All posts tagged: Graffiti Research Lab

BSA Film Friday: 12.13.13

BSA Film Friday: 12.13.13

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Mujeres-Creando-Video-Screen-Shot-2013-12-12-at-10.04

 

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. “Mujeres Creando” – Women Creating; Political Graffiti in Bolivia
2. Making LED Street Art – Hard Science
3. BMD x Orchestra Wellington in New Zealand

BSA Special Feature: Mujeres Creando – Women Creating

From Bolivia comes this profile of feminists who use graffiti as a way to advance their political views, to raise awareness, to seek justice and equality for women. For these writers, graffiti is fighting instrument.

“I am going to show you the graffiti that the girls and I do at night,” says one of your hosts as she drives through a neighborhood and explains how she keeps an eye out while her co-sprayers write slogans like “Keep your rosaries out of our ovaries” on walls.

“We are not artists,” explains one of the crew, “We are street stirrers.”

Making LED Street Art – Hard Science

Not sure if Graffiti Research Lab (GRL) envisioned this mainstreaming of their ideas would come to fruition, but on the other hand, we are in love with these two smarty-pants experimenting brainiac hosts.  Just watch.  Like Fat Albert used to say, if you’re not careful you just might learn something.

BMD x Orchestra Wellington in New Zealand

Nothing like having a live accompaniment to your mural painting  – especially when it is a small orchestra.

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“Freed from the Wall, Street Art Travels the World”, an Essay for “Eloquent Vandals”

The following essay by Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo, co-founders of Brooklyn Street Art, appears in the book “Eloquent Vandals The History of Nuart”, edited by Martyn Reed, Marte Jølbo, and Victoria Bugge Øye and published in 2011 by Kontur Publishing. More information appears after the essay.

Freed from the Wall, Street Art Travels the World

The Internet and the increasing mobility of digital media are playing an integral role in the evolution of Street Art, a revolution in communication effectively transforming it into the first global people’s art movement.

While that may seem hyperbolic, just witness the millions of images of Street Art uploaded on photo sharing sites, the time lapse videos and full length films online, the hundreds of blogs, websites, discussion forums, chatrooms, Facebook pages, Twitter addresses, and phone and tablet apps dedicated entirely or partially to Street Art and graffiti and the multifaceted culture that grows around it. Thousands of people daily are populating the databases, compiling a mountainous archive of something once quaintly referred to as an ephemeral art. This said, the transformative story is that the images are now freed from their sources to float in the ether for anyone with a digital device to access.  Within the space of a decade, art that once lived and died on a wall with a local population is now shared via digital capture and upload, gaining access to a worldwide audience. Immediately.

The multi-authored amorphous swirling whirlwind of street art, graffiti, public art, and urban art is simply too vast for any person to get their arms around or explain – yet our digital media tribes are enabling us to collect it, share it, and study it in larger numbers than ever imaginable. As artists and professionals for 25 years in New York, a city with a legacy of graffiti all its own, we have been extremely lucky to witness the blossoming of the current Street Art movement; to document it, analyze it, discuss it, and share it by real world means and virtual means with thousands of others.  With the dual forces of high rents and corporate gentrification pounding the final nails into the coffin of the established creative neighborhoods in Manhattan,   gritty bubbling new and youthful artist neighborhoods of Brooklyn became de facto showcases for the Street Art scene at the turn of the century, and we were shooting images and tracking its evolution from the beginning.

In concert with the Internet, all manner of art that occurs in the streets is being captured and shared, discussed, critiqued, celebrated or dismissed by people of searing intellect and those who cannot locate their own country with their finger if you spin a globe in front of them.  As text has been loosed from print in this post Gutenberg Parenthesis world of Sauerberg, so too our local Street Art is freed from its wall.  Going from “All City” to “All Timezones” has radically transformed how Street Artists perceive their work and their audience, with the concept of “place” profoundly altered.

