photo Jaime Rojo)

 

Having recently lost a testicle, Don Pablo Pedro sure has balls.

He might tell you that himself, or you could just go to his first solo show at English Kills Gallery in Bushwick that closes tomorrow.  They’ll be having a “Closing Barbecue” and gallery owner Chris Harding advises you to bring your own meat. Whether to eat it before of after viewing the “One-Ball Show” is a very good question.

Dream or nightmare? (Don Pablo Pedro) (photo Steven P. Harrington) 

Dream or nightmare? (Don Pablo Pedro) (photo Steven P. Harrington)

 

Speaking of barbecues, it’s a good thing the mighty Church of England or the Vatican don’t chase down artists for heresy or blasphemy anymore, because our poor young Pablo would be roasting over an open pit right about now. Witness the scroll canvasses with gaping vaginas in the middle of bellies and foreheads, a four-armed chanteuse sucking her own turgid finger, a man giving birth to a screaming baby out of his rectum, and gender bending not seen since the bathroom at Don Hill’s.  Simultaneously riveting and repulsing, after seeing this bevy of multi-colored psycho-sexual torment, I felt guilty and sickened and a little bit turned on.

Do they cover this in Lamaze Class? (Don Pablo Pedro) (photo Steven P. Harrington)

Do they cover this in Lamaze Class? (Don Pablo Pedro) (photo Steven P. Harrington)

 

His name is Don Pablo. And he is a warm person who speaks freely, if mischievously, and if there is torment, you wouldn’t know it. With long hair, bushy beard, nail polish, and a knockout fashion designer girlfriend, Don Pablo looks part Jesus of Nazareth, part Devendra Banhart.

She was quite a dish (Don Pablo Pedro) (photo Steven P. Harrington)

She was quite a dish (Don Pablo Pedro) (photo Steven P. Harrington)

 

And now he’s done a big blue multi-breasted piece on a wall – so that is pretty much all it takes to get on this blog.  As a painter, the dude’s no slouch either – taking it slowly and methodically with careful rendering and attention to detail.  On a sunny afternoon last week we finally saw the gallery show (Opened Aug. 1), and saw DPP in action.

Sometimes it's hard to get a head, other times 

Sometimes it’s hard to get a head in this city (photo Steven P. Harrington)

 

And you complain about YOUR family (photo Steven P. Harrington)

And you complain about YOUR family (photo Steven P. Harrington)

 

Brooklyn Street Art: So, for how long have you been painting?

Don Pablo Pedro: My father handed me a brush as soon as I came out of my mothers vagina.

Don Pablo Pedro

Don Pablo Pedro at work (photo Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Your gallery show features creatures that are very human, yet have multiple variations of genitalia, as well as clever locations for them.

Don Pablo Pedro: Yes they do.

Don Pablo Pedro

Don Pablo Pedro (photo Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: You recently had a very serious medical crisis. How did that affect you personally and how has it affected your work?

Don Pablo Pedro: I’m lighter now only having one testicle and faster and more efficient.

Don Pablo Pedro

A bit of a challenge to work with the building’s topography (Don Pablo Pedro) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Are scrolls easy to store?

Don Pablo Pedro: Very easy that’s why I love them.

Don Pablo Pedro

Toe Detail (Don Pablo Pedro) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Have you ventured out of the studio to do much street art?

Don Pablo Pedro: Not much lately but maybe more soon.

Don Pablo Pedro

Don Pablo Pedro (photo Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Whose this blue friend on the wall?

Don Pablo Pedro: My dream girl .

Don Pablo Pedro and Chris Stain

Chris Stain, Don Pablo Pedro, FKDL (photo Jaime Rojo)

Sorry, couldn’t resist… set design by Justin Mikal Davis by the way.

English Kills Gallery

Pedro Products

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Closing Party for Zonenkinder Collective at McCaig Welles

Closing Party for Zonenkinder Collective

Bambule, a gallery wide installation and exhibition of artworks by the Zonenkinder Collective – two German graff-artists. The term “bambule“ derives from the German argot and is traditionally used to describe a form of protest practiced by prison inmates – drumming with different objects, like spoons, inside jail cells to articulate resistance…. Sounds like the lunchroom in my junior high school.

The Zonenkinder Collective describes their work as “meant as a confusing but positive counterbalance and alternative vision of living and as a creative statement against the status quo of greed, jealousy, arrogance, ignorance, self-righteousness, lack of liability and lack of respect the dignity of men”.

Zonen Kinder Collective

Zonenkinder Collective

Through murals, paintings and installations, the Zonenkinder Collective transforms the gallery into a visual epic meant to transport the viewer in to the peculiarity of their world and into the radicalism of their worldview.

courtesy McCaig-Welles

(courtesy McCaig Welles)

(courtesy McCaig Welles)

(courtesy McCaig Welles)

(courtesy McCaig Welles)

(courtesy McCaig Welles)

Zonenkinders "Bambule" <a href=@ McCaig Welles, New York City, 2009 by ZONENKINDER Collective.” width=”400″ height=”500″ />

Leather Daddy and friends at the show. (Courtesy Zonenkinder)

paint for fun

An example of Zonenkinder's work outside.

Creative Commons License photo credit: PixLjUicE23

McCaig Welles Gallery

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Deutschland im Haus! A few more days to enjoy Bambule.

It’s been up for a couple of weeks, but you can still hit the closing party Friday at McCaig Welles of

Bambule, a gallery wide installation and exhibition of artworks by the Zonenkinder Collective – two German graff-artists. The term “bambule“ derives from the German argot and is traditionally used to describe a form of protest practiced by prison inmates – drumming with different objects, like spoons, inside jail cells to articulate resistance…. Sounds like the lunchroom in my junior high school.

The Zonenkinder Collective describes their work as “meant as a confusing but positive counterbalance and alternative vision of living and as a creative statement against the status quo of greed, jealousy, arrogance, ignorance, self-righteousness, lack of liability and lack of respect the dignity of men”.

Zonen Kinder Collective

Zonenkinder Collective

Through murals, paintings and installations, the Zonenkinder Collective transforms the gallery into a visual epic meant to transport the viewer in to the peculiarity of their world and into the radicalism of their worldview.

courtesy McCaig-Welles

(courtesy McCaig Welles)

(courtesy McCaig Welles)

(courtesy McCaig Welles)

(courtesy McCaig Welles)

(courtesy McCaig Welles)

Zonenkinders "Bambule" <a href=@ McCaig Welles, New York City, 2009 by ZONENKINDER Collective.” width=”400″ height=”500″ />

Leather Daddy and friends at the show. (Courtesy Zonenkinder)

paint for fun

An example of Zonenkinder's work outside.

Creative Commons License photo credit: PixLjUicE23

McCaig Welles Gallery

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