All posts tagged: Stickers

An Evergreen “Magnet Wall” Growing in Urban Spree

An Evergreen “Magnet Wall” Growing in Urban Spree

The organic nature of art in the streets characterizes the experience in many parts of the city of Berlin – the true roots of D.I.Y. still very much in full effect.

Paste Up/Magnet Wall. Urban Spree, Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The 1700 square meter artistic space named Urban Spree typifies the unrelenting energy that Berliners invest in the scene, thanks to this compound dedicated to urban culture and subcultures. The multichannel event space in the Friedrichshain district features artist residencies, DIY workshops, exhibitions, concerts, and beer. It’s also slaughtered from top to bottom with aerosol, bucket paint, wheat-pastes, and stickers.

Paste Up/Magnet Wall. Urban Spree, Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This is a shot of adrenaline that you’ll experience from one large wall at Urban Spree that is completely covered with the cacophony of the moment, an “organic wall” or “magnet wall” boasting hundreds of voices and views all at once; soon to be covered, and recovered with the visual Vox Populi.

Paste Up/Magnet Wall. Urban Spree, Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Paste Up/Magnet Wall. Urban Spree, Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Bathroom Graffiti on Canvas With Mint & Serf

Bathroom Graffiti on Canvas With Mint & Serf

New canvasses celebrate the graffiti-covered bar bathroom and its aggressive lack of style.

A quick snort, a scribbled tag, and you my love.

Now that you are caked with sweat and nearly deaf from gyrating and slamming your body to the music at your favorite jam-packed downtown dive, it’s time to hit the line for the unisex bathrooms and wait behind frat boys, saucy girls, and a couple of drag queens.

The closet-sized bar bathroom is barely big enough for a toilet and sink and may have been cleaned sometime in the last week. This one was last remodeled in the 1970s probably – and has been a thin slice of respite, however tawdry, for years – shunting many guests away from the rumbling roar of a New York nightclub and providing a private moment.

An actual bathroom in Williamsburg, Brooklyn on the left. Detail from a new canvas by Mint & Serf on the right. (both photos © Jaime Rojo)

With battered and buckling flooring underfoot and one bare light bulb overhead, it’s a good place for guests to fix their hair, snort a line of coke, perform a rushed sex act with a new friend, or perhaps to barf. If you happen to have a juicy black marker in your boot you can scream a quick tag across the pileup of graffiti that smothers the walls, or slap a sticker on it, before zipping up and pushing your way out the door to find another beer.

For Mint & Serf, this is inspiration.

And now they are bringing it to the canvas.

Mint & Serf, Pablo Power and Jacuzzi Chris at The Broadway Chapter.  February – August 2012, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Like when you go to some Williamsburg bathroom and you see this pile of tags – that’s the aesthetic. That’s the graffiti,” explains Mint during a recent in-studio visit, “ because graffiti to me is this aggression, this turbulence. The beef, the sex, the fame. You know what I mean?”

The new collection is still evolving, and it began initially with spreading canvasses out and inviting friends to hit them up whenever they visited the studio. “(It’s been) an ongoing therapy session where a lot of our friends would come in and start doing fill-ins and tags. Then about a month or two ago we started taking them down and focusing more on each one,” says Serf.

Mint & Serf, Pablo Power and Jacuzzi Chris at The Broadway Chapter.  February – August 2012, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

When viewed on their own, each of these canvasses does look like a sawed off chunk from a sleezy restroom wall, but not like a Banksy. While the guys appreciate that Street Art and commercially successful graffiti artists have their place, this bathroom aesthetic is from the CBGB punk era perhaps, rather than the MTV polished rebelliousness that followed. Raw, aggressive, unstyled – it’s a return to the gestural, the raw markings of graffiti, in an effort to strip it back to the nerve endings. If the campy stylings of latter day Banksy are Green Day, Mint & Serf are evoking the Dead Boys or Sex Pistols. Not that early punks were unstyled, and neither are these deliberately raging canvasses.

