All posts tagged: OverUnder

Overunder and “Joins” Remixing Mexico on Walls in the Capital

Street Artist Overunder has discovered the warmth of Mexican people and the character of the painting, sculpture and everyday architecture of Mexico City and he shares with us his first impressions on the street making art with his friend Joins. One of the new magicians in the current Street Art movement, it is no surprise that Overunder easily assimilates and reinterprets this culture characterized by its respect for tradition, for folk art, and for a love of magic realism.

“Mexico city is still amazing with each new day,” he enthuses while recounting his study of the cultural touchstones and icons when making selections of subject matter. “So far my trip has consisted of embedded anthropology that comes with some of the most unique and beautiful experiences had from painting here.”

 

Overunder. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

He says he had the goal of exploring institutions, parks and galleries but usually found that meeting people was a great way to learn and to get walls. “The mentality is beautiful here,” he says of the new friends with whom he’s had dinners and caguama (slang for 40 oz. sized beer) and the families with whom he has gotten to hang out with. “I’ve had house after house offered up as an experimental canvas – which seems unheard of back in the states,” he says in a sort of befuddled amusement. “Mi casa es su casa y mi pintura es su pintura.”

As you look at the images of new pieces Overunder has been creating, fans of his work will notice some are distinctly in the style and family of references that he typically works in. Others, like the swinging strands of the local bougainvillas and prickly pear fully mimic his flying bird/plane line tag that hit many a city wall over the last few years; instead of being accompanied by text or passages, the poetry is in the motion of the line as blossoms and leaves wend their way along the wall. “And with the amazing backdrop of these houses it’s unnecessary to paint my usual architectural features because they already have remarkable features,” he explains, “They are Duchampian readymades.”

Overunder. Detail. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

It’s sort of unusual to see Overunder delving into work that may be considered more decorative, but as usual with this thinking artist, the intellectual machinations are many. “The paintings of flora and fauna are a departure but the work fell into place naturally,” he says as he recounts his process for selection. “I started using the imagery as a way to connect and speak the native tongue visually. I already feel like a foreigner when I attempt to speak Spanish and the idea of painting foreign imagery feels wrong. So reintroducing a familiar and indigenous sight in an unorthodox way felt natural.”

His wall work on this trip also includes more localized influences, as the Street Artist was inspired by the Mexican mural tradition as well 20th century sculptors like Mexican Luis Ortiz Monasterio and currently active Columbian Fernando Botero, all with the considered weight of the Mayans and Aztecs forming the figures. Naturally Overunder takes his own approach to these more formal masters, remixing and matching symbols and meanings with the ease of any modern digital denizen, weaving his own biography to provide structure.

Overunder. Detail. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

Speaking about the largest piece featuring the cowboy flanked by two figures, Overunder tells us that it is a reinterpretation of the figures flanking the center figure in ‘Monumento a la Madre’ by Monasterio. “I came across the statues while exploring the San Rafael neighborhood and I was enamored by their bulky Botero-like look.”

Of the 1949 figures that separates San Rafael from Colonia Cuauhtémoc, he says, “Secondly and even more so, I’ve never seen a statue that was performing an action while seeming to be completely distracted by something else going on in their periphery. So when my friend Joins started painting the faceless vaquero in the center I thought it was a perfect opportunity to remix these images with their focus on his cowboy.”

Overunder collaboration with Joins. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

But why not leave the central figure as a tribute to motherhood, as the original? The answer lies in the biographies of the two Street Artists. “The gender shift lends itself to more of a monument to Father, which seems very suiting since I lost my father several years ago and Joins has just met his father after 33 years.

Joins at work on his collaboration with Overunder. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

In a way typical for the experimenting and adventuring Street Artist traveling abroad, much of the work is made of spur of the moment inspiration, and functions as much as sketch as finished piece; part public, part diary entry. Finally, the “Cauce Ciudano” mural is another collaboration between Overunder and Joins that expresses more of their personal styles. Joins has the feather page of the book while Overunder produces one of his portraits that features patterning across the countenance. Like the lines that trace the our faces as time progresses, these include impressions of his time visiting what he regards a country at once proud in tradition and somewhat magical in imagination.

