All posts tagged: Keely

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.05.15

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.05.15

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This 4th of July holiday weekend in New York is alive with art on the streets, on roofs, on stoops, in parks, on piers.  And run down back lots, tunnels, abandoned spots. Check your local listings.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring ARC, BAST, Bibbito, Bifido, Cash4, Clint Mario, Don John, Entes y Pesimo, Faith47, JR, Keely, Smells, The Yok, and WK Interact.

Top image above >>> Faith47 for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faith47 for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faith47 for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bifido in Sicily, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

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Bifido in Sicily, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

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Bast and his outsider art (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Don John in Copenhagen. (photo © John Don)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The Yok (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Arc (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Smells (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Clint Mario (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Cash4 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bibbito. Reggio Emilia, Italy. (photo © Bibbito)

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Bibbito. Detail. (photo © Bibbito)

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Entes y Pesimo for Inoperable Gallery. Linz, Austria. (photo © Philipp Greindl)

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Entes y Pesimo for Inoperable Gallery. Linz, Austria. (photo © Philipp Greindl)

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Entes y Pesimo for Inoperable Gallery. Linz, Austria. (photo © Philipp Greindl)

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Keely (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Williamsburg, Brooklyn. July 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The Power Of Slow and the Ascent of the Storytellers

The Power Of Slow and the Ascent of the Storytellers

A big deal has been made about the so-called virtual experience of Street Art – made possible by ever more sophisticated phones and digital platforms and technology – producing a pulsating river of visually pleasing delicacies to view across every device at a rapid speed, and then forget.

Sit on the city bus or in a laundromat next to someone reviewing their Instagram/RSS/Facebook  feed and you’ll witness a hurried and jerky scrolling with the index finger of images flying by with momentary pauses for absorbing, or perhaps “liking”. The greatest number of “likes” are always for the best eye candy, the most poppy, and the most commercially viable. It’s a sort of visual image consumption gluttony that can be as satisfying as a daily bag of orange colored cheese puffs.

This is probably not what art on the street is meant for. At least, not all of it.

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Space Invader (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As we have been observing here and in front of audiences for a few years now, the 2000s and 2010s have brought a New Guard and a new style and approach to work in the street that we refer to as the work of storytellers. These artists are doing it slowly, with great purpose, and without the same goals that once characterized graffiti and street art.

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London Kaye’s tribute to Space Invader. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

While there has been the dual development of a certain digital life during the last decade, these street works are eschewing the shallowness that our electronic behaviors are embracing. Even though the digitization of society has pushed boundaries of speed and eliminated geography almost entirely, it is creating an artificial intelligence of a different kind. In other words there really is still no substitute for being there to see this work, to being present in the moment while cars drive by and chattering pedestrians march up the sidewalk.

Setting aside the recent abundance of large commissioned/permissioned murals and  the duplication/repetition practice of spreading identical images on wheatpasted posters and stickers that demark the 1990s and early 2000s in the Street Art continuum, today we wanted to briefly spotlight some of the one of a kind, hand crafted, hand painted, illegally placed art on the streets.

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Judith Supine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The materials, styles and placements are as varied as the artists themselves: Yarn characters attached to fences, tiles glued to walls, acrylic and oil hand painted wheat pastes on a myriad of surfaces, ink, lead and marker illustrations, carved linotype ink prints, clay sculptures, lego sculptures, intricate hand-cut paper, and hand rendered drawings have slowly appeared on bus shelters, walls, doorways, even tree branches.

They all have a few things in common: The artists didn’t ask for permission to place these labor-intensive pieces on the streets, they are usually one of a kind, and frequently they are linked to personal stories.

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QRST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We’ve been educating ourselves about these stories and will be sharing some of them with you at the Brooklyn Museum in April, so maybe that’s why we have been thinking about this so much. There is a quality to these works that reflect a sense of personal urgency and a revelation about their uniqueness at the same time.

If the placement of them is hurried the making of them it is not. The themes can be as varied as the materials but in many cases the artist informs the art by his or her autobiography or aspiration. And once again BSA is seeing a steady and genuine growth in storytelling and activism as two of the many themes that we see as we walk the streets of the city.