Mint & Serf, Pablo Power and Jacuzzi Chris at The Broadway Chapter.  February – August 2012, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mint & Serf, Pablo Power and Jacuzzi Chris at The Broadway Chapter.  February – August 2012, NYC. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As they talk, there are references to some of the 20th century painters whose work was repulsive before it was revered, and these 30-something graffiti artists are not afraid to disgust you while pursuing work that feels real. “Because there is beauty in ugliness,” Mint opines as he talks of initial responses to Bacon, de Kooning, and Picasso. With time, he says, people realized “They actually are masterpieces, you know.“

But you may hear them bracing for some criticism, even as they appear confident in this direction. “I know it’s probably gonna be kind of hard to swallow for a lot of people just because they are used to seeing graffiti work nowadays being very precise and calculated,” says Serf, “But it is what it is. It is probably the most honest work we have done to date.”

Mint & Serf, Pablo Power and Jacuzzi Chris at The Broadway Chapter.  February – August 2012, NYC. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The stripping back, the lack of artifice, the aggression – it all comes through here on this collection that is not yet ready for public display. For guys who have had commercial success as graphic artists creating more stylized installations for hotels and night clubs and who have a solid track record in product and lifestyle design, this new work is a return to what originally attracted them to doing graffiti on the street.

“One of the reasons I got into graffiti is because of the crazy stories I’ve heard about it. About jumping rooftops, stealing paint, staying out late, going to raves, getting laid – all this shit. The turbulence of that lifestyle, that’s what turned me on. Not doing a piece for 20 hours,” says Mint as he stares up at the cacophonic canvasses.

He continues, “For us it’s taking an existing portrayal of graffiti, which is these beautiful, colorful pieces, and just stripping it down to graffiti.”

And as a specific reference point, Serf couldn’t be clearer, “It’s all about the bar bathroom.”

Mint & Serf, Pablo Power and Jacuzzi Chris at The Broadway Chapter.  February – August 2012, NYC. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mint & Serf, Pablo Power and Jacuzzi Chris at The Broadway Chapter.  February – August 2012, NYC. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mint & Serf, Pablo Power and Jacuzzi Chris at The Broadway Chapter.  February – August 2012, NYC. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mint & Serf, Pablo Power and Jacuzzi Chris at The Broadway Chapter.  February – August 2012, NYC. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mint & Serf in studio, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mint & Serf, Pablo Power and Jacuzzi Chris at The Broadway Chapter.  February – August 2012, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

In studio with Mint & Serf, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Graffiti and stickers cover the walls of a bathroom in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Inspiration: Graffiti and stickers cover the walls of a bathroom in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Graffiti and stickers cover the walls of a bathroom in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Graffiti and stickers cover the walls of a bathroom in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Graffiti and stickers cover the walls of a bathroom in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Mad One and Cartel Coffee Lab Present: “Sticker Phiends”. (Tempe, Arizona)

Sticker Phiends

Presented by: Mike “Mad One” Neely II
Location: The Cartel Lab
225 W. University Dr. Tempe,AZ. 85281
Date: October 13th 2012
Time: 8pm-12
Artists:
BigFoot1
Bisk
Codak
Cope 2
Chris/RWK
CopyRight
Dain
DumperFoo
Evoker 1
Hmph/Kento
Jaber
London Police
Mad One
Mr. Brainwash
Nate Luna
Peeta
Pez
Phresha
Seizer
Sike’
Slick/Dissizit
Shepard Fairey/Obey
Voxx Romana
Street/Gallery artist “Mad One” will present and team up with Cartel Coffee Lab to host the fifth annual one of a kind “Sticker Phiends”, a showcase of local and international sticker artists, graphic designers, graffiti artists and many others for a fifth year in a row. The show will feature stickers and other forms of urban/gallery art. Plenty of sticker giveaways,handouts throughout the night donated by our sponsors like clothes, magazines, dvds and limited edition screen prints/stickers produced by showcasing artists and much more….Also did we mention 100% of the art is for Sale! There are even a few secrets we do not want to mention; you will just have to show up to see for yourself…
There have been several Graffiti/Urban art themed shows throughout the valley the last few years. This is one of a kind for sure; its name explains itself “Sticker Phiends” an array of street/gallery artists and designers throughout the world coming together to show case under one roof. “Mad One”, a former Arizona based, now residing in Portland,Oregon street/gallery artist, had the opportunity to lock down many local and international artists for the show making it five years in a row, and this years expectations are growing still by the day. We have artists ranging from New York to California, theU.K. and beyond”. “Sticker Phiends” is about the sticker/urban art movement and bringing awareness of stickers and adhesives and how they have gone from the streets to modern forms of art being displayed in today’s galleries and museums. “Mad One”, a street art advocate, has taken on the duty of curating this one of a kind show and many others throughout the counrty.

