All posts tagged: Deeker

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.05.15

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.05.15

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This 4th of July holiday weekend in New York is alive with art on the streets, on roofs, on stoops, in parks, on piers.  And run down back lots, tunnels, abandoned spots. Check your local listings.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring ARC, BAST, Bibbito, Bifido, Cash4, Clint Mario, Don John, Entes y Pesimo, Faith47, JR, Keely, Smells, The Yok, and WK Interact.

Top image above >>> Faith47 for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faith47 for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faith47 for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bifido in Sicily, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

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Bifido in Sicily, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

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Bast and his outsider art (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Don John in Copenhagen. (photo © John Don)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The Yok (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Arc (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Smells (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Clint Mario (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Cash4 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bibbito. Reggio Emilia, Italy. (photo © Bibbito)

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Bibbito. Detail. (photo © Bibbito)

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Entes y Pesimo for Inoperable Gallery. Linz, Austria. (photo © Philipp Greindl)

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Entes y Pesimo for Inoperable Gallery. Linz, Austria. (photo © Philipp Greindl)

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Entes y Pesimo for Inoperable Gallery. Linz, Austria. (photo © Philipp Greindl)

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Keely (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Williamsburg, Brooklyn. July 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 05.03.15

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.03.15

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We’ve been seeing an increase in the number of politically charged pieces showing up in the street lately. It is no surprise given the rise in marches and demonstrations and discussions in our city and country about topics like racism, police brutality, and rising economic inequality.  Street Art has a tradition of addressing socio-political topics, sometimes gently, sometimes yelling at the top of its lungs.

This comes at a time where the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) is banning all political speech and religious ads in the advertisements it runs. “Hateful speech is not harmless speech. Only a fool or rogue would argue otherwise,” said Charles Moerdler, an MTA board member and Holocaust survivor who voted for the new policy. Of course any time you start to ban speech you don’t like, you are risking someone banning yours.

One could argue that all speech is political but you don’t recognize it when the message expresses views endorsed by the dominant culture; BP ads tell us that it is splendid to burn fossil fuels, CitiBank ads on bicycles tell us that bankers are nice community-minded people, and McDonalds ads tell us that eating meat is nutritious. Nothing political there right? Do you think the MTA would allow you to run an advertisement saying the opposite of any of those messages? Or would that suddenly be political?

The first few messages of this weeks walls are examples of speech, some of them political, some of them not. The streets will decide which get banned.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring 907 Crew, Adam Cost, Anthony Lister, Balu, bunny M, Cash 4, David Shillinglaw, Defs, Deeker, FWC Crew, HA3, Icy & Sot, JR, Kaws, London Kaye, Merve Berkman, Myth, Omen, R2, Rambo, ROA, Rubin 415, SEA, Smells, Sote, and Specter.

Top Image: Turkish Street Artist Merve Berkman brings this Syrian refugee with child from the streets of Istanbul to the streets of New York. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Balu and his portrait of Malcolm X (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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“Nobody in the world, nobody in history, has ever gotten their freedom by appealing to the moral sense of the people who are oppressing them” a quote from Assata Shakur in this new Myth piece. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Davaid Shillinglaw . Lily Mixe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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London Kaye (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Adam Cost. Tell me about it. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Cash4 . Rambo . Droid . Smells (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Roman . 907 Crew (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Specter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rubin415 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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ROA. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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ROA. Detail. Omen . SEA . Kaws (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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ROA. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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ROA . HA3 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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SOTE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister and friends. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JR from his series Walking New York. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JR from his series Walking New York. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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DEFS and FWC Crew in Dubai (photo © DEFS)

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bunny M (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. SOHO, NYC. May 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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The Power of Color via Street Art, Graffiti, and Murals

The Power of Color via Street Art, Graffiti, and Murals

No doubt it is the grey days of late winter that is making us think about this as we brace for the next snowstorm, but today we’re considering the impact that Street Art color has on architecture that never asked for it.

We’re not the first to think of hues, shades, tones, and palettes when it comes to the man made environment of course, but it does strike us that most of the buildings that are hit up by street art and murals today were designed by architects who never imagined art on their facade.

