All posts tagged: Geometricks

Hellbent, Rubin, and Aakash Nihalani In Progress on Domino Walls in BK

Hellbent, Rubin, and Aakash Nihalani In Progress on Domino Walls in BK

Williamsburg once ran heavy with renegade Street Art; names like Faile, Swoon, Bast, Shepard Fairey, Gaia, NohJColey, Judith Supine, Momo, Elbowtoe, Dain, DarkClouds, Matt Siren, Armsrock, Dennis McNett… well you get the point. Add about 40 more names and you can begin to re-construct the explosion that happened here mostly because industry had died and artists in the 80s and 90s and early 00s flocked to the previously industrial maritime neighborhood for space to create art, mount exhibitions, and have lots of free sex. Just checking to see if you were paying attention.

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Hellbent at work on his portion of the wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Now almost 10 years into a North Brooklyn rezoning and construction boom (with a small break for the Great Recession) some of those same street artists are actually invited to paint walls in the same neighborhood – by landlords, advertisers, developers, and businesses. The Domino Sugar Factory, long an employer and symbol of industry on the river is now beginning a humungous decade-long renovation with new buildings planned while retaining the old refinery building on the site. Before buildings started coming down last summer these mammoth green construction walls went up, creating this sort of municipal/industrial sealed green monotony for five blocks on Kent Avenue.

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Hellbent at work on his portion of the wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Today Hellbent, Rubin, and Aakash Nihalani, three artists who have been doing work in the streets for much of this time (and who have each made inroads into the gallery system), are each taking on their largest projects ever and culling more friends and buckets and cans and courage than ever to knock out these prodigious paintings. We’re calling it “Domino Walls” because we’re clever at naming things and we’re acting as “curatorial advisors” because hey, that’s what we do. BSA has a history of working with community and arts institutions, small and large, to give a variety of street artists a voice and to introduce them to greater audiences. This project provides a showcase to some of the strong voices who are familiar with working on the streets and who are pushing that language in new directions.

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Hellbent. Process shot. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A lot of urban art academics and critics have been talking about this new hybrid of art on the street that is sometimes called ‘graffuturism’ and we are very gratified to present a few of the new practitioners on the street who reflect it. Employing geometric shapes, deconstruction, abstraction, minimalism, even Op Art techniques, this quickly shifting movement unites graffiti, street art, and contemporary; at once futuristic while paying tribute to art movements more than a hundred years old. With MOMA’s “Inventing Abstraction” show last year and the Guggenheim’s “Italian Futurists” show right now, we feel like our 2012 show “Geometricks” right here in Brooklyn was actually just ahead of the curve. Putting Hellbent, Aakash, and Rubin together on massive walls in Williamsburg feels like this is right on time for this decade.

So we’ll tell you more about the project and each artist a little later but we wanted to show you the progress thus far so you know what is going on on these giant walls. If you are planning to see the astounding Kara Walker show that opens this week on the site and features more sugar than you can consume during a month of Halloweens – you’ll also definitely be seeing some rockin’ eye candy in progress right on the street here as well.

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Hellbent. Detail of one of the stencils. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“We all work in different ways but in a similar abstract nature and that is kind of why we are here together.  It shows a little of the arc of abstraction and the different sort of forms you can go with.  We’re all pretty geometric at the same time – using the power of the clean line and using optical tricks,” says Hellbent as he and his team are on their 9th day knocking out a nearly 500 foot long piece called We Walk (REM).

“I like the way Jaime (Rojo) described this wall when he said I was changing the shape of the wall through color and pattern and repetitions and that the visual effect pushes you forward. I think that more or less describes the movement for me at this moment and it is what I have been doing.”

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Aakash Nihalani at work on his portion of the wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Aakash doesn’t typically work with paint and stencils, preferring his trademark bright masking tape method of revealing geometry in public spaces but he is going huge here for his piece tentatively titled Spaced. “I don’t have a lot of roots in graffiti, I mean, we share the same territory and spaces.  But I don’t liken myself to a graffiti artist per se.  I mean it does make sense that after a certain amount of time in a period of an art movement that it is bound to start deconstructing and abstracting, concentrating more on the form instead of the content. So I guess that kind of makes sense and I guess my work sort of fits in with that evolution, so its definitely part of that, but it is not intentional.”