Nuart became a focal point for many in the Street Art world in the early 2000s because of its highly curated nature and its expansive brand of personal interaction with public space.  A hybrid of high-minded civic involvement and an art form with roots solidly in anti-authoritarianism, Nuart has presented a rolling roster of Internet stars and miscreants of the Street Art scene. It’s a highly unusual mix: quality experimental elements birthed by the interconnectedness of the virtual world, soon imitated by other entrepreneurial Street Art enthusiasts.  With the help of the Internet this Norwegian port town of Stavanger is an international player in the Street Art scene, a by-invitation celebration capable of drawing a wide range of serious talent to create epic pieces in singular locations. When the images and videos of installations at Nuart are relayed through the forums and chatrooms and blogs and Flickr pages around the world, other cities begin rethinking public space and examining with a new interest the players in their own Street Art scene.

A large part of our understanding of art and its expression for generations has come from textbooks, lorded over by scholars and experts who were trained by others using similar texts passing along received knowledge and prejudices.  For those rebels of the graffiti and Street Art movement who have never given much credence to formal education, the unbound and chaotic nature of digital communications actually feels more organic and trustworthy.  In large part, with the exception of the formalism of the logical structure comprising the undergirding of the Internet, its explosive growth has been more intuitive and behavioral than left-brained or hierarchical. The beauty of a new Street Art piece on a nearby wall is electrifying to share with the digital tribe, and in so doing, it legitimizes ones status among peers and the work of the artist as well. With the innate desire to learn being regularly quenched by members of this tribe, collective intelligence is rising more quickly than any organized curricula could ever aspire.

Image Capture, Sharing, and Platforms

Graffiti and Street Artists have always benefitted from documentation of photographers like John Naar, Keith Baugh, Martha Cooper, Henry Chalfant, and James Prigoff, who are largely responsible for the capture and preservation of the historical knowledge we now have of graffiti in New York City during the 1970s and 1980s.  Without the benefit of instant communication of these images, copies of Cooper and Chalfant’s book Subway Art and Charlie Ahearn’s movie Wild Style relied upon actual physical distribution channels and commerce to travel around the world and inspire young artists. “Viral” was a word associated with antibiotics.

As film turned to digital at the turn of the century and cameras and personal computers became far more affordable, the convergence of technology gave professional and amateur photographers the incentive to roam the streets hunting for street art and the ability to have the instant gratification of seeing their photos online. As in the early days of graffiti, Street Artists of the 2000s didn’t shy away from the attention photographers were giving to their work and a new symbiotic relationship between the street artists and web savvy photographers was born where certain artists would place their work where it was likely to be seen and photographed, and hopefully distributed online. Like the days of Cooper et al., digital photographers assisted many of the current stars of Street Art to gain exposure to an appreciative fan base and to increase their popularity during the decade.

With the introduction of the online image-sharing platform called Flickr in 2004, the already rapid spread of Street Art photography completely ballooned as fans from every city and town and hamlet began uploading their Street Art images to one location where everyone could coalesce around their common interest. With a database structure and system for tagging, images could be categorized, sorted and most importantly, searched. No longer reliant on the approval of gatekeepers or site curators, Street Artists gained autonomy and audience largely on their own terms and with the help of photographers who scoured the streets to capture their work. Of the current 6 billion or so images uploaded to the site since then, millions are of street art – a de facto common repository and shared research archive for artists, professionals, curators, collectors, and casual fans.

A new central nervous system in formation, Flickr and other lesser-known sharing platforms had a profound causational relationship to the dissemination of Street Art culture to a worldwide audience.  You knew Melbourne and Bristol and São Paulo and New York had a Street Art scene, but Sacramento? Shanghai? Stavanger?  In addition to images and videos, the platform provided common space for exchange of opinion, ideas, and news, fostering online and offline relationships and enabling Street Artists and photographers to pursue their work as a possible career route.

Photo sharing sites of course are not the only means for the worldwide distribution and formation of a common understanding of Street Art culture. Today’s digital biosphere includes primary content sites and blogs, aggregators (or self-described “curators”), peer-to-peer forums, Social Media, and mobile apps as part of the overall knowledge base, forming an increasingly common understanding about Street Art, it’s origins and it’s evolving expression in the public sphere. No one can doubt that this familiarity has only aided its popularity.

