All posts tagged: Noah Sparkes

Images of the Week 09.02.12

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Cassius Fouler, Cruz, Dan Witz, Distort, Don John, Faust, GR170, Hellbent, Knarf, Leon Reid IV, Lumpenpack Crew, Meer Sau, Noah Sparkes, Rae, Ryan Doyle, Sobekicis, Sofia Maldonado, Swoon, and Toven from places like Brooklyn, Baltimore, Copenhagen, Vienna, Austria and Croatia.

Special shout out to photographers Meer Sau, Henrik Haven, and our own Jaime Rojo for getting all these great exclusive shots for BSA readers.

Sofia Maldonado (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unkonwn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Knarf from Lumpenpack Crew in Vienna, Austria. (photo © Knarf)

Knarf from Lumpenpack Crew in Vienna, Austria. (photo © Knarf)

Meersau from Lumpenpack Crew. Knarf taking a piss in Croatia. (photo © Meer Sau)

Rae (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sobekcis in Copenhagen (photo © Henrik Haven)

Gr170 in Søllerødgade on the North Side of Copenhagen for Galore Festival. Stay tuned for more coverage of the Galore Festival coming this week. (photo © Henrik Haven)

Distort (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Toven in Baltimore (photo © Toven)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dan Witz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dan Witz. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cruz in Milan (photo © Federico Cruz)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Brooklyn Shelflife Project by Showpaper created for BAMArts 2012 and curated by Andrew H. Shirley included five sculptures that will serve as “kiosks” for Showpaper. Finally three of the pieces, shown above, were installed outside the Brooklyn Academy of Music as they were originally intended. From left to right: Swoon and Ryan Doyle, Leon Reid IV and Noah Sparkes, Cassius Fouler and Faust. Click here to see our coverage of this show as it was being installed back in June. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Swoon and Ryan Doyle piece being admired and contemplated for peeing upon. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Is this a quartet of pop heroes? Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Don John in Copenhagen (photo © Don John)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hellbent (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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“Brooklyn Shelf Life” and the Showpaper Installation at BAM

Paper boxes are an important vehicle for communications on the street , even as the City has tried to consolidate them into elaborate ‘street furniture’ schemes that often leave out independent voices. Showpaper, a free print publication has been churning out issues for five  years to give exposure to events and D.I.Y. culture around New York. It usually dedicates a large portion of print space and ink to an original artwork by an artist, and its listings provide an important exposure for artists and performers who haven’t yet been “discovered” by the larger media outlets.

Yesterday’s interview with UFO907 and W. Thomas Porter showed the amount of work and inspiration that went into their entry in the Showpaper show “Brooklyn Shelf Life” curated by Andrew H. Shirley at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.  5 pairs of artists affiliated with the New York street art scene were chosen to created new paper kiosks for the street. BSA was there in the BAM lobby to witness the installation of the sculptural pieces for Tuesday’s reception, and bring you the work of the other artists who prepared these pieces specifically for the show and to be placed on the streets of New York to distribute Showpaper.

The artists include Adam Void & Gaia, Cassius Fouler & Faust, Leon Reid IV & Noah Sparkes, Ryan C. Doyle & Swoon, and UFO 907 & W. Thomas Porter.

Leon Reid IV and Noah Sparkes (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Leon Reid IV and Noah Sparkes (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Leon Reid IV and Noah Sparkes (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Leon Reid IV and Noah Sparkes. A stack of Showpapers in a compartment behind the ear. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cassius Fouler and Faust (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cassius Fouler and Faust (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cassius Fouler and Faust (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cassius Fouler and Faust. A stack of showpapers. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon and Ryan Doyle (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon and Ryan Doyle (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon and Ryan Doyle (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon and Ryan Doyle (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon and Ryan Doyle. A stack of Showpapers inside the beehive. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia and Adam Void (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia and Adam Void (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia and Adam Void (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

General View of the Exhibition (photo © Jaime Rojo)

General View of the Exhibition (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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UFO Crashes at Brooklyn Academy of Music

UFO 907 & W. Thomas Porter Unveil Giant Wood / Metal Sculpture With 34 Eyes

“I think this is the kind of art work that people can step up to and they won’t say “Why the f*ck am I looking at this? I could do this – my kid could do this! I wanna blow people’s minds. I want people to be awestruck by it,” W. Thomas Porter exclaims in a burst of unhinged bravado that a master metal worker and inventor can claim after 3 consecutive weeks of custom cutting, bending, molding, and welding a crash-landing space ship, a 3-D realization of the UFO 907 graffiti moniker on it’s head.