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Jaye Moon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Elbow Toe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Keely and Deeker collaboration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Square and bunny M collaboration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BD White (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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City Kitty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pyramid Oracle (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bagman (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Images Of The Week: 02.23.14

Images Of The Week: 02.23.14

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Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring 1up, Bishop203, Bradley Theodore, Cash4, Deekers, El Sol 25, Hiss Keeley, Kevin Cyr, King Amsterdam, Ludo, Mosco Clandestino, Not Art, ROA, Royce Bannon, Smells, Sweet Toof, Trap Art, and Zimer.

Top Image >> Sweet Toof joins Deekers, 1UP, Roa and Keely on this little wall of horrors. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sweet Toof and Smells collab on a roof top. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bradley Theodore gives Anna and Karl a face lift. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hiss (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Cash4 . Smells (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Clearly this is Not Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Trap Art. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The Padlock Menagerie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ludo up close at the show “Fruit of the Doom”. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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An unusual thing for Ludo – a sculptural reprise of his recurring image “Fruit of the Doom” from his solo show at Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ludo “Fruit of the Doom” solo show at Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Sol 25, Bishop 203 and Royce Bannon adorn the facade of 17 Frost Gallery for  the “Outdoor Gallery NYC” show. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kevin Cyr “Right Place, Right Time” solo show at Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kevin Cyr “Right Place, Right Time” solo show at Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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King Amsterdam (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Zimer (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mosco Clandestino (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Central Park, Manhattan. 2013 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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The 2013 BSA Year in Images (VIDEO)

The 2013 BSA Year in Images (VIDEO)

Here it is! Our 2013 wrap up featuring favorite images of the year by Brooklyn Street Art’s Jaime Rojo.

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Before our video roundup below here is the Street Art photographer’s favorite of the year, snapped one second before he was singled out of a New York crowd, handcuffed, and stuffed into a police car – sort of like the Banksy balloons he was capturing.

“Among all the thousands of photos I took this year there’s one that encapsulates the importance of Street Art in the art world and some of the hysteria that can build up around it,” he says of his final shot on the final day of the one month Better Out Than In artist ‘residency’ in NYC this October. It was a cool day to be a Street Art photographer – but sadly Rojo was camera-less in a case of mistaken identity, if only for a short time.

Released two hours later after the actual car-jumping trespasser was charged, Rojo was happy to hear the Chief Lieutenant tell his officer “you’ve got the wrong man”, to get his shoelaces back, and to discover this photo was still on his camera. He also gets to tell people at parties that he spent some time in the holding cell with the two guys whom New York watched tugging down the B-A-N-K-S-Y.

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What’s everybody looking at? Jaime Rojo’s favorite image of the year at the very end of the Banksy brouhaha. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Now, for the Video

When it came to choosing the 112 images for the video that capture the spirit of the Street Art scene in ’13, we were as usual sort of overwhelmed to comb through about ten thousand images and to debate just how many ‘legal’ versus ‘illegal’ pieces made it into the mix. Should we include only images that went up under the cover of the night, unsanctioned, uncensored, uncompromised, unsolicited and uncommissioned? Isn’t that what Street Art is?

Right now there are a growing number of legal pieces going up in cities thanks to a growing fascination with Street Art and artists and it is causing us to reevaluate what the nature of the Street Art scene is, and what it may augur for the future. You can even say that from a content and speech perspective, a sizeable amount of the new stuff is playing it safe – which detracts from the badass rebel quality once associated with the practice.

These works are typically called by their more traditional description – murals. With all the Street Art / graffiti festivals now happening worldwide and the growing willingness of landlords to actually invite ‘vandals’ to paint their buildings to add cache to a neighborhood and not surprisingly benefit from the concomitant increase in real estate values, many fans and watchers have been feeling conflicted in 2013 about the mainstreaming that appears to be taking place before our eyes. But for the purposes of this roundup we decided to skip the debate and let everybody mix and mingle freely.

This is just a year-end rollicking Street Art round-up; A document of the moment that we hope you like.

Ultimately for BSA it has always been about what is fresh and what is celebrating the creative spirit – and what is coming next. “We felt that the pieces in this collection expressed the current vitality of the movement – at least on the streets of New York City,” says photographer and BSA co-founder Rojo. It’s a fusillade of the moment, complete with examples of large murals, small wheat pastes, intricate stencils, simple words made with recycled materials or sprayed on to walls, clay installations, three dimensional sculptures, hand painted canvases, crocheted installations, yarn installations etc… they somehow captured our imaginations, inspired us, made us smile, made us think, gave us impetus to continue doing what we are doing and above all made us love this city even more and the art and the artists who produce it.