In one significant role-reversal, the online experience of Street Art has also altered the behaviors on the streets and once sacrosanct “rules” of the street have been turned on their head. Although it was once verboten to reveal a street location for fear of reprisal, now both street artists and fans geotag their images so they can be found on a map with any GPS enabled device. As mobile device use eclipses Internet use in the next couple of years and hardware and software becomes more flexible, sophisticated, affordable, and available, there is no doubt that more apps and platforms using mapping and GPS are likely to thrive. Whether through image sharing platforms or mobile apps, these systems of tagging are providing exact information for self-guided tours by fans and tour groups, peers, enemies, and of course, law enforcement.

Excerpts from additional subtopics of this essay:

Tribes and Co-Surveillance

“The growth of connectivity is producing a foundational change to the world of the Street Artist and his or her relation to society as a hidden and/or marginalized figure. Increasingly it appears that it is impossible to be socially isolated when you are so busy relating, even if anonymously. Unwittingly, the stereotypical vision of the outsider is melting as one is pulled into a collective environment where peers regulate and monitor the actions of one another and settle disputes or give encouragement and opportunities. The new digital world, once thought to be impersonal, is increasingly fluid, intuitive, and connected; enabling a near eradication of feelings of estrangement, ostracization, marginalization, and isolation for many people, Street Artists included.”

Reaching an Audience

“Arguably the act of spraying a tag or signing your name to your art can be called advertising or at the very least, branding; A Street Art purist who rejects any ideas of the advertising taint may instead put their work on the bottom side of a railroad tie, but we haven’t heard of it. Everyone understands that the primary motivation is to have one’s work seen, and thanks to the Internet and digital media, an ever-growing sophistication in self marketing is on display from Street Artists who are adept at making art, and even those who are not.”

Democratization, Homogenization and Gate Keepers No More

“A certain homogenization of recurring styles, techniques, and themes due to mass disbursement also has begun, creating certain elements of an international style with clearly traced antecedents. A common language, vocabulary, and terminology that began with print media and graffiti continues to grow and refine itself. An international galaxy of galleries and festivals, and increasingly, museums, expands and contracts with lists of overlapping names traveling from continent to continent in search of walls.  Listed after the artist’s name in parenthesis is the abbreviation of their country but in practice the Internet has quickly enabled them to become virtually stateless. Thanks to instant availability, a 14 year old in a sleepy small town is schooling himself with YouTube right now and with luck and skill will inherit that state as well.”

 

~ Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo, co-founders of Brooklyn Street Art

Read the full essay in:

ELOQUENT VANDALS “THE HISTORY OF NUART”

Available Internationally on Amazon
Buy Now, Norwegian : Platekompaniet

Editors: Martyn Reed, Marte Jølbo, Victoria Bugge Øye,
Features: 304 Pages, full colour, hardcover
Format: 21 x 26cm
Language: English & Norwegian
Publisher : Kontur Publishing

Eloquent Vandals is the definitive book on one of the worlds leading street art festivals featuring exclusive essays from some of scene’s biggest names. Over 300 pages of exclusive images including works by Swoon, Brad Downey, David Choe, Vhils, Blu, Ericailcane, Logan Hicks, Dface, Nick Walker, Judith Supine, Graffiti Research Lab, Blek Le Rat and many more…

Eloquent Vandals tells the story of how Stavanger, a small city on the West Coast of Norway gained a global reputation for Street Art. For the past six years, the annual Nuart Festival has invited an international team of Street Artists to use the city as their canvas. From tiny stencils and stickers to building sized murals, from illicit wheat-paste posters on the outskirts of the city to “Landmark“ pieces downtown, found everywhere from run down dwellings and train sidings to the city’s leading galleries and fine art institutions, Eloquent Vandals documents the development of not only Nuart, but also one of the most exciting art movements of our times.