Stickers and sticker art isn’t just for skateboarders and bands/DJ’s anymore, it has become a new way of expressing yourself and getting your name and or images out to the public eyes. Letting the general public analyze your images and getting up where ever you can, you can find stickers on the back of street signs, electric boxes, and magazine kiosks. Most importantly putting them up where no one has before. Some people just collect stickers, some simply just represent themselves. But either way you look at it stickers have been accepted and will be displayed as a new wave art form. Some of the artists on the bill will be coming into Phoenix for the show. I could mention a few names, but you will have to attend or stay tuned to find out who’s who and from where.

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Kosbe: Under the Radar and in the Studio

Kosbe: Under the Radar and in the Studio

Why One Brooklyn Stick Up Kid is Worth Watching

Sometimes on the street you get an inkling of the future. It could be an overheard excerpt from a cell-phone conversation about a club show the night before, or the color and texture of woman’s blouse as it flutters around her while she reads on a park bench, or the sight of the 3rd food truck this week selling spicy meatballs. Something tells you that you just got a glimpse of the future. And while it doesn’t completely reveal itself in it’s fullness, you can see a nascent potential, a storyline developing that may go far beyond it’s current self. Sometimes when you see a Kosbe sticker on a paper box, it feels that way too. In fact, each time you see one of his pieces on the street, it grabs you from above the fray. Yet it seems like he’s been under the radar. He may not stay there much longer.

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

In the ebb and the flow of the Street Art conversation in New York, you keep seeing Kosbe’s wacky characters popping up in doorways and paper boxes. They aren’t tossed off little marker drawings done while watching TV – they’re intense petite character studies. Packed into one slapped on sticker is a lot of cacophonic kineticism; near crazed city characters with primitive wild eyes staring or blinkered, with tight jaws and teeth squarely gritted. The folk faces and forms are framed by an ardent prose, non-sequitors of angst and inside jokes. “What’s the guy saying?” you could ask. And why is he yelling? “Is he okay, is he mocking me? It’s the bundled rage and cryptic cleverness of the court jester.  Layers of reapplied color and repeated lines trap multiple actions on one non-static figure. This is not simple tagging, it’s a stationary tornado.

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Street Artist Kosbe has put in two good decades of practice, and has learned some lessons the hard way. He’s been hitting up New York for a half decade but he comes from a long graffiti history as a kid in his native Chicago. Now a practicing artist readying a solo gallery show for fall, he grew up in a very young single-parent home where his mom created a small studio for the boy in the back of their apartment. “My mom was really supportive of me as an artist. When I was a kid she gave me this little back room that she allowed me to use like a painting studio. So I was always grabbing stuff off the street and bringing it in there, painting it. I was very secretive with my stuff. A lot of people would come over and see my stuff and they were like, ‘Dude, I didn’t know that you painted’. I was very protective of it.”

That hasn’t changed. He still likes to use found materials as canvasses, as he shows us around his small studio hidden in a warehouse in New York. “I’m always using things that I find in the streets. Like this is an old grading book from 1919,” he says as he pulls out a tattered tome with pages ripped out.  “It has all these people’s signatures. I found this outside a high school in Brooklyn. It’s really cool. So that’s what I’ve been using for my drawings.”

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tough times at home got him in trouble at school and with the police as a youth. Describing himself as hard headed, he talks about running away as a young teen to San Francisco for a while in the early 90s, where he spent a lot of time on the street admiring a new kind of character-based and tattoo influenced graffiti on the street by people like Twist (Barry McGee), Mike Giant, and Reminisce. “I went out and there were these Reminisce horses everywhere and they were great because you were going down the street and you would see this horse like galloping down the street. This stuff really blew me away. So I think the same time this stuff was going on there, over here in NY you had like Cost and Revs posting bills and doing rollers. And back then there wasn’t the internet.”

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Years later here in this fluorescent lit studio filled with his drawings, paintings, books, ‘zines, assorted ephemera, a desk, and a loveseat, his excited retelling of stories reveals how much those childhood escapades running Chicago streets and exploring San Francisco formed his view of Street Art and prepared him for moving to New York eventually in the 2000s. A self-schooled student of graffiti, fine art, and street art, Kosbe can recount names of writers and crews, timelines, styles; drawing etymologies and stylistic connections and talking about migrations. With much fanfare he’ll also tell you the  stories about the famed Chicago “buff” – a citywide anti graffiti campaign in the mid-late 1990s that he says whitewashed the city’s history.

