Editorz

Montana Elevates With New Platform: Tramontana Magazine / Issue 03

Montana Elevates With New Platform: Tramontana Magazine / Issue 03

This March we were in Madrid hosting three days of BSA Talks at Urvanity Art Fair and while we were there, Esteban Marin, the director of Contorno Urbano Foundation, introduced us to the Editorial Director of a new magazine; Tramontana. Antonio Garcia Mora, un tio mu majo, as they say in Spain, impressed us with his knowledge and enthusiasm, showing off the first two issues of the perfect-bound volume. Unfortunately, due to our duties within the art fair, we didn’t have much time to visit with him and then the fair was over and we all went to our different countries and about our business.

We’re happy to see that the quality perseveres at Tramontana as the magazine publishes its third edition of the year, and its editorial standards continue to be very high. Rarely do we see a magazine these days that is so well edited, designed and with extraordinary, well-written content.

Leveraging its history as a Spanish aerosol paint manufacturer and art supplies brand that many within the graffiti/Street Art community use and laud, Montana Colors here ventures into a contemporary direction with the trappings of and subtle refinements more often associated with galleries and museums. It’s a safe bet at this point, but they’re not resting on their laurels – this is cut above what we’re used to seeing in terms of content, documentation, preservation, storytelling, and even academic detailing.

Don’t worry; you’ll also enjoy it. The Spanish/English format is open and accessible, the reasonably short essays and interviews are good for today’s attention spans, the balance of text to images and graphics suitable to one another. You may long for a glossy richness of image occasionally, and undoubtedly that is coming, but the design supports without overwhelming or calling attention away from what amounts to a textbook of the moment for the thinking fans, students, and collectors.

Issue 3 boasts interviews with people like photographer Martha Cooper, filmmaker Selina Miles, impresario Roger Gastman, graffiti writers Shiat, Ellas, muralists Shan and Spok. There is a condensed history of Punks and City Kids in 1970s-80s Amsterdam by Remko Koopman, an interview with teacher/author/photographer of NYC trains Craig Castleman as he tours Europe speaking, and an essay on the elusive quality of originality by conceptual Street Artist SpY.

You also get a one-shot impression of Amsterdam graffiti and an extensive train bombing background story on Chilean-Canadian couple LOS KEOS with Mr. Garcia Mora. From that interview, the world-travelers share their influences, techniques, and negotiating their way through variable legal/penal systems of different countries, but we also learn about the social interactions with writers and crews.

“We have met many people over the years, not all of them well-known. The best relationships are the ones where we share more than just painting: our lifestyle, our political thinking, the desire to go out to explore a city and learn a little about the local culture.”

The intersecting cultures of graffiti, Street Art, urban art, and Contemporary continue to blend, reorganize, and propagate. Tramontana appears poised to capture and communicate with respect the history, techniques, soft and hard sciences that all convene to study the movement, where it moves.  

Tramontana Magazine is published by Montana Colors under the guidance of its CEO Jordi Rubio Rocabert and the Editorial Director Antonio Garcia Mora. This magazine is free.

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BSA Film Friday 09.20.19

BSA Film Friday 09.20.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. “REWILD” from Escif
2. Guido van Helten in Faulkton, South Dakota by Brian Siskind
3. How Artist JR Is Helping Connect Our Humanity Through Street Art


BSA Special Feature: “REWILD” from Escif

As part of our core commitment as a non-commercial platform that has helped hundreds of artists over the last decade+, BSA significantly helped Escif to raise money for his Indiegogo fundraiser in Spring 2017 when we promoted his “Breath-Time” horticultural project heavily as he planted trees to reforest Mount Olivella in Southern Italy.

Today BSA debuts REWILD, a new tree-related project by the Spanish Street Artists – just as the Global Climate March is spreading to cities around the world, including New York.

The concept of the short film is simple: can’t we just push the “Rewind” button?

“The narrative runs in reverse, rewinding the clock on deforestation to undo the damage caused by the unsustainable production of one of the worlds most versatile commodities. Beyond the industrialisation of the land, we end at the beginning, a thriving eco system alive with wildlife. The concept mirrors the real world action of the Sumatran Orangutan Society and their partners in reclaiming land on the borders of the Leuser rainforests to rewild them with indigenous trees, expanding the boundaries of one of the most biodiverse places on earth.”  

Finally, a stunning custom soundtrack by Indonesian composer Nursalim Yadi Anugerah captures and carries this into another world, which is possible.