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Askash Nihalani letting the sky bust through on this work in progress. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Aakash and his assistant at work on the wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Aakash Nihalani. Process shot. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rubin at work on his portion of the wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

One of the most active graffiti writers in Sweden in the 1990s, Rubin has been deconstructing his earlier work and uncovering his Finnish/Swedish DNA. For his block long Resistance V. Acceptance, he says “I’m busy looking forward – I’m very much influenced by the Futurist movement , the Bauhaus. It’s also really natural for me growing up in Scandinavia – I grew up with the streamline and the IKEA – so it is like a parallel with the minimalism of Scandinavia so when I discovered the whole Futurist movement it made perfect sense,” he explains.

“Moving to working more large scale I had to adapt my work so that I can still work fast. It suits me so well. It is also is about balance – it can’t be too geometric so its’ always a struggle so that is why I try to keep my work free hand – so I don’t use projectors and stencils. I started using the chalk line more because it’s a time saver, but also I try to keep it analog and organic and physical. It can’t be too sharp – there has to be a more human element”

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Rubin and one of his assistants at work on the wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rubin process shot. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rubin’s detail of his sketch for the project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Read Part II of this project here:

“Done!” Murals from Rubin, Aakash, & Hellbent : Domino Walls Part II

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Overunder LNY and ND’A Study and Play in Bushwick

Even as they shoot spit-wads at the windows and doodle intensely in the margins of their notebooks while constantly shifting in their chairs in the back row of English class, these two ADHD kids are paying sideways attention to the teacher and not really trying to cause trouble. If you want to keep their attention you just need to keep them engaged and help them channel their energy productively because the next thing you know Overunder and ND’A will be eyeballing the fire extinguisher or pulling apart the wall clock to see what makes it tick…

Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Two of the new crop of painters on the street who can’t keep their metaphors unmixed, Overunder and ND’A are sprinting through Brooklyn looking for new walls and ladders right now, and they’ve covered a lot of space already this new fall semester. The fast talking buddies have a way of playing off each others’ fantastic ideas and stories that will get you lost if you try to follow them, with words and symbols and meanings tossed into a clothes dryer and tumbled. Give ’em a spot, some bucket paint, and a couple of cans, and who knows what you’ll get. But you won’t be bored.

While their individual styles are distinct, with OU blending realism and figurative forms with architectural elements and ND’A giving a gritty low-brow cartoon monster treatment to his symbols and characters, the fluidity of undulating shapes and the free flow of ideas keeps these two in the same school. Here are a couple of new pieces of theirs for you to grade as they run down the hall and out the double back doors onto the playground to swing from the monkey bars and look up girls skirts. Here on this wall Overunder found a way to interact with that other devilish, horns ‘n all bad boy LNY. The results are well balanced with both pieces complimenting each other.

Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

LNY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder on the left with LNY on the right. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder and LNY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ND’A (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ND’A (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ND’A (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ND’A (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder is one of the artists participating in GEOMETRICKS currently on view at Gallery Brooklyn.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Sneak Peeks from Geometricks

The show’s up and the bubbly is waiting for the iceman to cometh and of course we hope you’ll be rolling through as Hellbent curates our first “Vandals or Visionaries” show, entitled GEOMETRICKS.

Tricks are for kids, and for Olek, who has reserved one of her raunchy text messages for you to discover crocheted into her sculpture, and for Overunder, who is hanging his free wheeling story-telling metaphors with pattern overlays on large sheets of draftsman paper. It’s also tricky to make your eyes focus through multiple abstractions, line plays, blinding colors, and rippling patterns that jump off at you as you walk through the gallery space.

Augustine Kofie. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

All of these artists have been bringing it to the streets, and all come at it from different perspectives. See One developed his through the NYC graffiti scene, Augustine Kofie evolved his draftsman approach out of his days as a writer in LA during the 90s, and Jaye Moon is a fine artist from Korea who’s had a gallery career before she started taking Legos to the streets. But when you see it all together, you realize there is one new language in formation in the Street Art AND Graffiti scene.

