All posts tagged: Mural

“MURAL” Roundup, Montreal Arts Festival Keeps The Quality for Year 2

“MURAL” Roundup, Montreal Arts Festival Keeps The Quality for Year 2

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Montreal has shown up again on our radar this summer because of the second annual MURAL festival, a large gathering of art fans, performances and live painting. The quality of the work is high and appropriately placed center stage, and the caliber of the event draws a good cross section of modern public art fans who are there to see the art and meet the artists rather than rush past it on the way to the next music performance, beer tent, or drug deal.

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Kashink. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

A majority of the 20+ artists made their mark initially by doing graffiti/street art, about a third of them are Canadian, and all of them were stunted by heavy rains the first two days of the four-day event. By the weekend the sun had cleared the way for block parties, DJs, live painting, tours, and commercial vending along the Saint-Laurent and the golden age of murals was in full effect once again.

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Bryan Beyung. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

Impossible to place into one stylistic category, many of the massive pieces this year are singular portraits, or at least figurative, appealing on the whole, and with a handful of abstract and surreal tableaus. Transgressive themes, as in many street festivals around the world, are almost disappeared or nearly imperceptible — an irony of sorts considering the rebellious street culture that many of these artists evolved from. Ultimately, it is the quality of the endowment that gives it staying power and many of these new pieces will endure into the future in Montreal.

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Seth. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

Artists for the MURAL festival include:

123 Klan, Bezt from the Etam Cru, Zilon, Alex Scaner, Inti, Vilx, Cyrcle, Zema, Alex Diaz, Seth, Fred Caron, 2501, Zoltan, Kashink, Kevin Ledo, Bryan Beyung, Miss Me, Stikki Peaches, Mathieu Connery, Alex Produkt, and Le Diamantaire.

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Rone. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

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RR & DB. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

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INTI. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

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Cyrcle. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

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Zoltan. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

 

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Bizt/Etam Cru. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

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Vilx. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

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Fred Caron. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

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Zilon. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

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Zema. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

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Kevin Ledo. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

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2501. Mural Festival 2014. Montreal, Canada. (photo © Daniel Esteban Rojas)

 

MURAL Montreal Festival: Day 1 and 2

Mural Montreal Festival: Day 3

 

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BIP: From Connecticut to Taiwan

BIP: From Connecticut to Taiwan

Connecticut based artist BiP (short for “Believe in People”) is sampling a handful of the aesthetic styles associated with the past decades of art on the streets – including this recent one “Worth Every Blow” that draws from the graphic poster style many people will associate with Shepard Fairey.

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BiP. A new permanent mural commissioned by The Museum Of Modern Art in Taiwan. (photo © courtesy of BiP)

Completed for a Taipei museum last fall the piece has been published before elsewhere but is a prime example of the impact that the popularity of Street Art is having on the work of new artists including BiP who has reportedly courted an Ivy-leagued audience with multiple installations on and around Yale’s campus in New Haven. Here you will see BiP also cycles through the conventions of pop, light irony, illustration, and even tries his hand at a throwie, albeit with a five syllable word. Oh, word?

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BiP (photo © courtesy of BiP)

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BiP (photo © courtesy of BiP)

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BiP (photo © courtesy of BiP)

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Alice Pasquini on the Streets of Madrid

Alice Pasquini on the Streets of Madrid

As December rolls into a slow coast toward the New Year, street artist Alice Pasquini met some new fans in the small and quiet neighborhoods and in one commercial district of this Spanish city last week. No festivals, no curated installations, no gallery openings – just the opportunity to bring to life a wall that you previously walked by without notice.

“I was just in Madrid these past few days to visit with old friends and paint,” she says. Somehow she managed to not be distracted the 6,000 Santa Claus runners in the street Saturday.

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A couple of local dogs keep an eye out for disturbances in this run-down lot where Alice painted one of her girls. Alice Pasquini in Madrid (photo © Alice Pasquini)

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Confidants. Alice Pasquini in Madrid (photo © Alice Pasquini)

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A local business owner talks with Alice while she finishes her new portrait. Alice Pasquini in Madrid (photo © Alice Pasquini) Brooklyn-Street-Art-copyright-AlicePasquini_Madrid3

Her girl on a skateboard is easily integrated with the existing aerosol missive above it. Alice Pasquini in Madrid (photo © Alice Pasquini) Brooklyn-Street-Art-copyright-AlicePasquini_Madrid7

This panel creates a frame for a multilayered stencil. Alice Pasquini in Madrid (photo © Alice Pasquini)

 

 

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Daze and a Second Wall in Miami

Brooklyn born graffiti/street/fine artist DAZE completed two walls while in Miami during Art Basel 2012. The first wall done in conjunction with Wynwood Walls has been extensively documented, including a couple of great shots from Martha Cooper here on BSA.

