All posts tagged: No Longer Empty

Chris Jordan “Locost Queue” Debuts from a Tower in Queens

New Yorkers will stand in line for many things; heavily frosted confections from the Cupcake Cafe, the new iPhone 17, or the chance to rub against a sweaty stranger on a light-crazed dance floor while paying 8 dollars for a plastic cup of ice. Since the superstorm Sandy hit last month, many of us have stood in line for food and blankets, and since the banking superstorm hit in ’09, many more have passed hours on the unemployment line. While we stand, sometimes we can feel time passing, the hands of the clock slowly waving past us incrementally as we fill out our forms or scroll through our electronic devices.  Light artist Chris Jordan is illuminating and projecting our waiting plight in his new installation at the top of a 14 story tower of a former bank in Queens.

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You” Street view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I’ve been working overtime on this installation, which on the surface is incredibly simple,” he says of his piece entitled ‘Locost Queue’, which debuted in darkness in Long Island City last night.

The forms are photographed silhouettes of people from the local neighborhood, marching slowly across the four 11-foot diameter clock faces. Describing the low cost piece that will run for 3 months as part of a group exhibition curated and produced by No Longer Empty, Jordan reveals some of the back story effort and planning that went into making this glowing show above Queens.

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You”. For this installation Mr. Jordan fashioned a handmade four-way projector with a “reel” of silhouettes in continuous motion, projected on the four walls of the clock tower of the former Bank of Manhattan building. Indoor view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“This has been anything but simple to accomplish, due to numerous constraints – including having to haul all the gear up three stories by rope, through a narrow hatch,” he says as he describes the grimy ladder and port-holed room. With an extremely limited budget, the resourceful designer had to forgo the powerful high cost projectors he is accustomed to working with and devise a decidedly old-fashioned approach to light projection. Ironically, as one stands in this dust-covered belfry on a chilly winter night it looks completely appropriate for a tower built in 1927, two years before last century’s bank-caused depression.

“Despite the challenges,” he says proudly as he surveys the shadows inside the drafty illuminated room, “it’s running, and looking pretty fantastic.”

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You” Indoor view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You” Indoor view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You” Indoor view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You”. Tenth floor view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Jordan. “Locost Queue” LIC, Queens, New York. 2012. From the group exhibition “How Much Do I Owe You”. Street view. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

View of NYC from a broken panel on one of the clock faces. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris’ installation is part of the group exhibition titled “How Much Do I Owe You” curated and produced by No Longer Empty. To learn more details about this exhibition, the complete list of participating artists and about the programs and mission of No Longer Empty click here.

Viewing every evening from dusk to midnight through March 13, 2013.

This installation depicts a queue of people moving through the four clock faces at this historic clock tower in Queens Plaza. The speed correlates with the population increase of New York City.

Best viewing is from the park across the street from the building.

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More Mansion Rooms from “This Side of Paradise”

A week and a half before the exhibition “This Side of Paradise” opened at the Andrew Freedman House, BSA readers got the first glimpse of the completed rooms of the mansion that were taken over by artists like Daze, Crash, How & Nosm, and Adam Parker Smith (“Poorhouse for the Rich” Revitalized By The Arts). The grand unveiling of the completed installations at last weeks opening was attended by throngs of people who simply poured in through the gates of the grand estate, darling, and listened to speeches, enjoyed libations, took photos, and waded through the crowded hallways to poke their heads in the individual mini-suites and their various interpretive installations.

Cheryl Pope (photo © Jaime Rojo)

In case you missed the opening and still need some encouragement to see this free show over the next 7 weeks or so, we bring you views of some more of the rooms that have opened since the first visit. Each artist was well-schooled in the curious history of this place and it’s former residents so what emerges is part tongue-in-cheek reenactment, part fragmented memory, and part lyrical reverie. Thanks to Mid-Bronx Council for hosting us and here’s is what caught our eye to share with you.

Cheryl Pope (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sylvia Plachy (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sofia Maldonado (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sofia Maldonado (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Justen Ladda (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Federico Uribe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Federico Uribe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gian Maria Tostatti (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gian Maria Tosatti (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Princess Alexander, Kristen McFarland, Jimmy Smith (photo © Jaime Rojo)

To read our article “Poor House for the Rich: Revitalized by the Arts”on the Huffington Post click here

For further details regarding this exhibition click here.