Augustine Kofie. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Art from the streets has been heralding a new eye-popping geometric disorder that can now fairly be called a movement.

With roots in recent art history and the rhythms of the street, artists are giving themselves over to pungent color, pattern, grid inspired line, and a sharp edged abstraction. No one can say what has moved the conversation toward this aesthetic — it all mimics the repetitive patterns that are found in nature as well as the cool symmetries programmed by human industry. These modern alchemists from across the globe are somehow pumping the Street Art scene with an oxygen-rich supply of lifeblood and a variety of possible directions to explore.” ~ from Color, Geometry and Pattern on the Streets, our recent piece on the Huffington Post.

Overunder. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Olek. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Maya Hayuk. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaye Moon. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaye Moon. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Feral Child. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Drew Tyndell. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Chor Boogie. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

MOMO. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

See One. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

See the GEOMETRICKS Facebook Page
Download PDF of Flyer and Invite here.

The Announcement Here

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Fun Friday 09.21.12

Yo Yo what’s up all the Brooklyn peepuls and the New Yorkers and the LA’ers and the Chicago’ers and the Stavanger Norway buddies and shout out to Martha as she hangs in Johannesburg today and to everybody who’s brave enough to tap into the creative spirit. Today in Brooklyn it’s sunny and bright and there’s a bird singing on the chain link fence outside my house. As usual the place to be is where you’re at. Also, we’d be really happy to meet you tomorrow at our show in Red Hook if you can fly by.

1. Kit Kat Flex Dancer in Brooklyn (VIDEO)
2. GEOMETRICKS Opens Saturday (BKLYN)
3. Shai Dahan “Broken Window” (Sweden)
4. Fall Group Exhibition at C.A.V.E (LA)
5. Sydney curates a show on the Street (Australia)
6. “Luchadores” by El Hase is now open to the public at One Art Space in Manhattan.7. Ricky Powell is “Back in BK” and you can catch him tonight at Mishka in Brooklyn
7. PUBLIC WORKS PART I By Jason Wawro (VIDEO)
8. PUBLIC WORKS PART II By Jason Wawro (VIDEO)
9. Narcelio Grud: “Spiral”  Invention and Graffiti (VIDEO)
10. TEJN Has a lock on Street Art (VIDEO)
11. Don John in Copenhagen by Alexander Lee (VIDEO)

Let’s start Friday by getting inspired by KitKat – a Brooklyn flex dancer who knows her stuff. (VIDEO)

GEOMETRICKS Opens Saturday (BKLYN)

Of course we had to put this one first because we have 11 cool artists showing work that collectively illustrates one of the major new directions that Street Art and Graffiti are going in right now.

The Red Hook neighborhood is where the fun will be this Saturday as the opening of “GEOMETRICKS”, curated by Hellbent,  takes place at Gallery Brooklyn. With a FREE shuttle from the G/F Trains on Carroll St to the Gallery courtesy of local Brooklyn Crab restaurant, a Young Collectors Wall with dope pieces by the artists in the show all priced at $200 each (you must have valid student ID for these pieces), and music provided by Sleptember, you are going to see a slice of community we’ve all grown to love.

Support  the inaugural show of “Vandal or Visionaries” Series by BSA and enjoy the beautiful art works by: Augustine Kofie, Chor Boogie, Drew Tyndell, Feral Child, Hellbent, Jaye Moon, Maya Hayuk, MOMO, OLEK, OverUnder, See One. Then join us at Brooklyn Crab to hang after the show – and the restaurant will be offering a FREE shuttle back to the G/F Trains. So what’s there not to like? And we thank our local Red Hook based sponsor, SixPoint Brewery.

Detail of Drew Tyndell on the Foreground. “GEOMETRICKS” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

See more about GEOMETRICKS on Vandalog, Graffurism, Arrested Motion, NY Taco, Donut Chocula, ArtSlant, Premium Mints, 12 oz Prophet, – we thank you all for your support.