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

But now he’s an artist on his own, and his practice is daily. “Now I’ve learned more that the only way, as an artist, that you can kind of grow and come up with new ideas is you gotta keep giving them away. So that’s why street art is kind of funny. I have friends who are painters that have become painters because of me. They are like ‘Dude, I was totally influenced by your drawings’ and stuff like that.” But the practice of Street Artists putting fully formed works out on the street still confuses some of his peers, “They say ‘Dude you give all your art away’ – you know, they don’t understand the concept.”

His new work on the street and in this studio now bends toward abstract expressionism and his years of comic book reading enlivens that rawness with a furtively bombastic character-driven personality. Almost every piece he does has some sort of commentary- a sort of helpful therapeutic narrative to explain what the character is thinking or feeling at the moment. “I like being bad for the sake of being bad”, “Tupac!”, “deathy”, “not good”, “astro zombie”,”power to the people”,“Kosbe don’t cry”.

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kosbe also credits the street as his formative and evolutionary art instructor. “When I took an oil painting class, my teacher was like, ‘Dude you already know how to paint. How did you learn this?’ and I was like, ‘graffiti.’ ” Even though graffiti still attracts him and captures his imagination, Street Art and fine art have occupied his efforts lately and the combined synthesis of a lifetime studying art on the street and plenty of experimentation is coming together very strongly aesthetically. Combine that individual vision with the maturity that hits a person in their 30s and you may think that you are seeing a sudden glimpse of the future.

Brooklyn Street Art: I want to talk about you and your art and your influences. What are these characters? Where did they come from?
Kosbe: I don’t know. I’ve been drawing since I was real young.  It’s always something that comes naturally. I don’t do any sketches, I don’t plan anything out. I just – for me it’s more a guttural, more natural thing. It’s good and bad.

Brooklyn Street Art: What’s the bad part?
Kosbe: The bad part is that I don’t focus on it, you know? I just have been doing it so long and I really enjoy it.

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Is your experience kind of like a faucet that you turn on and it all comes flowing out and then you decide, “Okay I better turn it off”?
Kosbe: Exactly, right. So the thing with me is, I try to also look for other outlets. So I’m really into other things. Like I like music, photography, writing, all that stuff. But that stuff doesn’t come as naturally to me like this does. But it’s a great outlet for me and I feel really kind of lucky to have something like that – to be able to express myself in that form and manner. It’s helped me out tremendously to kind of learn how to communicate with people. Every year I realize new things – like this is how I communicate with people. Is it bad? Is it bad that I think that this is the only way I think that I can talk to people? Maybe I’ve gotta learn how to become better with talking with people verbally or something.

Brooklyn Street Art: You don’t seem to have great difficulty communicating verbally. But I’m interested in understanding a little more about how you think of this work and this practice as communication.
Kosbe: There is definitely a lot of emotional stuff in my work, you know,

Brooklyn Street Art: There is! Despair, anger …– you use a lot of descriptive words, verbal narratives throughout – whether it’s a sticker or a wheat paste.
Kosbe: Yeah it’s whatever is always popping into my head and so there are a lot of things that are on my mind and hopefully this is a good way to have an outlet for it. I’m trying to not be so negative anymore. And some people are like “Man, it’s so dark”. You know I use a lot of bright colors now, which has been phenomenal. That has really changed my work. Here you can see some of my earlier stuff and it’s really brown, dark. Actually this is beginning where I started experimenting with more color. And then as I got to New York, more and more color started getting into my stuff.

When you do graffiti you learn the fundamentals of color theory, you know. You learn what works.

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: You know WK Interact talks about New York being a violent city
Kosbe: I love that guy! You know when I first moved to New York he had that little shop on the Lower East Side and you’d walk in and it was like a locker, a desk, and some Japanese kids standing around. And it would be like, “What is this? Is this a store? Is this a studio?”