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Fun Friday 04.06.12

Good Friday for the Christians, Passover for the Jews, Movie Night for the Atheists

 

1. “This Side of Paradise” in Da Bronx
2. “Highbrow, Lowbrow, Nobrow – MOUSSE! (Netherlands)
3. G40 in Richmond, VA
4. New Website called “The Facebook” (VIDEO)
5. Dolk and Pøbel: Norwegian Street Artists Fan Video
6. This Video Contains a Large Depiction of Eggs and is therefore Tangentially Related to Easter >> Michael Beerens (Video)

“This Side of Paradise” in Da Bronx

“This Side Of Paradise” opens this week to the public – involving 32 artists in a massive Mansion in the Bronx that is in disrepair. The exhibition is curated by No Longer Empty and hosted by The Mid-Bronx Council at the Andrew Freedman Home, a limestone palazzo that for several decades served as a “homeless shelter” for those poor folks that lost their fortunes during the Great Depression. Having been rich once was a key requirement for those applicants that wished to be admitted to the club. We hear that the waiting list was long.

This weekend take the D train to 167 St. in the Bronx and have fun.

How and Nosm installation “Reflections” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this exhibition click here.

For more photos of the installation and to read our article and interview with the curators click here. “Poorhouse for the Rich” Revitalized By The Arts

“Highbrow, Lowbrow, Nobrow – MOUSSE! (Netherlands)

MAMA”S new group show “Highbrow, Lowbrow, Nobrow – MOUSSE! Opens today in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Artists included are: Admir Jahic (CH, 1975), East Eric (FR, 1974), Isaac Cordal (ES, 1974), Mark Jenkins (USA, 1974), Nomad (DE, 1971), Stefan Gross (DE, 1965), Tobias Allanson (SE, 1974), Zoe Strauss (USA, 1970)

Isaac Cordal (photo © Isaac Cordal)

G40 in Richmond, VA

The reception for the G40 Summit in Richmond, Virginia takes place tomorrow. Artists will be present and there will be an Art Battle where teams of artists will paint live.

With 12 internationally known Street Artists invited to create murals for this festival including:  Jacopo Ceccarelli aka 2501, Italy, Angry Woebots – California, Aryz – Spain, El Mac – California,  Gaia – New York, Jaz – Argentina, Jesse Smith – Virginia, La Pandilla – Puerto Rico, Lelo – Brazil, London Police – UK, Pixel Pancho – Italy, Roa – Belgian and Scribe – Kansas City.

The downtown Art Walk is reported to include murals by Gaia, Pixel Pancho, Aryz, Roa, Jaz, Lelo, La Pandilla, Angry Woebots, 2501 and Scribe. Check your local listings as there is quite a bit of variation in reported artists lists. You might get lucky and catch an artist at work.

To learn more about The G40 Summit click here.

There’s a new Website called “The Facebook” – This leaves Atari in the Dust! (VIDEO)

Dolk and Pøbel: Norwegian Street Artists Fan Video

This Video Contains a Large Depiction of Eggs and is therefore Tangentially Related to Easter >> Michael Beerens (Video)

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“Poorhouse for the Rich” Revitalized By The Arts

A block-long limestone mansion originally built as a welfare hotel for the retiring rich invites streetwise Graff artists and others to gild it’s decayed rooms, raising it from pigeon-infested squalor. Call it “This Side of Paradise”

Enter a discussion about the impact of the modern Street Art movement and someone will inveigh with swollen gravitas that Street Art has the power to “activate” or “re-vitalize” a previously moribund space, to bring it to life. Aside from sounding like part of the gentrification process, the “activate” argument is meant to tip on its head the impulse of  simple-minded dullards who opine that Street Art and it’s cousin graffiti are pure social disease and degrading to the foundations of city life.

How and Nosm “Reflections” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Opening in April in the Bronx a similarly anti-intuitive project invites artists of the street to create new life in a decaying mansion and the looking-glass contradictions are as rich as those of the benefactor for whom the aged home is named. The Andrew Freedman Home, with it’s Italian Renaissance details and stepped back grandeur along the Grand Concourse and a mile south of Yankee Stadium, acquired its landmark status in 1984 – the same year it breathed it’s final breath as a retirement home for the rich who had fallen on hard times.

When the building’s namesake, a New York millionaire businessman and colleague of the corrupt Tammany Hall, died as a confirmed bachelor in 1915, he wanted to make sure the money he left would keep the wealthy feeling wealthy after falling in the poorhouse. He simply didn’t want his peers to suffer no matter their financial plight so his wealth commissioned this mammoth home with roughly twice the space of the White House to give these deserved folk a good life in their later years, with servants. Beginning in the Roaring Twenties and over the next six decades, with hallways as long as 22 Town Cars, the ground-bound ship liner swam with former Cunard attendants serving the mostly white seniors as they dined in red and black Chinoiserie style, thumbed books in the library, played sport in the billiard room, and bobbed in the grand ballroom.

