All posts tagged: Picasso

Artists Continue to Fight for Affordable Housing in NYC

Artists Continue to Fight for Affordable Housing in NYC

They’re not coming here to dine at the Olive Garden or take a tour through the Target.

They’re here for “Hello Dolly”, “Hamilton”, and “Cats”. They’re here for Billie Joel at the Garden, “Springstein on Broadway” and the “David Bowie” opening at the Brooklyn Museum. They’re here for the virtual reality exhibition “Celestial Bodies” at the Museum of Sex, Picasso and Marina Abramović at MoMa, and the 34,000 items in the Met’s Costume Institute. They’re here for Jazz at Birdland, punk at Manitobas, the singers at Joe’s Pub and dancing at “The Dirty Circus” party at House of Yes in Bushwick.

Whether its EDM or country music, Ai Wei Wei or Shepard Fairey, they’re reading about the arts from writers in the The New York Times, ArtForum, Hyperallergic, Time Out, The Village Voice, Daily News and right here.

Brooklyn Skyline. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The creative economy of artists, actors, dancers, musicians, photographers, curators, designers, art directors, architects, producers, writers, authors, painters, poets, coaches, trainers, teachers, filmmakers, lighting designers, stage designers, software programmers, prop makers, furniture designers, singers, chefs, hairdressers, makeup artists, fashion designers, and yes, Street Artists all are the contributors to the valuable cultural lifeblood of New York City.

And all of these people need a place to live and work, to create, to practice, to try and fail, and to try and succeed.

They also need to be able to pay the rent. That has been less and less and less possible in the last three decades at least with skyrocketing prices chasing low and medium income people from one neighborhood to the next.

These cultural creators have been moving from abandoned neighborhood to neglected neighborhood – in the process most often making the neighborhood more desireable – and then pushed out by the real estate investors. An effort to stem this unfair, brutal and insulting process, activists and artists created The Loft Law, which saved thousand artists in the 1980s and 1990s and it protected many Live/Work creative spaces and the cultural richness of the City that Never Sleeps. A second wave of Live/Work spaces were given protection via Albany in 2010 in a 2nd Loft Law  that covers creatives who brought neighborhoods around the city like Williamsburg and Bushwick back to life as desireable creative meccas.

Yes, this is one of the stories about gentrification – and yes, protection of affordable space for artists is not more important than affordable apartments for every single New Yorker. There are many programs afoot put in place ( please see: Mayor de Blasio Announces City Secured More Affordable Housing in 2017 Than in Any Prior Year.)

But that’s not why we’re writing today.

We’re writing to support all artists who give to this city and would like to assure that our elected officials, landlords, and the Loft Board remember their responsibility to respect and protect the rights of tenants, their families, their children, their grandchildren, brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, mothers, fathers.

Many tenants in the last couple of years have questioned whether the protections afforded under the Loft Law are being run over roughshod or ignored altogether, according to many artists you’ll speak with. There are accusations that hard-won rules are being skipped over, artists are being coerced, that clearly defined processes are being foreshortened and rammed through without input.

It’s an old story, a swinging of the pendulum of justice toward the people and away from the people, but one that needs to be righted occasionally. At this moment, with the Mayor so clearly expressing a desire to protect the rights of the New York creative industry for affordable safe loft Live/Work spaces, it seems possible.


Here is the press release for a protest by 475 Kent tenants today at the meeting of the New York City Loft Board.

475 Kent tenants are asking that you ALL come out and support them.
Loft Board Meeting
2:00 PM
January 18, 2018 
New York City Loft Board   
22 Reade Street, 1st floor 
New York, New York

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Miss Bugs Top Feature on Huffpost ARTS Today

The “Parlour” Show Produces Some of the Most Riveting Scenes of the Summer

If you missed the BSA inteview of UK Street Art duo Miss Bugs a little while ago, you can read the interview and vote on your favorite shot on the slideshow on the Huffington Post Arts page. Special thanks to Miss Bugs, Rae & Hope at Brookynite Gallery, and Kimberly Brooks.

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Leave a comment or vote on your favorite Miss Bugs slides from this remarkable installation here.