 

 

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BSA in Print : “Eloquent Vandals”, the Book about Nuart

The Internet and the increasing mobility of digital media are playing an integral role in the evolution of Street Art, a revolution in communication effectively transforming it into the first global people’s art movement.

While that may seem hyperbolic, just witness the millions of images of Street Art uploaded on photo sharing sites, the time lapse videos and full length films online, the hundreds of blogs, websites, discussion forums, chatrooms, Facebook pages, Twitter addresses, and phone and tablet apps dedicated entirely or partially to Street Art and graffiti, and the multifaceted culture that grows around it. Thousands of people daily are populating the databases, compiling a mountainous archive of something once quaintly referred to as an ephemeral art. This said, the transformative story is that the images are now freed from their sources to float in the ether for anyone with a digital device to access. Within the space of a decade, art that once lived and died on a wall with a local population is now shared via digital capture and upload, gaining access to a worldwide audience. Immediately.”Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo, Eloquent Vandals : A History of Nuart Norway

Street Artist ROA in Norway (photo courtesy Nuart)

One of the three books BSA was published in during 2011, Eloquent Vandals tells the story of a Norwegian waterfront town that became a focal point for the emergence of Street Art during the first decade of the century. Edited by Marte Jølbo, Victoria Bugge Øye, and the Nuart festival founder Martyn Reed, the book explains how badass Street Artists and vandals can coalesce for a few weeks to make great walls come alive and educate through forums, roundtables, and lectures. Nuart and its accidental oracle, Mr. Reed, give us a smart and shining story of how to brilliantly engage public space with the very same artists who usually get blamed for defiling it.

Vhils at Nuart (photo © CF Salicath)

Over the last few years this port called Stavanger became a high profile portal for thrilling work by many globally known Street Art explorers every September and thanks to the easy reach of digital communications, people in cities across the globe experienced it. That was the very aspect that drew us into the project; the fact that Street Art has become so global so rapidly thanks to the engagement of everyday people via digital technology. In our chapter “Freed from the Wall, Street Art Travels the World”, we deconstruct the various pathways and digital social tribes that enable an elevated consciousness about this global peoples art movement.

“A large part of our understanding of art and its expression for generations has come from textbooks, lorded over by scholars and experts who were trained by others using similar texts passing along received knowledge and prejudices.  For those rebels of the graffiti and Street Art movement who have never given much credence to formal education, the unbound and chaotic nature of digital communications actually feels more organic and trustworthy.”

Skewville represents Brooklyn at Nuart (photo © Marte Jølbo)

To be invited to participate in this book along with experts whom we admire greatly, most notably culture critic Carlo McCormick and author and lecturer Tristan Manco, is a great honor. To give background and context for a festival that includes some of the heavy talents in Street Art including Vhils, Blu, Skewville, Logan Hicks, Graffiti Research Lab, Blek Le Rat, Chris Stain, Ericailcane, Swoon, Judith Supine, Nick Walker, Dot Masters, ROA, M-City, Evol, Dan Witz and many more, it was a rare honor indeed.

Dot Masters toying around at Nuart (photo © Nuart)

 

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Fun Friday 10.28.11

Basically today is the kickoff of a 4 day Halloween weekend of debauchery for many NYC freaks in the streets, loft parties, and bars. You are permitted to wear your Halloween costume at all times, including sleeping in a pile of barf and fake blood.

Some of the favorite Halloween costumes this year are Nicky Minaj, Angry Birds, Captain America, Charlie Sheen, a Pink Slip, a Topless Occupy Wall Street Protester, the Koch Brothers, Snooki or John Bohner (orange paint required), and your Chase Bank Student Loan Officer, Mrs. Snippet.

Top Stories this week on Fun Friday:

1. Bushwick Tonight – Beat Nite

2. The Rainbow Machine at Active Space

3. Launch of “Eloquent Vandals” Tonight in Stavanger

4. DAIN at Rook and Raven Gallery, “You Rest You Rust”

5. D’Face Never Liked What You Did Anyway (VIDEO)

Bushwick Tonight – Beat Nite

Jason Andrew continues to make the rallying cry for this art crawl/bar crawl in Bushwick, Brooklyn and it’s always an eclectic mix of badass, confounding, and clever work inside the galleries that are sprinkled around this neighborhood splattered with a fair share of Street Art. The beat we think of is the one on the streets here, where the air is infused with industrial sediment and diesel fumes, and electricity. Among the wandering artkids, quizzical conceptualists, and the odd hot-aired impresario claiming to be the original scene starter, you can look out  for intermittent zombies tonight.

