All posts tagged: Switzerland

SAYPE Paints “un nouveau souffle” in the Majestic Friborg Pre-Alps

SAYPE Paints “un nouveau souffle” in the Majestic Friborg Pre-Alps

Staring at clouds and seeing images is Mother Nature’s Rorschach test about how one sees life’s possibilities; revealing winged angels and horned devils, a ship on the high seas, a milk maiden’s profile, a fire-breathing dragon.

Saype. “Un Nouveau Souffle” (A New Breath). Moleson-sur-Gruyeres, Switzerland. August 2021. (photo © Valentin Flauraud for Saype)

French-Swiss land artist Saype has had plenty of time recently to contemplate the clouds while painting on a grassy mountain and he thinks our vision of the future is reaching a point of clarity, despite our current seemingly cloudy perspective.

The rising, lushly green summit of Moleson-sur-Gruyeres in Switzerland can do that to you.

Saype. “Un Nouveau Souffle” (A New Breath). Moleson-sur-Gruyeres, Switzerland. August 2021. (photo © Valentin Flauraud for Saype)

The artist’s newest ephemeral simulacrum depicts what appears as a child blowing clouds toward the horizon. He calls it “un nouveau souffle” (“a new breath”), he says, and he uses the framing of the majestic Friborg Pre-Alps to give flight to this novel fancy.

Saype. “Un Nouveau Souffle” (A New Breath). Moleson-sur-Gruyeres, Switzerland. August 2021. (photo © Valentin Flauraud for Saype)

Seen on land from a great distance and especially when flying above, the new 1500 square meter fresco is of biodegradable pigments made out of charcoal, chalk, water, and milk proteins.

With time, this vision will fade. Hopefully, our ability to imagine stories, fancies, and promising futures will not.

Saype. “Un Nouveau Souffle” (A New Breath). Moleson-sur-Gruyeres, Switzerland. August 2021. (photo © Valentin Flauraud for Saype)
Saype. “Un Nouveau Souffle” (A New Breath). Moleson-sur-Gruyeres, Switzerland. August 2021. (photo © Valentin Flauraud for Saype)
Saype. “Un Nouveau Souffle” (A New Breath). Moleson-sur-Gruyeres, Switzerland. August 2021. (photo © Valentin Flauraud for Saype)
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BustArt Knows What Time it is in Le Locle : Swiss Time

BustArt Knows What Time it is in Le Locle : Swiss Time

Bad weather and two broken lifts later – Bustart has created this tribute to the precision of Swiss watchmakers in the small town of Le Locle (population 10,200) in the Canton of Neuchâtel in Switzerland. Known as one center of Swiss watchmaking since the 1600s, the town is famous for numerous watchmakers and watch companies respected around the world.

BustArt. “Time Out”. In collaboration with EXOMUSE. Locle, Switzerland. (photo © Francoise Balmer)

“I have highlighted the precise and complicated gears of the watch,” he tells us of the crisp illustration-styled mural he created in his home country. “As in life itself, it’s the gears in the background that make the outside work.” He calls the mural “Time Out.”

Opening this week here in New York, Bustart has new works on display in his first solo show in the city at Krause Gallery, entitled “Graffiti Pop.” He planned to attend but sadly will not due to current visa regulations and the ongoing Covid situation affecting international travel. If only all things worked as precisely as a Swiss watch!

BustArt. “Time Out”. In collaboration with EXOMUSE. Locle, Switzerland. (photo © Francoise Balmer)
BustArt. “Time Out”. In collaboration with EXOMUSE. Locle, Switzerland. (photo © Francoise Balmer)
BustArt. “Time Out”. In collaboration with EXOMUSE. Locle, Switzerland. (photo © Francoise Balmer)
BustArt. “Time Out”. In collaboration with EXOMUSE. Locle, Switzerland. (photo © Francoise Balmer)
BustArt. “Time Out”. In collaboration with EXOMUSE. Locle, Switzerland. (photo © Francoise Balmer)
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Basel is “Home Sweet Home” for Bustart and 40 Friends at “Change of Colours” in Switzerland

Basel is “Home Sweet Home” for Bustart and 40 Friends at “Change of Colours” in Switzerland

The international art fair Art Basel announced today that this year’s flashy Miami event is cancelled, joining its two other high-profile annual fairs in Hong Kong and Basel, Switzerland, which had both already met this fate earlier – all due to the complication of COVID-19.