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Overunder . Joins. Detail. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder . Joins. Detail. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder . Joins. Detail. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

“The smiley face flower wall was a quick painting I made in exchange for a dinner date from a wonderful grandmother” OU

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Overunder. Detail. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Little bull plays futbol with big bull. Joins. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder . Joins. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder . Joins. Detail. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder . Joins. Detail. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder . Joins. Detail. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder . A portrait of the Mother of the house. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder. Mexico City. July 2013. (photo © Overunder)

A shout out to Gonzalo of Mamutt Creatividad, who helped line up the large wall and the Cauce Ciudadano wall. Check him out on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/MamuttCreatividad

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Bushwick Is Hot Now. Hurry!

Bushwick Open Studios is Paved With Street Art

Brooklyn’s already percolating artists neighborhood called Bushwick continues to thrive despite the circling of real estate agents, lifestyle brands and celebrity chefs. Born in the mid-late 2000s as it’s older sister Williamsburg to the West began to professionalize, this noisily industrial and dirty artists haven got a reprieve from gentrifying forces when the deep recession slowed the rise of rents for artist spaces, which remained still relatively cheap by Manhattan’s standards. Today the area boasts a diverse influx of artists, students, cultural workers, and entrepreneurs who are experimenting and collaborating on projects and shows.

Spagnola (photo © Jaime Rojo)

That radical economic downturn probably also nurtured the nascent Street Art scene here, which was one of the early outliers of a cultural influx as artists and explorers began to skateboard to the local delis and stare at laptops for hours in the one or two cafes that offered  Wi-Fi. Outcroppings of this new art movement combined with old-school graffiti to pop up on selected concrete and corrugated walls, signposts, and deteriorated blocks where the authorities were disinterested and the neighbors only partially curious in their activities.

It’s an age-old New York story by now; a neglected or winding down post industrial neighborhood reacts to the incoming and odd-looking artists with a sort of bemused affection, happy that at least the block is getting some attention for a change. Puzzlement eventually leads to familiarity and then buying you a sandwich – and then asking you to paint a mural inside his foyer. While national and international Street Artists were already making Bushwick a stopping point thanks to some of the earliest galleries like Ad Hoc and Factory Fresh, the scene recently got newly shot in the arm by a local resident who is facilitating much desired legal wall space to a crowd of artists who otherwise would be hunting and hitting up less-than-legal spots.  Not to worry, there are plenty of aerosol renegades and ruffians scaling walls at night too; this is New York after all, yo.

Zimad (photo © Jaime Rojo)

But for now the Bushwick Collective, as it is newly christened by wall-man Joe Ficalora, has infused an adrenaline rush of creativity inside and outside the area that is roughly bordered by Flushing Avenue, Starr Street, Knickerbocker Avenue and Cypress Avenue.  The Collective has guidelines on content (nudity, politics, profanity) so the works are not completely unfettered in the true spirit of Street Art/graffiti, but most artists are happy for the luxury of time to complete their work and not look over their shoulder. With a selection of murals that are densely gathered and easy to walk through, the new collection has attracted attention from media folks (and tour guides) on the main island brave enough to venture into the gritty wilds of Brooklyn for a Street Art safari.

As Bushwick hosts its 7th annual open studios cultural event this weekend, intrepid pedestrians who march through opening parties, rooftop DJ jams, dance performances, live bands, transcendent costumery, sidewalk barbecues, open fire hydrants and more than 600 open artist studios will also be buffeted by a visual feast on the streets themselves. As long as the L Train is running (fingers crossed) you can just get off at the Morgan stop. From there it should be pretty easy for any curious art-in-the-street fan to be regaled with big and small works of graffiti, Street Art, tags, wheat-pastes, stencils, rollers, murals, and ad hoc installations all day and night.