Favoring illustration and symbols in a muralist style, Daze, who was hitting trains in the late 70s and early 80s, brings some of that New York flavor to this wall. Here are a few images along with a new timelapse video from Daze in quieter spot outside the buzz of Wynwood Art District.

DAZE. Detail. (photo © Daze)

DAZE (photo © Daze)

DAZE. Detail. (photo © Daze)

 

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Arabbers; A Dying Baltimore Tradition Brought to Life by Gaia

Street Artist Gaia regularly highlights people from whichever community that he’s painting or wheatpasting in. Passersby commonly stop to talk while he’s working, often adding layers of history, knowledge, opinion, and nuance to his piece while he works. With his newest wall in Sandtown, a neighborhood of Baltimore, Gaia draws attention to a dying local profession that is hanging on, but barely.

Gaia “The Arabbers” Sandtown, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Gaia)

Arabbers, pronounced locally with a long A (“A-rab”) were salespeople who had as many as 400 commercial carts offering fresh produce and other items rolling daily through the streets of Baltimore at one time, according to some accounts.  Horse-drawn carts were a normal part of the early 20th century street life and amazingly B-Town still supports a few of these small business people on the streets in the 21st.

Because of new zoning and bylaws enacted during a period of urban renewal, the city restricted where horse stables existed, and many were put out of business. But during our travels through Baltimore with photographer Martha Cooper, who grew up there, we have had occasion to meet a number of the people who still carry this trade forward, some for many generations. Their small fenced off plots of land and stables appear suddenly like an oasis of farm life from another era in the middle of otherwise urban blocks. Once able to provide a good living to a family, Arabbers still brings fresh food to under served communities at reasonable prices. Unfortunately the proud profession is now endangered by the economic pressures of rising fees, the costs of animal care, and stable upkeep.

One of the people featured in the new mural by Gaia, Great Grandpa Manboy. Sandtown, Baltimore. 2012. (photo © Gaia)

“The Arabbers are a dying Baltimore tradition,” says Gaia, “that have long been a staple of this remarkable city.” The NYC Street Artist, who has been living in Baltimore for a handful of years while attending university as an art student, feels a kinship to the families who are still enduring to keep this kind of livelihood sustainable. “These men and women define the word ‘hustle’,” he remarks, “trotting along both desolate and vibrant landscapes selling their goods and making ends meet. This mural depicts four generations; starting with the great grandfather Manboy in the middle and up to Fruit’s son on the top right.”

Gaia “The Arabbers” Sandtown, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Gaia)

As the many expressions of Street Art freely bleed into all of art’s disciplines, many of Gaia’s more recent work clearly overlaps the traditions of community murals, where local residents are called out and celebrated, deified, congratulated, and mourned.  In this case, the tradition also extends to being a little bit educational as Gaia points to some of the contributing factors that endanger a profession here, “ The Arabber portraits are mixed with the logos on the containers in which their produce comes: a global economy meets a fading, tough tradition.”

Gaia “The Arabbers” Sandtown, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Gaia)

Gaia “The Arabbers” Sandtown, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Gaia)

Gaia “The Arabbers” Sandtown, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Gaia)

Gaia “The Arabbers” Sandtown, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Gaia)

Gaia “The Arabbers” Sandtown, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Gaia)

Gaia “The Arabbers” Sandtown, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Gaia)

Gaia “The Arabbers” Sandtown, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Gaia)

Gaia “The Arabbers” Sandtown, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Gaia)

Gaia “The Arabbers” Sandtown, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Gaia)

Gaia “The Arabbers” Sandtown, Baltimore. 2012 (photo © Gaia)

A Pony in a Baltimore stable. 2011 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A Pony in a Baltimore stable. 2011 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pigeons and Ponies mix well at a Baltimore Stable. 2011  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

 

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EVER Finishes New Wall in Baltimore

Argentinian Street Artist “Ever” is still in New York for a couple of days before heading off to Barcelona to do some new paintings and while here he was in Baltimore for the Open Walls he created a huge new piece in his realist/surrealist style. During his process and as he completed the painting Wednesday, Martha Cooper was there to catch the action, as she has been for all of the artists throughout the Gaia-led enterprise this spring. With just a couple more walls to go, including one by MOMO, Open Wall Baltimore is almost. Ever says it was a great experience and sent us a few pics for you to enjoy.  Thanks Ever, y ¡Buen viaje!