 

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

With the graffiti guy known on the street as UFO 907 as his master woodworking partner, Porter has crawled like a monkey inside, around, and on top of every inch of this metal-skinned vessel with 34 rotating smooth wooden eyes.  Standing inside a Brooklyn studio staring up at this audacious labor intensive sculptural blast-off of inspiration and technical handy-work, you can’t believe that this is the same UFO who jumped roofs and trains for years spraying a rapid flat version of this ubiquitous alien vessel.

907 Crew fans may also experience a mind-melt when hearing first hand the soaring descriptive narrative UFO lets loose about this brand new street piece, “It’s a symphony between wood and metal. Seeing the wood next to the metals – it’s almost like jewelry work, it’s like it’s growing up out of the earth like a flower. It’s totally looking like this flower that is blooming, this metal is blooming out of all of this wood. It’s fun, man.” A tough NYC street graffiti writer who sometimes get’s dragged into the uncomfortable position of being called a Street Artist?  Nah, UFO is just an artist now, and the usually shy guy is so ripped about this project he frankly doesn’t care about the label. It’s about the work.

 

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Introduced last night at a reception hosted by The Brooklyn Academy of Music, this UFO will house a stash of copies of Showpaper, a free print publication that lists and promotes events and DIY culture all around New York. Commissioned with funding from BAMart: Public, the “Brooklyn Shelf Life Project” is Showpaper’s hand picked selection of Street Art affliated artists collaborating as pairs to create innovative new versions of the traditional street kiosk. Curated by Andrew H Shirley, the eclectic collection of street explorers also includes Adam Void & Gaia, Cassius Fouler & Faust, Leon Reid IV & Noah Sparkes, and Ryan C. Doyle & Swoon.

 

A sketch to the side of this preliminary mockup shows the full scale of the piece by UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A carpenter by trade, UFO 907 has been at it for 16 years but he didn’t try his hand at exploring his own graffiti tag in 3D till a few years ago. “It only made sense – I mean after over a decade drawing that stupid guy on the wall I began to wonder what he looked like in 3 dimensions…now I’m starting to wonder what the dude looks like in 5D!”

Porter says he started his path to metal work as a boy, tearing up old houses and rebuilding them with his father. “I’ve been making sculptures since I was 14, had no idea there was an art world then,” he says. Now that he is newly situated in his own Brooklyn studio, he’ll definitely be making more of his custom bike configurations (see his “F*ck Bike”) among other metal bending discoveries, “I’ve always been into material mashups,” he explains, “I started welding at 16, and metal became a gateway drug to all sorts of new possibilities.”

 

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

While touring through their respective studios, BSA had the opportunity to see the entire process of making the new sculpture for BAM, entitled “The End If the Beginning”. It was also good to talk with UFO 907 and W. Thomas Porter about how they teamed up, who the UFO character symbolizes, and what they’ll think if the sculpture gets vandalized on the street.

Brooklyn Street Art: When people think of UFO 907 on the streets, it’s a quick tag with not much detail. Don’t you think they would be pretty shocked to know how much time you put into a sculptural piece like this?
UFO 907:
I guess so. If there’s one thing I’ve learned all these years in the graffiti game is you never know what your going to get when you uncover the man behind the moniker.

I’ve always felt a kind of separation between my vandalism tendencies and my artistic urges. Sure my tags and retarded throwups can look artistic but it’s just a quick elementary thoughtless expression. I’m doing the macho getting up sh*t, pissing like a dog. But with my studio work I slow down to a f*cking snails pace, considering every detail, knowing each line of the brush/pen, each turn of the jigsaw, each stroke with the sander is injecting so much f*cking feeling and energy and power into the piece. So, if ya didn’t know, now ya know.

 

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: What part of this new piece are you most proud of?
UFO 907: I’m pretty excited to have the opportunity to work to such a large scale. I also always had a desire to fabricate a larger-than-life UFO piece and just love the idea of using metal. And of course I’m totally stoked to have the opportunity to be collaborating on such an intense piece with an artist and craftsmen I hold in high regard, W.Thomas Porter.

Brooklyn Street Art: The first time we saw a sculptural UFO it was with Ad Hoc Projects for a group show in Miami. The piece was called “Williamsburg Guy”. Was that the first time you did something like that?
UFO 907:
No, I have built a few smaller wooden UFO pieces before the “Williamsburg Guy” piece, and over the years I have messed around with some other materials to find the form I’m looking for.