Trek Matthews (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A shout out to Arts In Bushwick, an all volunteer organization that has steadily grown and fostered an open sense of community inclusiveness each year for Bushwick Open Studios and to the many volunteers who have contributed greatly to the success of many of the cultural workers here.  Without an open studios event many of these shy and quirky artists and performers would simply have stayed unknown and unknowable.

So far Bushwick still has the unbridled imperfect D.I.Y. enthusiasm of an experiment where anything can happen, but grey ladies with kooky bright colored spectacles have already begun to flip it over to inspect it with one hand while pinching their nose with the other, so savor this authentic moment.  Ethereal by nature, you know the Street Art scene is never guaranteed to you tomorrow – neither is the mythical artists bohemian hamlet of New York’s yesteryear.  For now we’re hopping on our bikes to catch a golden age of Bushwick before it’s repackaged and sold back to us at a price we can’t afford.

The first series of images are walls from the Bushwick Collective, followed by a series of walls that you may also see in the neighborhood.

MOMO (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Solus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Alice Pasquini (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Toofly and Col Wallnuts (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stik (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Billy Mode and Chris Stain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nard (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder and LNY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brett Flanigan and Cannon Dill (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gats (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sheryo and The Yok (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Here are a series of walls not related to Bushwick Collective.

ECB (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A portion of a wall by the 907 Crew, Sadue. Don Pablo Pedro, Smells, Cash4, and Keely (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Phetus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rubin (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Peeta (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BR1 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Apolo Torres (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris, Veng, RWK and ECB (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cruz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

KUMA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Free Humanity (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Keely and Deeker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kremen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For a full list of activities, studios, schedules and directions for Bushwick Open Studios 2013 click HERE.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Film Friday 3.15.13

Aiko. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening: Aiko “Edo Pop”, ART POLLUTION with: Overunder, Jilly Ballistic and The Yok & Sheryo

 

BSA Special Feature:

Aiko: “Sunrise” for The Japan Society exhibition “Edo Pop”

In this new video released by The Japan Society, Street Artist Aiko speaks about her work in the street and how it relates to the current exhibition inside the gallery space, and of course about stencilling and staying up all night painting on the street.

“I believe that my energy is transferring through the stencil onto the wall. It’s like a transferring ceremony,” she says.

Art Pollution

A new series of brief introductions to some Street Artists currently working in BK are here from Brooklyn’s talented new film group called Dega. So far the “Art Pollution” series features sharply edited quick sketches of Overunder, Jilly Ballistic, and the duo Yok and Sheryo.

Overunder

Jilly Ballistic

The Yok & Sheryo

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BSA Film Friday 03.08.13

ESSAM (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening: Drones and Street Artist Essam.

 

BSA Special Feature:

Drones, Rand Paul, and Street Artist Essam

Street Artists use their medium of message on the street sometimes to entertain, engage, or educate the passerby. Whether it’s a personal, cultural, or politically relevant message, often the work provides a mirror for us to look at and examine ourselves. Sometimes the sentiments are seemingly irrelevant, other times prescient. Last year photographers of Street Art, who already had been accustomed to the multiple fake and usually comical “official” messages posted around the city on signposts by Trustocorp, began noticing the street signs that warned of drone surveillance.  Most people had a vague idea of what drones were, but couldn’t see the connection between drones and our streets. This week we had a 13 hour national education when the very conservative Libertarian Kentucky Republican Rand Paul filibustered on his feet about the use of drones in the US and abroad, stirring up a huge controversy about their use that could actually rise to become a genuine crisis for this president as citizens contemplate the constitution and the use of technology like this.

It brings to mind of course the Street Artist and his further work and what may ultimately be revealed as his role as the canary in the coalmine. According to news reports he is still under arrest for putting his art up, and there is a fundraiser for his benefit, and while the major networks talked about his signs when they came out (New Yorker, Complex Magazine, Portland Press Herald, CNN, Fox Business…), you don’t see as much news about it today. Today we feature this mini-doc about Essam and consider the impact of Street Art on public policy and how sometimes it can have the power to advance important conversation and debate.