Beat Nite: Bushwick Art Spaces Stay Open Late
Friday, October 28, 2011 6-10PM

Voted “Best Neighborhood-Wide Gallery Night” by L MAGAZINE, participating art spaces include among others: Norte Maar, Centotto, English Kills, Famous Accounts, Regina Rex, Storefront, Valentine Gallery, and the long awaited debut of AirPlane Gallery.

The official after party will be held at The Bodega. This episode of BEAT NITE is sponsored by Hyperallergic.

http://nortemaar.org/ 

The Rainbow Machine at The Active Space

Interactivity is the name of the game and you can be part of “The Rainbow Machine”, a deceivingly simple installation by Reid Bingham and Sean McIntyre where you stand still with a smile across your face while Sean sprints behind you with his custom programmed rainbow machine. Expect wilder variations in models and backgrounds than these rather tame participants in our example below.

 

 

“The Rainbow Machine” by Reid Bingham and Sean McIntyre. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Active Space will be a part of “Bushwick Beat Night”. For more information please click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/2011/10/19/the-active-space-presents-the-rainbow-machine-by-reid-bingham-and-sean-mcintyre-brooklyn-ny/

Launch of “Eloquent Vandals” Tonight in Stavanger

If you find yourself in Stanvanger, Norway today NUART invites you to the launch of “Eloquent Vandals”. It’s a history of Nuart we’ve been anticipating!

” Nuart became a focal point for many in the Street Art world because of its highly curated nature and its expansive brand of personal interaction with public space.  A hybrid of high-minded civic involvement and an art form with roots solidly in anti-authoritarianism, Nuart has presented a rolling roster of Internet stars and miscreants of the Street Art scene. ” – Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo

 

 

The definitive book on one of the worlds leading street art festivals featuring exclusive essays from some of scene’s biggest names. Over 300 pages of exclusive images including works by Swoon, David Choe, Vhils, Blu, Ericailcane, Logan Hicks, Dface, Nick Walker, Judith Supine, Graffiti Research Lab, Blek Le Rat and many more…

Eloquent Vandals tells the story of how Stavanger, a small city on the West Coast of Norway gained a global reputation for Street Art. For the past six years, the annual Nuart Festival has invited an international team of Street Artists to use the city as their canvas. From tiny stencils and stickers to building sized murals, from illicit wheat-paste posters on the outskirts of the city to “Landmark“ pieces downtown, found everywhere from run down dwellings and train sidings to the city’s leading galleries and fine art institutions, Eloquent Vandals documents the development of not only Nuart, but also one of the most exciting art movements of our times. Features specially commissioned essays and texts by Carlo McCormick, Tristan Manco, Logan Hicks, Chris Stain, Steven Harrington & Jaime Rojo, Leon Cullinane and Martyn Reed.
————————————————————————————————————————–

WELCOME TO THE LAUNCH OF THE MUCH ANTICIPATED HISTORY OF NUART BOOK
TOU SCENE, ØLHALLENE
FRIDAY 28TH OCTOBER – 19.00

GUEST DJ’S, GIVE-AWAYS, OPEN BAR

For more information regarding this event click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/2011/10/18/nuart-presents-an-invitation-to-the-launch-of-eloquent-vandals-stanvanger-norway/

DAIN at Rook and Raven Gallery, “You Rest You Rust”

“You Rest You Rust” Opens today in London, featuring work by Brooklyn Street Artist DAIN.

 

Dain on the streets of London (photo © Dain)

Here’s a sneek peak at one of the new piece’s Dain will be unveiling at the show.

