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Images of the Week 02.20.11

Brooklyn-Street-Art-IMAGES-OF-THE-WEEK_05-2010

Our weekly interview with the street; this week featuring Aarhus, Clown Soldier, Don John, El Sol 25, Gaia, Michael DeFeo, CB23, Tats Cru, and Voina.

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CB23. Recession Era Cartoons. Photo © Jaime Rojo

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If you love something, set it free. Gaia (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Berlin, Germany (photo © Er1cBI41r)

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Berlin, Germany (photo © Er1cBI41r)

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Don John Stencil in Aarahus, Denmark (photo © Don John)

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Clown Soldier (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Michael DeFeo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Blue Swan (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Tats Cru (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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CircleCulture Gallery Presents: “New Art-Formely Known As: New Art” Group Show (Berlin, Germany)

CircleCulture Gallery
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NEW ART – FORMERLY KNOWN AS: NEW ART
Urban artists paying homage to innovators from the history of art

Opening: January 20, 7 – 9 PM

In this exhibition, artists from all over the world take reference to some ground breaking artists of the past. An homage to the spirit of innovation, non-conformity and alternative thinking of the older days.

Judith Supine / Christian Awe / Jonathan Yeo / Helle Mardahl / XOOOOX / Kevin Earl Taylor / Anton Unai / Jaybo Monk / Adriana Ciudad / Stefan Strumbel / Marco “Pho” Grassi
VS.
Gustav Klimt, Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, Pablo Picasso, Damien Hirst, Andy Warhol, Pierre Soulages, Henri Matisse, Théodore Géricault, James Ensor

Art looks back on a history that is as multi-faceted and fascinating as our own time. Among the illustrators, designers, sculptors, painters, calligraphers, fashion designers and architects of the past centuries, new avant-gardes have constantly emerged, establishing themselves to be replaced soon enough by the next generation craving innovation.
A process of creation that naturally builds upon preceding aesthetics, concepts and techniques that deconstructs them in order to create a contemporary art-remix. Many artists eschew this conscious connection to history. Freely and radically, they create new approaches: the new art.

Exhibition:           January 21 to March 05 2011
Opening hours:    Tue – Sat 12 – 6 PM

For more information please see the press release and online: http://www.circleculture-magazine.com/?p=2547

Circleculture Gallery
Gipsstrasse 11
10119 Berlin Mitte
berlin@circleculture-gallery.com
www.circleculture-gallery.com

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Quel Beast: Street Art, Hip Hop, and Cross-Undressing

Quel Beast: Street Art, Hip Hop, and Cross-Undressing

Quel Beast. Chicky in Chelsea (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Feeling cocky in Chelsea. Quel Beast (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

BSA guest writer Robin Grearson talks about herself, the Street Artist Quel Beast, and the unknowable beast within.
 

I headed to Bushwick’s Wreck Room last week to talk to Quel Beast about art and see how he’s doing.  He’s pasting up some work indoors this week, at Kings County, and a new street piece was almost ready for Chelsea.  The Wreck Room is an unpretentious spot where secrets flow easily, and so, over beer and fried pickles, Quel Beast confided to me his frustrations, some obsessions, and what he would do if he couldn’t make art. But he remained quiet about the street piece, which made me nervous.

 

Quel Beast. Detail (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Quel Beast. Detail (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Until today, I hadn’t seen it. It’s a woman; full length, but cocky. She taunts passers-by to check her out once, maybe twice.  She’s not wearing much. That much I remembered. She’s like his Chelsea kiss, or, postcard: Dear Art Crawlers. With love from Brooklyn, Quel Beast.

He shows me on his iPhone some of the portraits for the show, called “Back That A$$ Up,” after the Juvenile/L’il Wayne song and video. It’s hours, many beers, two more locations and some wine later, before I ask about the Chelsea girl. Quel Beast answers offhandedly that she’s…weird. I’m sure he knows a better word because he says it like it’s a question. He’s into the piece, and says it exemplifies the direction he sees his style heading. But his question mark says, maybe I’ll hate it, a possibility I hadn’t considered.