Funny story about the first time we showed “Williamsburg Guy”;

The night we finished the piece I slapped together a crate and Doyle and myself threw the piece underneath the Chinatown bus, and took it down to Richmond Virginia for a group show we were involved in. If you know the size and weight of the piece that’s a pretty impressive feat. But it was free shipping! Go Chinatown Bus!

 

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © UFO)

UFO and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Since this is a vessel of sorts, and you have said your UFO tag is almost a self portrait, do you imagine yourself inside this sculpture looking out windows and swinging your 34 eyes in all directions looking at people?
UFO 907:
Not necessarily but I love that idea! At this point it seems less like being inside the sculpture – but more so I continue to see the UFO as an embodiment of my being. I have always seen the UFO as my self portrait, yes, but not in the sense of a photograph or painting of myself. It’s more like a window to my spirit energy and soul. The form, energy and idea behind UFO has continuously been evolving, morphing, and growing over the years. If it wasn’t it would be dead, right?

So, yes, I’m guessing at some point you might just find me sitting inside the mothership staring at ya’ll, plotting my next move. Ha ha HA!

Brooklyn Street Art: When you are making such labor-intensive carefully considered work and putting it out into the street, do you ever worry about it being vandalized?
UFO 907: Naw… that’s what happens to sh*t on the streets! I kind of secretly have a fantasy about a car running up the sidewalk and crashing into the piece. That would be pretty cool, as long as I get a nice photo of the piece pinned between the car and a brick wall!

Brooklyn Street Art: What has working with Thomas brought to your process?
UFO 907: I have been a fan of his work and his great craftsmen ship since I met him. I think I first met him the night me and Doyle were cramming to get “Williamsburg Guy” completed. Dude came through and he quietly handled shit, helping us get the piece done. Aces!

When I first heard that Andrew Shirley was curating this project, I told him I had to be on board and wanted Tom Porter as my partner. Tom has brought amazing metal work, which is not my craft but a material I love all the same, and he is a champ with the kinetics/mechanics helping us both bring our visions to life and adding many levels to the piece. As well Tom Porter is a perfect match with me with his boundless energy, obsessive attention to detail, grand positive visions, eternal positivity directed towards the project at hand. What a dude!!

 

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter. Inside view of the structure. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Yeah, your skills seem really well suited for collaboration.
UFO 907:
Yup we both have brought what we do best to the table and all thing immediately fell into place, leading to a seemingly effortless symphony of materials and ideas.

Brooklyn Street Art: Thomas, when you think of the sense of balance this piece has to have, do you rely on lessons learned from building other projects?
W. Thomas Porter :
We set out on this project without any concept of limitations. We just decided what we wanted to get out of it and said, “F*ck it, it’s on”. I think that confidence comes from having been a builder and a bizarre mind forever. Everything I’ve done leads me to this moment. We have to come correct.

Brooklyn Street Art: Is it difficult to carry a demanding project like this across the finish line? Do you get tired of the detail work?
W. Thomas Porter:
I don’t think it’s easy to get anything actually “finished”. Starting things is easy but getting there can be war. We are up against a tough deadline, a limited budget, working for money, UFO and I both just started new studios…it’s been hectic. As for the details, I’m with the devil. Every detail is an example or the bigger picture; it’s the fabric, and the pattern, the feel and what you see.

Brooklyn Street Art: This is a collaborative piece using the skills of a metal worker and a wood worker. How did you achieve an organic feeling with such rigid and sturdy materials?
W. Thomas Porter:
It’s amazing to work with someone like UFO; Half man, half beast and all gusto. We both came to a similar place by working with our hands while our brains are off in the universe. It’s only a matter of time before that all explodes into space! I always loved wood and metal together, flesh and bone. In this case, I had to make steel feel like skin, and without a single straight line anywhere – it’s a challenge. I was blessed to have a dedicated assistant like Dagga to help plow through the process. Out of extremely limited means we came up with something greater than the sum of its parts.

