Canada

Space 27 Gallery Presents: “Permanence” A Group Exhibition. (Montreal, Canada)

Permanence

C215 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Permanence

Space 27 Gallery and Pure Living present Permanence, an exhibition contrasting the ephemeral nature of street art with the permanence of collectible art.

Including a variety of artwork created by Montreal-based as well as Canadian and international street artists shaping our urban landscape, Permanence aims to show the transition of street art from its underground beginnings to mainstream.

The works presented are directly influenced by the artist’s involvement with the street art movement; one that uses the city as a medium of expression, combining a vast range of techniques and artistic influences. In Permanence, they are brought out of the urban landscape and into the fine art world.

INTERNATIONAL ARTISTS:
Army of One – US
Banksy – UK
Bast – US
Brett Amory – US
C215 – FR
Charming Baker – UK
Faile – US
Guy Denning – UK
Holly Thoburn – UK
Hush – UK
Jef Aerosol – France
Judith Supine – US
Luc Bouchard – US
Mario Wagner – Germany
Quik – US
Shepard Fairey – US

CANADIAN ARTISTS

Alan Ganev
Case
Earth Crusher
Fauxreel
Fred Caron
Gawd
Jason Botkin
Labrona
Lilyluciol
Mathieu Connery
Omen
Other
Philippe Chabot
Produkt
Rage 5
Roadsworth
Scan
Specter
Stikki peaches
WIA
Xavier Landry
Zilon

Details:

Date: September 15th, 2012
Time: 18:00h – 23:30h
Location: Space 27, 101 rue Louvain W. Montreal

 

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Cooper Cole Gallery Presents: Maya Hayuk Solo Exhibition (Toronto, Canada)

Maya Hayuk

Maya Hayuk (photo courtesy of the gallery)

Maya Hayuk is a muralist, painter, photographer, printmaker, video artist and musician. From her large-scale installations to small works on paper, her obsession with symmetry and nourishing color play out in what might be views from the Hubble Telescope, airbrushed nail art, Mexican woven blankets, Ukrainian Easter eggs, chandeliers, mandalas, Rorschach tests and/ or holograms. Her work has been exhibited and published extensively internationally in galleries, museums, on the streets and in various printed and electronic media. Hayuk lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

COOPER COLE
1161 Dundas Street West, Toronto ON, M6J1X3, Canada
info@coopercolegallery.com / 647 347 3316  / www.coopercolegallery.com
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Twist Gallery Presents: CASE “Mischief Over” (Toronoto, Canada)

CASE

 

July 5 – July 28, 2012
Opening: Thursday, July 5, 7-12 p.m.
TWIST GALLERY
1100 Queen St. West
Toronto, ON M6J 1H9
T: 416 – 588 – 2222
info@twistgallery.ca
www.twistgallery.ca
Hours: Tues–Sat 11–6 p.m.

Twist Gallery presents a solo exhibition of all new work by one of Canada’s most notable graffiti artist CASE.

His 20 years of urban beautification have spread his notoriety across the globe; showing overseas and throughout the United States including The Armoury in New York City; Carmichael Gallery of Contemporary Art in Hollywood, CA ; The Graffiti World exhibit at GO Gallery in Amsterdam; and the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto.

Merging his graffiti experiences and his studio study into a style that weaves classical and street art together, while continuing to explore the industrial medium of spray paint without traditional boundaries. CASE has also directed/animated music videos for a number of recording artists including Eminem, Neil Diamond and  The Arcade Fire.

There will be drinks, standard gallery opening snacks with DJ’s Fathom and Dougie Boom spinning

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Show and Tell Gallery Presents: James Marshall (Dalek) & Greg Lamarche “Geometric Balance” (Tornonto, Canada)

Geometric Balance

brooklyn-street-art-Show-and-Tell_gallery-DalekJames Marshall (Dalek) “Untitled“, Acrylic on Paper, 20″ x 20”, 2011

brooklyn-street-art-Show-and-Tell_gallery-GregMailerGreg Lamarche “Untitled (O Series)“, Paper Collage, 8.5″ x 11”, 2011

James Marshall & Greg Lamarche
Geometric Balance
July 22 – August 31 2011
www.showandtellgallery.com

Show & Tell Gallery is pleased to present a 2 person exhibition with James Marshall (Dalek) and Greg Lamarche.

Exhibiting these distinct artists together creates a powerful dynamism based on the collision of James Marshall’s graphic geometries with Greg Lamarche’s typographic savvy and cut-paper collages. The cross-pollination of visual and conceptual traits that occurs when viewing both bodies of work at once produces a new, combined aesthetic that is wholly unlike either Marshall or Lamarche’s artistic achievements on their own. That said, it would be an oversight to discount the similar visual and structural methodologies upon which these artists have built their practices.

