All posts tagged: Carlito Brigante

Fun Friday 07.23.10

Fun-Friday

Fun Friday Brooklyn Street Art

MOMO at the Fame Festival in Italy

Video-still-copyright-MOMO-Brooklyn-Street-Art

American Street Artist MOMO has been working with abstract, geometric and modernist elements on scaffoldings and walls in New York for a few years.  This new video of his participation in the FAME festival shows his sense of humor, command of negative space, and sophistication of placement.

Somebunny’s Getting Up in Seoul

Actually he’s back in New York now but while in Korea studying about public art for the last month, Gaia put up a number of brand new pieces, all in color, and all deeply rooted in the culture, art history, and traditional symbolism of his host as well as the western world.  So it’s not just about a rabbit?
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Copyright-Gaia-Korea-July2010 “Sunrise Neighbor” (image © Gaia)

In the video for another piece we see Gaia’s “Ungnyeo in Namdaemun”

“The body of Ungnyeo is composed of buddhist cloud motifs and the center of the massive body has an oval silhouette to signify the womb flanked by two strong inwardly turned hands. The earth woman is then hybridized with the supremacy of the sky to institute the female figure into a role of reproduction versus reception. Within this new iteration of the ancient narrative, the woman animal becomes the most prominent figure of genesis.”

Billi Kid New Vid with Carlito Brigante

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A Man’s World: A Carlito Brigante Image Essay on a BedStuy Barbershop

“The Head Hunters” visits for a bit with Brooklyn guys getting a cut.

Getting ready for the buzzers (photo © Carlito Brigante)
Getting ready for the buzzers (photo © Carlito Brigante)

Photographer Carlito Brigante spent an hour shooting pics and talking with the proprietor and customers in a barbershop in Brooklyn recently. With his audio and images he created a brief multi-media photo essay with Charles Le Brigand .

From his short piece on the visit, Carlito says:

“Jason told me that whether in Bed-Stuy, North Florida or Brixton U.K, the ambiance in a barbershop is indistinguishable. A barbershop holds a key role in African-American culture. It is a community gathering place, a discursive space where you receive words on local doings and the latest rumors of the neighborhood. The barbershop is also a neutral place where men interact regardless of class, education, or occupation. Kids, adults, cops, hustlers, nearly everyone takes part in the casual conversations where the barber plays the very active role of moderator.”

Read all about The Head Hunters here:

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Bushwick Beat: Stalking the Wild Street Art with Vincent Cornelli

by photographer Vincent Cornelli

Sure, Jef Aerosol had his show 2 Fridays ago, and he’s now back home in France. But it seems worth revisiting the amount of amazing moments I captured in Bushwick that day as a result of his energy and inspiration while he was in New York; One cannot help but feed off of it.

I want to give you some behind-the-scenes photos of the art and street scene that surrounded the artist at work. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did photographing and capturing them.

Carlito Brigante and C215 in an unlikely collaboration © Vincent Cornelli

Carlito Brigante and C215 in a subtle collaboration © Vincent Cornelli

Te Amo © Vincent Cornelli

Te Amo © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

C215 on a firebox © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

Know Hope © Vincent Cornelli

Know Hope © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

Bast and Clown Soldier © Vincent Cornelli

Bast and Clown Soldier © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

Robots Will Kill © Vincent Cornelli

Robots Will Kill © Vincent Cornelli

Mac and Remed © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

Eine in the center of the Ad Hoc entrance © Vincent Cornelli

Eine in the center of the Ad Hoc entrance © Vincent Cornelli

See more of Vinny’s work HERE

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Carlito Brigante and the “Rubadub Session” Videos & Pics

Carlito Brigante and the “Rubadub Session” Videos & Pics

Blending passions for Street Art, Urban Photography, and Jamaican Culture in a way that honors all three.

Street Art photographer Carlito Brigante shows us his project “The Rubadub Session” in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn.

Rub-a-dub session by Carlito Brigante & Los Invisibles was filmed by M-Lo and edited by Carlito Brigante

 

 Bed Stuy boy shakin' his head in front of a wheat-pasted soundsystem (photo © Carlito Brigante)

 

New York Street Art has so much variety due to it’s incredibly varied populations and neighborhoods, among other factors.