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Miss Bugs in Brooklyn: Girls, Sex and a Car Crash in the Forest

A horrendously stunning car crash, windshield smashed in by a wooden stump, a shard of white light cutting sharply through a smoke cloud which rises to eerily announce the arrival of UK Street Artists Miss Bugs in Brooklyn.  In “Parlour”, their first solo on view right now in Bed Stuy, the backyard diorama is a plastered paper perimeter of gnarled and murky indigo off road forest, a haunting backdrop to the cut-out distorted and riveting forms who break the 4th wall toward you with intent.

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The curvaceous ladies are cousins of the street pieces Miss Bugs places with great care publicly, cut outs that fade into their surrounding and pop out from it, undulating and teasing and riveting, a perfectly charged counterweight of sex to the violent metal and glass carnage before you. Throughout the inside gallery and backyard installation, Miss Bugs plays with a scale slightly larger than life, giving imperious and distantly cool figures a personal, almost intimidating immediateness.

brooklyn-street-art-miss-bugs-jaime-rojo-brooklynite-gallery-07-11-web-1The front room of “Parlour” at Brooklynite Gallery with Miss Bugs (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The distortion of the forms and come hither stand-offishness is softened and sweetened by saturated pop colors and cleverly patterned replications of art you have seen somewhere else. Always willing to take appropriation to new heights, Miss Bugs gladly incorporates signature elements of other artists works into their distorted and sensuous forms, weaving them into the hair, tattooing them across the skin, wrapping their ladies with a body conscious knitted brocade.

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Miss Bugs (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Speaking with the royal “we”, the very anonymous Miss Bugs talked with Brooklyn Street Art about “Parlour”:

Brooklyn Street Art: What was the genesis for “Parlour” in general and this outdoor installation in particular?
Miss Bugs:
We wanted it to be a place that unsettles you… The concept of the ‘Parlour’ exploits the idea that the art establishment plays on people’s desires, whether for money, beauty, sex or ownership. We’ve always looked at these themes within our work, so here we continue to question them. However, this time, we wanted to extend the ideas beyond the work and have the pieces viewed in their own theatrical space making us see the works’ symbolism in a different, darker light. We place our own fictional characters in the middle of the space. ‘The Madam’ is here with her open eyes; to convey ourselves as part of this sometimes strange and seedy world.

The outside installation grew from the concept that the parlour is being protected by a few souls and that this can be a twisted place, full of contradiction… We suppose it’s a nightmare or maybe just a bad dream! Comparisons can be made throughout the show between our ‘Parlour’ and the real world of the art establishment. Just depends how deep you want to scratch!

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Miss Bugs (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: How was it to install your work in Brooklyn this time around?
Miss Bugs
: It’s great to show in New York especially Brooklyn, we love it… Just to spend time walking around soaking it all up is brilliant. Since we were kids we saw and heard Brooklyn in music, film and art, so it feels great when we’re here and it always makes us feel at home!

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: The imagery gives off sex, cars, alcohol… what are some of the messages you are working with?
Miss Bugs: All these elements we try and show in a warped way; For example, placing glamorous but distorted nudes next to a burnt-out car, which hopefully makes us question our desires and see them differently! When we got the car into the gallery and we realised just how horrific a smashed up car is, it had a sadness about it which we hope we were sensitive to with our cut out figures. The installation of the woodland clearing we wanted to be experienced at night to create a haunting and again unsettled atmosphere, but the smoke machine could have done this job by itself …

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Miss Bugs (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: You borrow from different artists and other cultural art forms (including Shakespeare in one instance) and incorporate many of those images into your work. How do you go about selecting the images? Are they your favorite artists or is it purely aesthetic?
Miss Bugs:
The list of artists that we ‘stole’ from and remixed for this show is massive…Hannah Hoch and Kurt Schwitters, Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Vera Lehndorff, Gustav Klimt, Picasso, Mc Escher, Man Ray, David Lynch, Mel Ramous, Takashi Murakami, Leonardo De Vinci, Banksy, Warhol, Stanley Kubrick

We’ll stop now but the list goes on!  You have to look harder for some of them and others can be staring you in the face but sometimes still go unnoticed as they’re seen out of context. Playing with ideas of how we view artwork and how much of its reasoning we understand.