 

How and Nosm “Reflections” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How and Nosm “Reflections” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I think that you cannot help but be struck by the bizarre nature of the enterprise because it was class solidarity. He was less concerned with the indigent poor than protecting his own class who had fallen on hard times,” exclaims Manon Slome as she frames the ridiculous circumstances that kept “members” well heeled into their twilight.

Slome is President and Chief Curator of No Longer Empty, a contemporary public art organization that takes empty buildings that are often in disrepair and revitalizes them with site-responsive contemporary art exhibitions. Together with the Mid Bronx Senior Citizens Council, the non-profit that has owned the 117,000 square foot complex since 1984, No Longer Empty is curating a 32 artist show that for two months will offer curious visitors the first peek at the decrepitude that is slowly being enlivened.  Since bidding farewell to their last upper crust in the early 1980s, the crusty decay of walls and ceilings has been curling and peeling and dropping to the floor. With artists interpreting the history and memories of the place along with their own take on the economics involved, the results are definitely site specific.

How and Nosm “Reflections” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How and Nosm “Reflections” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As she talks about the new show “This Side of Paradise,” Jeanette Puryear, Executive Director of Mid Bronx Senior Citizens Council, reflects on how she used to watch the games and social activities in the grassy gardens of the home from the other side.  “We began across the street when the council started in 1973. I came aboard as a staff person in ’77 and I used to look down on the parties that they had on the lawn here. I just thought it was a wonderful building.”

Discussing the selection of No Longer Empty (NLE) as partner to the arts community and curator of the new show, Puryear feels like it is a natural accord. “The idea, our collaboration, really came about when I met Manon and she talked about NLE’s interest in revitalizing communities and it really fit very much with our mission of comprehensive community revitalization.”

Justen Ladda. “Like Money, Like Water”. Eventually this installation in progress would be black lit. The blue tape affixed to the walls is to economize and will not be a part of the installation. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Daze (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This may come as news to some that graffiti kings like Crash and Daze were called upon to do community revitalization in the same borough where leaders once reviled their painting style.  With a few heavyweight street art and graffiti names bringing these rooms to life, it’s interesting to see their role as one of contributing in a positive way here where the emergence of a global “Wildstyle” graffiti first blossomed while entire neighborhoods burned.

“At the same time in the late 70s and early 80s when this home’s original purpose was failing you had the rise of Bronx graffiti,” says curator Keith Schweitzer, who introduced Crash, Daze and Tats Cru alumni How & Nosm to Slome, each taking one of the rooms and bringing it to life. Schweitzer sees many parallels in this Bronx tale as he reflects on the role of the artist rising from the ashes of the burned-out neighborhoods then and an art show in the decay of this home now. “At that time you had things like Fashion Moda in the Bronx, which sort of incorporated graffiti into a contemporary art exhibition and these conceptual spaces that Street Artists and Graffiti artists participated in. And it all happened at the same time.”

 

Daze (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Daze (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Slone brings the stories full circle as she excitedly relates the multiple arts and education projects currently afoot in the home, including many with a social mission of building community and connections within it. “When we started selecting and inviting the artists, we steeped them in the history of the home. The goal was really to create a fusion of the history of the home and the nature of the history of the Grand Concourse and the present day realities of the Bronx. And that fusion was really the creative springboard, if you like, for most of installations in the exhibition.”

Whatever role you assign the artist in this clubby home of decay, the experience of discovering these complete room installations is at times reflective, sometimes illuminative, and often revitalizing to the spirit. It will depend on the definition of paradise.

Crash “Connections” 2012. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash “Connections” 2012. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash “Connections” 2012. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Scherezaede Garcia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Scherezaede Garcia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cheryl Pope “Then and There” Installation in progress. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cheryl Pope “Then and There” Installation in progress. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cheryl Pope “Then and There” Installation in progress. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cheryl Pope “Then and There” Installation in progress. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adam Parker Smith. “I Lost All My Money In The Great Depression And All I Got Was This Room”,  2012. Installation in progress in collaboration with Wave Hill. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adam Parker Smith. “I Lost All My Money In The Great Depression And All I Got Was This Room”,  2012. Installation in progress in collaboration with Wave Hill. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adam Parker Smith. “I Lost All My Money In The Great Depression And All I Got Was This Room”,  2012. Installation in progress in collaboration with Wave Hill. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Pigeons took over while most of the house remained close and unused. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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This Side of Paradise will open on April 04 at 6:00 pm.  For further details about this exhibition click here.