The works on display, with their robust colours and sinuous lines, are a testament to the leading position Marshall and Lamarche occupy at the frontier of the new abstraction. The current impulse back towards abstracted forms and the spectral buzz of cleverly combined colours is brought to fruition by these artists. What Geometic Balance candidly demonstrates is that Marshall and Lamarche are successfully recalibrating the relationship between figure and abstraction without losing the primacy and critical content of their work.

Opening Reception: Friday June 22, 7 – 11pm.

Address
1161 Dundas St. West
Toronto, ON
M6J 1X3
Canada
Gallery Hours
Wed – Sat: 1pm – 7pm
Sun: 1pm – 6pm
Mon & Tue: By Appointment Only

Phone:
+ 647.347.3316
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Augustine Kofie in Studio

Augustine Kofie in Studio

Graffiti writer and fine artist. Old Skool Bomber. Wildstyle. Mid-Century Abstractionism. American Modernism. Choose One and Stick with it, right?

You find the evolution of artists of the streets can go in many different directions with time. As the current generation of wild teens and art school grads claim a hip-hop birthright to get up on public walls across cities everywhere, we are reminded of 1970s New York train-writing graff artists like Lee Quinones and Futura who eventually evolved their skills into galleries, private collections, museums. And they are only two. It has happened enough times now for it to be identified as a natural progression for some artists ‘of the street’, and in many cases, to incredible effect. It is a worthwhile point to consider if not labor over; the street has proven a valuable training ground for an increasing number of our great artists; With or without, and sometimes in spite of, our participation.

brooklyn-street-art-augustine-kofie-todd-mazer-4-webAugustine Kofie (photo © Todd Mazer)

Augustine Kofie began as a writer in Los Angeles in the 1990s and has always had a deep love for illustration and linework. Today he has a studio doing markedly different work from what he developed on the streets – and it is a direct result of his evolution as an artist and as a person.

Todd Mazer recently visited the studio of Kofie and talks here about what he saw:

“Tucked away in the sleeping hills of Filipino town in Los Angeles, just a stones throw away from an Emergency Room entrance where Bob Dylan’s immortal words “He not busy being born is busy dying” are literal, you’ll find Augustine Kofie. This meeting of degradation and downfall with birth and uprising seem to be principle themes that play out in this ongoing story. It’s a story that eloquently eludes those who question the direction, proximity and order of the beginning to the end.

Kofie will be the first one to tell you that we are a product of our environment. Upon entering his work/living space it becomes nearly impossible to find the separation point between his environment and his work. A quick scan across the dimly lit room offers the realization that these aged manuals, endless sketchbooks and found artifacts are like records to a beat-maker and that Kofie is creating his own version of soul music on canvas”

~Todd Mazer

 

 

brooklyn-street-art-augustine-kofie-todd-mazer-1-webAugustine Kofie (photo © Todd Mazer)

Kofie talked with Brooklyn Street Art about his work and his inspirations;

Brooklyn Street Art: The clean architectural lines and shapes in your work fit together as if they were a floor plan. Have you had experience designing buildings?
Augustine Kofie:
None at all. I’m inspired by preliminary design, drafting, architectural renderings and pre production concepts revolving around visual futurist design. I wouldn’t be opposed to an actual build out based on my work at some point but it’s not where my heads at right now… sticking to what I know.

 

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Augustine Kofie (photo © Todd Mazer)

Brooklyn Street Art: Why is it important to incorporate found items into your work, when you obviously could create them yourself.
Augustine Kofie:
I’m taken by their texture, color and age, plus I enjoy the archeologist/ ‘digging in the crates’ aspect of collecting. Sampling is the best way to put it.. It is like finding a strange soundscape from a record or film, then twisting, manipulating and layering it with other found bits to create a new component, both audio and visual. They possess lost histories and past stories all their own so it feels appropriate and truthful to use such ephemera instead of recently produced papers. The up cycling and reinterpretations are endless.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Augustine-Kofie-March12011-callout2

Brooklyn Street Art: What kind of object catches your eye and forces you to bring it back to the studio?
Augustine Kofie:
Usually outdated garage and office items from estate sales make me geek out. Anything that ‘contains’. Old wooden boxes, metal file boxes and hand made cabinets from an old mans garage workshop. Drafting based items. Paper wise, the more fatigued and yellowed the better but not to the point of crumbling. Engineering and accounting paperwork is nice as well. Yardsticks definitely get scooped.