Brooklyn Street Art: What made me think of him was I was interested in how you describe the city because WK has said that when he makes work on the street, if it is violent in nature and people walk by it, they sometimes give him the thumbs up! And it runs longer. But if he were to paint a pink bunny it would get crossed out because New Yorkers don’t really respond to positive cheerful stuff.
Kosbe: Oh yeah, and New York has definitely had a profound impression on me in that sense because my work before I got here still had that weird dark edge but it was a little cutesy-er. But like as time has progressed I just think I have kind of matured a bit more, becoming more of an adult and my stuff is getting more serious. But with me everything’s gotta be fun. I think it’s supposed to be fun.

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pawn Works Unveils Sticker Collection: Nick and Seth Tell the Story

Do you geek out on stickers?  Come on, you know you do. To you, the world is a place where slapping and hitting are good things to do on your daily travels, especially if the surface is dust free.  We are regularly smacked in the email with exhortations to come out to huge sticker fests and New York has probably a few hundred doorways that are so slapped up and multi-layered with gluey handmade postal labels and mass produced vinyl tags that if a bomb blasted inside the whole door would blow off in one piece. Most sticker fiends point back to the late 70s, early 80s as the time of genesis for this phenomenal addiction and passion, possibly encouraged by Miss Marsette, your second grade teacher who had a pretty figure and pleasing perfume and who used to put a Papa Smurf or unicorn sticker on your History report to award your good work.

For many Street Artists and graffers and collectors and fans of stickers, it is a life-long love: Just ask Dave and Holly Combs, who have run Peel Magazine in print and online since 2003 , or MAD One, who has been running Sticker Phiends in Phoenix since ’08, and King Rid and Jice of Brass Knuckle Crew, who hosted a proper show this summer in New York with contributors from around the world.  Add to that list Seth Mooney and Nick Marzullo, founders of Pawn Works in Chicago, who this week formally proclaimed a long love affair with the humble sticker by mounting a personal tribute with a lot of history totally taking over the gallery windows – a moving and triumphant event in their sticker geekery. They’ve been minting their own line of home-made stickers for a little over a year, but this installation takes in a couple of decades.

Pawn Works Gallery: Sticker Collage (photo © Brock Brake)

Brooklyn Street Art is lucky that photographer Brock Brake was on the scene to capture the momentous proceedings and even more fortunate to get this very personal insight into some of their history and personal favorites from the guys:

“As sticker heads and collectors ourselves producing and distributing stickers for artists from all over the world via the Pawn Works Sticker Club we have obsessed since day one. All the way back to the days of repping Cruella DeVille and The 101 Dalmation’s, He-Man, Scrooge McDuck, G.I. Joe and other childhood favorites on our sippy cup’s. Both Seth and I can remember holding certain stickers over 18 years ago back to before we were teens. Some of those stickers and many more hoarded over the years as well as new jewels created through the club over the last year, reached their final destination.

 

Pawn Works Gallery: Sticker Collage (photo © Brock Brake)

We committed our ‘priceless’ stickers to an intense vinyl sticker collage representing the essence of what Pawn Works is about, the love and support of those responsible for the culture in which we are ensconced in. We often reminisce of our time as harmless teen deviants taking Stussy Clothing labels off of shirts from the mall back when the price tags/labels doubled as unique, hard to get, vinyl stickers. Anyways, we spent most of February last year making this collage to have on permanent display at Pawn Works. This year we are going to display it publicly along with the help of our friend Lucas Blair from Hedrich Blessing Photographers and Vinyl Wrap Technician from Roll Out Industries in Brooklyn, Michael Yrigoyen.

Pawn Works Gallery: Sticker Collage (photo © Brock Brake)

A few of our personal stand-outs include the instant classic logo of street wear boutique Bodego spelling out their name using the logos of Major League Baseball teams, which was quite common in the 90’s into the early 2000’s. The use of the Montreal Expo’s logo as the ‘e’ plays on so many levels for us, we love this sticker so much that we don’t feel bad it was taken off a hostess pad at a pub so many years ago. We can’t forget an all time favorite in the 513 OG Circle Sticker. Representing Cincinnati and the grime of their streets, this sticker was everywhere long before we were anywhere. This particular sticker thrived on a privately-owned Tetris Arcade game for so many years and thankfully was salvaged along with the Tetris machine from a damaging personal relationship. Got away with the sticker! Collectively, we love this sticker.