ESSAM (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

A new mini-documentary on events of the past year surrounding Street Artist Essam and the national and local news coverage it generated.

To read more about this visit: http://www.freeessam.com/

 

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BSA Film Friday 01.11.13

BSA Film Friday 01.11.13

 

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening: A debut from UR New York, Cola de Farinha, Pigeon in the Venice of the North, En Masse in Miami MMXII, and a promo for “Working Class”.

UR New York Spends 10 Days in Miami

In this video debuting today on BSA, 2Esae and Ski Mst of UR New York spray, stencil, wheatpaste, play with kids from the Children’s Bereavement Center, flirt and give the finger at openings, cavort in front of the camera, and otherwise act a fool in pursuit of the one thing that made these trouble makers who they are, art.

Cola de Farinha – Brazilian Wheat-pasting

A small documentary interviewing some wheat-pasters in São Paulo, that gives an idea of how the scene takes on the personality and style of the culture. A unique opportunity to learn what it means to artists and how it is perceived as a means of communication.

Pigeon Wheat-pasting in the Venice of the North

Follow Street Artist Pigeon on an icy river in a canoe.

En Masse: Miami MMXII

The great collaborative feeling of working together on the streets is epitomized here with En Masse in Miami last month. Featured artists in their two week roll-through were;

Mke Maxwell, OverUnder, NDA, Omen514, ASquidCalledSebastian, Jason Botkin, Fred Caron, Melissa DelPinto, LezaOne, Alan Ganev, Dustin Spagnolia, Mas Paz, Optimo, Pat Lazzo, Marc PaperScissor, Carmelo Blandino, Five Eight, Pixel Pancho, Never 2501, Sam Parker, Samson Contompasis, Linsey Carron, Anne Preece, Victor Cox

“Working Class”

A brief taste of the new film about the work of artists Mike Giant and Mike Maxwell.

 

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ECB Photographed by Joel Zimmer

ECB Photographed by Joel Zimmer


We’re counting down the last 12 days of 2012 with Street Art photos chosen by BSA readers. Each one was nominated because it has special meaning to a reader or is simply a great photograph from 2012 that they think is great. Our sincere thanks to everyone who shared their favorite images.

Our fifth entry comes from Joel Zimmer from NYC, who nominates this photo taken in Bushwick, Brooklyn in NYC. Many Street Art photographers these days like to experiment with their craft in addition to simply documenting someone elses, and we’re all in favor. Here Joel experiments and bends the planes of the wall to reach out to the viewer. Joel explains that this is a triple exposure of the ECB mural with an Over Under mural under it. He says he made the image “in camera” using a Yashica-A and Portra 400.

ECB, Overunder. (photo © Joel Zimmer)

Visit Joel Zimmer’s site to see more photos of his work here.

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Check out the BSA Images of 2012 video here.

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(VIDEO) 2012 Street Art Images of the Year from BSA

Of the 10,000 images he snapped of Street Art this year, photographer Jaime Rojo gives us 110 that represent some of the most compelling, interesting, perplexing, thrilling in 2012.

Slideshow cover image of Vinz on the streets of Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Together the collection gives you an idea of the range of mediums, techniques, styles, and sentiments that appear on the street today as the scene continues to evolve worldwide. Every seven days on BrooklynStreetArt.com, we present “Images Of The Week”, our weekly interview with the street.

We hope you enjoy this collection – some of our best Images of The Year from 2012.