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Augustine Kofie (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Augustine Kofie (photo © Todd Mazer)

Brooklyn Street Art Your work is vintage and futuristic – vintage in that jazz modernist warm way, and futuristic in its 1960s complex precision.  Do you feel some nostalgia for that period and what does it represent for you?
Augustine Kofie:
When I was a kid my parents played old jazz and soul records. This became the soundtrack to my life and I created my own perspective of a time-period that I only experienced as a child. That combined with the Futurist viewpoint of Syd Mead as well as the Futurist Movement set the foundation for what I do today and who I will become in the future.

 

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Augustine Kofie (photo © Todd Mazer)

Brooklyn Street Art Your studio working environment really parallels the clean lines and warm tones of your work. Could you create this same work in a different place (like a chaotic and messy one for example), or is it not important at all?
Augustine Kofie:
To me my studio is a place of comfort, meditation and inspiration. I prefer a ‘workshop’ environment over a living room setting. I have been working on my aesthetic for long enough that as long as I’m given paint and a surface then I could create a style that is mine, anywhere. The energy and execution of the art is always influenced by my surroundings, though.

 

brooklyn-street-art-augustine-kofie-todd-mazer-8-web

Augustine Kofie (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Augustine Kofie (photo © Todd Mazer)

Brooklyn Street Art: Your earlier graffiti contained foreshadowing of the abstract approach you are using now. At what point do your pieces stop being called graffiti and start being Street Art?  Or does it matter at all to use terms like this?
Augustine Kofie:
This is a strange place for me, this sort of limbo between titles. I just want to contribute my work as a man and as a whole, regardless of its contemporary title or standing. Confusing or not it is what it is.

My work and I are in constant progression. Evolution is mandatory. There is no seam that defines a beginning or ending to who I am and what I wish to produce. I do both the Graffiti and ‘art on the street’ depending on the moment and situation and especially moods. I’m a moody cat and I tend to gravitate to what I want to do to ease my restlessness. A different attention and energy is given to each form of expression here. Sometimes I want to blast on a crew production with classic characters/ letters & background scenarios. Other times I want to take a 20 year old can of outdated American spray-paint to a refused and abandoned surface and paint triangles, circles and lines without lettering, just getting loose on the foundations of line-work. I feel like Graff gave me a voice and I’ve contributed to this art form, now I have to contribute further and test my styles as well as change my own mindset and preconceived ideas of what this art form is as much as where its going.

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Augustine Kofie (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Augustine Kofie (photo © Todd Mazer)

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brooklyn-street-art-augustine-kofie-todd-mazer-web

Augustine Kofie (photo © Todd Mazer)

On Saturday March 5th Augustine Kofie will be part of a group show curated by Indigo at the Becker Galleries in Vancouver, Canada. To learn more details about this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=18278

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Indigo’s Enchanted Forest

The Street Artist Returns to the Woods of Her Youth, Art in Hand

Vancouver based Street Artist Indigo works in emotion and poetry, and recently, the woods. Raised in a log cabin by artists and activists, Indigo knew the forest long before she knew fat caps and she returns to the childhood playground for this new series. A lifetime dancer who studies the human form, Indigo installs these languid pagan princesses among the mossy columns of the deep timber thicket. As a collection, they summon an enchanted forest in a way that most visitors have never seen.

With these new muses placed into this natural context our perception of public art hikes into unusual territory. With Indigo as the tour guide, the trip is more than a little magic.

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Indigo (photo © Victoria Potter)

This week Indigo is proud to present a group show she has curated with other artists who have worked in the Street Art and Graffiti scenes and whose work she admires for “Unintended Calculations” at the Becker Gallery on Granville Island in Vancouver. The high caliber crew includes Augustine Kofie from Los Angeles, Jerry Inscoe from Portland, Remi/Rough from London and local Vancouver talent Scott Sueme.

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Indigo (photo © Victoria Potter)

Indigo spoke to BSA about her work and why she’s run to the woods for a while;

“What interests me is the idea of taking street art out of its usual locations, into spaces that are less populated – so that if the work is by chance seen in the flesh by human eyes, the experience for that one person becomes something intensely personal. We all expect to see street art in cities, alleys, on rooftops and billboards and walls. It’s been done, and I am searching for something that speaks to me – and potentially to others – on a deeper level.