Shai Dahan “Broken Window” (Sweden)

A Gallery in Göteborg, Sweden is hosting American Street Artist Shai Dahan with his solo exhibition titled “Broken Window” opening on Saturday.

Shai Dahan ( Image © courtesy of the artist)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Fall Group Exhibition at C.A.V.E (LA)

C.A.V.E. Gallery in Venice, Beach, CA invites you to their Fall Group Exhibition with an eclectic mix of fine and Street Artists including:

YOUNG CHUN * PAT PERRY * RADICAL! * BRANDON BOYD
MEAR ONE * CRAWW * MAX NEUTRA * J. SHEA
RESTITUTION PRESS * NOM KINNEAR KING * JOHN PARK
CHERRI WOOD * HANS HAVERON * KYLE HUGHES-ODGERS aka CREEPY
BAYO * SHAUNNA PETERSON * CODAK * L CROSKEY
KEN GARDUNO * SOPHIE BASTIEN * JoKa * RAFAEL DELGADO

Radical! on the streets of Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Sydney curates a show on the Street (Australia)

It looks like the Australians’ love affair for Street Art continues strong. Ambush Gallery has teamed up with Darling Quartet, Sydney’s new precinct and public arts space to mount an outdoor exhibition opening to the public today. The works of art on view are by a handful of well known and respected Street Artists working today including: Anthony Lister (Bris/NY), Beastman (Syd), Shannon Crees (Syd) and Hiroyasu Tsuri/TWOONE (Melb). The exhibition is FREE, open 24/7 and it will be illuminated at night.

Anthony Lister working on his contribution for this show. (image © courtesy of Ambush Gallery)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Also happening this weekend:

“Luchadores” by El Hase is now open to the public at One Art Space in Manhattan. Click here for more details on this show.

Ricky Powell is “Back in BK” and you can catch him tonight at Mishka in Brooklyn. Click here for more details on this show.

PUBLIC WORKS PART I By Jason Wawro (VIDEO)

PUBLIC WORKS PART II By Jason Wawro (VIDEO)

To learn more about LALA Arts Public Works Project with the participation of Ron English and Shepard Fairey, as well as How & Nosm, Insa, Push, Revok, Risk, Seen, Trustocorp, WCA Crew, Uglar and Zes click here.

Narcelio Grud: “Spiral”  Invention and Graffiti (VIDEO)

TEJN Has a lock on Street Art (VIDEO)

Sculptor TEJN from Copenhagen broadens our conception of what street art and public art and sculpture are with his installations that he chains and locks and leaves. Basically, he’s just giving you his art, and if you really want it probably you will need a blow torch.

Don John in Copenhagen by Alexander Lee (VIDEO)

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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GEOMETRICKS Update: FREE Shuttle & Young Collectors Wall

The show is looking great! And we’re happy to make a few new announcements below. We sent this out to the email list with an incorrect photo for the Kofie Augustine image below so if you got one of those in your email box we apologize.

 

BSA teams up with Gallery Brooklyn, Brooklyn Crab, and Sixpoint Brewery to bring you a great night in Red Hook, Brooklyn on September 22nd.

JUST ANNOUNCED – FREE SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE courtesy Brooklyn Crab! Service from F/G train at the Carroll Street Station to the Gallery and crab house and back to the train, free.

BRAND NEW ART WORKS by 11 Street Artists of this moment.

YOUNG COLLECTORS WALL for Students With Valid ID (download PDF Flyer and Invite)

Music by SLEPTEMBER

Brand new gallery work from 11 Street Artists, including Augustine Kofie, Chor Boogie, Drew Tyndell, Feral Child, Hellbent, Jaye Moon, Maya Hayuk, MOMO, OLEK, OverUnder, See One.

Read More about GEOMETRICKS here.