Artists include 2501, 4Burners, 907, Above, Aiko, AM7, Anarkia, Anthony Lister, Anthony Sneed, Bare, Barry McGee, Bast, Billi Kid, Cake, Cash For Your Warhol, Con, Curtis, D*Face, Dabs & Myla, Daek One, DAL East, Dan Witz, Dark Clouds, Dasic, David Ellis, David Pappaceno, Dceve, Deth Kult, ECB, Eine, El Sol 25, Elle, Entes y Pesimo, Enzo & Nio, Esma, Ever, Faile, Faith47, Fila, FKDL, Gable, Gaia, Gilf!, Graffiti Iconz, Hef, HellbentHert, Hot Tea, How & Nosm, Icy & Sot, Interesni Kazki, Jason Woodside, Javs, Jaye Moon, Jaz, Jean Seestadt, Jetsonorama, Jim Avignon, Joe Iurato, JR, Judith Supine, Ka, Kem5, Know Hope, Kuma, Labrona, Liqen, LNY, Love Me, Lush, Matt Siren, Mike Giant, Miyok, MOMO, Mr. Sauce, Mr. Toll, ND’A, Nick Walker, Nosego, Nychos, Occupy Wall Street, Okuda, OLEK, OverUnder, Phlegm, Pixel Pancho, Rambo, Read Books!, Reka, Retna, Reyes, Rime, Risk, ROA, Robots Will Kill, Rone, Sacer, Saner, See One, Sego, sevens errline, Sheyro, Skewville, Sonni, Stick, Stikman, Stormie Mills, Square, Swoon, Tati, The Yok, Toper, TVEE, UFO, VHILS, Willow, Wing, XAM, Yes One, and Zed1 .

Images © Jaime Rojo and Brooklyn Street Art 2012

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Overunder and ND’A in Nevada

A Street Art Residency is born in Reno

The Street Art scene exists at least partially in tandem with the digital sphere and one of its effects on the concept of community is that artists today are more mobile and internationally connected to one another than their pre-Internet graffiti predecessors were.

The growth of connectivity is producing a foundational change to the world of the Street Artist and his or her relation to society as a hidden and/or marginalized figure. Increasingly it appears that it is impossible to be socially isolated when you are so busy relating, even if anonymously. Unwittingly, the stereotypical vision of the outsider is melting as one is pulled into a collective environment where peers regulate and monitor the actions of one another and settle disputes or give encouragement and opportunities.Harrington and Rojo, Freed from the Wall, Street Art Travels the World, an essay for Eloquent Vandals, 2011

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

Any Street Artist who has visited another city quickly realizes that there is a network of couches across the world – open to the adventurous artist who has paid dues and built a trustworthy or respected reputation among their peers. If you are cool, you’ll find a brand new batch of friends who will help you out. Even as you can remain anonymous on some level in your online presence, a sort of relational database exists in the tribes hands today that enables peers to perform a streetwise background check on you. If you have a solid rep, you’ll easily get offered a place to crash and a tour of favorite spots to hit. That sort of camaraderie has always existed to some extent of course, as well as rivalry.

One relatively new development is the Street Art residency. The concept of a residency (or some variant) is not foreign to academically trained artists and as many artists on the streets today have some formal training, they will have exposure to the idea. But discussing a residency for Street Artists feels ironic as these artists have inherited and altered a scene that once was populated and defined almost exclusively by youth who grew up with far fewer opportunities, resources, or access.

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

As always there are still the philanthropists and the collectors today who give lodging and materials to young artists and many times today these doors are also open to Street Artists. Additionally there are the loosely cobbled-together festivals that are more prevalent in the last 5 years where one artist with leadership qualities is able to pool enough paint, available bedrooms, and beer to invite a collection of peeps to their city to kill some walls.  With the rise in interest in Street Art due to high profile names like Banksy and Fairey, increasingly we are seeing corporate cash is slipping into that model as well so that lifestyle brands can more easily mingle with a scene that might help it sell product.