 

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © UFO)

 

UFO 907 in the wild. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 in the wild. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter. The sculpture arrived to BAM in parts. Here is one half. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter. Inside view of the armature. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“The Beginning if the End”, 2012, by UFO 907 and W. Thomas Porter

Materials: Yellow Pine, Walnut, Plywood, Epoxy, Cold Rolled Steel, Hot Rolled Steel, Bearings, Ball Joints, Hardware, Wax
 

Assistants: Dagga Gaines, Kelsey Womack, Jumbo, Diego Guzman, Sadue 907, and Hest One

“Brooklyn Shelf Life” is Presented by SHOWPAPER and curated by Andrew H. Shirley. Newsboxes commissioned by BAM for BAMart: Public.

Go to http://brooklynshelflife.org/ to learn more about this project. Joe Ahearn, Managing Director

Go to BAMart: Public to learn more about this program.

Stay tuned to BSA as tomorrow we’ll feature the rest of the sculptures of “Brooklyn Shelf Life” by Leon Reid IV + Noah Sparkles, Cassius Fouler + Faust, Swoon + Ryan Doyle and Gaia + Adam Void.  Also you can visit the Showpaper Tumblr http://showpaper.tumblr.com/ for more images.

 This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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BAMart Presents: Public (Brooklyn, NY)

BAMart: Public

BAMart: Public

June 2012—May 2013

Selected Artists:

Glen Baldridge
Timothy Hull & Future Expansion Architecture
Ed Purver
Showpaper
featuring Adam Void & Gaia, Cassius Fouler & Faust, Leon Reid IV & Noah Sparkes, Ryan C. Doyle & Swoon, UFO 907 & William Thomas Porter

BAMart: Public’s inaugural year presents four proposals for temporary art projects or interventions that enliven BAM’s campus and the surrounding BAM Cultural District. Selected through a juried open call, the participants’ works will transform underutilized spaces that serve as ideal platforms for creative expression within the distric using a variety of media and generating new and exciting ideas about ways to introduce art and culture into urban public space.

Opening reception
Tue, Jun 19, 6—8pm
Peter Jay Sharp Building
30 Lafayatte Ave, Brooklyn

Free

Leadership support for BAMart provided by Agnes Gund, Toby Devan Lewis, and Donald R. Mullen, Jr., with additional support provided by the Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc.

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Monster Island in Williamsburg; 2004-2011

By now it has been very well documented that Monster Island in Williamsburg, Brooklyn has closed its doors after seven years of art exploration and experimentation with murals, art shows and music concerts. The building is set for demolition and it is rumored that it will be replaced by a Whole Foods Store.

During these years we’ve watched the exterior of Monster Island with great interest as it was an every-changing heaven for emerging artists to show their stuff to the public. The environment engendered creativity; With non for profit art galleries and performance spaces, an underground music venue, a surf shop, a screen-print studio, a recording studio, several artists studios and a family of lovely street cats, Monster Island was a symbol of what Williamsburg was all about; artists and community struggling to make cool stuff for each other and sometimes a big audience. Since the early 1990s, ad-hoc love-driven venues like this have opened and closed, along with art parties, loft performances, artist collectives, and a loose association of art galleries. The settlement of writers, dancers, bands, performers, and all sorts of artists helped give the area a decided edge, even if you couldn’t convince your Manhattan friends to come visit the neighborhood at night.

Kid Acne (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Now “The Edge” of course is the name of a corporate looking glass tower on the waterfront and the moderate frightened masses began their march to Williamsburg after the developers re-zoned 30+ blocks in North Brooklyn in 2005, transforming it quickly to a New York suburb with quirky, kooky shopping opportunities. It’s an old story, but we have to tell it; Now the rents are too high and the culture is increasingly inhospitable to artists and the Monster Island landlord has a different plan for the lot and the lease wasn’t renewed.  Williamsburg is going upscale just like Manhattan and the rest of the city and for struggling artists and the venues that give them shelter and nurture them this is another reason why we are watching people move to other neighborhoods or out of New York altogether. In a way, this is what NYC is all about; Re-invention and greed.

We have been photographing the ever-changing facade of this building that was offered as a canvas for local and visiting artists all over the world to put their art up. Today we pay homage and say farewell to this iconic institution and to the people that endeavored to make it unique with a photo essay of the numerous murals that went up there since 2004. We have made an effort to identify most of the artists. Please let us know if you know the names of the artists we have tagged as unknown or if we erroneously credited a piece of art.