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Os Gemeos in Boston. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Modern architecture for some reason is still primarily grey, washed out greens, beige, eggshell, snore.

“Color is something that architects are usually afraid of,” said internationally known and awarded architect Benedetta Tagliabue in an interview last May about the topic of color.  A generalization probably, and you can always find exceptions of colorfully painted neighborhoods globally like the Haight in San Francisco, La Boca in Buenos Aires, Portafino in Italy, Guanajuato in Mexico, Bo-Kaap in Capetown, the favelas of Rio de Janeiro and the Blue City of India, but many of those examples speak to color blocking and pattern.

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Interesni Kazki in Baltimore. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We’ve been looking at the power of Street Art to reface, re-contextualize, re-energize, and re-imagine a building and its place in the neighborhood. Some times it is successful, other times it may produce a light vertigo. The impact of work on buildings by today’s Street Artists and muralists depends not only on content and composition but largely on the palette they have chosen. It sounds trite, and self-evident perhaps, but much of Street Art is about color, and primarily on the warm scale first described by Faber Birren with his OSHA colors and color circle in the 1930s .

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Faile in Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Birren developed his color system with the observation that artists favor the warm colors more than the cold, from the violet side of red and extending beyond yellow because “, their effect is more dynamic and intense and because the eye can, in fact, distinguish more warm colors than cold.

It’s common now to think of 21st century Street Art as the graffiti-influenced practice that primarily activates the detritus of the abandoned industrial sector blighting western cities in the wake of trade agreements that sent all the jobs to lands without protections and regulations. While that is definitely the sort of neglected factory architecture preferred for “activation” by many graffiti artists and Street Artists alike, we also see more curious couplings of color with the delicately ornate, the regal, or even modernist structures today thanks to artists being invited, rather than chased.

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Shepard Fairey in Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The results? Abstractionist, cubist, geometric, letter-based, illustrative, figurative, text-based, outsider, folk, dadaist, pop.  One common denominator: color.

“The environment and its colors are perceived, and the brain processes and judges what it perceives on an objective and subjective basis. Psychological influence, communication, information, and effects on the psyche are aspects of our perceptual judgment processes,” writes Frank H. Mahnke in his recent piece for Archinect. The author of Color, Environment, & Human Response has made it his mission to explore psychological, biological effects of color and light and to help creators of the man-made environment make good choices.

Whether all of these choices are good, we leave up to you. But it is worth considering that Street Artists have been part of the conversation on the street for decades now, making powerful suggestions to architects and city planners , so maybe it’s worth taking another look at what they’ve been up to lately.

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Ever in Baltimore. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Escif in Atlanta. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kenton Parker and Roa in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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LUDO in Chicago. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in Los Angeles. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kobra in Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Smells, Cash4 and Spiro in Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Don Rimx in El Barrio. Harlem, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Agostino Iacurci in Atlanta. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Barry McGee in Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Jaz and Cern in Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pose and Revok in Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rime, Dceve and Toper in Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pixel Pancho in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Deeker and David Pappaceno in Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Reka in Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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RRobots in Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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MOMO in Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Skewville in Brooklyn, NYC with an old NEKST tag on top. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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3ttman and Elias in Atlanta. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Chris Stain and Billy Mode tribute to Martha Cooper in Brooklyn with ROA on the water tank. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rubin in Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Os Gemeos in Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JMR in Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Greg LaMarche in Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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This article was also published on The Huffington Post

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The 2013 BSA Year in Images (VIDEO)

The 2013 BSA Year in Images (VIDEO)

Here it is! Our 2013 wrap up featuring favorite images of the year by Brooklyn Street Art’s Jaime Rojo.

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Before our video roundup below here is the Street Art photographer’s favorite of the year, snapped one second before he was singled out of a New York crowd, handcuffed, and stuffed into a police car – sort of like the Banksy balloons he was capturing.

“Among all the thousands of photos I took this year there’s one that encapsulates the importance of Street Art in the art world and some of the hysteria that can build up around it,” he says of his final shot on the final day of the one month Better Out Than In artist ‘residency’ in NYC this October. It was a cool day to be a Street Art photographer – but sadly Rojo was camera-less in a case of mistaken identity, if only for a short time.