And so it appears like a natural development to find that OverUnder has a little shack in Nevada for a Street Artist to develop their craft, focus on their skills, and with some luck, to hit up some walls. Still in its beginning stages, OverUnder and his friend and co-Street Artist White Cocoa are hoping this residency can provide a safe space to expand and explore creatively for their hand-picked guests and to possibly work collaboratively. Here are some images from the very first residency guest who arrived this fall from Brooklyn, Street Artist ND’A. Among the local activities they did together were painting walls downtown, hiking a trail historically remembered for cannibalism, and slaughtering a pig on a ranch.

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

“Yeah, so ND’A was just out here and it was a very exciting yet strange time of changes. The residency is still being built up but is very close to being finished. White Cocoa and I built the entire structure with my brother over the summer and we tried to use mostly found materials which is evident by it’s idiosyncrasies. We also made a few trips to Habitat for Humanity and the lumber yard,” OverUnder explains about this multi-windowed shack with a slim sleeping quarter overhead.

The first mural they painted in Reno was at an old Dice factory that is now being converted to a band rehearsal space and a metal shop down by the railroad tracks. ND’A says the process was kind of like a conversation, “We just sort of worked out the idea on the wall – and we have gotten to a point where we communicate well with each other on ideas and we’re able to go back and forth and change things kind of “on the fly”. That’s what I’ve always like about working with OverUnder. He’s really adaptable. It makes it easy to work on the street.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

OverUnder agrees, “The great thing about working with ND’A is that the painting is very conversational. And it goes both ways because anyone that knows ND’A will tell you how friendly and talkative he is, but even more so he holds up a great dialogue on the wall.”

About the piece itself,  OverUnder helps explain what, for many, is work that needs some crib notes, “When painting together we tend to create non-linear totem poles that could be viewed like a cyclical ideogram,” he says.  “For example, this piece could be about being lost in the idea of home, aiming at becoming stronger, snake eye vision and being three sheets to the wind. Of course the dice represent the Flyce Dice factory where the mural is located, the rocker foam hand signals the transformation of the factory into band rooms and a metal shop, and the dogs curly breath hints at the corkscrew tail of the 300 lb pig living just to the right of the frame. So it becomes very lyrical with hints at the past and the present. And if you read into it you can literally read into it.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

“The second mural we painted is found in downtown Reno. In the scene you see two geese watching a royal hand requesting one shot,” he says, “The message in the bottle is delivered at lightning speed to a Native American Medusa grandmother.” Is that clear to you? OverUnder isn’t that worried, “What it all means? We have no idea. But plenty of people walking by told us what it meant to them, which is always cool.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

The experience on the street in Reno and the conversations they had with passersby was a little different from those in some of the rougher areas in Brooklyn or fast-paced Manhattan. Says ND’A, “For the most part we had a really positive interaction with the neighborhood. People seemed to appreciate having a little artwork.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

When not in the cabin working on sketches painting walls in Reno, the artists were hiking up a snow-covered mountain and checking out an icy lake.

OverUnder explains, “We took advantage of our adventurous artist and exposed him to some alpine exploration and painting at Donner Lake. This is the same area that was made notorious by the tales of the cannibalistic Donner party.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

ND’A was pretty enthusiastic, “We went up into the mountains up the Donner Trail and painted in the tunnels and that was a completely awesome experience. It’s really serene and pretty and you are freezing your ass off and you can’t feel your hands.”

“After nearly freezing ND’A we showed him the other side of our diverse landscape by taking him out to a ranch,” OverUnder recounts about ND’A learning to slaughter a pig under the guidance of a Basque rancher.  “None of us knew how we would feel when we did it – but it was a bonding and learning experience. It also provided meat for Thanksgiving and beyond that.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

Not all residencies are the same, and while the FAME festival offers artists incredible food, none have reported having to kill it before eating it. But for the right Street Artist, OverUnder is going to offer some good experiences just by way of location and his lust for experimentation and affinity for collaboration.

ND’A says he liked working together on pieces, “Even though we both work in different mediums we both have similar ideas on style and I think that each one of our styles are significant in their own right but complement each other very well.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

“To say the least, our residency program is not the slight-most traditional; but either is Street Art or any of the passions that give us our drive,” sums up OverUnder, “We loved having ND’A in Reno and look forward to all the work he creates in the future.”