Ever in Baltimore (photo © Ever)

Ever in Baltimore (photo © Ever)

Ever shoots Martha shooting Ever. Baltimore for Open Walls (photo © Ever)

Ever in Baltimore (photo © Ever)

 

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JMR Stars Again This Week In Dallas (not JR, he got shot, remember?)

YEEE HAAAAWWWW!  Brooklyn Street Artist JMR has been exploring the dusty detritus of Dallas for a spell and has found that some of the BIG D’s outlying areas remind him of the wildness of abandoned spots in Brooklyn that provided succor and inspiration to artists and performers and poets and wise guys at the turn of the century. But he has no illusions about the future for a lively hipster art scene here. For one thing, there are no redheads from Portland with 36 stringed home-made musical instruments connected to a projector here yet. Naturally while exploring, JMR brought some paint with him. Here’s what he’s been seeing…

JMR (photo © Jim Rizzi)

“The wall was offered to me in collaboration with a Dallas graff legend named Ozone. The building is a live-work space for two local guys starting a longboard company/music studio. They also repair motorcycles while watching documentaries in their make-shift living room; it’s a very early 90s Williamsburg ‘Frontier Land’ vibe, sans the imminent real estate surge. That’s never coming here and it’s refreshing. In the midst of this industrial lower class neighborhood at night you can light a fire and sit around it and talk about politics or whatever, while drinking beer and smoking.

There’s a bunch of hardcore graff writers out here as well, who I met through this painting.  Although the city is oddly devoid of any tags, throw-ups, or fill-ins, there is a major freight yard where trains lay up for days and people are getting busy. The trains are bombed well and it’s inspiring to watch them pass, and frustrating to try and snag flix with my iPhone, fumbling to keep up with the motion.”

JMR (photo © Jim Rizzi)

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Street Artist Gaia Creates a Memorial Unexpectedly

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Street Artist Gaia just had an unexpected encounter with grief and memory after putting up one of his carrier pigeons on a fire damaged house. He was in Miami to paint a collaborative mural with 131 Projects honoring outsider artist Purvis Young at the Bakehouse studio complex.

While painting his mural he broke away to adorn the entrance of the house with a wheat-paste of his bird-in-hand, a linotype print that has appeared in neglected areas a number of times. The image, out of place and temporary, can suddenly bring a neglected place alive. Maybe it’s the juxtaposition of the elements, the symbolism of this hand made bird traditionally trained to carry and deliver messages.Brooklyn-Street-Art-Gaia-Miami-Sept-2011-3

The following day while he continued working on his mural, he looked across the street to see someone on the property gazing at the bird quietly, then raising her arms to take a photo. His curiosity was peaked. Later, the story took a little turn.

“While painting in the evening I was approached by two women looking for who was responsible for the new piece on the house. After admitting culpability, they divulged to me that their brother had burned to death on the premises, and that they thought the carrier pigeon in the hand was a sign of his passing,” Gaia says as he talks with some wonder about this sudden interaction with people whose lives are so connected to the building.

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On the one hand, it is amazing that someone is so affected by the appearance of something we recognize as a simple piece of street art. But when you think about our sense of place, the history and memories associated with it can be powerful. Sometimes when you are in so much grief and you are crying out for solace, you look for something, anything to comfort yourself. To see this image on such a scale, on the front of a burned house where your loved one died must have seemed like a sign from God. And truthfully, who is to say that it was not a sign from God, with artist as messenger?

“Their gratitude was something unexpected,” Gaia says as relates the story with a little shock, and possibly re-consideration of the impact his work can have. Upon reflection, the Street Artist says he is satisfied with the experience meeting the two new friends and his practice of placing his temporary works in places like this, concluding that the story is “a small, but powerful case for street art.”