I posed for the photo he’s working from to create her. So she’s me, and she’s not. I start wondering if, while painting testosterone-soaked me, her sneer has maybe gotten to him. But then, art is supposed make you feel something, which is the conversation we’ve been having. And I wonder what I will feel when I see her.

Quel Beast (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Quel Beast (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Quel Beast compares art to music, harshly. Placed side by side, art gets its ass kicked. “Art isn’t good enough,” he says, with reverence for music’s power to evoke feeling, stir memory and stir senses. People quickly filter out tags and stickers as visual noise, he points out, adding, “You don’t have a personal experience with someone’s name, the way you can with music.”

“I hate art. Art sucks,” Quel Beast declares, and we laugh. He’s describing his exasperation with the impossibility of art to realize his ideal of it.

But even as he’s describing most art as dismissible in contrast to music, he is a little distracted, scanning stickers and tags on the tables and walls, naming the artists. “Why can’t art do what music can do?,” Quel Beast wonders, and lays down a gauntlet.  “An artist has a responsibility to reach out and grab someone the same way a ridiculously awesome song does.”

So it’s natural that Quel Beast’s portraits would have music in their souls; for him, “Back That A$$ Up” is the track that conjures the flow and energy of shared experience that he aspires to render in his paintings. But the series is no fan letter: Quel Beast is looking through the video’s lens at his own agenda. He’s retrofitted his painted subjects as though they were plucked from frames of the video, undressed them, and reversed the gender roles.

Quel Beast (© Jaime Rojo_

Quel Beast (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

He designed the portrait series as his inquiry into the source of our judgments. Where do conclusions come from, for instance, about a two-dimensional woman who may be posturing instead of pouting but in other ways remains unknowable? “Why is it that just because you put your body into certain positions, people will assume anything about you, your identity or your sexuality?,” Quel Beast asks, without knowing the answer.

Juvenile and L’il Wayne provide Quel Beast with audio inspiration for his paintings, but their lyrics tow the misogyny-and-hetero line. Quel Beast reveals only a cool nonchalance about this apparent collision of cultures. By co-opting the rappers’ revelers in an effort to unlock an insight or two on identity politics, won’t Quel Beast ostensibly alienate those fans who would be drawn to a show inspired by hip hop? The more secrets he tells me, the more a picture emerges of someone who doesn’t mind making people uncomfortable.

Early this morning, Quel Beast showed me the Chelsea girl. She has my straight, boyish hips, and a casual, male confidence that is impervious to judgment. Within that masculinity, though, something remains defiantly feminine. He looked at me and said with a shrug,  “If there’s one thing I learned from rap, it’s how to deal with haters.” —Robin Grearson

BSA………….BSA………………BSA………….BSA………………BSA………….BSA………………BSA………….BSA………………

 

Quel Beast, “Back That A$$ Up”, October 16, 10 PM, Kings County, 286 Siegel Street, Brooklyn, NY 11206.

Robin Grearson is an independent writer and essayist living in New York. She has written for The New York Times.

Robin Grearson: www.robingrearson.com

Quel Beast: www.quelbeast.com, facebook.com/quelbeastart

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From Here To Fame Publishing Presents: Muralismo Morte. Book Release And Exhibition (Berlin, Germany)

Muralismo Morte
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We are delighted to commence our fall season with a beautiful new title.

Wir freuen uns sehr mit diesem außergewöhnlich schönen Buch in den Herbst zu starten.

Muralismo Morte – The Rebirth of Muralism in Contemporary Urban Art reveals the vibrancy of a new type of muralism as it rises from the shadows of urban spaces in metropolises worldwide. From much celebrated pieces in prominent places to those hidden in anonymous, decayed ruins, it features the large-scale murals and small interventions of some of the most exciting international artists associated with this movement. Muralist and art activist Jens Besser uncovers these treasures and offers special insights into the emerging scene that is coloring our urban experience.

Artists/Künstler: Roa, Remed, Klub 7, Aec & Waone (Interesni Kazik), Blu, Os Gemeos, Escif, Jens Besser, BerlinBeamBoys, Sonice Development, 3ttman, Kain Logos and many more.