Armsrock (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Armsrock (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Maya Hayuk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ripo and Maya Hayuk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 “This Wall Could Be Your Life” was a 7-year project conceived, curated and solely funded by Maya Hayuk. “For the following seven years artists were invited from all over the world, given paint, space and freedom to create” Maya Hayuk. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This spring the Lilac bush outside the building was majestic. Punto and Blok’s mural on the background. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Wolfy (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Noah Sparkes (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ROA pulls a rabbit out of a hog. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

MOMO and Zosen  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

MOMO and Zosen working on a makeover. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Waldo with a hook looks on as an artist works on a makeover. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Troy Lovegates AKA OTHER. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Troy Lovegates AKA Other, Deuce 7 and Pork. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

YOTE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hellbent and Hellcat (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cat with Punto’s mural in the background. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

I just finished my installation. Time to take a cat nap. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A Spring 2011 model. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kyle Ranson and Oliver Halsman Rosenberg. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Julia Langhof (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Maya Hayuk. As a final collective event, a paint pour and block party was organized in September. Multiple artists went up to the roof and poured paint down the walls, a colorful blessing on the home that gave so many opportunities to artists and built community.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Maya Hayuk. Paint Pour (photo © Jaime Rojo)

An unknown artist painted this figure while the building awaits demolition. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Uphues gives the building a heart while it awaits demolition. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Fun Friday 09.09.11

Fun-Friday

1. Freedia Video Exhortation
2. Guy Denning at Brooklynite Gallery Pop Up
3. LUDO in a Solo Show tonight “Metamorphosis” at High Roller Society (London)
4. YOUNITY is YOU! See the Goddesses Saturday in Yonkers (NYC)
5. Pandemic Says Goodbye to Summer with “Heat Beaten” Group Show
6. Australian Street Artists in San Francisco’s 941 Geary
7. “His Wife & Her Lover” at Primary Projects (Miami)

Okay everybody GET UP! Before we get cookin’ on too many projects today let’s everybody get up and do a dance to Friday and to life and the creative spirit that’s running through every person right now! This ain’t no rehearsal peepul. Miss Freedia gonna show us how to work it.

Guy Denning at Brooklynite Gallery Pop Up

Opening last night in a smoke filled ripped up storefront below Canal and above City Hall was this shrine filled show of meditations on 9/11, and the places we go amidst the memories and the rubble. Rae from Brooklynite spoke about the balance you try to strike when presenting a show like this, and they have probably hit it. Mixing headlines, languages, and the metaphor of purgatory with the anguish, longing, celebration and poetry that somehow coexist, Denning does a tender justice to us all.

brooklyn-street-art-WEB2-guy-denning-brooklynite-gallery

For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=23974

LUDO in a Solo Show tonight “Metamorphosis” at High Roller Society (London)

LUDO’s been working in the laboratory, and tonight you are allowed to enter it.

brooklyn-street-art-WEB-LUDO-jaime-rojo-Chicago-08-11-web-12

LUDO (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=23927

YOUNITY is YOU! See the Goddesses Saturday in Yonkers (NYC)

The YOUNITY Art Collective group show “Goddess Hood” opens on Saturday  at the Yonkers Public Libray and boasts a really impressive line up of contemporary female artists working today in NYC. Some say that the female energy is what is going to lead us through the times ahead, and if so, these artists with rock solid connection to the street have lanterns in hand: Lichiban, Swoon, Sofia Maldonado, Krista Franklin, Marthalicia, Diana McClure, Faith 47, lmnop, Lady Alezia, and Alice Mizrachi

brooklyn-street-art-WEB-YOUNITY-lmnop-jaime-rojo-07-11-web

LMNOP (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=24291

Pandemic Says Goodbye to Summer with “Heat Beaten” Group Show

Williamsburgs Southside hub of authentic street culture and a charming Joie de Smartass brings you another fun event and show – “Heat Beaten”.

brooklyn-street-art-WEB-Pandemic-sofia-maldonado-primary-flight-miami-2010-jaime-rojo-01-11

Sofia Maldonado (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=23982

Australian Street Artists in San Francisco’s 941 Geary

In San Francisco the Australians have staged an ART invasion both on the streets and with a show at the 941 Geary Gallery. If you were wondering why the Australians are at the forefront of Street Art please turn your electronic gadgets off and get up and go see some hot art with: Anthony Lister, Kid Zoom, Dabs & Myla, DMote, New2, Ben Frost, Meggs, Ha Ha, Reka, Rone, Sofles and Vexta.

brooklyn-street-art-anthony-lister-jaime-rojo-street-art-los-angeles-08-11-webAnthony Lister (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=24112

“His Wife & Her Lover” at Primary Projects (Miami)