One of the best parts about graffiti, street art, mural, and hip hop culture events like Urbane Kunst here in the city of Basel is you don’t have to worry about air kissing on both cheeks.

BustArt. Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)

Graffiti jams are more interested in getting up on the wall, drinking beer, and having a barbecue – which 40 local and international artists did here from August 20-30, thanks to the event’s sponsor, Bell on Neudorfstrasse in Basel.

“The top criterion for artists was we have to know them: because we’re going to spend a lot of time together,” explains street artist BustArt, who has been working for about five years to make this wall happen. “You are together every day for about two weeks and so the main important thing is having a good time and for this, we just wanted to have cool people here with whom we’ve worked in the past and who we could trust that we were going to have a great outcome.”

BustArt. Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)

Not that “Change of Colours”, as this event is called, didn’t have a lot of complications from the worldwide virus. The artist list kept changing as certain countries were eventually banned from traveling here – First the US, later Spain.

BustArt and Mr. Cenz. Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)

A final list of names was not available at press time but scheduled were artists like Boogie, Cole, Kesy, Kron, Tizer, Seyo, and Sonic. Photographer and journalist Nika Kramer caught a handful of the artists to ask a few questions, including Mr. Cenz (UK), Chromeo and Bane (CH), and event organizer BustArt (CH).

Street artist Julian Phethean aka Mr. Cenz is internationally known for his unique, expressive portraits of women. He tells us “I created one of my futuristic female portraits that I’ve been doing for a few years now and I paint a lot of black women as well because I think they are under-represented in the street art world. It’s very important to me, coming from a multicultural city like London.

Mr. Cenz. Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)

Also for me, hip-hop is a black culture that’s why I paint mainly black power for women,” he says. “If you look at it, it’s quite spiritual as well. My style is kind of something transcendent. It’s for people to look at and to get lost in. That’s just what I do, and it’s amazing to do it on a big scale in such a prominent place and I hope people enjoy it.”

Mr. Cenz. Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)

Two Swiss artists Fabian Florin aka Bane and David Kümin aka Chromeo, have worked together on smaller walls in the past, but the two masters of photorealism have never truly collaborated on something new together, and they say that they’re very satisfied with the result.

For Chromeo, Basel holds a special meaning to him in the development of his career as a graffiti writer and an artist.

Bane and Chromeo. Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)

“Basel is history. Back in the days when I started graffiti it was like a duty: you have to go to Basel!” he says. “Because it was considered state of the art. No disrespect to other places in Switzerland but… The graffiti history is here and it is the most important, I would have to say – even though I’m not from Basel.”

Bane and Chromeo. Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)

In the opinion of Bane, Basel left a major impression as well, but it is much more personal. “I came here with completely fresh eyes. I was drug addicted during the time that Chromeo’s referring to,” he explains. “I’ve just been painting for about 10 years so Basel for me is a very fresh place, like new. What I enjoy here is the community. There’re so many people. It’s a community I’m stepping inside of – kind of a small family already. It was heartwarming and I felt very welcomed and for me, that is the best thing about Basel.”

For organizer and hometown boy BustArt, who just completed his largest wall to date for Urban Nation Museum in Berlin a couple of months ago, this wall has been beckoning to him and the event is the result of persistence in pursuing it. “I’ve been wanting to paint this wall for 20 years so we are happy that the company actually paid for it,” he says. He calls his new piece, “Home Sweet Home” because it symbolizes the place and the city he loves more than any other.

CRBZ. Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Need A Pencil. Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Tizer. Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Tizer. Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Sonic. Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Urbane Kunst 2020. Basel, Switzerland. (photo © Nika Kramer)
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NEVERCREW Paints #urbancontemporaryart on a Warehouse in Switzerland

NEVERCREW Paints #urbancontemporaryart on a Warehouse in Switzerland

You used to hire your cousin Vinny and his creative buddy who went to art & design school to do some sign-painting for the side of your warehouse so people who were driving by on the highway would know where they could potentially get air conditioners, filters, casings, and floor fans. And you would pay them mostly in beer and weed.

Things have changed. Now in Switzerland you hire guys who hashtag #urbancontemporaryart on their Instagram posting of the mural they painted all summer on the side of your factory. Also art exhibition curators who run an art blog will pontificate about the new paintings’ finer points, its cultural/historical references, and they will coo about how the composition works seamlessly in a “contextual” way with the Swiss mountains that the warehouse is nestled within.

