All posts tagged: Singapore

Alice Pasquini In South Asia

Urban and fine artist Alice Pasquini just finished a three week trip through Southeast Asian which took her to Singapore, Yogyakarta, and Ho Chi Minh City and where she called forth her aquamarine palette of thoughtful women to walls in new environments while getting to know the local urban art scene and meeting local artists.

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Alice Pasquini. Singapore 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

“Sometimes we’re forced to adapt: for instance painting with horrible local spray paints or letting go of our daily habits,” she says as she describes challenging herself to work with new materials and create effects that she liked. “You can create some interesting effects using old spray paint meant for cars.” More challenging for an Italian perhaps was foregoing her habit of daily espresso.

 

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Alice Pasquini. Singapore 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

After a week of teaching a mural workshop at LaSalle College of Arts in Singapore, which was organized by the Italian Culture Institute of Singapore, she and photographer Jessica Stewart traveled around Indonesia and Vietnam, “to get some new inspiration and escape a bit to a totally new environment,” says Stewart.

They say it was a very different from their experiences in Europe and North America and yet Pasquini says her search for subcultures that resemble the Street Art and Urban Art environment of the more Western variety. “I was in need of new inspiration,” says Alice, and “what I saw was amazement and admiration for urban art and I was able to encounter growing subcultures”.

Special thanks to Ms. Stewart for sharing these exclusive images of the trip with BSA readers.

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Alice Pasquini. Yogyakarta, 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

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Alice Pasquini. Yogyakarta, 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

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Alice Pasquini. Yogyakarta, 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

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Alice Pasquini. Yogyakarta, 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

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Alice Pasquini. Yogyakarta, 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

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Alice Pasquini. Yogyakarta, 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

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Alice Pasquini. Yogyakarta, 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

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Alice Pasquini. Yogyakarta, 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

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Alice Pasquini. Ho Chi Minh, 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

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Alice Pasquini. Ho Chi Minh, 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

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Alice Pasquini. Ho Chi Minh, 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

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Alice Pasquini. Ho Chi Minh, 2013. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

 

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Ernest Zacharevic Plays on Walls in Singapore

Ernest Zacharevic Plays on Walls in Singapore

A quickly rising Street Art installation artist from Lithuania is keeping his work refreshingly down-to-earth and sincerely engaging with the public. While some artists working on the street can lose sight of how to have fun, Ernest Zacharevic keeps his eye on creating installations that punch through the third dimension and pull passersby into his work, and some times on it.

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Ernest Zacharevic. Singapore, 2013. (photo © Gabija Grusaite)

It’s not surprising to find his sculpture-paintings including wheels, as in this new one he’s just finished in Singapore. “It’s a part of ‘play’, but also a wider narrative about the continuous desire by human beings to travel, push forward, explore unknown horizons,” he explains to BSA.  “Cars and bicycles and tricycles were invented because just walking is too slow to most of our imaginations.”

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Ernest Zacharevic. Detail. Singapore, 2013. (photo © Gabija Grusaite)

The new work on the street is rare considering Singapore’s very severe punishment for graffiti and street art, which actually includes severe beatings that can rip skin off the backside, called caning. “We feel that it is a ground breaking project that will hopefully open Singapore up for other artists,” says his friend and photographer Gabija Grusaite, who shares these images of his new piece that uses a sawed in half shopping cart. Possibly the organizers saw the success of his piece last year in Penang, Malaysia, which became a popular tourist destination and still draws people to see it and pose with it daily.

“Most of my work is photography based and site-specific, so I photograph my subjects and later choose angles for painting. Working with children allows more anonymity, I don’t consider my artworks to be portraits of a specific person, rather a universal experience,” says the energetic and curious Zacharevic, who is still in his mid-20s and has done installations in Japan, Italy, Norway, Lithuania, and Singapore so far this year.  “It is also easier to work with children – they are not self-concious and are not afraid to look stupid or ugly. So we play together and I take pictures that later translate into my artwork.”

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Ernest Zacharevic. Detail. Singapore, 2013. (photo © Gabija Grusaite)

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Ernest Zacharevic. Detail. Singapore, 2013. (photo © Gabija Grusaite)

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Ernest Zacharevic. Detail. Singapore, 2013. (photo © Gabija Grusaite)

Take a look at Ernest’s installation last year in Georgetown, Malaysia, that had hundreds of people interacting with it moments after it was finished and is a celebrated tourist destination.

 

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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In Singapore a Street Artist is Harshly Charged

While we love spending our days tooling around the streets looking at Street Art and various expressions of creativity and otherwise, we readily recognize that there is no unanimity of opinion that clearly defines the line between art and vandalism – and sometimes people can get heated in their position on the topic.

Screen grabs from a video on Channel News Asia of stickers attributed to The Sticker Lady.

So as a point of reference, it’s helpful to see that in places like Singapore a young woman slapping some humorous stickers around her city is now in the slammer for a few years.  Clearly, that would be considered extreme for most of the world and according to Melissa Chong at Channel News Asia and Tan Weizhen at Today Online, many Singaporeans question the sort of penalty that is being levied. And as artists and fans increasingly communicate via the Internet around the world, there is at least one online petition with about 14,000 signatures, and many have taken to chat rooms and Facebook to argue leniency for The Sticker Lady.

Naturally, there is also a hashtag on Twitter to continue the conversation: #freestickerlady. A quick review shows that the majority of the tweets posted are in favor of taking it easy on the artist, including.

“Can’t we all appreciate a bit of humour, the Singaporean way? The stickers didn’t harm nor offend anyone. We liked them!”, and “Have you seen some of the cheesy bus shelter / train ads by the Gov? Those honestly feel like vandalism to me.”

It can be illuminating to see a how an act regarded as hardly noteworthy or at the worst an annoyance in one city is considered a severely punishable offense elsewhere. Think we’ll stay in Brooklyn for the moment, where the streets are a continually convulsing crowdsource-curated cacophony.

Press To Time Travel. Via Yahoo News. (Photo © Nicholas Ta…)

Here are a couple more links, one from Yahoo news and one from Huffington Post.

 

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