Brooklyn Street Art 2013 Images of the Year by Jaime Rojo includes the following artists;

A Dying Breed, Aakash Nihalini, Agostino Iacursi, Amanda Marie, Apolo Torres, Axel Void, Bagman, Bamn, Pixote, Banksy, B.D. White, Betsy, Bishop203, NDA, Blek le Rat, br1, Case Maclaim, Cash For Your Warhol, Cholo, Chris RWK, Chris Stain, Billy Mode, Christian Nagel, Cost, ENX, Invader, Crush, Dal East, Damien Mitchell, Dase, Dasic, Keely, Deeker, Don’t Fret, The Droid, ECB, el Seed, El Sol 25, Elbow Toe, Faile, Faith 47, Five Pointz, Free Humanity, Greg LaMarche, Hot Tea, How & Nosm, Icy & Sot, Inti, Jilly Ballistic, John Hall, JR, Jose Parla, Judith Supine, Kremen, Kuma, LMNOPI, London Kaye, Love Me, Martha Cooper, Matt Siren, Elle, Mika, Miss Me, Missy, MOMO, Mr. Toll, Nychos, Okuda, Alice Mizrachi, OLEK, Owen Dippie, Paolo Cirio, Paul Insect, Phetus, Phlegm, Revok, Pose, QRST, Rambo, Ramiro Davaro, Reka, Rene Gagnon, ROA, RONES, Rubin, bunny M, Square, Stikki Peaches, Stikman, Swoon, Tristan Eaton, The Lisa Project 2013, UFO 907, Willow, Swill, Zed1, and Zimer.

Read more about Banksy’s last day in New York here and our overview of his residency in the essay “Banksy’s Final Trick” on The Huffington Post.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Bushwick Is Hot Now. Hurry!

Bushwick Open Studios is Paved With Street Art

Brooklyn’s already percolating artists neighborhood called Bushwick continues to thrive despite the circling of real estate agents, lifestyle brands and celebrity chefs. Born in the mid-late 2000s as it’s older sister Williamsburg to the West began to professionalize, this noisily industrial and dirty artists haven got a reprieve from gentrifying forces when the deep recession slowed the rise of rents for artist spaces, which remained still relatively cheap by Manhattan’s standards. Today the area boasts a diverse influx of artists, students, cultural workers, and entrepreneurs who are experimenting and collaborating on projects and shows.

Spagnola (photo © Jaime Rojo)

That radical economic downturn probably also nurtured the nascent Street Art scene here, which was one of the early outliers of a cultural influx as artists and explorers began to skateboard to the local delis and stare at laptops for hours in the one or two cafes that offered  Wi-Fi. Outcroppings of this new art movement combined with old-school graffiti to pop up on selected concrete and corrugated walls, signposts, and deteriorated blocks where the authorities were disinterested and the neighbors only partially curious in their activities.

It’s an age-old New York story by now; a neglected or winding down post industrial neighborhood reacts to the incoming and odd-looking artists with a sort of bemused affection, happy that at least the block is getting some attention for a change. Puzzlement eventually leads to familiarity and then buying you a sandwich – and then asking you to paint a mural inside his foyer. While national and international Street Artists were already making Bushwick a stopping point thanks to some of the earliest galleries like Ad Hoc and Factory Fresh, the scene recently got newly shot in the arm by a local resident who is facilitating much desired legal wall space to a crowd of artists who otherwise would be hunting and hitting up less-than-legal spots.  Not to worry, there are plenty of aerosol renegades and ruffians scaling walls at night too; this is New York after all, yo.

Zimad (photo © Jaime Rojo)

But for now the Bushwick Collective, as it is newly christened by wall-man Joe Ficalora, has infused an adrenaline rush of creativity inside and outside the area that is roughly bordered by Flushing Avenue, Starr Street, Knickerbocker Avenue and Cypress Avenue.  The Collective has guidelines on content (nudity, politics, profanity) so the works are not completely unfettered in the true spirit of Street Art/graffiti, but most artists are happy for the luxury of time to complete their work and not look over their shoulder. With a selection of murals that are densely gathered and easy to walk through, the new collection has attracted attention from media folks (and tour guides) on the main island brave enough to venture into the gritty wilds of Brooklyn for a Street Art safari.