Nevercrew. “Shifting machine”. Cadenazzo, Switzerland. 2019. (photo © Nevercrew)

Welcome to NeverCrew’s new mural on the side of this facility that will be a burgeoning hub for package traffic in the southern region of the country – where the artists Christian Rebecchi and Pablo Togni are from. They say that this mixture of industrial and natural landscape is where they took the inspiration from for this combination of a monochromatic industrial diagram and an earth-science illustration of minerals surrounded by a colorful hazy aura.  

Nevercrew. “Shifting machine”. Cadenazzo, Switzerland. 2019. (photo © Nevercrew)

They feel like the environment informed their concept as well. “During the evening we could listen to the car traffic or the machines working on the right side of the wall,” they tell us, “and frogs, birds, and insects on the left side of the wall.” 

As if visiting an art gallery, you ask the artists to explain the mural, and now you realize there’s so much more than a pretty picture here. “We were thinking about a symbolical net, a twine of transfers and projected thoughts, and as well we were imagining a production line that is both mechanical and human.” You smile because you realize that your cousin Vinny never said stuff like that.

Nevercrew. “Shifting machine”. Cadenazzo, Switzerland. 2019. (photo © Nevercrew)
Nevercrew. “Shifting machine”. Cadenazzo, Switzerland. 2019. (photo © Nevercrew)
Nevercrew. “Shifting machine”. Cadenazzo, Switzerland. 2019. (photo © Nevercrew)
Nevercrew. “Shifting machine”. Cadenazzo, Switzerland. 2019. (photo © Nevercrew)
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NesPoon Makes Swiss Lace

NesPoon Makes Swiss Lace

There used to be over 600 lace-makers here. Nespoon is remembering them with her new works on the street.

NeSpoon. Le Locle, Switzerland. July 2019. (photo © NeSpoon)

Part of a residency that she is doing with the  LuXor Factory in Le Locle, this project has enabled the Polish Street Artist/fine artist/muralist to study the local lace motifs that are identified with this part of Switzerland historically. She has included the heritage in this veritable wrapping of lace, custom made for this town of 10,000 especially.

NeSpoon. Le Locle, Switzerland. July 2019. (photo © NeSpoon)
NeSpoon. Le Locle, Switzerland. July 2019. (photo © NeSpoon)
NeSpoon. Le Locle, Switzerland. July 2019. (photo © NeSpoon)
NeSpoon. Le Locle, Switzerland. July 2019. (photo © NeSpoon)
NeSpoon. Le Locle, Switzerland. July 2019. (photo © NeSpoon)
NeSpoon. Le Locle, Switzerland. July 2019. (photo © NeSpoon)
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Never Crew, Wishes And Hopes For 2019

Never Crew, Wishes And Hopes For 2019

As we draw closer to the new year we’ve asked a very special guest every day to take a moment to reflect on 2018 and to tell us about one photograph that best captures the year for them. It’s a box of treats to surprise you with every day – and conjure our hopes and wishes for 2019. This is our way of sharing the sweetness of the season and of saying ‘Thank You’ to you for inspiring us throughout the year.


Today’s special guest:

Never Crew,
(Christian Rebecchi and Pablo Togni), Swiss Street Art duo, environmentalists, neo-realist naturalists, mural interventionists


We love this picture because in a simple way it recalls many aspects of our actual lives. This has been taken in our country, Switzerland, one week before traveling to Phoenix to realize a series of mural interventions on the historical Heard Building (curated by Anne-Laure Lemaitre of FatCap), while we were preparing them.

There is of course the connection between different contexts and far places, the immersion in the location and in the project that we live for – for each urban intervention. But above all there’s an idea before its realization, an aim before its fulfillment.

This was the first mural intervention planned in 2018 and it was a hard project to prepare and solve. We see it here in it’s imaginary shape, with all the difficulties yet to be faced and as an undefined experience. Now, eleven months later, after many other interventions prepared for and concluded and many places lived, this is quietly part of a tangible reality and it’s shared with everyone.

So this is the kind of feeling and awareness we would like to keep bringing with us for the next year.


Location:         Lugano, Switzerland (with Phoenix, USA)

Date:         25th of January 2018

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Nevercrew: “Home Ground” in Chur, Switzerland

Nevercrew: “Home Ground” in Chur, Switzerland

The Alps, the lakes, the 360 degree views; yes this bear is in Switzerland. It is newly painted by Nevercrew for the young Street Art Festival here in Chur, a quiet town of 35,000 and the oldest town in the country.