Released two hours later after the actual car-jumping trespasser was charged, Rojo was happy to hear the Chief Lieutenant tell his officer “you’ve got the wrong man”, to get his shoelaces back, and to discover this photo was still on his camera. He also gets to tell people at parties that he spent some time in the holding cell with the two guys whom New York watched tugging down the B-A-N-K-S-Y.

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What’s everybody looking at? Jaime Rojo’s favorite image of the year at the very end of the Banksy brouhaha. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Now, for the Video

When it came to choosing the 112 images for the video that capture the spirit of the Street Art scene in ’13, we were as usual sort of overwhelmed to comb through about ten thousand images and to debate just how many ‘legal’ versus ‘illegal’ pieces made it into the mix. Should we include only images that went up under the cover of the night, unsanctioned, uncensored, uncompromised, unsolicited and uncommissioned? Isn’t that what Street Art is?

Right now there are a growing number of legal pieces going up in cities thanks to a growing fascination with Street Art and artists and it is causing us to reevaluate what the nature of the Street Art scene is, and what it may augur for the future. You can even say that from a content and speech perspective, a sizeable amount of the new stuff is playing it safe – which detracts from the badass rebel quality once associated with the practice.

These works are typically called by their more traditional description – murals. With all the Street Art / graffiti festivals now happening worldwide and the growing willingness of landlords to actually invite ‘vandals’ to paint their buildings to add cache to a neighborhood and not surprisingly benefit from the concomitant increase in real estate values, many fans and watchers have been feeling conflicted in 2013 about the mainstreaming that appears to be taking place before our eyes. But for the purposes of this roundup we decided to skip the debate and let everybody mix and mingle freely.

This is just a year-end rollicking Street Art round-up; A document of the moment that we hope you like.

Ultimately for BSA it has always been about what is fresh and what is celebrating the creative spirit – and what is coming next. “We felt that the pieces in this collection expressed the current vitality of the movement – at least on the streets of New York City,” says photographer and BSA co-founder Rojo. It’s a fusillade of the moment, complete with examples of large murals, small wheat pastes, intricate stencils, simple words made with recycled materials or sprayed on to walls, clay installations, three dimensional sculptures, hand painted canvases, crocheted installations, yarn installations etc… they somehow captured our imaginations, inspired us, made us smile, made us think, gave us impetus to continue doing what we are doing and above all made us love this city even more and the art and the artists who produce it.

Brooklyn Street Art 2013 Images of the Year by Jaime Rojo includes the following artists;

A Dying Breed, Aakash Nihalini, Agostino Iacursi, Amanda Marie, Apolo Torres, Axel Void, Bagman, Bamn, Pixote, Banksy, B.D. White, Betsy, Bishop203, NDA, Blek le Rat, br1, Case Maclaim, Cash For Your Warhol, Cholo, Chris RWK, Chris Stain, Billy Mode, Christian Nagel, Cost, ENX, Invader, Crush, Dal East, Damien Mitchell, Dase, Dasic, Keely, Deeker, Don’t Fret, The Droid, ECB, el Seed, El Sol 25, Elbow Toe, Faile, Faith 47, Five Pointz, Free Humanity, Greg LaMarche, Hot Tea, How & Nosm, Icy & Sot, Inti, Jilly Ballistic, John Hall, JR, Jose Parla, Judith Supine, Kremen, Kuma, LMNOPI, London Kaye, Love Me, Martha Cooper, Matt Siren, Elle, Mika, Miss Me, Missy, MOMO, Mr. Toll, Nychos, Okuda, Alice Mizrachi, OLEK, Owen Dippie, Paolo Cirio, Paul Insect, Phetus, Phlegm, Revok, Pose, QRST, Rambo, Ramiro Davaro, Reka, Rene Gagnon, ROA, RONES, Rubin, bunny M, Square, Stikki Peaches, Stikman, Swoon, Tristan Eaton, The Lisa Project 2013, UFO 907, Willow, Swill, Zed1, and Zimer.