 (photo © Carlito Brigante)

(photo © Carlito Brigante)

You are never going to get bored walking through New York’s boroughs because the sheer number of languages, cuisines, fashions, and music you will experience will continually surprise you and expose you to great new people.

Street art fan and photographer Carlito Brigante (aka Charles Le Brigande) has been hanging in Bed Stuy Brooklyn for a few years, and has fallen in love with the music and history of the Jamaican soundsystem. A recent piece he did in the street recalls the big mountains of music speakers that pump loudly in the street  with ska, reggae, and rocksteady music spun by a handful of disc jockeys engineers and MCs.

 

 (photo © Carlito Brigante)

 

In addition to two of videos of that corner deli installation, Carlito engaged neighbors and shot pictures of them dancing in front of the paste-up. With a special affinity for the culture and the people, he loves street scenes that capture the flavor of this neighborhood.

 

 (photo © Carlito Brigante)

(photo © Carlito Brigante)

Brooklyn Street Art: What is a “soundsystem” and where did they begin?
Carlito Brigante: A soundsystem can be described as a means to bring the music to the people. In Jamaican popular culture, sound systems first appeared in the ghettos of Kingston in the late 40’s, way before the birth of ska, rocksteady and reggae music. Poor people could not afford the high prices of jazz and rhythm & blues (R&B) concerts organized for the wealthy elite and tourists, so sound systems sprung up. DJ’s would assemble large heavy speakers, power amplifiers and generators and blast music all night in the streets.

 

 (photo © Carlito Brigante)

(photo © Carlito Brigante)

Brooklyn Street Art: Can you talk about the genesis of the “rubadub session” video and the wheatpaste? What was the aim?
Carlito Brigante: The rubadub session project is a tribute to the Jamaican sound system culture. It was my way of bringing an unfamiliar art form (wheat-pasting) and combining it with a familiar cultural symbol (the soundsystem) as a gift to the neighborhood in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. One day I was walking-by a laundry in Bed-Stuy, and the shape of the wall reminded me of a huge speaker. I immediately thought of doing a piece representing a sound system there.

 (photo © Carlito Brigante)

(photo © Carlito Brigante)

Brooklyn Street Art: It’s great how you feature people interacting with the art and with each other. What inspires you most about the project?
Carlito Brigante: The idea was to recreate the mood of a Jamaican soundsystem and capture people’s reaction. This corner is always very busy, people are hanging around there all the time, so by pasting-up on this spot, I knew that people would relate to the piece and would interact with it. I wanted to make them dance with no music!

Trevor (photo © Carlito Brigante)

This image he took of Trevor during a huge block party inspired Carlito to learn more about the soundsystem culture. (photo © Carlito Brigante)

Brooklyn Street Art: The neighborhood of Brooklyn called Bed-Stuy certainly has roots in the Jamaican soundsystem. Can you talk about your experience of living here?
Carlito Brigante: This piece was directly inspired by a personal “Bed-Stuy/Jamaican” experience. Two years ago during a block party, I took a photograph of a natty dread skanking in front of a massive wall of speakers. I mean, every time I go out to take pictures here, I find amazing material. Bed-Stuy is full of surprises. It is an ongoing source of inspiration for me, from a visual standpoint but also from a human perspective. I have met so many incredible people in this neighborhood and taken a good amount of images.

 

 (photo © Carlito Brigante)

(photo © Carlito Brigante)

Brooklyn Street Art: How is this project related to your passion for street art and urban photography?

Carlito Brigante: With the rubadub session, I wanted to blend my passion for street art, urban photography and Jamaican culture. That’s the reason why I have created this “background”.  I knew that the spot was pertinent, that the piece would generate genuine reactions and that I would be able to take great photographs.

It was great to see people dancing and jamming throughout the whole process.

 

The "rubadub session" on a rainy day in Bed Stuy (photo © Carlito Brigante)

The “rubadub session” on a rainy day in Bed Stuy (photo © Carlito Brigante)

Rub-a-dub session by Carlito Brigante & Los Invisibles (version II.) was filmed by Ron Brodie and edited by Jay Morales

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See more of Carlito’s work on his Blog and on his Flickr pics

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