The old part of the city is car-free and rather pristine and quiet most of the time, which is a mind-blowing concept for people in congested cities like New York where the morning radio traffic report is more important than the weather report.

Nevercrew. “Home ground” for Street Art Festival Chur. Chur, Switzerland. June 2018. (photo © Nevercrew)

The Swiss duo was back in their home country for a change for this one, which may have contributed to the name “Home Ground”. They tell us a very general background of it’s influences – which can be summarized as addressing natural resources, political borders v geographical boarders, cohabitation, and a broader discussion about who owns the earth and our natural resources.

Nevercrew. “Home ground” for Street Art Festival Chur. Chur, Switzerland. June 2018. (photo © Nevercrew)

Nevercrew. “Home ground” for Street Art Festival Chur. Chur, Switzerland. June 2018. (photo © Nevercrew)

Nevercrew. “Home ground” for Street Art Festival Chur. Chur, Switzerland. June 2018. (photo © Nevercrew)

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Rough.eq Creates Miniature Refugee Boats in Basel, Switzerland

Rough.eq Creates Miniature Refugee Boats in Basel, Switzerland

As much of Europe is actually the recipient of refugees arriving in boats from war-torn countries, this image of a small boat filled past its capacity with people has a lot of relevance to people in Basel, Switzerland who spot them.

Rough.eq. Basel, Switzerland. 2017. (photo © Bernhard Chiquet)

The tiny concrete sculptures by a Street Artist who goes by the name of Rough.eq are usually attached via lock and chain near a body of water or stream or inlet, and a viewer can quickly begin making associations with the plight of people leaving home forever to go upon dangerous seas.

Other times the diminutive refugees are landlocked, or sitting in snow – giving perhaps an even greater sense of being adrift in unknown, unrecognizeable territory and the difficulty many people experience when trying to assimilate in what can be a strange and confusing society.

Rough.eq. Basel, Switzerland. 2017. (photo © Chihun Yang)

As frightening as the stories that immigrants and refugees tell of riding in overloaded and insecure vessels to escape war, poverty, persecution, they are increasingly in danger of not feeling safe in their country of destination, thanks to a rising xenophobic sentiment in some places.

The economic burden is not always easy to take on, and natives worry that the host culture will be changed in fundamental ways that they will not like. Some times the culprit is simply racism and fear of the “other”.

For Rough.eq, the response to his pieces has been quick, but it is hard to tell if it is supportive or the opposite.

“Three out of these four of my “Lock Ons” have already disappeared,” he tells us.

Rough.eq. Basel, Switzerland. 2017. (photo © Chihun Yang)

Rough.eq. Basel, Switzerland. 2017. (photo © Chihun Yang)

Rough.eq. Basel, Switzerland. 2017. (photo © Chihun Yang)

Rough.eq. Basel, Switzerland. 2017. (photo © Chihun Yang)

 

Rough.eq. Basel, Switzerland. 2017. (photo © Bernhard Chiquet)

Rough.eq. Basel, Switzerland. 2017. (photo © Chihun Yang)

Rough.eq. Basel, Switzerland. 2017. (photo © Bernhard Chiquet)

 



Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Two brothers. Two Murals. Two Countries. One Great Great Grandfather.

Two brothers. Two Murals. Two Countries. One Great Great Grandfather.

Overunder and his Bro create “Nostalgia”

A migration story has just been completed between Osnago, Italy and Vogorno, Switzerland by two Reno artist brothers who traced their great great grandfather’s journey via bicycle adventure this summer.

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“At either end of the bicycle trip I proposed to create a mural. Or half mural to be exact,” says Erik Burke, a Street Artist (Overunder) who has worked on walls in many cities over the last decade. He proposed the idea of creating half a portrait of Guisseppe Mozzetti in each town. “Each mural would be painted at the border of a building to create a break in the composition. By allowing the imagery to break at the edge it hopefully would hint at the absence of image, identity, and a larger picture,” he explains.

Using their only known photo of him for a study, these brothers connected the story of his past and their family roots going back to the mid 1800s. They say that the art project and the entire trip gave them a unique opportunity to study the countries and cultures that formed him before he eventually immigrated to the United States (Reno, Nevada) in 1890.