As Bushwick hosts its 7th annual open studios cultural event this weekend, intrepid pedestrians who march through opening parties, rooftop DJ jams, dance performances, live bands, transcendent costumery, sidewalk barbecues, open fire hydrants and more than 600 open artist studios will also be buffeted by a visual feast on the streets themselves. As long as the L Train is running (fingers crossed) you can just get off at the Morgan stop. From there it should be pretty easy for any curious art-in-the-street fan to be regaled with big and small works of graffiti, Street Art, tags, wheat-pastes, stencils, rollers, murals, and ad hoc installations all day and night.

Trek Matthews (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A shout out to Arts In Bushwick, an all volunteer organization that has steadily grown and fostered an open sense of community inclusiveness each year for Bushwick Open Studios and to the many volunteers who have contributed greatly to the success of many of the cultural workers here.  Without an open studios event many of these shy and quirky artists and performers would simply have stayed unknown and unknowable.

So far Bushwick still has the unbridled imperfect D.I.Y. enthusiasm of an experiment where anything can happen, but grey ladies with kooky bright colored spectacles have already begun to flip it over to inspect it with one hand while pinching their nose with the other, so savor this authentic moment.  Ethereal by nature, you know the Street Art scene is never guaranteed to you tomorrow – neither is the mythical artists bohemian hamlet of New York’s yesteryear.  For now we’re hopping on our bikes to catch a golden age of Bushwick before it’s repackaged and sold back to us at a price we can’t afford.

The first series of images are walls from the Bushwick Collective, followed by a series of walls that you may also see in the neighborhood.

MOMO (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Solus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Alice Pasquini (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Toofly and Col Wallnuts (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stik (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Billy Mode and Chris Stain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nard (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder and LNY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brett Flanigan and Cannon Dill (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gats (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sheryo and The Yok (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Here are a series of walls not related to Bushwick Collective.

ECB (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A portion of a wall by the 907 Crew, Sadue. Don Pablo Pedro, Smells, Cash4, and Keely (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Phetus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rubin (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Peeta (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BR1 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Apolo Torres (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris, Veng, RWK and ECB (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cruz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

KUMA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Free Humanity (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Keely and Deeker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kremen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For a full list of activities, studios, schedules and directions for Bushwick Open Studios 2013 click HERE.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Images of the Week: 05.26.13

Here’s our weekly interview of the street, this week featuring Beau Stanton, Brett Flanigan, Cannon Dil, Cosbe, Creepy, Deeker, Facter, Gats, Icy & Sot, Invurt, Jaz, Keely, Nunca, Rubin, Sexer, Solus, Sonni, Zimad.

Top image > Brett Flanigan and Cannon Dill at Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The paint is still wet on this one by Brett Flanigan and Cannon Dill in Brooklyn. They are on a cross-country tour put these two on BSA earlier in the week when they hit Chicago. To follow them as they rampage with cans in hand, check out #lqvmuraltour2013 on Twitter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

GATS has a fresh water tower at Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rubin (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A new one from NUNCA  in Chichester, UK (photo © NUNCA)

Zimad at Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Zimad at Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaz at work on is new wall in Vienna. (photo © Inoperable Gallery)

JAZ in Vienna (photo © Inoperable Gallery)

Sexer at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cosbe at 121 Knickerbocker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sonni at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sonni at Bushwick Collective. This portion of the wall is part of the above piece but cars parked in front of it. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Solus at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A Deeker and Keely really hit it with this collaboration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Beau Stanton at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Facter at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Creepy is in town at Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Brooklyn, May 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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A Grimey Organic Group Wall Grows in Bushwick

The audacity of the organically grown Street Art and graffiti wall, covered with styles and sentiments that are anybody’s guess, people painting whatever the heck they want. It may not be easy to digest, but maybe you’ll find part of it to be inspiring, or challenging, or eye opening. Or all three.

“One person did drive by and yell out the window, ‘This is awful!’ ” says artist Don Pablo Pedro as he lets out a belly laugh. “So that was fun, that was a good one. Other than that I’ve enjoyed it a lot.” He’s talking about the new wall still in progress in Bushwick Brooklyn that is taking shape without input from anyone but the artists. “Yeah there are no real rules, we’re just going out there and having fun. Not trying to do anything that is too important or anything,” says Pablo as he talks about his blue Jesus character with the chastity belt.