With special thanks to President and Chief Curator Manon Slome and Curator Keith Schweitzer of No Longer Empty for their generous access to the installations in progress. To learn more about No Longer Empty click here.

BSA would also like to extend our gratitude to Jeanette Puryear, Executive Director of Mid-Bronx Council for taking time to answer our questions. To learn more about Mid-Bronx Council click here.

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No Longer Empty in Collaboration With Mid-Bronx Council Present: “This Side of Paradise” (Bronx, NYC)

This Side Of Paradise

On April 4, 2012, the gates of the Andrew Freedman Home will open to the public. The Home was once built to be a haven, a paradise, for the rich elderly who had lost their fortunes. Bequeathed by millionaire Andrew Freedman, the Home provided not only food and shelter but all the accoutrements of a rich and civilized life style – white glove dinner service, a grand ball room, a wood-paneled library, billiard room and a social committee who organized concerts, opera performances and the like.

Referencing this quixotic history, This Side of Paradise will reference the past and reconnect the vision of Andrew Freedman to today’s Bronx and its realities. The exhibition and its extensive public programming onsite and offsite will draw together the economic and social history of the Home with the present day realities of the Bronx and its residents.

The selected artists’ will work in a site-specific manner and will respond to such issues as memory, immigration, storytelling, aging and the creation of fantasy that the original concept of the Home “being poor in style” suggests. This Side of Paradise will celebrate human ingenuity, the strength of the human spirit and the resilience needed to fashion beauty, hope and rejoicing.

Opening Reception will be Wednesday, April 4 from 6 to 8pm followed by the Speakeasy After Party Fundraiser sponsored by St. Germain starting at 8:30pm. Support NLE and future exhibitions by purchasing tickets here.

Exhibition Hours: Thursday to Sunday, 1pm to 7pm (extended hours when events are hosted).

Bronx Arts Alliance is a partner for This Side of Paradise either installations, events or general cross-promotion of Bronx Arts. Partnering organizations are: Bronx Documentary Center |  Casita Maria  |  Hebrew Home at Riverdale  |  Lehman College Art Gallery  |  Longwood Art Gallery at Hostos College  |  The Bronx Children’s Museum  |  The Bronx Council of the Arts  |  The Bronx Museum of the Arts  |  The Bronx River Art Center  |  The POINT  |  Wave Hill

Organizations Presenting Installations are Wave Hill – Installation by Adam Parker SmithThe POINT – Designed by Carey Clark, Alejandra Delfin, Danny Peralta, Lady K Fever, Sharon de La Cruz, Tats Cru, David Yearwood among others;  The Bronx Museum of the Arts – Works by artists in the AIM Program; Bronx Documentary Center -Film by Tim HetheringtonLehman College Art Gallery – Works by Scherezade García

Video and Production SupportBronxNet– a not for profit  that provides local television by the people of the Bronx, for the people of the Bronx.

Media Partner: WNYC Radio

The Cafe in the Home is generously supported by La Colombe Torrefaction coffee.

This Side of Paradise is a collaboration with the Mid Bronx Senior Citizens Council, one of the largest nonprofits who has been providing community services in the South Bronx. Contact wpuryear@midbronx.org about the Andrew Freedman Home and mjenkins@midbronx.org about MBSCC.

Curatorial team is Manon Slome, Keith Schweitzer, Charlotte Caldwell and Lucy Lydon. A tremendous thank you to all our volunteers and interns involved in the project. Thank you!

ARTISTS:

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Images of The Week 09.26.10

Brooklyn-Street-Art-IMAGES-OF-THE-WEEK_05-2010

Our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring  Chris Stain, Imminent Disaster, Labrona, Lister, Oculo, Shepard Fairey, Shin Shin, Trice,  White Cocoa, and a big piece of freshly baked CAKE.