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Overunder with help from his brother. “Nostalgia”. The first half of the project goes up for La Voce Del Corpo Festival in Osnago, Italy. (photo © Overunder)

“My brother and I were navigating the Ticino countryside on borrowed mountain bikes without a map or knowledge of the language,” Erik says. “Regardless we approached most encounters with ‘Tutto bene’ and we think we came to a deeper understanding of both pizza and penne, valleys and peaks, nostos and algos.”

Those last two words speak directly to the name of the collaborative two-mural immigration mural project which they named “Nostalgia”. According to the brothers there was a certain sentimentality about the natural beauty of the countries and the people whom they encountered on their trip. All of the gathered information also permitted them to imaginine what this great great grandfather may have been like.

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Overunder with help from his brother. “Nostalgia”. The first half of the project goes up for La Voce Del Corpo Festival in Osnago, Italy. (photo © Enrico Ponzoni)

Erik explains, “The word nostalgia is a learned formation of a Greek compound, consisting of νόστος (nóstos), meaning “homecoming” and ἄλγος (álgos), meaning “pain, ache”. The term was coined by a 17th-century medical student to describe the anxieties displayed by Swiss mercenaries fighting away from home. As I discovered my own Swiss heritage I wondered what nostalgia would mean to someone like me – a person not going home but curious about his family’s home.”

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Overunder with help from his brother. “Nostalgia”. The first half of the project goes up for La Voce Del Corpo Festival in Osnago, Italy. (photo © Overunder)

The story of actual research is slightly more complicated, including targeted emails to strangers in Vogorno in search of a possible wall to paint. Erik was already booked to paint a mural for a festival in Osnago (La Voce Del Corpo Festival) so his vision of sharing this bike trip with his brother needed a welcoming person willing to have their building painted at when they arrived in Switzerland.

“After many failed attempts at making contact with Vogorno residents I sent a seemingly unlikely email to a woman I found on the Internet who was running the Rustico Cioss who happened to share the Mozzetti name. Luckily she responded and a dialogue grew,” says Erik of the detective work that finally landed their artwork on the right building. “Her family research unearthed a document for Giuseppe Mozzetti and a few emails later she had secured permission from the municipality for the mural and was allowing us not only to paint on the house of Giuseppe Mozzetti but also stay there!”

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Overunder with help from his brother. “Nostalgia”. The first half of the project goes up for La Voce Del Corpo Festival in Osnago, Italy. (photo © Overunder)

The images form physical and psychological bookends to an immigrant story that both brothers found profound and rewarding. It also raised more questions about the concept of borders and nationality – a search further elucidated by way of painting and meeting new people.

“Many borders presented themselves to us throughout the ride from Osnago to Vogorno in the form of dialect, currency, value, power sources, politics, culture, and physical geography. The painting component also utilizes my own physical borders by taking advantage of moments of fatigue and endurance directly following cycling to paint these works, ” he concludes.

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The route from La Voce Del Corpo Festival in Osnago, Italy to Vogorno, Switzerland.

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Overunder. A road rest to re-charge. (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder. Going up in Vogorno, Switzerland. (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder. Abandoned home. The Bergamo Alps in the background. (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder. Doing tricks because the bike trip wasn’t enough to tire him…why not? (photo © The Bud)

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Overunder. The original photo of Joseph Mozzetti. Photo from Ancestry.

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Overunder. “Nostalgia”. The second half of the project on the original house of Joseph Mozzetti in Vogorno, Switzerland. (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder. “Nostalgia”. The second half of the project on the original house of Joseph Mozzetti in Vogorno, Switzerland. (photo © Overunder)

Erik and Mike would like to extend their great thanks to Mayor Paolo Brivio of Osnago and the many people of Osnago and Vogorno for their hospitality – especially Bruno Freddi, Michele, Frederica, Enrico, Flavio, Fabio, Jacopo, and Valeria for their generous support and friendship.

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BSA Images Of The Week: 03.06.16

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.06.16

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Armory Week : The art fairs are happening in NYC and folks are finding new, original and purely derivative ideas from the commercial shows that swarm with fans and lookyloos. The few folks we spoke with say that sales have been average to slow with guests carefully considering before purchasing, with the occasional big splurger. It could be that the market has been in an unspoken soft period for the last year or so due to a weak economy or the tumultuous political landscape in this election year. Nonetheless, there is nothing like the hivelike high you can get swimming through rivers of art fans at a New York fair, periodically bumping into a peer or a tanned celebrity.