In Miami things get heated at Primary Projects group show : “His Wife & Her Lover”.  To find what happens to either the wife, the lover or the husband put your high heeled boots on, comb your hair, spray some cologne on and wish for the best.

brooklyn-street-art-mark-jenkins-jaime-rojo-armory-week-art-fairs-nyc-03-11-20-web

Mark Jenkins (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=23938

Check out Primary Flight teaser video art directed by Primary Flight c0-founder Chris Oh and shoot by Peter Vahan. “Good Night and Farewell”

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Pandemic Gallery Presents: “Heat Beaten” A Group Show (Brooklyn, NY)

Heat Beaten
brooklyn-street-art-pandemic-galleryWell it’s been hot… DAMN HOT! The heat has beaten us yet again. But the summer is about to start winding down into fall, and to the eventual cold grip of winter. So in celebration… or acceptance… of this annual de-swelter we are hosting a multimedia group show with 9 great artists hailing from New York and Philadelphia. With work ranging from painting, printmaking, sculpture and installation, as well as murals painted directly on the gallery walls. The show will be a great farewell to the hot summer and a welcome mat for the cool autumn season.

Please join us for:

“Heat Beaten”
A summer’s end art show
Saturday, Sept. 10th
opening 7-11pm

Featuring:
Abby Goodman
Buildmore

El Hase
Ellis G

John Skibo
KA
Noah Sparkes
Sofia Maldonado
W. Thomas Porter

PANDEMIC gallery
37 Broadway btwn Kent and Wythe
Brooklyn, NY 11211
www.pandemicgallery.com

Gallery hours:
Tues.-Fri. 11-6pm
Sat. & Sun. 12-7pm
closed Monday
or by appointment

L train to Bedford ave, J train to Marcy ave, or Q59 bus to Broadway/Wythe

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“Bizarre! Weird Bikes! Weird Art!” silent auction benefit at Brooklyn Fireproof

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“Bizarre! Weird Bikes! Weird Art!” silent auction benefit

Hosted by Brooklyn Fire Proof East, 119 Ingraham Street, Brooklyn, NY

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010 8pm-Midnight

From the D.I.Y. scene in Brooklyn comes a show of epic proportion featuring art and design themed around the greatest celebrity of the modern era, the BIKE!!!

This exhibition draws together talented artists from NY to California around the launch of PORTER CYCLES, an independent bike builder established in 2010 in Brooklyn. All types of media will be represented: film, prints, photography, sculpture, installation, sound art, performance, and more.  Also, a variety of weird bikes, performance track bikes, and cargo trailers will be displayed.  Everything will be auctioned between 8pm and midnight.  All proceeds go to the artists unless donated to Porter Cycles by artist.

DJ’s, live-silk-screening, and bike performances will run throughout the night.

Artists:

Amy Smalls, Amigo Unit, Andrew H. Shirley, AVOID ∏, Chloe Swantner, Conrad Carlson, DARKCLOUDS, DeeDock-Hobby Horse-5003, Hillel, Ellis Gallagher,Fumie Ishii, Greg Henderson, Ian Helwig, Ian Vanek, Jennifer Shear, Julian C. Duron, Ian Colon, Julie Glassberg, Keith Pavia, Lindsay Ellesar, MIKEY 907, Nick Chatfield-Taylor, Noah Sparkes, Ryan Doyle,  Tod Seelie
Tony Bones, Travis Moonschien, UFO 907, Weiwei Lin, William T. Porter,

Curators: Andrew H. Shirley  and W.T.Porter  (wthomasporter@gmail.com)

Event Space Coordinator: Leslie Padoll  (leslie@brooklynfireproof.com)

Porter Cycles exists to serve the bicycle, cyclists, and bicycle culture.

Porter Cycles designs and builds human powered vehicles of all types, including practical use vehicles, utility vehicles, and carriage trailers for the commercial market.

Porter Cycles’ future goal is to replace the semi-truck+trailer with a human-powered equivalent capable of long distance travel under heavy cargo through all conditions.

Porter Cycles is an active participant of the sustainable-living movement.

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Braddock Street Art: A Town Ready for Renaissance

A Small Town Mayor Invites Street Artists to Revive His Abandoned Town – Swoon and Others Heed the Call.