Read more about Banksy’s last day in New York here and our overview of his residency in the essay “Banksy’s Final Trick” on The Huffington Post.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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BSA Halloween Street Art Special 2013

BSA Halloween Street Art Special 2013

The Halloween Parade through the Village in NYC is tonight, the 40th actually, and you will see a greater number of ghostly guys and ghouls on the bus and subway and hanging out on the street today. Of course New York has a fair share of freaks throughout the year, and some people love a dancing skeleton or screeching witch or marching Zombie almost anytime, really. When it comes to Street Art, you can always count on skulls and monsters and the occasional raven.

Last year Halloween in NYC was basically cancelled by the sincerely frightening Superstorm Sandy that left half of the city in darkness for days, and this year we hope it will be more about the fantasy aspect of All Hallows Eve.

We start off the BSA collection by photographer Jaime Rojo with this brand new one from Banksy’s Grim Reaper on Houston Street this weekend.  Also, check out the video by Kadshah Nagibe of the last Halloween parade that NYC hosted.  Have a great day and a haunted fun night everybody!

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Banksy (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Vor138 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Duke A. Barnstable (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Vexta (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Post Mortem (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Obey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Roberta’s Bushwick (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The Yok and Sheryo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Paolo Cirio. Google Ghosts, (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Magda Love (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mocks108 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dan Witz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kenny Scharf (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Niño De Las Pinturas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Buff Monster (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dug (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Deeker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bushwick Is Hot Now. Hurry!

Bushwick Open Studios is Paved With Street Art

Brooklyn’s already percolating artists neighborhood called Bushwick continues to thrive despite the circling of real estate agents, lifestyle brands and celebrity chefs. Born in the mid-late 2000s as it’s older sister Williamsburg to the West began to professionalize, this noisily industrial and dirty artists haven got a reprieve from gentrifying forces when the deep recession slowed the rise of rents for artist spaces, which remained still relatively cheap by Manhattan’s standards. Today the area boasts a diverse influx of artists, students, cultural workers, and entrepreneurs who are experimenting and collaborating on projects and shows.

Spagnola (photo © Jaime Rojo)

That radical economic downturn probably also nurtured the nascent Street Art scene here, which was one of the early outliers of a cultural influx as artists and explorers began to skateboard to the local delis and stare at laptops for hours in the one or two cafes that offered  Wi-Fi. Outcroppings of this new art movement combined with old-school graffiti to pop up on selected concrete and corrugated walls, signposts, and deteriorated blocks where the authorities were disinterested and the neighbors only partially curious in their activities.

It’s an age-old New York story by now; a neglected or winding down post industrial neighborhood reacts to the incoming and odd-looking artists with a sort of bemused affection, happy that at least the block is getting some attention for a change. Puzzlement eventually leads to familiarity and then buying you a sandwich – and then asking you to paint a mural inside his foyer. While national and international Street Artists were already making Bushwick a stopping point thanks to some of the earliest galleries like Ad Hoc and Factory Fresh, the scene recently got newly shot in the arm by a local resident who is facilitating much desired legal wall space to a crowd of artists who otherwise would be hunting and hitting up less-than-legal spots.  Not to worry, there are plenty of aerosol renegades and ruffians scaling walls at night too; this is New York after all, yo.

Zimad (photo © Jaime Rojo)

But for now the Bushwick Collective, as it is newly christened by wall-man Joe Ficalora, has infused an adrenaline rush of creativity inside and outside the area that is roughly bordered by Flushing Avenue, Starr Street, Knickerbocker Avenue and Cypress Avenue.  The Collective has guidelines on content (nudity, politics, profanity) so the works are not completely unfettered in the true spirit of Street Art/graffiti, but most artists are happy for the luxury of time to complete their work and not look over their shoulder. With a selection of murals that are densely gathered and easy to walk through, the new collection has attracted attention from media folks (and tour guides) on the main island brave enough to venture into the gritty wilds of Brooklyn for a Street Art safari.