As a child, the forest was my home, and I spent most of my days dreaming of elves and faeries hiding among the trees. After living in the city for over a decade, I think that part of me is trying to rediscover that sense of wonder – to find a connection to the old magic that still exists in places people rarely tread”

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Indigo (photo © Victoria Potter)

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Indigo (photo © Victoria Potter)

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Indigo (photo © Victoria Potter)

Learn more about the show Unintended Calculations opening March 5th here  http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=18278


For more images by Victoria Potter, http://www.flickr.com/photos/blindphotography

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Show and Tell Gallery Presents: “Good Folks” A Group Show (Toronto, Canada)

Swoobrooklyn-street-art-Show-Tell_Gallery-Swoon-Irina-Printn

Swoon
Irina
Silkscreen on fabric, hand dyed, embroidered, painted, and coffee stained.
Signed edition of 10
10.5″ x 24″ (26.67 cm x 60.96 cm)
2010

Click here to purchase this special limited edition print online now.

Entitled Good Folks, this exhibition features an exciting line up of multi-disciplinary artists whose works express a concise cultural identity by conveying shared community values, aesthetics, and a delicate understanding of society and their place in contemporary culture.

While the artists in this exhibition can be linked to folk art, on a more one-dimensional level the name simply celebrates some Good Folks who have contributed to the successful and exciting journey of Show & Tell Gallery for the past two years.

Participating artists include:

Swoon, Monica Canilao, Jeremiah Maddock,
Derek Mehaffey, Felix Berube, and Troy Dugas

If you are interested in being added to the collector preview list for this show please contact the gallery.

1161 Dundas St. West
Toronto, ON
M6J 1X3
Canada

+ 647.347.3316
info@showandtellgallery.com

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Becker Galleries Present: “Unintended Calculations” A Group Show Curated By Indigo (Vancouver, Canada)

Becker Galleries

brooklyn-street-art-kofie-circulation-soflinear-lustAugustine Kofi. Photo Courtesy of the gallery

Curated by Indigo, Unintended Calculations brings together a group of internationally renowned artists – Augustine Kofie (LA), Jerry Inscoe (PDX), Remi/Rough (LDN) and Scott Sueme (VAN) – for an exhibition at Becker Galleries and two collaborative murals at Moda Hotel exploring four very different approaches to abstraction. Working in a variety of mediums, these artists have evolved the letter form building blocks of their shared graffiti background, deconstructing and rebuilding them as compositions of color, line, shape and movement.

  • Dates:

    Mural installation @ Moda Hotel: March 1-3, 2011
    VIP opening @ Becker Galleries: March 4, 2011 6-10pm
    Public opening @ Becker Galleries March 5, 2011 11-3pm
    Afterparty @ Red Card Sports Bar: March 5, 2011 9pm-12am
    Show closes: March 26th, 2011

  • Becker Galleries Inc
    Pier 32, Granville Island
    Suite 210 – 1333 Johnston St
    Vancouver, BC V6H 3R9

To learn more about this show and to see the curator and artist’s bios please click the link below:

http://unintendedcalculations.com/

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Wish #3: Indigo

eleven-for-11-animation-final

Wish-3

For 11 days we’re presenting 11 artists and BSA readers and their wishes for the new year, 2011, in no particular order. Together, they are a tiny snapshot of the people who are creators and fans of street art. Individually, each has added their expression of the creative spirit to the year now ending.

Today’s wish comes from Canadian stencil artist and Street Artist Indigo, who includes a photograph she took in Solingen, Germany;

My wish is that we can all find ways to set (and reach) new milestones, discover the lessons to be learned in every challenge and appreciate the small moments that often go overlooked.

brooklyn-street-art-dec- 23-Indigo-Aether-12-10-web“Aether” (photo © Indigo)

Visit Indigo’s site

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Images Of The Week 10.17.10

Images Of The Week 10.17.10

Brooklyn-Street-Art-IMAGES-OF-THE-WEEK_05-2010

Our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring: Ski & Werds, Anera, Clown Soldier, Old Crow, Gaia and Radical!

Gaia. Outdoor mural at Brooklynite Gallery (Photo © Jaime Rojo)
Gaia. Outdoor mural at Brooklynite Gallery (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Clown Soldier (Photo © Jaime Rojo)
Clown Soldier (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Montreal Street Art (Photo © Adolfo Bejar)
Montreal Street Art (Photo © Adolfo Bejar)

Anera. She hasn't been feeling friendly lately (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Anera. She hasn’t been feeling friendly lately (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Optimo, Mok and AdLib. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ski & Werds. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

DC (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Old Crow (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Radical (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Radical (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Show And Tell Gallery Presents: Know Hope “There Is Nothing Dear (There Is Too Much Dear)” (Toronto)

Know Hope

Know Hope

Know Hope (© Jaime Rojo)

For the past 4 years, Know Hope has been showing his work in galleries and exhibitions worldwide, but mainly on the streets, in their natural urban settings. Know Hope deals with the ephemeral aspect of not only the genre itself, but also as a subject – the need of momentary connections in the everyday reality, and the common denominator that is the human struggle.