We look at links between the artists and their working methods throughout history. Artists that would not normally be considered to sit alongside each other are then remixed together showing just how the working style of (for example) Keith Haring can gel together with Picasso, and how artists from very different periods in time and culture are using very similar approaches, often where you wouldn’t expect to see it.

Here we’ve selected elements of artists whose work goes someway in helping us tell our own story within ‘Parlour’… Suppose we’re like some sort twisted museum curator cramming the world’s greatest artists together into a small room for an orgy, then throwing some classical writers and iconic film directors in for good measure!

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Panoramic view of the outdoor installation (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Bugs. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Miss Bugs “Parlour” is currently on view at Brooklynite Gallery. Click below for more information.

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=21691

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Street Art:Downtown LA, Culver City, West Hollywood, Echo Park, and Venice

In select neighborhoods of Los Angeles, certain street artists keep it local. You might see them in one neighborhood but not another, as the term “all-city” is not too important. Here’s a selection of pieces from the Arts District, Culver City, West Hollywood, Echo Park and Venice.

brooklyn-street-art-ben-aine-jaime-rojo-Los-angeles-venice-art-district-culver-city-west-hollywood-04-11-web-23Ben Eine in Venice (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JR in Venice (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JR in Venice (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Proving that it isn’t just for bankers, here’s Bankrupt Slut in Culver City (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bankrupt Slut in Culver City (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Longtime Los Angeles Street Artist Becca in Echo Park (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Becca in the Art District in Downtown LA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Classic piece from Blek Le Rat in Echo Park (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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I’ve got an idea! Let’s do a cat stencil in Downtown LA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Cfer does Kim Kardashian in Downtown LA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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These Curly stickers showed up very quickly in LA this week. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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D*Face in Sunset Blvd (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Invader, a visitor sticker from MOCA, and a Beatlesque statement about graffiti artist Revok in Little Tokyo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A feeding fest from Kim West in The Art District LA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JH in The Art District LA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Word to Mother in Culver City (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pornography and Taxidermy in Sunset Blvd (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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This piece near the museum in Little Tokyo was well placed for a lot of traffic and there were even a few people posing with it. Love More War Less  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Picasso’s famous anti-war “Guernica” is reinterpreted here by Street Artist Ron English in The Art District (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Shepard Fairey lurking behind the fence on Sunset Blvd (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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An Obey sticker in Little Tokyo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Shepard Fairey, Uti, and Charm in Little Tokyo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A sticker crush in Little Tokyo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Where’s your REVS? Sculpture is HOT!

THE TEN MOST EXPENSIVE PIECES OF ART EVER SOLD

You would think that the current doldrums with bear markets worldwide, discussions of entire countries in imminent bankruptcy, the banker-induced housing crisis here and unemployment rolls hitting record heights, the appetite for buying art might have dried up. Um, nope.

Apparently for art collectors with big pockets, a keen eye, and good intuition there’s no such a thing as a recession. Art continues to be made, bought and sold regardless of the economic environment, if the recent record sale of Alberto Giacometti’s “Walking Man I” for a whopping $104.3 was any indication. It was the most expensive artwork ever sold at an auction.

The 1961 “L’Homme Qui Marche I,” a life-size sculpture of walking human figure is 72 inches (183 centimeters) tall. According to Sotheby’s auction house, it “represents the pinnacle of Giacometti’s experimentation with the human form” and is “both a humble image of an ordinary man, and a potent symbol of humanity,”

Good news for REVS! Sculpture is hot! (photo ©Jaime Rojo)
The recent record-breaking news has got to be good for REVS! Sculpture is hot! (photo ©Jaime Rojo)

Here’s a chart of the ten most expensive pieces of art ever sold throughout booming economies, bull markets and financial crisis regardless.

CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Image Courtesy of "Transparency"

Image Courtesy of GOOD

Read more about this at GOOD here:

Also check out a new interview by Sebastian Buck of Fauxreel at GOOD.

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