As Bushwick hosts its 7th annual open studios cultural event this weekend, intrepid pedestrians who march through opening parties, rooftop DJ jams, dance performances, live bands, transcendent costumery, sidewalk barbecues, open fire hydrants and more than 600 open artist studios will also be buffeted by a visual feast on the streets themselves. As long as the L Train is running (fingers crossed) you can just get off at the Morgan stop. From there it should be pretty easy for any curious art-in-the-street fan to be regaled with big and small works of graffiti, Street Art, tags, wheat-pastes, stencils, rollers, murals, and ad hoc installations all day and night.

Trek Matthews (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A shout out to Arts In Bushwick, an all volunteer organization that has steadily grown and fostered an open sense of community inclusiveness each year for Bushwick Open Studios and to the many volunteers who have contributed greatly to the success of many of the cultural workers here.  Without an open studios event many of these shy and quirky artists and performers would simply have stayed unknown and unknowable.

So far Bushwick still has the unbridled imperfect D.I.Y. enthusiasm of an experiment where anything can happen, but grey ladies with kooky bright colored spectacles have already begun to flip it over to inspect it with one hand while pinching their nose with the other, so savor this authentic moment.  Ethereal by nature, you know the Street Art scene is never guaranteed to you tomorrow – neither is the mythical artists bohemian hamlet of New York’s yesteryear.  For now we’re hopping on our bikes to catch a golden age of Bushwick before it’s repackaged and sold back to us at a price we can’t afford.

The first series of images are walls from the Bushwick Collective, followed by a series of walls that you may also see in the neighborhood.

MOMO (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Solus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Alice Pasquini (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Toofly and Col Wallnuts (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stik (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Billy Mode and Chris Stain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nard (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder and LNY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brett Flanigan and Cannon Dill (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gats (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sheryo and The Yok (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Here are a series of walls not related to Bushwick Collective.

ECB (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A portion of a wall by the 907 Crew, Sadue. Don Pablo Pedro, Smells, Cash4, and Keely (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Phetus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rubin (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Peeta (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BR1 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Apolo Torres (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris, Veng, RWK and ECB (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cruz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

KUMA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Free Humanity (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Keely and Deeker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kremen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For a full list of activities, studios, schedules and directions for Bushwick Open Studios 2013 click HERE.

 

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Images of the Week: 05.26.13

Here’s our weekly interview of the street, this week featuring Beau Stanton, Brett Flanigan, Cannon Dil, Cosbe, Creepy, Deeker, Facter, Gats, Icy & Sot, Invurt, Jaz, Keely, Nunca, Rubin, Sexer, Solus, Sonni, Zimad.

Top image > Brett Flanigan and Cannon Dill at Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The paint is still wet on this one by Brett Flanigan and Cannon Dill in Brooklyn. They are on a cross-country tour put these two on BSA earlier in the week when they hit Chicago. To follow them as they rampage with cans in hand, check out #lqvmuraltour2013 on Twitter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

GATS has a fresh water tower at Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rubin (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A new one from NUNCA  in Chichester, UK (photo © NUNCA)

Zimad at Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Zimad at Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaz at work on is new wall in Vienna. (photo © Inoperable Gallery)

JAZ in Vienna (photo © Inoperable Gallery)

Sexer at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cosbe at 121 Knickerbocker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sonni at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sonni at Bushwick Collective. This portion of the wall is part of the above piece but cars parked in front of it. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Solus at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A Deeker and Keely really hit it with this collaboration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Beau Stanton at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Facter at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Creepy is in town at Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Brooklyn, May 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Pandemonium on the Walls at Pandemic

Brooklyns’ Pandemic Gallery recently invited a sort of painted pandemonium to fill all the walls of their space for a summer art party. Shoulder to hip and head to toe, this mixture of artists is actually emblematic of this moment in Brooklyn history and representing the raucous variety of styles that are mashing and mixing on the graffiti/street art/fine art continuum throughout the world.

But no one likes to be labelled and if you ask them and probably each of these artists would prefer not to be called graffiti artists or street artists or fine artists because each title has too many limitations or insulting inferences. One thing everybody agrees on is they like to paint on walls and while we have seen our share of bring-all-your-friends wall smashing that somehow goes awry, this indoor installation is one of the most cogent mashup derby style groupings you are likely to see this year.