ND’A. Donner Tunnels. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

Overunder . Kelly Peyton. Donner Tunnels. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

The Little Big Clubhouse. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

Donner Lake. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

To learn more about the Big Little Clubhouse Residency Program click here.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Making Deals Zine and Trumbull Studio Present: RELIEF: Silent Art Auction & Raffle Benefit. (Brooklyn, NYC)

Relief

Making Deals Zine and Trumbull Studio presents:RELIEF: Silent Art Auction & Raffle Benefit to support New York Residents Affected by Tropical Storm SandyFriday, November 9th, 2012

Silent Auction & Raffle begins at 6 pm – Final Drawing at 9:30 pm
@ Trumbull Studio, 143 Roebling St, 3rd Floor, Brooklyn, NYA huge group of established and emerging urban artists will have work for sale, and all proceeds will support LOCAL charities. Our goal is to help our fellow New Yorkers who have been hardest hit from areas like Far Rockaway, Staten Island, Breezy Point, and Red Hook. This is going to be a great event and all proceeds from the sale of your donation will go to our designated charities for the victims of Hurricane Sandy: New York Cares (nycares.org), Red Hook Initiative (rhicenter.org) and the Red Cross (redcross.org).Artists who have generously donating work for sale include (list is not yet final):

Abe Lincoln Jr.
Adam Lawrence
Adam VOID
Aimee Lusty
Alexander Heir
Alexander Richter
Anthony Sneed
Beater
Baser
Borf
ButtsUp
Brandon Haynes
Carnage
Cash For Your Warhol (The Collection of Brooklyn Street Art)
CRASTY
Daniel Feral
DB for Stuck-Up
EKG
Emma D.
Gloomer KTS
Goons
Herm
Howard Shindler
Ian (Pop Mortem) McGillivray
Isabel LaSala
JAMES
James Ivan Bailey
Jason Mamarella
Jon Bocksel
Jon Handel
Jowy Romano (Subway Art Blog)
Julian Gilbert
Kevin Foxworth
KOSBE
Lily Staley
Matt Dobbs
Matthew Hoffman
Martha Cooper
Mike Ion
Miss Night Catcher
MRS
Overunder
Pawn Works
RAE
Ribo 22KIDS
Roycer
RUSK
Scott Meyers

This is Awkward / Russell Lee
Tuse
Vickipages
Wisher914
Zato One
and more…

 

KosbeThere are several ways to donate at the event:
– An art raffle will be held where patrons have a chance to win artwork of their choice for as little as a $5 donation! The drawing is scheduled to be held at 9:30 pm and winners can take home their new artwork the same night.
– Select artwork will be up for silent auction. Bidding is scheduled to end at 9:30 pm.
-Blind monetary donations and credit cards will also be accepted.
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Images of the Week 10.14.12

This week we saw pumpkins piled at the corner deli, the Yanks pushing on toward the series, Streisand returning at 70 to sing again in Brooklyn, that Rasta MC goin’ hard over his stack of speakers outside the barbershop on a sunny cool day, Christopher Columbus as a giant  sculpture in somebody’s living room, and we can confirm that underground art parties are now moving to Bed Stuy, bypassing Bushwick.  Stranger things will undoubtedly keep happening because Halloween is on Wednesday this year; pretty much guaranteeing a solid week of sexy horror on the street because people won’t know when to party, and you’re going to see at least 3 mock boxing fights between two guys dressed up as Obama and Romney with gloves because the Presidential election is 11/6. The actual 2nd match-up of the candidates is this Tuesday in Long Island to debate. Are the Yankees playing that night?

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, an eclectic trip that takes us to Brooklyn, Paris, Baltimore, and Russia with Cern, Overunder, Philippe HÉRARD,  Lili Luciole,  Concrete Jungle,  Hot Tea,  Love Child, Dain, Sorta,  and Cynthia von Buhler.  We start of with this faux neighborhood painted by Concrete Jungle on a building in Vladivostok.