Meanwhile, we have some dope street stuff for you from Jersey City to Morocco to Italy and Switzerland. Here’s our our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Atomiko, Bifido, C215, Dmote, Bradley Theodore, Dylan Egon, El Anatsui, Fintan Magee, MSK, Obey, Otto “Osch” Schade, PK, Post, Rime, Sean9Lugo, Sharon Lee De La Cruz, Space Invader, and Toner.

Our top image: C215 at The Medina, Djama El Fna Central Square in Marrakech. (photo © Jaime Rojo) In the prolific work of French master stencilist C215 cats appear with some regularity. It is very fitting then to have found this kitty in the wild in a city where hundreds of cats roam the streets without a particular home to go to. While not officially kept as pets the cats are being fed next to doorways. Many of them struggle for food and are visibly in need of some medical care but you will see very some happy felines comfortably bathing under the warm Moroccan sun.

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C215 at The Medina, Djama El Fna Central Square in Marrakech. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Fintan Magee in Jersey City. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Fintan Magee in Jersey City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Space Invader  in Jersey City for Mana Urban Arts Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rime / MSK  in Jersey City for Mana Urban Arts Projects. PK added at a later time. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Obey / Toner / MSK in Jersey City. Mana Urban Arts Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Obey / Rime / Post / MSK in Jersey City. Mana Urban Arts Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Post in Jersey City. Mana Urban Arts Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rime in Jersey City. Mana Urban Arts Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Atomiko in Jersey City for Mana Urban Arts Project. The ENX wolves were painted at an earlier time and featured on BSA already. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dylan Egon in Jersey City. Mana Urban Arts Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bifido’s new work in Caserta, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

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Ruby Bridges stencil in Hunts Point by Sharon Lee De La Cruz AKA Maripussy inspired by the iconic Norman Rockwell painting depicting a seminal event in the USA during the civil rights movement. Ruby Nell Bridges Hall is an American activist known for being the first black child to attend an all-white elementary school in Louisiana during the 20th century. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dmote /RVCA in Hunts Point, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dmote /RVCA in Hunts Point, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Otto “Osch” Schade in Aargau, Switzerland. (photo © Urban Art International)

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Sean9Lugo in Jersey City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hey there, bear. Sean9Lugo in Jersey City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bradley Theodore in Jersey City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A monumental tapestry by El Anatsui at the Palais El Badii for the Marrakech Biennale 6 in Marrakech, Morocco. It is made entirely of metal bottle caps. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Anatsui’s monumental tapestry at the Palais El Badii for the Marrakech Biennale 6 in Marrakech, Morocco. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Anatsui’s monumental tapestry at the Palais El Badii for the Marrakech Biennale 6 in Marrakech, Morocco. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Anatsui’s monumental tapestry at the Palais El Badii for the Marrakech Biennale 6 in Marrakech, Morocco. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Anatsui’s monumental tapestry at the Palais El Badii for the Marrakech Biennale 6 in Marrakech, Morocco. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Water Bearer at The Medina, Djama El Fna Central Square in Marrakech, Morocco. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA’s Piece on “Submerged Motherlands” Acclaimed for Year

BSA’s Piece on “Submerged Motherlands” Acclaimed for Year

BSA with Swoon at Brooklyn Museum Sited by Huff Post Editors as Proud Moment of 2014

We’re very pleased and thankful to be included in this short list chosen by the editors of Huffington Post Arts & Culture as a story they are most proud of publishing last year.

In her introduction to the list, editor Katherine Brooks writes:

“It turns out, 365 days is hard to summarize in anything but a laundry list of seemingly disparate phenomena, filled with the good — woman-centric street art, rising Detroit art scenes, spotlights on unseen American art– and the bad less than good — holiday butt plugs, punching bags by Monet, Koonsmania. But, as a New Year dawns, we found ourselves just wanting to focus on the things that made us beam with pride in 2014. So we made a list of those things, a list of the pieces we’re proud of.”

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Describing why we thought this was an important story for us we wrote:

“We loved a lot of stories this year, but this hometown Brooklyn one about a street artist with humanity mounting her first solo major museum exhibition was a special turning point — and an astounding success. For us street art is a conversation, a continuum of expression, and Swoon is always a part of it. From following her street career to her transition to international fame to witnessing this exhibition coming to fruition in person in the months leading up to the Brooklyn Museum show, it is easy to understand why Swoon still remains a crucial part of the amazing street art scene and continues to set a standard.”