Shout out to the folks behind the project Splash and Burn: a cultural initiative curated by Ernest Zacharevic and coordinated by Charlotte Pyatt run in association with the Sumatran Orangutan Society and the Orangutan Information Centre.  

Guido van Helten in Faulkton, South Dakota by Brian Siskind

A massive piece by the observant eye of Guido van Helten, who knows how to capture a spirit, a gesture, a knowing expression. Here on a grain elevator in Faulkton, South Dakota, his piece becomes a clarion, captured here by Brian Siskind.

How Artist JR Is Helping Connect Our Humanity Through Street Art |

The Brooklyn Museum will be unveiling an exhibition with the works of French Street Artist JR this October. Here’s a small video of him explaining how his work is a connector between humans.

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Nevercrew Watch Their Paper Plane “Fade” in Torino

Nevercrew Watch Their Paper Plane “Fade” in Torino

Fresh from Torino, Italy, the Swiss artists Nevercrew did this commissioned piece for a coffee company with the theme of “responsible consumption” – which immediately reminds us that we were planning to switch from using K-cups to drip coffee. The image is abstract and realistic at the same time, a map of some sort folded into an airplane, a portion of it possible torched by a lighter. It looks fragile, yet full of possibility.

Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)

“We decided to work around the concept of carefreeness to evoke both the human responsibility on the production and consumption side,” says Christian Rebecchi, “and the planetary emergency we’re already living.”

The image of a simple childs’ toy is meant to imply a story of two logics, says the other member of the duo, Pablo Togni. “The positive logic of the game and the negative one of the lack of conscience and the unnatural use of resources,” he says.

“There is a care-freeness that’s about acting unaware of the large-scale repercussions of the exploitation of resources, of what precedes and follows every small action and, at the same time, a reference to the lightness of the game, to all that is now put at risk for the generations that will hold the future of the planet.”

Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)
Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)
Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)
Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)
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Alessio Bolognesi and a Whale Swimming in Garbage

Alessio Bolognesi and a Whale Swimming in Garbage

“I chose whales because despite of their size, so many are found on our beaches with the stomach full of plastic,” says Alessio Bolognesi about this new mural for the ST.ART festival in Italy. “It’s a symbol, in my mind, of how even the huge animals are so powerless.”

Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)

The image of large seafaring creatures washing up on shore starved of nutrition and bloated with plastic is becoming more common as we continue to poison ourselves and the world. Not surprisingly, similar images are also popping up in Street Art in other locations.

Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)

Originally from Ferrara in the north of Italy, the 3D graphic designer also once belonged to a graffiti crew as a kid, and he now balances professional design work with an increasing number of mural painting opportunities. Here in Provincia di Vicenza (Veneto region), he says he chose a whale drowning in plastic for this secondary school façade. But he didn’t want to be completely didactic, preferring to let the viewer make the connections themselves.

“I like to paint murals with a ‘multi-layer’ reading approach,” he explains. “You can look to the mural and just see the obvious image or you can try to go deeper and capture some more meaningful detail.”

Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)
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“Nostalgia” Brings Floriculture to the Tram Stop in Łódź, Poland.

“Nostalgia” Brings Floriculture to the Tram Stop in Łódź, Poland.

Last night we listened to artist Futura speak with Timothy Anne Burnside at the “Beyond the Streets” about his initial impetus for hitting the streets as a teenage graffiti writer in the late 1960s in New York – an urban environment he described aptly as “the city was on fire”.

“I wanted to express myself,” he said. “That’s all anyone wants to do, no matter how they do it.”

Dominika Cebula. “Nostalgia”. Lodzkie Centrum Wydarzen. Lodz, Poland. (photo © Michał Bieżyński)

As we move further from graffiti and mark-making in public art-making, is it a revelation that the desire to be seen, to have your voice heard, is the common denominator again, regardless of the form of expression.

In this case, a tram shelter in Poland preserves the natural world in resin, transparently.

Like a mix master, the artist here samples someone else’s handiwork and remixes it, adding a filter, chopping it up and repeating it.  

Dominika Cebula. “Nostalgia”. Lodzkie Centrum Wydarzen. Lodz, Poland. (photo © Michał Bieżyński)

Dominika Cebula, a student at the Academy of Fine Arts In Łódź, has created this street work for you to glance at and stare through while waiting for the bus, whatever the weather – rain, snow, morning sun.