For more information regarding this show click on the link below:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/2011/10/27/rook-and-raven-gallery-presents-you-rest-your-rust-a-group-show-london-uk/

D’Face Never Liked What You Did Anyway (VIDEO)

 

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Winners! BSA Giveway for “Eloquent Vandals”

Congratulations!

“I love art a lot, its a hobby that takes a lot of my time, and helps me being positive and keeps my mind off the more serious things in life,” says prize winner Martin C. from Denmark. Congratulations to him and to Marco C. from Italy who was stoked to win the big prize, “You made my day.” Finally, there is Mika A. from Washington, DC, who is a young street artist there and who sent us a cool pic.

Giveaway-BSA-Brooklynite-WEB-WINNERS-Nuart-prizes

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BSA Giveaway: Win “Eloquent Vandals” and NuArt Stuff

Answer 3 Simple Trivia Questions from last nights Brooklynite  LIVE chat with Martyn Reed

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Eloquent-Vandals-6

Man, that was a blast! The Chat Pub over at Brooklynite was pretty crowded last night with an international crowd of beer swilling NuArt fans all yelling and climbing over each other to grab the ear of the guest of honor. Peeps who logged online to see the World Premiere of “Eloquent Vandals” were happily peppering affable bad boy Martyn Reed with questions ranging from his experiences with the NuArt artists (95% good) to how his little Norwegian town became known for amazing Street Art over the course of a decade (work and talent and luck). All that chatter made it hard to hear the movie and if you were like us, you missed most of the show because of all the excitement.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Eloquent-Vandals-2

But, as promised, we’re giving away the movie today to you. Just answer these three questions and send them to us at Eloquent@BrooklynStreetArt.com.  The first three people who answer the three questions correctly win 1st, 2nd, and 3rd prize.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Eloquent-Vandals-5

No family or pets or employees or landlords of BSA are eligible. All complaints about the hardness of the questions should be addressed directly to Martyn Reed at thesequestionsaretoohardyousuck@nuart.no. Good Luck! We’ll tell you who won tomorrow.

Here are your Trivia Questions:

1) In the film, what does Dface’s work ask us to do?
2) GRL is an acronym for what ?
3) Nick Walker is from which British City ?


Giveaway-BSA-Brooklynite-Nuart-prizes

Shot and directed by Martin Hawkes, the film features work and interviews with Street Artists like Blek Le Rat, Graffiti Research Lab, Dface, Herakut, Nick Walker, Know Hope, Jimmy Cauty, Chris Stain, Wordtomother, Sten & Lex, Dotmasters, Zeus (UK) and Dolk & Pøbel.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Special thanks to Martyn Reed and Rae McGrath.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Eloquent-Vandals-7

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Chat With “Eloquent Vandals”: Film Debuts Monday at Brooklynite Online

You Chat Online With Martyn Reed Live Monday 1/31

We’re really happy to see that this project is finished and congratulate Martyn Reed for finishing his film “Eloquent Vandals”, made during the NuArt Festival in Stavanger, Norway. You can congratulate Martyn LIVE when you log in to chat with him and see the WORLD DEBUT of the film next Monday the 31st.  Brooklyn-Street-Art-Eloquent-Vandals-Still-Blek_le-rat-sheep

Shot and directed by Martin Hawkes, the film features work and interviews with Street Artists like Blek Le Rat, Graffiti Research Lab, Dface, Herakut, Nick Walker, Know Hope, Jimmy Cauty, Chris Stain, Wordtomother, Sten & Lex, Dotmasters, Zeus (UK) and Dolk & Pøbel.