Through site specific installations, murals and paste-ups, Know Hope attempts to create situations that happen in real time, and are accessible to the public on a day-to-day basis, with intentions of creating some sort of a dialogue.

He views his gallery practice as a completely different mindset as that of working in the street. Street art is about reacting to the surroundings, to an existing reality and becoming part of it, thus making the piece itself blend in and become as significant as the environment in which it is placed, whereas the gallery is a much safer environment, which can function as a greenhouse in some manners. The separation is vital, and Know Hope believes that it is impossible to recreate or bring the street indoors, but on the other hand allows the artist to create an environment of his own. The same process is valid for the viewer himself, because the context in which the pieces are seen inevitably affects the experience.

For the past year, Know Hope’s work has been revolving around the story of an un-named figure, following it and creating some sort of lifeline through its observations, mishaps and eventually its commentary. The figure is the visual manifestation of the human vulnerability addressed in all the pieces.

The re-occurring figure is used as a way for the viewer to create a “long-term relationship”, so to speak, with the character. Through different stages and situations of despair, hope and discovery, the narrative is an ever-developing one. Through the use of a vocabulary of iconography such as electricity poles, tree stumps, broken televisions and billboards, a whole world is created and is used as a visual metaphor of the world in which we live. In the gallery pieces the photographic backgrounds function as a substitute for the urban background which is provided organically in the street works.

The majority of the pieces are made out of cardboard, a choice based not only on the aesthetics of the medium, but on the essence of the material. Cardboard is often used to make boxes, to contain objects and transfer them from one place to the other, only to be discarded immediately after- it is always available, somebody else’s trash.
The use of cardboard makes the content of the pieces physical- the urgency of creating temporary art for the street, and the liability and rough fragility of the same struggle addressed before.

Know Hope has garnered much attention over the past year with his paste-ups and installations as well as successful exhibitions in the UK, LA, Norway, San Jose and recently New York and is now preparing for group and solo exhibitions in Rome, Tokyo, Toronto, San Francisco and Los Angeles in 2009.

Artist Homepage

Address
1161 Dundas St. West
Toronto, ON
M6J 1X3
Canada
Gallery Hours
Wed – Sat: 1pm – 8pm
Sun: 1pm – 7pm
Mon & Tue: By Appointment Only
Email
info@showandtellgallery.comPhone:
+ 647.347.3316
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Show And Tell Gallery Presents: Dan Bergeron AKA Faux Reel “Faces Of The City” (Toronto)

Faux Reel

Dan Bergeron "Beth" (Mixed Media On Wood, 56.5" x 59.5", 2010) Image Courtesy of the Gallery
Dan Bergeron “Beth” (Mixed Media On Wood, 56.5″ x 59.5″, 2010) Image Courtesy of the Gallery

Upcoming: Dan Bergeron – Faces of the City


Show & Tell Gallery is pleased to welcome Dan Bergeron (also known as fauxreel) to his first solo exhibition with the gallery. Bergeron is best known for his subversive and thought-provoking public street installations.

His most recent body of work, Faces of the City, juxtaposes the abrasive charm of the distressed surfaces of modern cities with the intimate familiarity of the human face. As the walls and surfaces of the city define its physical character and spatial identity, the faces of its inhabitants provide the city with its personality, disposition and magnetism. His fusion of the two explores the idea that beauty truly lies in the scars, wrinkles and blemishes of places we live and people we meet.

Faces of the City will feature original photo-based, mixed media assemblages as well as a selection of editioned photo prints featuring the artist’s street installations.

Bergeron’s work has been displayed in institutions such as the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Royal Ontario Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art. His public installations can be found in alleys, boroughs, arrondissements, and on high streets in Toronto, New York, Paris and London.

Dan Bergeron
Faces of the City
Sept 10th – Oct 3rd, 2010
Dan Bergeron
Artist talk
Sept 11th, 2010
4 – 6pm

1161 Dundas St. West
Toronto, ON
M6J 1X3
Canada

+ 647.347.3316
info@showandtellgallery.com

Wed – Sat: 1pm -8pm
Sun: 1pm – 7pm
Mon & Tue: By Appointment Only


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