Don Pablo Pedro, Smells, Cash4 and Keely. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Usually this sort of work appears on abandoned lots where only few eyes will see it, not on this corner in the still industrial, intensely trafficked, sooty smelly occasionally ear-splittingly loud part of Bushwick. Here you are greeted by very aggressive truck drivers caterwauling by on 18 wheels like bats out of hell. If you are not alert you can be mowed down or choked by the gritty air along with growing numbers of desparados who have settled here in recent years as artists, students, and low-wage workers continue to migrate in search of affordable space to live and work.

Many of the artists painting on this wall come from different directions and backgrounds – graffiti, street art, fine art, painting, woodworking, screen-printing, sculpture – and many have worked collaboratively before. Smells is the curator, if for no other reason than there had to be some sense of order, and according to Don Pablo it won’t be finished until its completely covered.  So far the collection includes work from Smells, Cash4, Droid, UFO, Gentu, Keely, Sadue, Don Pablo Pedro, Tony Bones…. “I think it’s still going to go on, it’s kind of a ‘progress wall,’ ” says Pedro.

Don Pablo Pedro, Smells. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Now the wall has turned into sort of a more grimey wall, which I love about it.  It’s my friends building and he kind of loves that too. It mirrors more of him actually.”

Does he find that passersby have a negative reaction to some of the content of his piece – the nudity, genitalia, the multiple additional boobs? “You know, I was hoping so! I have seen a number of people look at it and laugh, like some of the worker guys in the neighborhood.”

And for this neighborhood, if you call it that, community standards divine that this explosion of tags and characters is cool, not that some of these artists give a rats butt. “The neighbors are really nice. They know most of the artists  – the people next door have the art materials place and they’re really nice too.”

Don Pablo Pedro, Cash4 and Keely. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For Don Pablo Pedro, it’s the genuine artistic freedom he is attracted to and as part of his own practice he finds that he’s still learning about doing collaborative work with others and how to work with rough walls – since his typical practice is on canvas and is done solo and in a studio.

“This is also kind of new for me because I’m working with other people’s art pieces around mine and also the little nuances in the wall; like when I was doing the Jesus figure there were these little weird nail things that were on either side of the door so I used them.  Also there were like some little nipple things so I used them. And I think Smells liked using the thing for the vagina so it could sort of spray out. Smells piece is really good.  I love that one, it’s really good,” he says enthusiastically.

Don Pablo Pedro working on a fourth character. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

907 Crew . Keely. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

907 Crew . Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Whole Gang. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Fountain 2013 Shots of Street Art Above and Below

The Fountain fair raised the Street Art to the rafters this year with an installation curated by Mighty Tanaka Gallery and Robots Will Kill. The canvasses wave above the exhibit floor in this historic Armory space while below thousands of people milled through the booths of a varied collection of this years offerings. Here are new shots of the work we found Friday in the first full day of this weekend full of art fairs.

Fountain Art Fair 2013: Alan Ganev, Dark Clouds, CERN, Chris RWK, Veng, Danielle Mastrion, NEVER, ND’A, Joe Iurato, Chris Stain, See One, CAM, Miguel Ovalle, JMR, Apolo Torres, Keely, Quel Beast and Cake. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cern. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ND’A. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Stain. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris. RWK. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cake. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Apolo Torres. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Fountain Art Fair 2013: Alan Ganev, Dark Clouds, CERN, Chris RWK, Veng, Danielle Mastrion, NEVER, ND’A, Joe Iurato, Chris Stain, See One, CAM, Miguel Ovalle, JMR, Apolo Torres, Keely, Quel Beast and Cake. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Uphues. Detail. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

John Breiner. Detail. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

En Masse doing some live painting. Detail. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Fumero does Marilyn, Biggie, Keith. He says he has coined a term to describe the school of work he and others are evolving within as “Grafstract Expressionism” (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Sinxero. Detail. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

A delightful guest at Fountain. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Light artist Vicki DaSilva has video and photos of her work. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Pop Mortem has some political commentary dripping with drama, or oil. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Art performances with nearly naked people tend to draw an appreciative crowd. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

LNY prints being discussed. Detail. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Labrona. Detail. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

 

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Images of The Week 09.09.12

Our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Adeline, Cost, El Sol 25, JM, Joseph Meloy, Keely, LMNOP, Mr. Toll, No Sleep, NohJColey, Sanpaku, Sheryo, Smells, ICY & SOT, Shie Moreno,The Cretin, The Yok, and Werds.