She’s calling it “Nostalgia”, and you can see how those minutes of waiting could be affected; your memories triggered to remember birthdays, weddings, funerals, walks by yourself along a train track or beside the river. Hundreds of dried flowers are embedded in the resin, including cornflowers, forget-me-nots, roses, narcissus, freesias, daisies, fern leaves, muscaris, eustomas, alstroemerias, pansies, clover, daffodils, orchids.

Dominika Cebula. “Nostalgia”. Lodzkie Centrum Wydarzen. Lodz, Poland. (photo © Michał Bieżyński)

Curated by Michał Bieżyński, “Nostalgia” is an unusual horticultural intervention that adds one more point of visual interest in a city that has enjoyed an alluvial visual invasion of murals and sculptural works in the last decade.

Dominika Cebula. “Nostalgia”. Lodzkie Centrum Wydarzen. Lodz, Poland. (photo © Michał Bieżyński)
Dominika Cebula. “Nostalgia”. Lodzkie Centrum Wydarzen. Lodz, Poland. (photo © Michał Bieżyński)
Dominika Cebula. “Nostalgia”. Lodzkie Centrum Wydarzen. Lodz, Poland. (photo © Michał Bieżyński)
Dominika Cebula. “Nostalgia”. Lodzkie Centrum Wydarzen. Lodz, Poland. (photo © Michał Bieżyński)
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Dave Il is a Jolting Joker In Barcelona

Dave Il is a Jolting Joker In Barcelona

Dude you crack me up. You are such a joker.

Dave Il (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena

Dave II is an aptly comedic illustrationist with the paint can, and it is hard to believe that such potent jocularity in the hidden spots of this abandoned building wouldn’t scare you on a dark night with a flashlight in hand.

Dave Il (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena

All freshly painted this year, this bounty of boffo brutes and beasts are available for you to discover lurking around the corners of this undisclosed location in the area of Barcelona, Spain, thanks to the effort exploration and documentation of frequent BSA collaborator Lluis Olive Bulbena.

Dave Il (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena
Dave Il (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena
Dave Il (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena
Dave Il (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena
Dave Il (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena
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BSA Images Of The Week: 09.15.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.15.19

Did you see that micro-moon on Friday the 13th? We were up on the roof with artists and friends and weirdos celebrating “mid autumn moon” and looking at the New York skyline and that beautiful moon, which didn’t seem 14% smaller, did it? Seemed like your run-of-the-mill gorgeous Harvest Moon, right? Also, a dope opportunity to say “apogee“, which you just don’t get to say very much. No those are not those tassels that exotic dancers put on their nipples.

So here’s our harvest of Street Art and graffiti for you! The city has been producing amazing crops all year, to tell the truth.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Almost Over Keep Smiling, Crappytalism, Jason Naylor, Jocelyn Tsajh, Li-Hill, Peoples Power Assembly, Plannedalism, Pure Genius, Rider, Subway Doodle, Surface of Beauty, The Joker, Thomas Allen, and Will Kurtz.

Jason Naylor and Surface Of Beauty collab for ST.ART NOW. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jason Naylor and Surface Of Beauty collab for ST.ART NOW. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Plannedalism commentary on the polarization of our society. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Li’ Hill commentary on Climate Crisis. According to the text accompanying his art work the artists writes that the World Bank estimates that as many as 145 million people could become Climate Refugees in the near future. Global warming is causing temperatures to rise at alarming levels rendering vasts swats of the earth as inhospitable for its inhabitants. High-level heat and humidity are one of the main killers of humans by heat strokes. Humans are abandoning their lands and homes in search of a cooler environment. This exodus is causing logistical problems for the countries receiving the refugees as many lack the resources to provide and care for them. Wars, famines, and diseases are no longer the only reasons for people to abandon their homes. Global Warming has been added to the list, yet countries are reluctant to declare extreme heat waves as natural disasters. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Li-Hill. A Perilous Journey In A Changing World. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jocelyn Tsajh (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Unfortunately the only word we could read on the signature is Lily. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Collaboration between Subway Doodle and Thomas Allen. We had published a portion of this piece. It sits on a construction material business that insists on placing merchandise on the sidewalk thus the piece is almost fully blocked most of the time. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
As opposed to where? Crappytalism (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pure Genius (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unless it is. Peoples Power Assembly (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
This is an ad. The piece is not signed but it’s branded. It’s hand-painted and the artist is rendering a scene from the movie The Joker starring Joaquin Phoenix. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Will Kurts sculpture made with plastic shopping bags and tape. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rider (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Lower Manhattan. Summer 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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El Niño de las pinturas, Xolaka and Niño de Cobre; Dispatch from Benicarló, Spain.