Photos of GEOMETRICKS Artists

Chor Boogie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Augustine Kofie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

OLEK (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Maya Hayuk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaye Moon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

MOMO (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Over Under (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Feral Child (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hellbent (photo © Jaime Rojo)

See One (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Drew Tyndell (photo courtesy artist)

Click here to download the PDF of the Flyer and Invitation

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Chor Boogie “The Divided States of America”

As New York marks the 11th year since the September 11 attacks on our city, a sort of solemn sadness was evident on the subways and on the streets this morning, or maybe we’re just projecting our own sadness and feelings of loss.  In those days afterward it felt like we had put down our differences and unified in our sorrow and our determination.  We were changed by those events, and are still learning from them.

Now in 2012, news organizations are estimating that 6 billion dollars will be spent during this presidential campaign. “17 angry old white men will wake up and realize they’ve just bought the country,” said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid this summer. He was referring to our new system that for the first time enables anyone from anywhere to contribute as much as they want to a campaign and do it secretly. Free speech sounds pretty expensive, and we don’t even know who is speaking.

Chor Boogie “Lady Liberty” (photo © courtesy of the artist)

“How do we revive Lady Liberty from suffocation of war, pain and inequality?” Chor Boogie

Our right to free speech and expression was heralded as something “the terrorists” hated. Today as evidence that the right to free speech is alive and well, Street Artist and fine artist Chor Boogie creates a series of new paintings called “Divided States of America”

Coinciding the release of the paintings with the just concluded theater of the Republican and Democratic national conventions and anticipating the upcoming debates, Chor wanted to emphasize what he sees as our current and most pressing problems that directly and daily affect the lives of American citizens such as immigration, energy resources, poverty, class and the erosion of liberty and democracy. The collection is full of plain symbols and texts that can stir emotions and opinions and will be on tour through the US leading up to the elections, encouraging people to speak up and debate the issues that are not always talked about by the politicians and that definitely are are not always easy to grapple with.

Politics and art are frequently strange bedfellows because meanings are open to interpretation, and invariably passions are inflamed. So be it, Americans can handle a good lively open debate, with respect for others and their opinion. That’s how the system was supposed to work.

Chor Boogie “Pain at the Pump” (photo © courtesy of the artist)

“Can America pledge allegiance to finding sustainable solutions?” Chor Boogie

Chor Boogie “Annuit Coeptis” (photo © courtesy of the artist)

“How do we restore the voice of the people as the political authority in the United States?” Chor Boogie

Chor Boogie “The Ultimate Sacrifice” (photo © courtesy of the artist)

“How do we recapture our faith in American values, and forsake our fanatical lust for money and power?” Chor Boogie

Chor Boogie “The United State” (photo © courtesy of the artist)

“Will we plot the right course to bring America from divided to united?” Chor Boogie

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Chor Boogie works and lives in San Francisco. His more abstract work will be shown at GEOMETRICKS opening on Sept. 22 in Brooklyn, NY. Click here for more information on GEOMETRICKS.

 

 

 

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SEE ONE Merges Graffiti and Street Art Abstractly with Flying “Shards”

SEE ONE Merges Graffiti and Street Art Abstractly with Flying “Shards”

New Video Debut and Interview with the “GEOMETRICKS” artist See One

A New York native, See One is a self-taught visual artist with a big imagination which was electrified as a kid in the city seeing graffiti growing up in the 1980s. Constantly drawing for hours on end as a child, he was also inspired by the characters, cartoons, and comic books of the time and he began creating his own world at a young age in sketchbooks and on walls. His initial pieces on the street were character-based and paid homage to that earlier New York traditional graffiti style, and he still likes that too.

Around 2009 See One began to experiment and develop a more abstract style for his works on canvas and on the street, using a recurring symbol that he now refers to as “Shards”. As his style evolved, a new world opened before him as his swift and swooping hand and arm movements produced fluid and jagged abstract graffiti patterns that fly and flow, evoking broken shards of glass that inhabit a third dimension, making the art pop off the wall. With this new practice, See One effectively opened a door for himself to combine graffiti and Street Art influences into one distinctive vision.

Beginning September 22nd new work by See One will be featured in the GEOMETRICKS show curated by Hellbent and presented by BSA.