Win a FREE Copy! To celebrate the World Premier, BSA is hosting a trivia game and giveaway of copies of the film and other NuArt goodies the day after the show — Feb 1.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Giveaway-BSA-Brooklynite-Nuart

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Eloquent-Vandals-Still-herakut

Street Artist couple Herakut in this film still from “Eloquent Vandals” (© Nuart/Saft films)

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Eloquent-Vandals-Still-Blek_le-rat

French Street Artist and one of the early stencilists Blek Le Rat from “Eloquent Vandals” (© Nuart/Saft films)

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Eloquent-Vandals-Still-know-hope

Street Artist Know Hope shows how to keep warm by the TV in this film still from “Eloquent Vandals” (© Nuart/Saft films)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

* first image of post is a still featuring work by Blek Le Rat in “Eloquent Vandals” courtesy of Nuart/Saft films.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Eloquent Vandals
Running time : 27 mins

Shot on location during Norway’s Nuart Festival in 2008, Eloquent Vandals
features candid interviews and work from some of the worlds leading street
artists including Blek Le Rat, Graffiti Research Lab, Dface, Herakut, Nick
Walker, Know Hope, Jimmy Cauty, Chris Stain, Wordtomother, Sten & Lex,
Dotmasters, Dolk & Pøbel.

Shot and Directed by Martin Hawkes
Produced by Nuart/Saft films

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Nuart Update: Logan Hicks Pics and Vid of Stavanger

Well, they are all back safely from Stavanger by the sea and in Brooklyn again, disappearing into their more anonymous lives here in the sea of humanity.

As you know, Logan Hicks is a very talented stencil master, among other things. One of those other things is a photographer.  We are so thankful to him for sharing this other talent with us during this trip abroad to the sister city (as well as the images from Chris Stain and Ian Cox). Logan has an eye for the parallel, the perpendicular, and the vanishing point – and it comes across in his compositions behind the lens.  Here are some of his pics of the show and the city.

First we’ll start off with the man himself as a blur…. rushing up and down the ladder in this time-lapse video he did of himself while he was painting a stencil of himself looking at himself. Selfish?  Nah, just a one-man machine who knows if you want something done right, you might better do it yourself!

It's a little know tidbit that there is
It is a little known tidbit that there is a monstrous hole in the ozone layer above Stavanger, so in fact, there is no sky. (photo Logan Hicks)

While there,
In between art gigs, the Skewville brothers donated time to a local charity by installing new beautiful white vinyl siding to cover the ugly exposed insulation boards on the back of this Norwegian bodega. (photo Logan Hicks)

David
David Cho and Swoon and cobblestones (photo Logan Hicks)

This gleaming steel and glass
This gleaming steel and glass building seemed like a perfect location for Leon Reid IV to put his piece entitled “The Great Recession” (photo Logan Hicks)

d
“Where’s the Beef?” – Back inside the gallery, the rift between artists escalated and a security wall had to be erected to keep artists from Baltimore away from the more refined art area. (photo Logan Hicks)

s
This is a projected video piece in the gallery of a software demonstration by Graffiti Research Labs of one of their projects. (photo Logan Hicks)

Installation by GRL (photo Logan Hicks)
Installation by GRL (photo Logan Hicks)

Judith Supine's massive piece rocked the gallery
Judith Supine did some Bikram yoga and created a massive portrait in the gallery (photo Logan Hicks)

Street Art journalist Ali Gitlow had a funny article with Judith at Tokion Magazine. PDF Here.

d
Chris Stain’s finished piece for the gallery pays tribute to the working people (photo Logan Hicks)

lkj
Chris outside getting ready to do a mural (photo Logan Hicks)

Swoon, Cho, and Supine (photo Logan Hicks)
Swoon, Cho, and Supine (photo Logan Hicks)

Skew
A visitor to the gallery gives you an idea how big Skewville’s piece is (photo Logan Hicks)

Where are the police?
Where are the police? The prostitutes? The dudes on the corner?  Is this some Twilight Zone trick?  Where’s Rod Serling? (photo Logan Hicks)

Logan Hicks Website

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Stavanger Norway Celebrates Brooklyn Street Art! The NuArt Festival

Stavanger Norway Celebrates Brooklyn Street Art! The NuArt Festival

The Nuart Festival runs

The Nuart Festival runs September 10 – October 9, 2009

EXCLUSIVE BROOKLYN SPECIAL! NUART-NUYORK

Stavanger Norway meet Brooklyn New York.