Muralismo Morte – The Rebirth of Muralism in Contemporary Urban Art, zeigt die Dynamik einer neuen Form der Wandmalerei, die seit einigen Jahren weltweit aus den Schatten der urbanen Räume der Metropolen hervor tritt. Von den gefeierten Arbeiten an prominenten Plätzen zu den anonymen Werken, versteckt in verfallenen Ruinen, bietet dieses Buch die großen Murals und kleinen Interventionen einiger der spannendsten internationalen Künstler dieser Bewegung. Muralist und Kunst-Aktivist Jens Besser deckt diese Kostbarkeiten auf und bietet einen tiefen Einblick in eine aufstrebende Szene, die unsere urbane Landschaft in neuen Farben zeichnet.

Take a look inside the book here!

Title: Muralismo Morte – The Rebirth of Muralism in Contemporary Urban Art
Author: Jens Besser
Pages: 200, color, ca. 300 Illustrations & photographs
Format: 28.5 x 21 cm (11.22 x 8.27 inches)
Language: English edition

Price Hardcover: 24.95 € | £ 24.99 | US $ 34.95
ISBN Hardcover: 978-3-937946-29-0

Book Release / 1. October 2010!

Exhibition & Book release party / Common Ground Gallery / Berlin:
1.October 2010 / 7 pm-open end
Lecture / Buchvorstellung (Jens Besser): 8:30 pm

Live video performance – BerlinBeamBoys
DJ Dejoe

Common Ground Gallery / Hip Hop Stützpunkt
Marienburger Str. 16 A (Hinterhof)
10405 Berlin-Prenzlauer Berg

www.commongroundgallery.de

Muralismo Morte Events Schedule:
for detailed information please check www.fromheretofame.com

1. October 2010 – Berlin
Common Ground Gallery
Exhibition & Book release party / lecture by Jens Besser

7 – 10. October 2010 – Berlin
Stroke.03 Urban Art Fair
Muralismo Morte lecture by Jens Besser & live painting by Roa, Sepe and Aryz (TBC)

27. October 2010 – Dresden
Motorenhalle
Muralismo Morte lecture by Jens Besser

3. November 2010 – Leipzig
Mzin Book Store
Muralismo Morte lecture by Jens Besser & exhibition

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The Goethe Institut Of Los Angeles In Collaboration With LA Art Machine Presents: MA’Claim (AKUT, TASSO, and CASE), RETNA and Tom Kummer. “Vox Humana” (Los Angeles, CA)

VOX HUMANA
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The GOETHE INSTITUT LOS ANGELES, in collaboration with LA ART MACHINE and supported by the GERMAN FOREIGN OFFICE, is proud to present VOX HUMANA featuring German graffiti legends MA’Claim (AKUT, TASSO, and CASE).
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This historic art happening is two-fold. Arriving on Sept. 20, MA’Claim will begin a large-scale mural installation on the side of Boombang, a cutting edge, boutique design firm on the corner of Motor and Palms Ave,in Los Angeles. They will continue the mural through September 24. map it!
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Then, on Sept. 25, a live art installation will take place at the Goethe Institut followed by a panel discussion with, MA’Claim, L.A. street artist RETNA, and infamous Swiss journalist and rabble-rouser, Tom Kummer.

VOX HUMANA
September 20 through 24
3459 Motor Ave.
L.A., CA 90034
Wall Commissioned by the Goethe-Institut Los Angeles and sponsored by the German Foreign Office, Montana Paints, and Boombang.
Live Art Happening and Panel Discussion
September 25
GOETHE INSTITUT LOS ANGELES
5750 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 100
L.A., CA 90036

2:00 – 6:30 p.m. Live Painting
7:00 p.m. Conversation with Ma’Claim,
Retna and Tom Kummer

Tel. +1 323 5253388
Fax +1 323 9343597
info@losangeles.goethe.org

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Stencils of The Week on BSA 09.13.10