See One. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: You have evolved through graffiti and more character based work in your painting to something that seems newly abstract. How is the experience different when working with more abstract forms and shapes?
See One:
It’s a totally different world.  All the rules that apply when drawing characters or environments are thrown out because none of it applies to the style. I’ve learned that my abstract work bends and breaks all rules that I try to implement. With each new painting the style grows and evolves and is far different from doing illustrations – It’s a wild style on its own.

 

See One. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Is it important to have a label for the kind of work you do on the street?
See One:
No, but I think the public’s need to give it a label is high though. People don’t know what they’re looking at when they see a wall or painting. My Shards are a hybrid of styles so it can be tough to put it in any certain category.  I don’t see a need to label it.  It should just be.

Brooklyn Street Art: How has the work of Jose Parla impacted you or inspired you? Why is he good?
See One:
Jose Parla is the man! Long before I started doing my abstracted works, he inspired me.  I always like the way he builds history in his paintings; Some of them literally look like uncovered walls from the 1980s, which I find fascinating. Now that I am doing abstract work he stills inspires me because we are both working in layers, texture and depth – in two completely different ways. Jose Parla is great at capturing the feeling of an era in one of his paintings and his eye for detail is amazing. I hope to meet him one day.

Here is the new video of See One at work on this wall –  produced and created by

 

See One started his engagement with graff and Street Art with a character he continues to dig. This week we found him  merging all his styles in Bushwick, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Looking at the bending undulating flying shapes, or shards, in your work, a person could think that there is a mathematical equation happening, a sort of infographic. Does this style of painting feel like math to you?
See One:
I’m terrible at math! I think there is a type of visual math or “style equation” to my paintings in that certain parts of a painting need to be in the right place, or doing the right thing. I know it looks like a lot of chaos flying around, but there is a method to the madness. The colors have to be balanced and the composition and placement of each shard is also important. If the flow is off, the painting is off.

Brooklyn Street Art: What is your favorite jam to listen to when painting?
See One:
It always changes. Lately, I’ve been listening to Flosstradamus. It’s high energy dub-step. It’s what one of my paintings would sound like. I’ve been known to listen to cinematic soundtracks, hip hop, and some rock while working.  I’m a fan of instrumental hip hop mixes as well, anything that I don’t have fast-forward through is great.

 

See One. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: You have sited graffiti artist Futura as an influence on you. He is one of the original graff guys who bravely evolved his style and brought it into the gallery setting. Can you see yourself exclusively on the street or in the gallery?
See One:
Both. I couldn’t be exclusively in either. The streets are the biggest galleries in world and I think the streets are driving the art that is now getting into galleries. Being in a gallery is great – it allows the artist to have a platform to engage an audience and sell artwork. But the street is where the excitement over that artwork begins.

Brooklyn Street Art: You have participated in venues where you were painting live in front of an audience. How much of your process is improvisational, how much is planned?
See One:
It’s about 60/40. I like to have an idea of where I’m going even if I don’t know where I’m going to take it and just let it flow. That’s how my abstract style came out. I was painting life at a lounge, I sketched the profile of a cute girl I saw on the train as I was heading to the lounge. When I was there, I painted the profile and wasn’t sure what to with the other half of the canvas and these sharp jagged shapes came out and people loved it. Too much planning can ruin great art.

 

See One. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: What would be the most perfect compliment someone could give your work?
See One:
If I’m walking through a show and watching people stare at my paintings and discussing my art and hear them wonder how it was done. The look of wonder and inspiration in someone’s eyes is exciting, that’s what you want to see in a good painting. Your eyes need to move and take in all that you’re seeing. If they also bought the painting, that is the ultimate compliment because something I made is now hanging proudly in someone’s home, office or business to be shared with their friends and family.

Brooklyn Street Art: When you create these grand swirling layered storms of strikingly hued shards, do you think of them as graff letters or shapes or waves of energy or something else?  Are they a mirror of anyone?
See One:
When I first started in this style I used to think of them as abstracted letters only because I could see something letter-esque in the shapes. But that really stopped me from keeping the style in the abstract realm of my imagination because I was putting the style into an already pre-conceived form of something familiar. While Shards are reminiscent of letters, they aren’t quite there yet.