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(original images courtesy and © of the artist)
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WK Interact Honors NYC Firefighters with Block Long Mural

Veteran New York Street Artist WK Interact has been depicting the rush and clamor and violence of the streets of New York since the 80s. With stark black and white imagery that captures and distorts the action layered with precise mechanical renderings and computerized symbology, WK creates a portrait of the kinetic chaos of the life on the street and delivers it back.

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

His new project installed in Brooklyn on 9/9/11 commemorates the events marked citywide 2 days later, when WK watched our streets convulse. With 10 years distance, the memory is just as close as ever for some, including firefighters who plunged themselves into the disaster instead of running from it. While WK is highly gifted verbally, he is most powerful when he uses his Street Art to talk about the impact of that day and pays tribute here to those firefighters while looking at the disaster. “Project Brave” is not his work in solitary – WK did this in partnership with the Yonkers Fire Department and the support of the Fire Commissioner Anthony Pagano and his Deputy Chief William Fitzpatrick and other firefighters in the city.

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The huge installation expanse alludes to the overwhelming nature of the events and gives viewers the opportunity to contemplate the loss of firefighters and the people they left.  Without musty museum stilted pomp, this modern depiction casts the events in a contemporary context fitting for the times; one more example of the contribution that Street Art can make to the culture and life of the city.

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

(all photos copyright Jaime Rojo)

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See our 2 part interview from September 2009 with WK Interact;

The 25 Year War: WK Interact in New York, Part 1 : Brooklyn Street Art

The 25 Year War: WK Interact in New York, Part 2 : Brooklyn Street Art

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Street Artist Ethos Surreally Big in LA

Street Artist Ethos Surreally Big in LA

Bryson Strauss and the L.A. Art Machine keep an eye on global art phenomena and support the ongoing conservation of Los Angeles’ substantial outdoor mural collection, continuing to promote a vital art community on all levels. This week they hosted Brazilian Street Arts Ethos to come and paint and the results have been giant! Talented photographer Carlos Gonzalez jumped into some very tricky spots to get you these dynamic process shots of Ethos in action.

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Ethos (image © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Ethos (image © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Ethos (image © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Ethos (image © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Ethos (image © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Ethos (image © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Ethos (image © Carlos Gonzalez)

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L.A. Art Machine

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Chris Stain and Billy Mode have “Esperanza” in BK

Chris Stain and Billy Mode have “Esperanza” in BK

Little bit of inspiration on a whole lotta wall;

This just In, a new giant piece by people’s champion Chris Stain and mild mannered Billy Mode on a sanctioned space in Bushwick called “Esperanza”, which means “I love mac-n-cheese” in Polish, I think. Longtime collaborators and buddies originally from back home in Baltimore, the two knocked out this mural over the Memorial Day weekend.

“Esperanza” by Chris and Billy (photo Jaime Rojo)

 

Brooklyn Street Art: What was the inspiration for the piece?

Chris Stain: My friend Kevin speaks Spanish and I asked him what’s the word for “hope” in Spanish and he said “esperanza”. Since the neighborhood is heavily Latino, Bill and I wanted to do something the people could relate to.

Detail of the mural featuring good homies (photo Jaime Rojo)

Detail of the mural featuring good homies (photo Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Are you seeing “hope” out on the streets these days?
Chris Stain: At times. The idea with this piece is to inspire hope. Just like Whitney Houston said, the children are the future.

Man in photo is actual size (photo courtesy Chris Stain)

Man in photo is actual size (photo courtesy Chris Stain)

Brooklyn Street Art: Those are some dope letters, like they were carved out of blocks….

Chris Stain: Bill is a pretty sharp cat. He devised a template that would help speed up productivity as well as accuracy. The wall is 52 feet wide by 10 feet high. The rectangular shape he drew up and cut out of cardboard was made the width of a single letter (about 5 feet), which made it easier for us to center the piece and for bill to sketch out each letter. Letters are made up of shapes like everything else so he broke this particular letter form down to its most basic shape and we worked from there.

Man + Memorial Day Weekend = Lawncare (photo courtesy Chris Stain)

Human Male + Memorial Day Weekend = Lawncare (photo courtesy Chris Stain)

Chris Stain Website

Billy Mode photostream

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Inner Damonsional Street People

Inner Damonsional Street People

Damon Ginandes Brings Everybody Inside

A smoldering volcano for street art and artist culture in the last couple of years, Red Hook, Brooklyn provides fertile post-industrial soil for an actual growing bohemia. Thanks largely to its’ difficult accessibility by public transportation Red Hook is having an additional millisecond to germinate as a creative utopia before gentrification paves it.