Stencil-Top-5

This weeks top stencils as picked by Samantha Longhi of Stencil History X

Boxi. Image Courtesy of Samantha Longhi. Stencil History X

Boxi at the STAMP (Street Art Melting Pot) festival in Hamburg, Germany  (courtesy Stencil History X)

Check out an interview with Boxi by Samantha Longhi here

Grafeeney. (Courtesy Stencil History X)

Martin Whatson. Image Courtesy of Samantha Longhi. Stencil History X
Martin Whatson sprays this stencil on aluminum. (Courtesy of Stencil History X)

Finbarr. Image Courtesy of Samantha Longhi. Stencil History X

From the Schoony Show at Blackall Gallery in London, “Mummy’s Little Army Boy”, by Finbarr (Courtesy Stencil History X)

Snikk. Image Courtesy of Samantha Longhi. Stencil History X

“Eyes of Night”, by Snikk in Berlin. (Courtesy Stencil History X)

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Tats Cru Declares “Death of an Era”: How, Nosm & Aryz in Brooklyn

Bronx Tats Cru muralists How and Nosm Perre hit Brooklyn last week with their buddy Aryz to put up a new piece on the side of a deli while stray cats wandered out from the fence next door to take a look.  While BSA watched, the guys climbed up and down ladders and showed solid technique like the pros they are.

Tats Cru. How & Nosm With Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)
Tats Cru. How & Nosm With Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)

The globe trotting twins, born in seaside San Sebastion in the Basque region of Spain, grew up in Dusseldorf and fell in love with the New York style of graffiti in their teens.  When they joined the Tats Cru in New York in the late nineties they had already proved their skillz as graff artists and begun to explore Street Art and muralist technique.

Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)
Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)

With Aryz visiting from Barcelona it was a perfect time to hit the streets of Williamsburg and get a piece up before the skies darkened further. “Death of an Era” appears to pay tribute to some of hiphop and graffiti culture’s early icons and surround them with a rising tide of blood. A critique of the darker powers of commercialism, it may also be homage to a romantic vision of a dirty and dysfunctional city that increasingly looks Disneyfied. While homogeneity threatens the character of some of our neighborhoods, work like this ensures an expression of individuality that keeps the streets alive.

With one eye on an impending summer storm and another on their wall, the guys busily consulted sketches and wielded their cans in a race against time.

Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)
Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)

Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)
Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)

Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)
Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)

Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)
Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)

Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)
Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)

Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)
Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)

Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)
Tats Cru. How & Nosm with Aryz. (© Jaime Rojo)

http://www.hownosm.org

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Stencil Top 5: 05.11.10 from BSA

Stencil-Top-5

The Stencil Top 5 as picked by Samantha Longhi of StencilHistoryX

Eimeme (Portugal) Visual Street Performance (VSP), Porto http://www.flickr.com/photos/eimeime/  Although London based artist Best Ever distinguished himself at the  highest point at the 6th edition of Visual Street Performance held in  Porto, as for stencil art, we discovered the Portuguese artist Eimeme. The VSP is a collective unifying event that combines music, lectures,  indoor and outdoor artworks. It is especially supported since 2005, the  year of its creation, by the young prodigy's national street art Vhils. http://www.visualstreetperformance.com/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/45590745@N04/
Portuguese stencil artist Eimeme shows this piece as part of the 6th Edition of “Visual Street Performance” held in Porto. The event combines music, lectures, indoor and outdoor artworks. Created in 2005 the event was the brainchild of street artist Vhils.

Dolk 4 Mai Outdoor stencil, Duoshow with M-City, Brooklynite Gallery, NYC copyright Becki Fuller
Dolk  (photo © Becki Fuller)

Ender 6 mai Portrait de Michel-Ange http://www.flickr.com/photos/enderstencil
“Portrait de Michel-Ange” by Ender

Czarnobyl 6 mai Fat Lady, solo show <a href=@ATM Gallery until May 29, 2010. Copyright urbanartcore” width=”440″ height=”292″ />
“Fat Lady” by Czarnobyl “Mutations” at the solo show at the ATM Gallery in Berlin (image © Urbanartcore)