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By Salome Oggenfuss

    An abandoned church now referred to as "Transformazium" by Street Artist Swoon and some friends who recently purchased it for renovation in Braddock, PA. (photo © Salome Oggenfuss)

An abandoned church now referred to as "Transformazium" by Street Artist Swoon and some friends who recently purchased it for renovation in Braddock, PA. (photo © Salome Oggenfuss)

Artist and photographer Salome Oggenfuss recently took a trip from Bushwick, Brooklyn to visit the town of Braddock, Pennsylvania. She invites us to take a look at the beautiful work she found on the streets there, and to consider moving.

Braddock is a small town about a half hour drive outside of Pittsburgh in the Pennsylvania “Rust Belt”. In its heyday in the 1970s, the town used to boast about 20,000 residents, but when the steel industry started collapsing soon after, people moved away. The crack epidemic in the 80s further diminished the town’s population, and nowadays only about 3,000 people are left in Braddock and almost half of the town’s buildings are unoccupied.

A view inside an abandoned house. (photo © Salome Oggenfuss)

A view inside an abandoned house. (photo © Salome Oggenfuss)

A long view of Braddock with a mural by Noah Sparkes on the building on the right. (photo © Salome Oggenfuss)

A view inside an abandoned house. (photo © Salome Oggenfuss)

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Year In Images 2009 from Jaime Rojo

Street Art photographer Jaime Rojo captured a few thousand images in 2009 to help document the wildly growing Street Art scene in New York.

A veteran of 10 years shooting the streets of New York, Rojo has amassed a collection of images that capture the scene with the appreciation of an artist. To celebrate the creative spirit that is alive and well on the streets of New York, this slide video gives a taste of what happened in ‘09, without pretending to present the whole scene or all the artists, known and anonymous, who add to the ongoing conversation.

Included in this collection of images (in no particular order) are pieces by Skewville, Specter, The Dude Company, Judith Supine, C215, WK Interact, Anthony Lister, Miss Bugs, Bast, Chris from Robots Will Kill (RWK), Os Gemeos, Cake, Celso, Imminent Disaster, Mark Cavalho, NohJ Coley, Elbow Toe, Feral, Poster Boy, Bishop203, Jon Burgerman, Royce Bannon, Damon Ginandes, Conor Harrington, Gaia, JC2, Logan Hicks, Chris Stain, Armsrock, Veng from Robots Will Kill (RWK), Noah Sparkes, Robots Will Kill, Heracut, Billy Mode, Revs, Skullphone, Spazmat, Mint and Serf, Roa, Aakash Nihilani, Broken Crow, Peru Ana Ana Peru, & Cern

All images © Jaime Rojo

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Images of Week 06.14.09

Images of Week 06.14.09

Bishop 203

Black Heart in the Sun (Bishop 203)  (photo Steven P. Harrington)

JMR
Yo, check out the color! (JMR) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Judith Supine
Department of Parks Pool Rules: No. 4: Please check that there is water before you dive into the pool. (Judith Supine) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Noah Spark and?
Portrait of a barmaid. (Noah Sparkes and?)  (photo Jaime Rojo)

Shark Toof

Department of Parks Pool Rules: No. 7: Inspect pool for sharks (Shark Toof) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Sol 25
“Why you haven’t changed a BIT.  You look just as good as when we graduated.  How do you do it?” (Sol 25) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Specter Bishop203

It's an upside down world we are living in. (Spector & Bishop203) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Tian
Waiting for something to fall out of your burrito (Tian) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Veng RWK
Cracking a smile? (Veng RWK) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Gaia
Hunny, there’s a bear on the roof! (Gaia)  (photo Jaime Rojo)

Leif Mcllwaine
A tribute, to say the least (Leif Mcllwaine) (photo Jaime Rojo)

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It Takes a Village at Factory Fresh : “Boxed In” show

Are we envisioning a future of Hoovervilles?

It’s a weekend of opening doors!  

Tonight’s is going to welcome you to a Great Recession-era cardboard box village created by contemporary and urban (street) artists, to register a commentary on the on-going squeeze people are feeling here.  

Who better than street artists could help us live on the street in style? With jobs evaporating, the public sector heaving, the hand-out happy banks still refusing loans, and landlords still scalping, it’s easier than ever to imagine a future with the hapless hordes resorting to building their homestead in an empty lot with shipping boxes and various found objects.  Think of this show as Martha Stewart for the skid-row set.


“Boxed In” A group art exhibit

presented by
Factory Fresh and Plaztik Mag 

Opens May 1st, 7-10pm
show runs till May 21st
 
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