Shie Moreno (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shie Moreno. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shie Moreno in Miami (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 hangs out with LMNOP (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Yok and Sheryo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Beautiful and awesome Adeline performs to celebrate NohJColey’s birthday at his opening last night. Better than Marilyn at the MSG for Jack. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Cretin (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sanpaku (photo © Jaime Rojo)

From Wikipedia:

Sanpaku gan (三白眼) or Sanpaku (三白) is a Japanese term that means “three whites” and is generally referred to in English as “Sanpaku eyes”. The term refers to the iris being rather small, so that it only covers about two-thirds or less of the vertical axis of the eye; e.g. delineate an eye into four portions; the iris would only occupy one portion of the divided four sections; thus leaving the other three in white, hence “three whites”.

When the bottom of the white part of the eye, known as the sclera, is visible it is referred to as ‘Yin Sanpaku’ in Chinese lore. According to the myth, it represents physical imbalance in the body and is claimed to be present in alcoholics, drug addicts and people who over consume sugar or grain. Conversely when the upper sclera is visible this is called ‘Yang Sanpaku’. This is said to be an indication of mental imbalance in people such as psychotics, murderers, and anyone rageful. Stress and fatigue may also be a cause.[1]

In August 1963, macrobiotic pioneer George Ohsawa predicted that President John F. Kennedy would experience great danger because of his sanpaku condition. This was reported by Tom Wolfe in the New York Herald Tribune.[2]

People with sanpaku eyes may also be feared to be prone to violent or disordered behaviors.[citation needed] There is no evidence for this belief, however.

John Lennon mentioned sanpaku in his song “Aisumasen (I’m Sorry)” from the 1973 Mind Games album. It is also briefly referenced in William Gibson’s Neuromancer, as well as in Michael Franks‘ 1979 song “Sanpaku”, and in The Firesign Theatre‘s piece “Temporarily Humboldt County”.

Joseph Meloy (photo © Jaime Rojo)

No Sleep (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A message for William Wegman from a disaffected unknown feller. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cost, Smells and Keely welcoming mat. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Icy and Sot. Special shout out to Joe’s buddy at Bushwick 5 Points for giving me a lift so I could get the right angle. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Pandemonium on the Walls at Pandemic

Brooklyns’ Pandemic Gallery recently invited a sort of painted pandemonium to fill all the walls of their space for a summer art party. Shoulder to hip and head to toe, this mixture of artists is actually emblematic of this moment in Brooklyn history and representing the raucous variety of styles that are mashing and mixing on the graffiti/street art/fine art continuum throughout the world.

But no one likes to be labelled and if you ask them and probably each of these artists would prefer not to be called graffiti artists or street artists or fine artists because each title has too many limitations or insulting inferences. One thing everybody agrees on is they like to paint on walls and while we have seen our share of bring-all-your-friends wall smashing that somehow goes awry, this indoor installation is one of the most cogent mashup derby style groupings you are likely to see this year.

Darkclouds and David Pappaceno (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Keely, Matt Siren, Don Pablo Pedro, Cost, Royce Bannon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Don Pablo Pedro, Cost (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Keely, Matt Siren (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swampy, Deeker, Cost (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Yok and Shyro (photo © Jaime Rojo)

SET (photo © Jaime Rojo)

COST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Fun Friday 07.27.12

Let the Games Begin! (oh no, does that violate an Olympic copyright?) Here’s our Olympian sized Olympic Fun Friday Olympiatastic list, sponsored by nobody.

1. BOB ROSS REMIX (VIDEO)
2. KingBrown Group Show at Klughaus (NYC)
3. Quel Beast Solo Reception at Gallery Bar (NYC)
4. Believe the Hype at Pandemic Saturday (BKLN)
5. REVOK and SABER at Known Gallery (LA)
6. Matthew Silver Goes for the Gold in his Speedo at Union Square (VIDEO)
7. Pura Vida Presents: Entes Y Pesimo A Short Film (English) (VIDEO)

BOB ROSS REMIX (Video)

Bob Ross is back! Updated and autotuned, this visual medley ties together the overriding themes that his long-running show imparted to many people who may have been timid about reopening that creative spirit that we’re all born with. Some kids think they’re too cool and too street for this sh*t but really they like Bob’s message too, because he’s right. Get out your paintbrush and cans!