-Jaime Rojo & Steven Harrington, HuffPost Arts&Culture bloggers and co-founders of Brooklyn Street Art

In fact, we wrote 48 articles that were published on the Huffington Post in 2014, and as a collection we hope they further elucidate the vast and meaningful impact that the Street Art / graffiti / urban art movement continues to have on our culture, our public space, and our arts institutions.

Together that collection of articles published by BSA on Huffpost in ’14 spanned the globe including stories from Malaysia, Poland, Spain, France, Norway, Switzerland, Germany, New York, Arizona, The Navajo Nation, Philadelphia, Sweden, Istanbul, New Jersey, Lisbon, The Gambia, Brazil, Australia, New Zealand, Rome, India, Italy, Delhi (India), Montreal, San Francisco, London, Coachella, Chicago, Kabul (Afghanistan), and Kiev (Ukraine).

Here on BSA we published another 320 postings (more or less).

We thank you for allowing us to share these inspirational and educational stories with you and we are honored to be able to continue the conversation with artists, art fans, collectors, curators, academics, gallerists, museums, and arts institutions. Our passion for Street Art and related movements is only superceded by our love for the creative spirit, and we are happy whenever we encounter it.

Our published articles on HuffPost in 2014, beginning with the most recent:

 

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Icy & Sot on a European Street Art Tour

Icy & Sot on a European Street Art Tour

New York’s adopted Street Art brothers Icy & Sot have been spreading their wings in Brooklyn for a couple of years since we first interviewed them upon their arrival in the US from Iran. In that time they have continued to develop their personal style and voice, which is probably strongest when they use their work to address social issues and express opinion. To say that their New York experience has been a roller coaster of good and bad fortune for these two is an understatement, including having a solo show in Manhattan, being part of a supportive art community formed by ex-pats and street artists, and a horrifying shooting in their home that left three friends dead and Sot injured.

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Icy & Sot. Ad take over in Paris, France. 2014 (photo © Icy & Sot)

The intensity of the experience was fed by a media frenzy, and for a few months the brothers were in a surreal state of mind. The music and art community rallied to support them and they continued working and focused on more positive endeavors, like curating a cross cultural dual show between Brooklyn and Tehran in galleries in both cities this summer.

Now for the first time the brothers were free to travel this fall and they wasted no time hopping a plane to Norway for the Nuart Festival in September and continued their trip through Switzerland, France, and Germany to paint and meet friends and (gasp) collectors. Yes, these 20-somethings who work very closely together to  conceive of and produce their work have garnered a growing following of fans in a relatively short period of time. While Icy and Sot have no plans to return to Iran in the near future, the brothers were excited to see Europe for the first time and to experience the sometimes pronounced differences in acceptance of street art and graffiti in various cities they visited.

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Icy & Sot. Ad take over in Paris, France. 2014 (photo © Icy & Sot)

“It was our first time traveling and painting around Europe and it was a great experience,” says Sot of their various venues which included in-town interventions and a more intricate and contextual piece high in the mountains of Switzerland. They did some normal tourist stuff of course and Icy says, “From painting in a different environments and cultures to meeting artists, people and friends, we just loved it.” Aside from the many free-wheeling installations, including painting, stencil work, and bus shelter takeovers, they still are relishing the huge wall they did about homelessness in Stavanger, Norway they say. “We were so honored to be part of Nuart Festival,” says Sot, “which is our all time favorite festival.”

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Icy & Sot. Paris, France. 2014 (photo © Icy & Sot)

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Icy & Sot. Tout Scene indoor installation in Stavanger, Norway for NUART 2014. (photo © Icy & Sot)

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Icy & Sot. Outdoor installation in Stavanger, Norway for NUART 2014 (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

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Icy & Sot. Ad takeover in Stavanger, Norway. 2014 (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

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Icy & Sot. Crans-Montana, Switzerland. 2014 (photo © Icy & Sot)

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Icy & Sot. Crans-Montana, Switzerland. 2014 (photo © Icy & Sot)

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Icy & Sot. Vitry, France. 2014 (photo © Icy & Sot)

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Icy & Sot. Vitry, France. 2014 (photo © Icy & Sot)

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Icy & Sot for Urban Nation’s One Wall Project. Berlin, Germany. 2014. (photo © Icy & Sot)

 

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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