This is the third time that Lister has gone over himself on this spot (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

This is the third time that Lister has gone over himself on this spot (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Stain mural for DumboFest 2010 sponsored by No Longer Empty (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Stain mural for Dumbo Arts Festival 2010 sponsored by No Longer Empty Gallery (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Imminent Disaster mural for DumboFest 2010 sponsored by No Longer Empty (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Imminent Disaster mural for Dumbo Arts Festival 2010 sponsored by No Longer Empty (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Blue Suit (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Blue Suit (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Wanna Be Famouos? (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Wanna Be Famous? Keep those flames alive. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Labrona in Toronto (Photo © Space27)

Labrona in Toronto (Photo © Space27)

A commnetary on all the recent talk of wichtcraft on TV? (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

What has this street artist been dabbling into?  (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

White Cocoa (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

White Cocoa (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tin cut out sculptures of a common scene in NYC (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tin cut out sculptures of a common scene in NYC (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Oculo (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Oculo (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Trice explosion (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Trice explosion of paper collage (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rules and Regulations of NYC (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rules and Regulations of NYC (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shin Shin (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shin Shin (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lister Sez "Don't Be Bitter, Be Better" (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lister Sez, “Don’t Be Bitter, Be Better” (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

The guys of Primary Flight, Books and Typoe are hosting street artist Cake while in Miami at The Fountainhead Residency in conjunction with Primary Flight.

Below are images of her new work “Two Sisters and a Peach”with photos by © Lena Schmidt.

brooklyn-street-art-cake-miami-primary-flight-2010-3-web

brooklyn-street-art-cake-miami-primary-flight-2010-2-web

brooklyn-street-art-cake-miami-primary-flight-2010-1-web

brooklyn-street-art-cake-miami-primary-flight-2010-4-web

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No Longer Empty Presents: “Watch This Space” A Group Show Including Logan Hicks, Chris Stain, Imminent Disaster and Jordan Seiler (Dumbo,Brooklyn, NY)

No Longer Empty

Fernando Almanza Image Courtesy of The Gallery

Fernando Almanza Image Courtesy of No Longer Empty

Watch This Space

Opens September 24th, 2010 to October 23rd, 2010
Runs Thursday through Sunday, 12pm to 5pm

As a start to the Dumbo Arts Festival, No Longer Empty will be working with exteriors of buildings as well as mounting an exhibition in a vacant gallery space. United under the title of “Watch This Space”, both the exhibition and the mural works will allude to Dumbo’s industrial past as well as its current process of gentrification as the area remakes its image and purpose.

Working with the scaffolding, which surrounds the buildings in Dumbo, Chris Stain and Logan Hicks’s works will portray hauntingly photo realist images of New York crowds in gritty, urban scenery to elevate a sense of the working class hero.

In the gallery space at 55 Washington Street, NLE will be installing a site-specific exhibition, which unites the outdoors with the inner space again referencing the intensive construction of Dumbo in its march to gentrification. Artists to date include Alexandre Arrechea, Alejandro Almanza Pereda and Cal Lane.

Cal Lane creates “soft” or delicate images through “hard,” industrial tools. For instance, the artist has carved floral lace patterns into gardening shovels and car doors and carved intricate tapestries from oil drums.

The interdisciplinary quality of Alexandre Arrechea’s work reveals a profound interest in the exploration of both public and domestic spaces. He creates wry comments on the rapid expansion/demolition of cities mediating between the two impulses with his own push-pull sense of artistic negotiation.

Alehandro Almanza Pereda transforms the most basic objects from daily life or construction sites into poetic ruminations, which often seem to defy the laws of gravity. At once playful and conceptually strong, the viewer is compelled to see wood chips, crates, cinder blocks or florescent bulbs as aesthetic entities capable of transcendence.

Alexandre Arrechea
Alejandro Almanza Pereda
Michel de Broin
Logan Hicks
Cal Lane
Lincoln Schatz
Helen Dennis
Imminent Disaster
Jordan Seiler

Exhibition at 55 Washington Street, Suite 200

Murals on Plymouth, Main and Washington Streets Dumbo Brooklyn

http://nolongerempty.org/

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Gaia Hand Paints a Red Roll-up

Street artist Gaia is often thought of primarily for wheat-pasted lino prints of animal/human mashups as metaphor, but it’s nice to note that adept hand-painting is also in Gaia’s quiver of skills.

It's a red-rooster rollup!  Gaia (photo ©Keith Schweitzer)
It’s a red-rooster rollup! Gaia (photo ©Keith Schweitzer)

Here’s a brief motion collage of a hand-painted installation a few weeks ago on a roll-up door in Chinatown, NYC. Photographed by Keith Schweitzer and invited by No Longer Empty, Gaia creates a rooster portrait, where the proud sitter penetrates the passerby with an intense gaze.

Or is it a blank stare? I never know.

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