Pawn Works Gallery: Sticker Collage (photo © Brock Brake)

The Beastie Boys Ill Communication window sticker 4 pack and J-Dilla’s The Shining album cover sticker top our music charts. With a strong representation of stickers from the music, street and skate cultures, representing brands, boutiques, and important figures in the scene and our lives from Harold Hunter, Keith Haring, Mark Gonzales, Harmony Korine, Jeff Staple, The Dude and more we pay homage to the artists, designers and players on all levels. More notable stand outs include the original Cost and Revs stickers from the Early 90’s, Skewville’s Keep On Grass 1st edition on clear vinyl (small), many hand drawn labels from Evoker,Amuse,Poor One,Full Quip, KWT Crew, ATAK, DMS crew, Full Bleed and more, the scratch ‘n’ sniff pot leaf stickers are always a favorite for us as well. As are the original Ox-Fam Banksy stickers,the endless amount of hand-cut vinyl’s from SKAM Sticker Artist out of Portland, the over-sized classic ‘not for the handicap’ sticker from Gabriel Specter and anything by The Grocer.”

~ Nick Marzullo and Seth Mooney, from Pawn Works

Pawn Works Gallery: Sticker Collage (photo © Brock Brake)

Pawn Works Gallery: Sticker Collage (photo © Brock Brake)

Pawn Works Gallery: Sticker Collage (photo © Brock Brake)

Pawn Works Gallery: Sticker Collage (photo © Brock Brake)

Pawn Works Gallery: Sticker Collage (photo © Brock Brake)

Pawn Works Gallery: Sticker Collage (photo © Brock Brake)

Pawn Works Gallery: Sticker Collage (photo © Brock Brake)

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Click on these links for more stickerness on Brooklyn Street Art:

Slap Happy: The Humble Sticker Gets The Job Done

Stuck in Love With New York’s Stickers

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Street Art:Downtown LA, Culver City, West Hollywood, Echo Park, and Venice

In select neighborhoods of Los Angeles, certain street artists keep it local. You might see them in one neighborhood but not another, as the term “all-city” is not too important. Here’s a selection of pieces from the Arts District, Culver City, West Hollywood, Echo Park and Venice.

brooklyn-street-art-ben-aine-jaime-rojo-Los-angeles-venice-art-district-culver-city-west-hollywood-04-11-web-23Ben Eine in Venice (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JR in Venice (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JR in Venice (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Proving that it isn’t just for bankers, here’s Bankrupt Slut in Culver City (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-bankrupt-slut-jaime-rojo-Los-angeles-venice-art-district-culver-city-west-hollywood-04-11-web-19

Bankrupt Slut in Culver City (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Longtime Los Angeles Street Artist Becca in Echo Park (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Becca in the Art District in Downtown LA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Classic piece from Blek Le Rat in Echo Park (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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I’ve got an idea! Let’s do a cat stencil in Downtown LA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Cfer does Kim Kardashian in Downtown LA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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These Curly stickers showed up very quickly in LA this week. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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D*Face in Sunset Blvd (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Invader, a visitor sticker from MOCA, and a Beatlesque statement about graffiti artist Revok in Little Tokyo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A feeding fest from Kim West in The Art District LA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JH in The Art District LA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Word to Mother in Culver City (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pornography and Taxidermy in Sunset Blvd (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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This piece near the museum in Little Tokyo was well placed for a lot of traffic and there were even a few people posing with it. Love More War Less  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Picasso’s famous anti-war “Guernica” is reinterpreted here by Street Artist Ron English in The Art District (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Shepard Fairey lurking behind the fence on Sunset Blvd (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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An Obey sticker in Little Tokyo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Shepard Fairey, Uti, and Charm in Little Tokyo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A sticker crush in Little Tokyo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hello My Name is TY

Stickers keep coming up in conversation and on the street as a popular option for the time pressed or weather oppressed street artist who wants to get up and outy ASAP. Last week when we were getting pummelled by our weekly winter storm, this batch of stickers suddenly popped up all over the place by somebody named TY. They are fresh and haven’t achieved that weathered patina yet so they popped out in SOHO in front of passers by who dared to look up from icy sidewalks. Simple shapes and poppy colors are all it takes for TY to mix up a batch.