Later, I realized that Shards are jagged alien forms of wildstyle burners in motion on a smaller scale. Imagine what a wildstyle would look like if it exploded in slow motion. Broken down beyond chunks of 3-D letters are blocks of colors ripped apart from each other into broken pieces. The fills, the outline, forcefield and most importantly, the energy of wildstyle is broken down in the molecules. Colors and shadows fly around each other, almost fighting for space amongst themselves..a sort of “get in, where you fit in” type of fight for the right place.  That’s what Shards are.

Brooklyn Street Art: How do you know when a work is finished?
See One:
It’s a feeling I get, I have to be visually satisfied with what I see. I set a high standard for my work and if I don’t see the finish line then I know its time for more coffee, because there’s more work to do.

See One. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

See One is one of the 11 participating artists in GEOMETRICKS

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BSA Presents: “Geometricks” and Vandal or Visionary Series Curated by Hellbent at Gallery Brooklyn (Brooklyn, NY)

Geometricks

BSA Presents GEOMETRICKS

Curated by Street Artist Hellbent

As part of their Vandal or Visionary Series, where BSA selects one Street Artist to curate a show that follows their specific vision of the scene, BSA is proud to introduce Hellbent as curator of the inaugural show of the series titled “GEOMETRICKS” at new Gallery Brooklyn in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn, New York City, opening September 22, 2012.

Participating artists (alphabetically): Augustine Kofie, Chor Boogie, Drew Tyndell, Feral Child, Hellbent, Jaye Moon, Maya Hayuk, MOMO, OLEK, OverUnder, See One

***

GEOMETRICKS turns the spotlight on the movement on the streets that boasts bold color, wild patterning, sophisticated lineplay, and a modern approach to abstraction.

As the stylistic circle widens on the street, GEOMETRICKS grabs a razor-sharp cross section of the growing number of graffiti artists who depart from traditional forms of lettering, Street Artists who are not interested in Pop-inspired icons or irony, and fine artists who never considered the “rules” of the street to begin with.

GEOMETRICKS references modernists, tribalists, and the rhythmic symmetry of the natural world, with it’s hexagons and spirals and comforting repetitions. Old labels about graffiti and Street Art mean little; this group takes the formalist clarity that references geometry, folk art, and science, and often smashes it with an abstract hammer.

Parallel, perpendicular, rigid, curvilinear; lines and shapes intersect and play off color-rich pattern – challenging the shape, form and expectations of many in the Street Art scene. GEOMETRICKS show how graff and Street Art right now are exploding in a new direction together without first asking for permission, again advancing the conversation of art on the streets.

 

“I’m stoked to be able put together this GEOMETRICKS show with some artists who I’ve really admired for a long time as well as some of the new players on the scene. This show is a great opportunity for me to create a vision and really put a dream team of artists into one room and show people what I am diggin’ right now.” – Hellbent

The Vandal or Visionary Series presented by BSA
GEOMETRICKS
Curated by Hellbent

September 22 – October 28, 2012

Opening Reception
Saturday, September 22, 2012
6 pm – 9 pm

With sound provider SLEPTEMBER
Sponsored by Sixpoint Brewery
Gallery Brooklyn
351 Van Brunt St
Red Hook
Brooklyn, NY 11231

347.463.4063
info@gallerybrooklyn.com
gallerybrooklyn.com

Gallery Hours
Thursday-Saturdays: 12-6pm
Sundays: 12-5pm

Vandal or Visionary Series presented by BSA

The Vandal or Visionary Series calls into question the simplistic characterization of artists who work on the street as one dimensional vandals and it wonders aloud what a gallery show would look like if viewed through their eyes. Many artists have always had a better understanding of the scene than academics or experts who talk about it and this series allow us to see a show curated by someone with a direct view and a very unique perspective.

BrooklynStreetArt.com is a daily source for Street Art reporting, interviews, and photography in New York and around the world.