Darkclouds and David Pappaceno (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Keely, Matt Siren, Don Pablo Pedro, Cost, Royce Bannon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Don Pablo Pedro, Cost (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Keely, Matt Siren (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swampy, Deeker, Cost (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Yok and Shyro (photo © Jaime Rojo)

SET (photo © Jaime Rojo)

COST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Fun Friday 07.27.12

Let the Games Begin! (oh no, does that violate an Olympic copyright?) Here’s our Olympian sized Olympic Fun Friday Olympiatastic list, sponsored by nobody.

1. BOB ROSS REMIX (VIDEO)
2. KingBrown Group Show at Klughaus (NYC)
3. Quel Beast Solo Reception at Gallery Bar (NYC)
4. Believe the Hype at Pandemic Saturday (BKLN)
5. REVOK and SABER at Known Gallery (LA)
6. Matthew Silver Goes for the Gold in his Speedo at Union Square (VIDEO)
7. Pura Vida Presents: Entes Y Pesimo A Short Film (English) (VIDEO)

BOB ROSS REMIX (Video)

Bob Ross is back! Updated and autotuned, this visual medley ties together the overriding themes that his long-running show imparted to many people who may have been timid about reopening that creative spirit that we’re all born with. Some kids think they’re too cool and too street for this sh*t but really they like Bob’s message too, because he’s right. Get out your paintbrush and cans!

KingBrown Group Show at Klughaus (NYC)

Mike Giant is in New York and he brought some juicy markers with him. The New Show at Klughaus Gallery in Manhattan’s Chinatown hosted him yesterday with folks from Kingbrown Magazine to mark the release of their issue #8. The group show of small pieces in the gallery is smartly, densely packed with names you’ll like and  is now open to the public after last nights hot and sticky grand opening that ended with Mother nature blowing exhibition skateboarders sideways with sudden summer storm high winds and pounding rain. The show was presented along with the dudes from Fountain Arts Fair.

Mike Giant gate for Kingbrown at Klughaus Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artists include Morning Breath, Andy Jenkins, Chris Cycle, Dave Kinsey, “Grotesk” aka Kimou Meyer, Stefan Marx, Kevin Lyons, Mike Giant, Raza Uno aka MAx Vogel, Greg Lamarche, Zach Malfa-Kowalski, Steve Gourlay, Jay Howell, Ben Horton, Beastman, Phibs, Hiro, Reka, Kyle “Creepy” Hughes-Odgers, Meggs, Sean Morris, Yok, Sheryo, Ross Clugston, Daek, Lister, Numskull, Ian Mutch, Rone/ aka Tyrone Wright.

Mike Giant at work on his wall outside the gallery before the show opened. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Further information regarding this show click here.

Quel Beast Solo Reception at Gallery Bar (NYC)

The Gallery Bar on the Lower East Side of Manhattan hosts the opening reception today of Quel Beast’s solo show of portraits full of emotion as he continues in the journey of self-study. In a short career on the street that has depicted everything from anguish to rage to frustration, it is good to report that there is now an occasional smile.

Quel Beast. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Believe the Hype at Pandemic Saturday (BKLN)

PARTY! PARTY! PARTY! @ Pandemic Gallery tomorrow. “Believe The Hype” Is Pandemic’s title for this summer party including: The Yok, Sheryo, UFO 907, Swampy, Royce Bannon, Matt Siren, David Pappaceno, Darkclouds, Keely, Don Pablo Pedro, Cost KRT and Deeker. All the artists will paint the interior of the gallery in one collaborative mural. Go get wet and play. There will be limited prints, T shirts, zines and drawings for sale.

For further information regarding this show click here.

REVOK and SABER at Known Gallery (LA)

Double billing Revok and Saber in one night? You know the crowd will be big and enthusiastic to see these two concurrent solo shows and as Known Gallery hosts  REVOK’s “Gilgamesh” and SABER’s “Beautification” simultaneously Saturday.