El Niño de las pinturas, Xolaka and Niño de Cobre; Dispatch from Benicarló, Spain.

A few new marine-themed murals today from Benicarló in Valencia.


The realistic romantic stylings of many a muralist is a staple of current Urban Art Festivals right now, including a new one painted by the artist named El Niño de las pinturas, who mines fantasy and history, borrowing from memories, archetypes.

Niño De cobre. Benicarlo, Valencia. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

Completed in July during the annual patron saint festival, this year including the third edition of the urban art initiative Camden Bló, El Nino (from Granada) was joined by Xolaka, from Alcúdia (Valencia), the Argentinian Andrés Cobre, and illustrator César Cataldo.

It’s good to see the variety of styles being favored for local festivals and great to see artists getting opportunities to paint in the public sphere – even endorsed by the ministry of culture in this small town of 26,000 along the Mediterranean coast. Special thanks to photographer Lluis Olive Bulbena, who shares his photos with BSA readers.

Niño De cobre. Benicarlo, Valencia. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Xolaka. Benicarlo, Valencia. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Xolaka. Benicarlo, Valencia. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
El Nino de las Pinturas. Benicarlo, Valencia. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
El Nino de las Pinturas. Benicarlo, Valencia. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
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BSA Film Friday: 09.13.19

BSA Film Friday: 09.13.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. “Word on the Street” Debut
2. INO – “Freedom For Sale” in Athens
3. Two in a Row from Alex Prager: “La Grande Sortie” & “Despair”


BSA Special Feature: “Word on the Street” Debuts

“Fuck the old days. Graffiti is now!”

The last five years have been explosive for Street Art worldwide, and with “Word On The Street” you have a good indicator that the graff writing game is alive and well in New York as well – and tenaciously prolific.

Anonymous filmmakers infused the doc with vibrating audio and visual distortion and a sense of ever-present surveillance, or the implication of it cloaked in darkness. Interviews, late night runs, frozen wire fences, loose footing, bloody scrapes, and the sweet smell of aerosol lightly purring from cans across a shadowed wall. The labor of love for the filmmakers is the only thing that pushes a project like this to fruition. And fumes of course.

It’s first public screening is coming up September 29 in Brooklyn. Click HERE for more information.

It’s first public screening is coming up September 29 in Brooklyn. Click HERE for more information.

Featuring 143, AJES, BIO, BRAT, CASH4, CARL WESTON, CLAW, CHRIS RWK, DEK 2DX, DIVA, DSR, EDO, EL7, FAES, FLASH, JAKEE, JESUS SAVES, KLOPS, LEX, LOOSE, MERK, MRS, MUTZ, NEG, NOXER, PANIC, PLASMA SLUG, POE, SCAE, SEO, SILON, SMURFO, SPRAY, STOR, STU, and VEW.

INO – “Freedom For Sale” in Athens

Constantino Mass adds just the right amount of slickly pounding wipes and cuts to this installation by INO in Athens. We published photos from this a few days ago so have a look and enjoy the video.

Two in a Row from Alex Prager

Alex Prager debuted a new short film at Lehmann Maupin Gallery in New York this month, and it has piqued the interest of many in her work of disconnected, reconnected narratives. Impeccably styled, humorously shot, it’s a staged invoking of old Hollywood and street scenes, enveloped in drama and frequently suspense. Often the LA born director provides just the deconstructed portion of the scene you have seen, and keeps reworking it in surprising ways. Go to the gallery to see the new “Play the Wind”. Below are two of her short films from five and nine years ago respectively.

“La Grande Sortie” by Alex Prager

“Despair” by Alex Prager

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GOLA in Genoa, Italy: May the Circle be Unbroken

GOLA in Genoa, Italy: May the Circle be Unbroken

“THE ANCIENT WAY OF THE NEW CIRCLE”

New from Genoa comes this circular system from Gola Hundun, called “The Ancient Way of the New Circle.” 

It is reassuring to consider the systems of our lives and our world as we regard the passing seasons of the year; revisiting, reliving, remeasuring our progress and regress and aspirations.

Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)

Part of a 10 mural program here in the Certosa district, the artist tells us that his painting is meant to “invite people to go back to a circular system.”

“The main character of the wall is Cernunnos,” Gola tells us, “- a mythological creature belonging to the Celtic culture, a symbol of fertility, abundance, manhood and wild nature – painted in the lower part of the wall, highly visible by pedestrians.”

Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)

Gazing upon the natural elements of the composition that include a balance of phytomorphic elements, a tree of life, and a mountain, you can believe that the artist also likes to write poetry when he is in the right mood.

The color scheme may also speak to you as a powerful representation of the natural world, with blue and green being predominant – here surrounded by the harsher city palette of reds, yellows, oranges. Perhaps what hits you the most is a sense of balance that this mural achieves, even if you don’t know why exactly.

Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
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Bloop Festival 2019/Ibiza Dispatch 1: Vlady Plays “Hopscotch” in the Sea

Bloop Festival 2019/Ibiza Dispatch 1: Vlady Plays “Hopscotch” in the Sea

“Whenever, everywhere, anyway” “Hopscotch”

Ibiza is that place where you appreciate beauty and youth and hedonistic forays into western values of free will and free love. Or at least that’s what we’ve heard.

VLADY. “Whenever, everywhere, anyway” / “Hopscotch“. BLOOP International Proactive Art Festival. Edition 2019. Ibiza, Spain. (photo courtesy of BLOOP)

While Street Art was probably not initially part of the brief of this island when it transformed its reputation as a destination for fog-machine laser glow-stick dancing and poolside debauchery, initiatives like the BLOOP International Proactive Art Festival have extended the creative range of expression that is celebrated for almost a decade now. With the theme of “Art is for Everybody”, BLOOP has welcomed more than 60 murals and installations so far – about 30 of which are currently on view throughout the year on the isle known as an adult playground.

VLADY. “Whenever, everywhere, anyway” / “Hopscotch“. BLOOP International Proactive Art Festival. Edition 2019. Ibiza, Spain. (photo courtesy of BLOOP)

Today we look as a more conceptual/situational installation in the Balearic Sea that surrounds the Spanish islands, a la Brad Downey or Fra. Biancoshock. Here laying on the bottom of the quivering, wiggling and enticing blue sea you are invited by VLADY to play hopscotch. As if to channel the mindset of many a party animal, he is labeling the installation “Whenever, Everywhere, Anyway”.

Dive in and play!

VLADY. “Whenever, everywhere, anyway” / “Hopscotch“. BLOOP International Proactive Art Festival. Edition 2019. Ibiza, Spain. (photo courtesy of BLOOP)
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SEBS is “Headvertising” in the Suburbs of Lisbon

SEBS is “Headvertising” in the Suburbs of Lisbon

An argument today from SEBS for the power of politically charged Street Art in the suburbs of Lisbon. He shares with us his new adaptation of a previous project on child labor called “Slaves ‘R’ Us.” This one is a consciousness raising campaign he’s calling “Headvertising”

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

The mindless obeyance required by consumer advertising messages and PR firms that push disinformation has left the suburban landscape a disjointed, deactivated communities. We would argue it is about an eroding sense of responsibility toward preserving local culture, the pod-based life of traveling from location to location in automobiles, the lack of communal public spaces, and the seductive power of electronic media that demands us to sit passively and be entertained to death.

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

In our cities, the vox populi is alive and well on the streets, and our Street Art reflects it with textural and visual critiques of politics, policy and culture. But SEBS (Mauro Carmelino) says that he’s creating and advertising for fictional products to encourage us to “use our heads” and think about the great problems of modern societies, such as consumerism, pollution or the misinformation. He talks about these humorous hand-painted pieces he’s been putting up to help people re-connect, and he tells us about the disconnection between the suburbs and the city and how he feels about populations whom he wants to reach.

“The geographical gap between the city and the suburbs is accentuated in the degree of information and even in education, particularly in older age groups and in the most economically fragile communities. This remoteness has a negative impact on the ability of suburban populations to be part of discussions that can lead to the decisions that alter the social fabric, which, like in a vicious cycle, aggravates their remoteness – turning it into a kind of endemic exclusion.” To tell the truth, this isolation happens everywhere.

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

Today’s images come from the neighborhood of Reboleira, Damaia and 6 de Maio in Amadora city in the northwest of the Lisbon metropolitan area.

“These works are meant to be of satirical or subversive nature,” SEBS says, “with a light and sometimes even humorous approach. Advertising that usually sells products, brands and dreams of consumption is used to sell us structural social problems. I want the audience to turn from a passive consumption of reality to develop the critical thinking the world so badly needs to change.”

Here his message is conveyed through mass culture vernacular influenced by cartoons – the medium is brush and aerosol.

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

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