Ginandic Figures in the Window

Ginandic Figures in the Window

Brooklyn-based street artist Damon Ginandes hails from Red Hook and gets up in a big way; You might have seen his giant murals on Degraw Street in the last year –12′ tall and 60′ long (spray paint and latex acrylic); backed by an uncommon sight of figure-adorned windows in an abandoned building, perhaps a prescient preamble to the Electric Windows installation in Beacon NY this spring.

Recently sighted by Juxtapoz as an emerging artist worth noting, Ginandes for the first time brings his work into the air conditioning at the Williamsburg whitebox Artbreak Gallery. This premier solo show using Murals, canvasses, relief, sculpture (wood and wire), latex acrylic — is a solid introduction to his mixed media chops and to a finely drawn world.

Loggerhead

Loggerhead

The style of rendering, the elastic scale, and forlorn expressions are part cubist portraiture, part “Nightmare Before Christmas”. Having worked in film post-production the past few years, Ginandes is now pursuing his original love (and education) and is doing his art full-time.

High Chair

High Chair

As with his street work, “Dimensionals” is viewed best in person – line drawings and washes of figurative schemes that might once have been secreted away in your coffeehouse journal now literally burst out into 3-D.

The inner life of the sketch book comes to action, figures refusing to be constrained by canvas; craning their craniums atop long necks nearly bending into one another. These inanimate animations are multiple characters from the same family (or geneticist lab), gawking wistfully and wanfully at you, or blankly somewhere else; their gender not quickly discerned.

Mixed media relief on wood, 40″ x 92″

Brooklyn Street Art: How would you describe the figures and personalities of the characters in your work?

Damon Ginandes: In many ways I’m still getting to know my characters. Recently a friend of mine described them “portraits of souls” which I think is pretty accurate. I also like to think of them of distant relatives of ours, completely other-worldly, yet distinctly human. Our culture tends to define identities in a large part by external facades — our social networks, jobs, appearances, etc. — however, those factors tell little about the real being underneath. I try to strip my characters down to their most raw essence. Through their quiet, mysterious expressions, I seek to capture a subtle range of complex human emotions, which allow for a broad range of interpretations, ambiguous enough so that the viewer is left to uncover his/her own meaning. Their similar appearances serve to create a collective emotional effect, however each individual character conveys a deeply solitary and distinct inner world. Also, caught between the 2d and 3d (dimension), the characters themselves appear to be reacting to their own spatial ambiguity.

Brooklyn Street Art: How would you describe the difference between having an indoor gallery show and putting up the giant mural in a public outdoor space?

Damon Ginandes: A gallery is a controlled white space, so you don’t have to worry as much about context… you essentially create your own context. And there’s the converse — the challenge of integrating the public piece into (and hopefully altering) the pre-existing surrounding environment.

There is also the obvious difference that a public piece reaches a much broader range of people than a gallery show does. When painting my mural on Degraw Street, neighborhood kids, truck drivers, construction workers, other artists, locals, you name it, would stop and watch me paint, and provide their own interpretations. That is the best feeling, when people who aren’t ordinarily “art-goers” openly connect with the work — often because they’re the most enthusiastic.

Brooklyn Street Art: What are 3 things we should know about you and your work?

Damon Ginandes:
1. From what people tell me, my personality is quite different than you might expect based on my work.

2. I can’t stand it when people talk about food for long periods of time.

3. Among my biggest influences — Alberto Giacometti, Egon Schiele, Lee Bontecou — my style can also be traced back to my interest in 1990’s NYC graffiti and fascination with the Liquid Television animated shorts of Aeon Flux as an early teenager.

Brooklyn Street Art: What’s coming up for you?

Damon Ginandes: I’m in a group show entitled “Outside In” in London in Oct-Nov with a bunch of street artists from all over the world. I’m working on proposals for murals in NYC and Amsterdam among other places.

“Dimensionals” is showing through September 2nd at Artbreak Gallery

195 Grand Street, 2nd Floor
(betw. Bedford and Driggs Ave.)
Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 11211
www.artbreakgallery.com

For more on Damon Ginandes work or updates on his whereabouts, see
www.damonginandes.com
His photostream on Flickr is here

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