REVOK in Miami for Primary Flight (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding REVOK show click here.

SABER on the streets of Los Angeles. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding SABER show click here.

Matthew Silver Goes for the Gold in his Speedo at Union Square (VIDEO)

Miao Jiaxin captures some of the magic moments of this public performer who may be borderline bananas and who knows how to engage people, to help and flip their “I’m Free” switch to the “On” position.

 

Pura Vida Presents: Entes Y Pesimo A Short Film (English) (VIDEO)

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A Roof With a View : Looking at Art Up Above

Climbing up on a roof during the sultry city summer can be liberating, and it turns out to be a prime place for painting too.  Away from the cacophony of the sweaty streets, the breeze up here is a little cooler and stronger and aside from the occasional potted tomato plant or sun-tanning waitress, you are on your own. You may not own any personal real estate, but right now this is all yours, this sweeping urban vista of grand, glassy, grimy, gawdy, and gutted.

For years graffiti writers and Street Artists have sought these undiscovered spots as a kind of refuge, an urban backyard for hanging out and going big, often collaboratively. You could say that rooftop spots even have a certain lore, a place to tell stories about and revel in. In a hard-knock nasty city that sometimes seems to swallow people whole, on this rooftop with a view you can do a huge piece and feel like you are holding it all down. Not to mention the bragging rights you can claim for hitting a high profile location that grabs eyeballs and raises the stakes. As for the city dweller, the work, as ever, is subjectively reviled, ignored, or celebrated. No one can truthfully deny its affect on the character of the cityscape.

Here are some choice roof shots by photographer Jaime Rojo across New York, LA, Chicago, and Boston to give you a birds eye view of some art from on high.

Rime, Dceve, and Toper in Chinatown, Manhattan. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rime, Dceve, and Toper in Chinatown, Manhattan. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ROA on the water tower and Chris Stain and Billy Mode on the wall. Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

News in DUMBO, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JR in Hunts Point, The Bronx as part of Inside Out – A Global Art Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JR in Hunts Point, The Bronx as part of Inside Out – A Global Art Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bare, Hert, Gable, Deth Kult, TVEE in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rodeo, ILS, Bare, Hert, Gable, Deth Kult, TVEE in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon. The Central Street Roof in Cambridge, MA. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Anarkia Boladona in Hunts Point, The Bronx. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sweet Toof in Bushwick, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Deeker, Armer, Lister and Judith Supine in Bushwick, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Various & Gould in Bushwick, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey in Los Angeles, Arts Disctric for LA Freewalls Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaz and Cern in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ludo in Chicago with Pawn Works Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

At Large, Nekst, Rusk in Williamsburg, Brookklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Take No Action, Hellbent, Sweet Toof in Willimsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swampy in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tats Cru in Hunts Point, The Bronx. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Staino in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jeff Aerosol in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia in Chicago with Pawn Works Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Love Me, Screw Sacer in China Town, Manhattan. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Veng, Royce Bannon, Werds in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Staino, Sefu and RTF at the High Line Park in Manhattan. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

I Spy in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

WK Interact in The Lower East Side, Manhattan. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Pandemic Gallery Presents: “Believe The Hype” An Art Summer Party (Brooklyn, NY)

Pandemic Gallery

SUMMER GREETINGS!

Join us on Saturday July 28th for BELIEVE THE HYPE! An all day event filled with art, music, games, food, drinks, and gushing wateras Pandemic throws a summer party!!

Artists will paint the entire inside of the gallery into a stunning collaborative mural
and smaller works such as Limited Prints / T-shirts / Zines / Drawings and the likes will be available for purchase.
Stop by and have a blast!
2pm – 10pm
Saturday, July 28th
Artists Include:
The YOK
SHERYO
UFO 907
SWAMPY
ROYCE BANNON
MATT SIREN
DAVID PAPPACENO
DARKCLOUDS
KEELY
DON PABLO PEDRO
COST KRT
SET KRT
DEEKER
PANDEMIC gallery
37 Broadway btwn Kent and Wythe
Brooklyn, NY 11211
www.pandemicgallery.com

 
Gallery hours:
Tues.-Fri. 11-6pm
Sat. & Sun. 12-7pm
closed Monday
or by appointment 

L train to Bedford ave, J train to Marcy ave, or Q59 bus to Broadway/Wythe

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What’s New in Bushwick: A Quick Street Art Survey

As you may have heard, New York’s young artist community has been in a rather fast migration away from Manhattan for this entire century.