Quasikunst Boulevard de Sébastopol, Paris 4e http://www.flickr.com/photos/quasikunst/
Quasikunst on the Boulevard de Sébastopol in Paris

See more Eimeme images here

See more Ender images here

ATM Gallery in Berlin

See more Quasikunst images here

Learn more about Visual Street Performance here

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Stencil Top Five 04.12.10 from BSA

Stencil-Top-5

The Stencil Top 5 as picked by Samantha Longhi of StencilHistoryX

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A love stencil, anonymous (courtesy Stencil History X)

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Funk25 from Hambourg (© Urbanartcore)

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Indigo (Canada) “In Flight” (courtesy Stencil History X)

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Bruno Leyval “Le Duel”

(courtesy Stencil History X)

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Nazza (Argentina) “Carnaval” (courtesy Stencil History X)

See more at StencilHistoryX.com

See more Nazza images here

See more Indigo images here

See more Funk25 images here

See more Bruno Leyval here

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Street Layers from Paris, Berlin and Vienna

From the Editor:

In the past I breezed by destroyed posters and flyers that amass on construction worksites and abandoned buildings with little thought. Thanks to the work of photographer Vinny Cornelli I have learned to see them entirely differently – like Earth Science, like strata; a layer of text or design or photography with internally consistent characteristics that distinguishes it from contiguous layers. The destruction and consequent revealing of shapes, color, and texture create haphazard new compositions. Sometimes it doesn’t work, but hell yeah, some times it does, and Vinny is always on the lookout.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

From photographer Vincent Cornelli:

After my recent trip photographing street art in Hamburg, it brought me back to some of the photos I took last  summer in Paris, Berlin and Vienna.  I thought it would make the perfect follow-up piece for my bi-weekly posts for BrooklynStreetArt.com.  I think I would rather let the pictures speak for themselves.  Hope you enjoy them.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

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© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

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Vinny Goes to Hamburg: Street Art from Germany’s Largest Port

Vinny Cornelli is becoming a regular on BSA because with his photography he peels back some of the street art hype and looks at the innards of the gritty culture that engenders it.  A departure from documentation, his eye captures something more.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

For this photo essay, Vinny shows and tells us about his trip last week to Hamburg, Germany’s second largest city after Berlin- and opens our eyes to their approach to aesthetic expressions of the spirit on the street.

from Vinny Cornelli

Last weekend I was able to visit my girlfriend, Lena, on her home turf of Hamburg, Germany. I concede (for some of the obvious reasons) that the trip was incredible, warm and homey. Even outside of those reasons, I was also so very excited by the colors and comforts I felt from a city that seems to gush as a result of the public street and graffiti art that the population either endorses or passively permits.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

Hamburg is home to the likes of Flying Fortress and Funk25 and many other street artists. The city also fosters the existence of squats such as the Gaengeviertel; a small community of flats, studios and galleries that keeps it’s doors, beers and art open and available to it’s public. Like many people, these are some of the ideals that I subscribe to and appreciate.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

Because I was in the good company of Lena, light snowfall, and the art surrounding us, I had the fortunate opportunity of a guided walking tour through many streets, nooks, and playgrounds.  It was quite nice.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

One interesting/odd observation I noted was that much of the street art was placed well above the mass marketed posters of albums, concerts, and movies hitting your local Hamburg establishment. In a way, it gave me the feeling that everyday, commonplace (and I think boring) life is placed at eye-level.  Yes, this is what’s sometimes seen in NYC and other hotbeds of public art…but some of it just doesn’t fit.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

I visited C215 this summer, and he spoke at great lengths of the importance of where he’s placing his stencils – otherwise, it becomes irrelevant. I feel that the wheat pastes and stencils in Hamburg tend to suffer as a result. Placement seems sporadic when viewed with other works sharing the same wall.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

On the other hand, it seemed that the graffiti artists were better leveraging the walls and spaces they occupy and their work also seemed very well organized.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

I thoroughly enjoyed capturing these photos and the inspiration they foster.  I have already booked my tickets to return in April, so I look forward to sharing the city of Hamburg’s movement into the spring.

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