We’ve been thinking a lot about this show and recently published examples on the street that are indicative of one new direction;

“Art from the streets has been heralding a new eye-popping geometric disorder that can now fairly be called a movement.”
~ From our recent piece on The Huffington Post : “Color, Geometry and Pattern on the Streets”

 

Read all BSA posts on The Huffington Post HERE.

Follow BSA on Twitter

See the BSA Tumblr page

Join the BSA Fanpage on Facebook

For more details on GEOMETRICKS please contact us at GEOMETRICKS@BrooklynStreetArt.com

Thank you for your support.

See the GEOMETRICKS Square Invite

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more

BSA Presents GEOMETRICKS, Curated by Hellbent

BSA Presents GEOMETRICKS

Curated by Street Artist Hellbent

As part of their Vandal or Visionary Series, where BSA selects one Street Artist to curate a show that follows their specific vision of the scene, BSA is proud to introduce Hellbent as curator of the inaugural show of the series titled “GEOMETRICKS” at new Gallery Brooklyn in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn, New York City, opening September 22, 2012.

Participating artists (alphabetically): Augustine Kofie, Chor Boogie, Drew Tyndell, Feral Child, Hellbent, Jaye Moon, Maya Hayuk, MOMO, OLEK, OverUnder, See One

***

GEOMETRICKS turns the spotlight on the movement on the streets that boasts bold color, wild patterning, sophisticated lineplay, and a modern approach to abstraction.

As the stylistic circle widens on the street, GEOMETRICKS grabs a razor-sharp cross section of the growing number of graffiti artists who depart from traditional forms of lettering, Street Artists who are not interested in Pop-inspired icons or irony, and fine artists who never considered the “rules” of the street to begin with.

GEOMETRICKS references modernists, tribalists, and the rhythmic symmetry of the natural world, with it’s hexagons and spirals and comforting repetitions. Old labels about graffiti and Street Art mean little; this group takes the formalist clarity that references geometry, folk art, and science, and often smashes it with an abstract hammer.

Parallel, perpendicular, rigid, curvilinear; lines and shapes intersect and play off color-rich pattern – challenging the shape, form and expectations of many in the Street Art scene. GEOMETRICKS show how graff and Street Art right now are exploding in a new direction together without first asking for permission, again advancing the conversation of art on the streets.

 

“I’m stoked to be able put together this GEOMETRICKS show with some artists who I’ve really admired for a long time as well as some of the new players on the scene. This show is a great opportunity for me to create a vision and really put a dream team of artists into one room and show people what I am diggin’ right now.” – Hellbent

The Vandal or Visionary Series presented by BSA
GEOMETRICKS
Curated by Hellbent

September 22 – October 28, 2012

Opening Reception
Saturday, September 22, 2012
6 pm – 9 pm

With sound provider SLEPTEMBER
Sponsored by Sixpoint Brewery

 

Gallery Brooklyn
351 Van Brunt St
Red Hook
Brooklyn, NY 11231

347.463.4063
info@gallerybrooklyn.com
gallerybrooklyn.com

Gallery Hours
Thursday-Saturdays: 12-6pm
Sundays: 12-5pm

Vandal or Visionary Series presented by BSA

The Vandal or Visionary Series calls into question the simplistic characterization of artists who work on the street as one dimensional vandals and it wonders aloud what a gallery show would look like if viewed through their eyes. Many artists have always had a better understanding of the scene than academics or experts who talk about it and this series allow us to see a show curated by someone with a direct view and a very unique perspective.

BrooklynStreetArt.com is a daily source for Street Art reporting, interviews, and photography in New York and around the world.

We’ve been thinking a lot about this show and recently published examples on the street that are indicative of this new direction;

“Art from the streets has been heralding a new eye-popping geometric disorder that can now fairly be called a movement.”
~ From our recent piece on The Huffington Post : “Color, Geometry and Pattern on the Streets”

 

Read all BSA posts on The Huffington Post HERE.

Follow BSA on Twitter

See the BSA Tumblr page

Join the BSA Fanpage on Facebook

For more details on GEOMETRICKS please contact us at GEOMETRICKS@BrooklynStreetArt.com

Thank you for your support.

See the GEOMETRICKS Square Invite

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more