Some of the worlds leading street artists are flying for a week or two to Norway to participate in a street art festival that celebrates the Brooklyn Street Art with many of the same artists you’ll find right here. Leon Reid arrived yesterday, Chris Stain tomorrow, both to prepare to hold workshops with creatives and Norway National TV’s main cultural program “Safari” will be interviewing and following Swoon on the streets.

The roster includes;
SWOON, DAVID CHOE, BEN WOLF, JUDITH SUPINE, BRAD DOWNEY, LEON REID, GRAFFITI RESEARCH LAB, LOGAN HICKS, CHRIS STAIN, SKEWVILLE

As you know, New York is a city of immigrants, and the first Norwegians launched for New York 184 years ago and established their largest colony in the BK – creating a neighborhood of 200K plus people speaking Norwegian in bars, stores, and streets of Brooklyn.

The Nuart festival calls back the Brooklyn Flava by importing some of the greats from the streets of Brooklyn to exhibit, teach, and revel citiwide with panel debates, talks, film screenings, and fundraising.  It’s all BROOKLYN, all the time.

Over the next few weeks BSA will keep in touch with events in our Sista City, Stavanger and get you some insight into the cool stuff that happens there for the Nuart Festival.

Know Hope straightens out a line of tears.

Previous Nuart festival artist Know Hope straightens out a line of tears.

Stencil work from D*Face

Stencil work from D*Face

Chris Stain on the wall at NuArt

Chris Stain on the wall at NuArt

Heracut at Nuart

Herakut at Nuart

Nuart Festival

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JOY RIDE Group Show at Anonymous Gallery

JOY RIDE

Opening Reception: June 18th – 6 – 10PM /
6PM PERFORMANCE BY HUNGRY MARCH BAND at CHRYSTIE ST. and BROOME ST.

Kenny Scharf, Jonas Mekas, Martha Cooper, Agathe Snow, Kelsey Brookes, Cheryl Dunn, Maya Hayuk, Ryan Humphrey, Kenzo Minami, James Jean, Graffiti Research Lab, Scott Campbell, Erik Foss, Peter Sutherland, Mike Giant, Leo Fitzpatrick, Chiara Clemente, Julia Chiang, Takuya Sakamoto, AIKO, Ellis Gallagher, Gaia, Ji Lee, Chris Stain, Chris Uphues, Falcon Duran, Aakash Nihalani, Paolo Bertocchi, Taliah Lempert, Alfredo Bovel and Shane Bovel, Nesta Mayo, Stewert Semple, Benedict Radcliffe, Ashira Siegel, Steve MacDonald, Brian Vernor, Artus De Lavilléon, James Newman, Kevin Foxworth, Joe Stakun, Andrew McClintock, Marco Mucig, Yatika Starr Fields, Daniele De Lonti, Lisa Romans, Amy Bolger, Wonka,Jacques Ferrand, Marc Sich, Herman Mao, David Komurek, Silver Warner, Patrick Trefz, Made in Queens, Greg Ugalde, Camilla Candida Donzella, Fast Eddie Williams, Tristan Eaton, Robert S.L. Waltzer and Gordon Stevenson, Jud Turner, Suzette Lee, Wiilliam Robbins and Jeffrey Robbins, I LOVE DUST,  Maripol and Lino, Dana Goldstein, Rajan Mehta, Nathaniel Freeman, Giftcycle, Amelia Shaw, Jessica Findley, Lauren Silberman, Alessandro Zuek Simonetti, Daniel Leeb, Matteo Di Nisio , Ed Glazar, Bradley Baker, Cecily Upton, Rich Jacobs, Chris Thormann, Massan Fluker

Hungry March Band kicks off opening night at 6 PM with a performance in “the pit” at Sara D. Roosevelt Park on Chrystie Street and Broome Street.  Joy Ride maps will be available at each location.

For available artwork and more information about Joy Ride in NYC please visit www.anonymousgallery.com

or contact info@anonymousgallery.com
For more information about the Bicycle Film Festival, please visit

www.bicyclefilmfestival.com or contact jill@bicyclefilmfestival.com

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