And so has most of its Street Art.

As the neighborhood of Bushwick assumes the role of new art nerve center (and hard charging, chatty hormone-infused bohemia), the Street Art that began in Williamsburg at the turn of the millenium is without question a natural companion for the trip. This weekend Bushwick celebrated its 6th official Open Studios program (BOS) and gave Street Art it’s genealogical due as major influencer to the whole scene by inviting a number of the newer names to exhibit indoors for the opening party. Naturally, if not ironically, the streets walls had work by many of same.

Always in flux, the current Street Art scene reflects the players as much as the chaotic and diversified D.I.Y. times we’re in. As the more designed multiples of Fairey and the repetition of Cost have given much ground to the highly labor intensive one-offs with a story today, you can see that this narrative style may have been set into motion by people like Swoon and Elbow-Toe in the intervening wave.

To give you a sense of the complex visual ecosystem that influences the fine art/ Street Art continuum in 2012, here’s some eye candy from inside, outside, sanctioned and freewheeling that were on display during BOS this year.

We start with this new piece by Swoon inspired after her recent visit to Kenya. She incorporated drawings into the portraits of the two girls from an organization called 160 girls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon’s reprisal of a piece we’ve seen in Boston, LA, and New Orleans – newly colored for Bushwick (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Relative newcomer Gilf! In the Garden of Good and Bushwick. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gilf! does a stripped back road sign satire as part of the installation that she curated for BOS 2012 official opening party. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Yok as part of the installation curated by Gilf! for BOS 2012 official opening party. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Willow as part of the installation curated by Gilf! for BOS 2012 official opening party. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sheryo as part of the installation curated by Gilf! for BOS 2012 official opening party. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hellbent as part of the installation curated by Gilf! for BOS 2012 official opening party. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ND’A as part of the installation curated by Gilf! for BOS 2012 official opening party. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bishop203 as part of the installation curated by Gilf! for BOS 2012 official opening party. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

QRST as part of the installation curated by Gilf! for BOS 2012 official opening party. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

QRST in the wild. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Holy BOS! Housed in a former Lutheran church Bobby Redd Project Space invited artists to do site-specific installations in the actively decaying house of worship. Artists included Abel Macias, Andrew Ohanesian, Ben Wolf, Billy Hahn, Brian Willmont, Don Pablo Pedro, James Keul, Peter Bardazzi. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Holy BOS! @ Bobby Redd Project Space: Don Pablo Pedro (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Holy BOS! Holy peeling paint! @ Bobby Redd Project Space (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The backyard space @ Bobby Redd Project Space had this flowing installation by Phoenix entitled “Bushwick Forest” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Holy BOS! @ Bobby Redd Project Space: Phoenix. “Bushwick Forest” Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

An entrance @ Bobby Redd Project Space featured Street Artist Deeker with a backround by David Pappaceno. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bobby Redd Project Space: Deeker with background by David Pappaceno. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cassius Fouler @ Bobby Redd Project Space (photo © Jaime Rojo)

DarkClouds @ Bobby Redd Project Space (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A street installation by an Unknown artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jim Avignon at Bushwick 5 Point Festival (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Street Artist Specter is also a conceptual artist and sculptor. He painstakingly hand-painted this Bodega facade as an homage to the New York street scenes that are disappearing. Bushwick 5 Points Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A collaborative mural by Sheryo, The Yok and Never at Bushwick 5 Points Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sheryo stands on a sketch. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Set KRT and Cost at Bushwick 5 Points Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Priscila de Carvalho, Maria Berrio and Miariam Castillo at Bushwick 5 Points Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Klub7 at Bushwick 5 Points Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Daek1 at Bushwick 5 Points Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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