KingBrown Group Show at Klughaus (NYC)

Mike Giant is in New York and he brought some juicy markers with him. The New Show at Klughaus Gallery in Manhattan’s Chinatown hosted him yesterday with folks from Kingbrown Magazine to mark the release of their issue #8. The group show of small pieces in the gallery is smartly, densely packed with names you’ll like and  is now open to the public after last nights hot and sticky grand opening that ended with Mother nature blowing exhibition skateboarders sideways with sudden summer storm high winds and pounding rain. The show was presented along with the dudes from Fountain Arts Fair.

Mike Giant gate for Kingbrown at Klughaus Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artists include Morning Breath, Andy Jenkins, Chris Cycle, Dave Kinsey, “Grotesk” aka Kimou Meyer, Stefan Marx, Kevin Lyons, Mike Giant, Raza Uno aka MAx Vogel, Greg Lamarche, Zach Malfa-Kowalski, Steve Gourlay, Jay Howell, Ben Horton, Beastman, Phibs, Hiro, Reka, Kyle “Creepy” Hughes-Odgers, Meggs, Sean Morris, Yok, Sheryo, Ross Clugston, Daek, Lister, Numskull, Ian Mutch, Rone/ aka Tyrone Wright.

Mike Giant at work on his wall outside the gallery before the show opened. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Further information regarding this show click here.

Quel Beast Solo Reception at Gallery Bar (NYC)

The Gallery Bar on the Lower East Side of Manhattan hosts the opening reception today of Quel Beast’s solo show of portraits full of emotion as he continues in the journey of self-study. In a short career on the street that has depicted everything from anguish to rage to frustration, it is good to report that there is now an occasional smile.

Quel Beast. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Believe the Hype at Pandemic Saturday (BKLN)

PARTY! PARTY! PARTY! @ Pandemic Gallery tomorrow. “Believe The Hype” Is Pandemic’s title for this summer party including: The Yok, Sheryo, UFO 907, Swampy, Royce Bannon, Matt Siren, David Pappaceno, Darkclouds, Keely, Don Pablo Pedro, Cost KRT and Deeker. All the artists will paint the interior of the gallery in one collaborative mural. Go get wet and play. There will be limited prints, T shirts, zines and drawings for sale.

For further information regarding this show click here.

REVOK and SABER at Known Gallery (LA)

Double billing Revok and Saber in one night? You know the crowd will be big and enthusiastic to see these two concurrent solo shows and as Known Gallery hosts  REVOK’s “Gilgamesh” and SABER’s “Beautification” simultaneously Saturday.

REVOK in Miami for Primary Flight (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding REVOK show click here.

SABER on the streets of Los Angeles. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding SABER show click here.

Matthew Silver Goes for the Gold in his Speedo at Union Square (VIDEO)

Miao Jiaxin captures some of the magic moments of this public performer who may be borderline bananas and who knows how to engage people, to help and flip their “I’m Free” switch to the “On” position.

 

Pura Vida Presents: Entes Y Pesimo A Short Film (English) (VIDEO)

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Pandemic Gallery Presents: “Believe The Hype” An Art Summer Party (Brooklyn, NY)

Pandemic Gallery

SUMMER GREETINGS!

Join us on Saturday July 28th for BELIEVE THE HYPE! An all day event filled with art, music, games, food, drinks, and gushing wateras Pandemic throws a summer party!!

Artists will paint the entire inside of the gallery into a stunning collaborative mural
and smaller works such as Limited Prints / T-shirts / Zines / Drawings and the likes will be available for purchase.
Stop by and have a blast!
2pm – 10pm
Saturday, July 28th
Artists Include:
The YOK
SHERYO
UFO 907
SWAMPY
ROYCE BANNON
MATT SIREN
DAVID PAPPACENO
DARKCLOUDS
KEELY
DON PABLO PEDRO
COST KRT
SET KRT
DEEKER
PANDEMIC gallery
37 Broadway btwn Kent and Wythe
Brooklyn, NY 11211
www.pandemicgallery.com

 
Gallery hours:
Tues.-Fri. 11-6pm
Sat. & Sun. 12-7pm
closed Monday
or by appointment 

L train to Bedford ave, J train to Marcy ave, or Q59 bus to Broadway/Wythe

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