brooklyn-street-art-ty-jaime-rojo-02-11-7Ty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ty-jaime-rojo-02-11-1This reminds me of a guy at work. Ty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ty-jaime-rojo-02-11-2A ruby in the rough. Ty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ty-jaime-rojo-02-11-3What’ s that you say about Salvia? Lemme check.  No, that’s s-a-l-i-v-a.  Now I need a napkin. Ty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ty-jaime-rojo-02-11-4Ty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ty-jaime-rojo-02-11-5We are so in love. Sometimes I don’t know where you end and I begin. Ty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ty-jaime-rojo-02-11-6Ty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ty-jaime-rojo-02-11-8Damn, son whatchu been smokin’? Ty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ty-jaime-rojo-02-11-9Ty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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NPR Features Martha Cooper’s Sticker Book

Brooklyn-Street-Art-WEB-Martha-Cooper-Chris-StainImage from “Going Postal” by Martha Cooper of a Chris Stain sticker next to an early one by NohJColey. (copyright Martha Cooper)

Nestled in between heartwarming stories about mythological Thanksgiving feasts and recipes for Butternut Squash Hotdish Jubilee, NPR has this fun slide show of sticker tags from Martha Coopers book “Going Postal”.

“For me,” Cooper writes in the book’s introduction, “looking for stickers is an on-going treasure hunt, increasing my pleasure as I walk around cities.” She not only photographs the stickers, but also collects them. “I took two today,” she says.

Read more in the NPR site here:

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Slap Happy: The Humble Sticker Gets The Job Done

Stickering Adheres to Some Graff/Street Art Rules Too

Today we’re sticking to the little pieces; those quickly appearing peeled objects that people smack up on just about every smooth surface around the city. Getting your name, your art, your product out there for people to see has blossomed into a genre of it’s own, fostering shows, mini-conventions, websites, magazines, books, and collectors trading clubs dedicated to the sticky-backed missives some people call ‘slaps”. From individually handmade to glossy mass-produced pieces, the city is a magnet for these adhesive miniature works of art, accumulating them quickly in some locations like snow piling up in a doorway corner during a Nor’easter.

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

Books have been documenting the world of sticker art of late. Most notable are Martha Cooper’s tomes “Going Postal” and  “Name Tagging” from Mark Batty Publishers and this fall Rizzoli released a new book on stickers called “Stickers From Punk Rock to Contemporary Art” by DB Burkemen in collaboration with Monica LoCascio.

The humble sticker is an art medium that does not require a big production and carries a very low risk when being put on the streets and gets the job done.  Doors are often the hot spots where the stickers live together in a seemingly harmonious life – and the rules applied to other forms of Street Art regarding space and real estate on a surface roughly apply here too; “Don’t overlap your sticker on mine or Imma bust you head, son.”  In addition, getting up in as many places as possible, preferably where your fellow sticker artists can see you, is a goal.

Here are some images of richly textured surfaces around town that are “wall-papered” with a myriad of stickers. Even if we knew all the artists, it’s impossible to note them all here.

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Photo © Jaime Rojo

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Stuck in Love With New York’s Stickers

One of New York’s Visiting Photographers Shows His Collection of Sticker Pics

New York is blessed with thousands, maybe millions of visitors every year.  Some come for Broadway, The Naked Cowboy and Nathan’s hotdogs. Others come for the street art.  Richard Skinner from Ireland shows us the cool stickers he shot while here.

~with images and text by Richard Skinner

When I arrived in New York, although I already knew how big street art was, it still amazed me and made me happy to see it in person.

Richard Skinner

(Image © Richard Skinner)

As I looked at all the art I noticed the mass amount of stickers covering the posts and traffic lights all over the city, and I had not really seen it documented properly before, so I started.  Walking the city for hours capturing the stickers that a lot of people in one of America’s biggest city’s fail to notice.

Richard Skinner

(Image © Richard Skinner)

A lot of these stickers are very well designed graphically, and I try to capture them in a way that the background compliments this. Some are just plain funny.  Sometimes they can be in awkward places so to document them I took a close up. I find it interesting to spot these stickers all over the city and see the length some artists go to have themselves recognized.

Richard Skinner

(Image © Richard Skinner)

I have much respect for all the artists involved and it’s a pleasure to document it.  I hope my photographs can make these pieces of art last longer than they might normally.

Richard Skinner

(Image © Richard Skinner)

Richard Skinner

(Image © Richard Skinner)

Richard Skinner

(Image © Richard Skinner)

Richard Skinner

(Image © Richard Skinner)

Richard Skinner

(Image © Richard Skinner)

To see more of Richard’s work go HERE

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