Concrete Jungle in Vladivostok, Russia. (photo © Concrete Jungle)

Concrete Jungle in Vladivostok, Russia. Detail. (photo © Concrete Jungle)

Concrete Jungle in Vladivostok, Russia. (photo © Concrete Jungle)

Concrete Jungle in Vladivostok, Russia. (photo © Concrete Jungle)

As the temperature is dropping to the 40s – 50s in October, it’s good there is some Hot Tea to keep the chill off.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hot Tea (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hot Tea (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Love Child (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A new portrait of Bob Marley and Haile Selassie via SORTA in Baltimore (photo © SORTA)

WK Interact is scaling a wall, possibly breaking in. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cynthia von Buhler “Speakeasy Dollhouse” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cynthia von Buhler “Speakeasy Dollhouse” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cern. Detail of a fast moving truck. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Philippe HÉRARD in Paris. (photo © Sandra Hoj)

Philippe HÉRARD in Paris. (photo © Sandra Hoj)

Philippe HÉRARD in Paris. Detail. (photo © Sandra Hoj)

Philippe HÉRARD in Paris. (photo © Sandra Hoj)

Lili Luciole in Paris. (photo © Sandra Hoj)

Untitled (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Thank you to BSA Collaborator Sandra Hoj for her Parisian Report.

Thank you to Concrete Jungle for exclusive images for BSA of their sick mural in Vladivostok, Russia.

Thank you SORTA for keeping us up on Baltimore developments.

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Images of the Week 10.07.12

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Barry McGee, Berth Control, BustArt, Cash4, Hot Tea, JM, Michael DeFeo, OverUnder, Rae, Shie Moreno, Smells, Spiro, Swoon, and Willow. First we start with a selection of details from the brand new piece by Brooklyn Street Artist Swoon that appeared on the street recently – in her inimitable style of revealing an internal world at play within the larger structure.

Swoon. “Neenee. Bradock”.  Swoon created this piece to raise funds for the restoration of the church in Braddock, PA. This hand tinted what paste for the streets was done on a metal fence with a colorful background by a different artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon “Neenee. Braddock”. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon “Neenee. Braddock”. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon “Neenee. Braddock”. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon “Neenee. Braddock”. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon “Neenee. Braddock”. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon. Detail of the maquette of the church as envisioned by the artist during a recent fundraiser called “Pearlys”. (photo © Jaime Rojo via Iphone)

Swoon. Detail of the miniature mode of the church as envisioned by the artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo via Iphone)

Shie Moreno (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JM, Berth Control (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rae (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Willow (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Michael DeFeo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Smells . Cash4 . Spiro (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Barry McGee’s completed mural. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BustArt in Amsterdam goes after the behaviors of corporate chains. (photo © BustArt)

Hot Tea’s latest very subtle installation almost got lost here in the photo. Too bad, as this is one of his best installs so far. The fonts are beautifully rendered with the yarn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Overunder LNY and ND’A Study and Play in Bushwick

Even as they shoot spit-wads at the windows and doodle intensely in the margins of their notebooks while constantly shifting in their chairs in the back row of English class, these two ADHD kids are paying sideways attention to the teacher and not really trying to cause trouble. If you want to keep their attention you just need to keep them engaged and help them channel their energy productively because the next thing you know Overunder and ND’A will be eyeballing the fire extinguisher or pulling apart the wall clock to see what makes it tick…

Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Two of the new crop of painters on the street who can’t keep their metaphors unmixed, Overunder and ND’A are sprinting through Brooklyn looking for new walls and ladders right now, and they’ve covered a lot of space already this new fall semester. The fast talking buddies have a way of playing off each others’ fantastic ideas and stories that will get you lost if you try to follow them, with words and symbols and meanings tossed into a clothes dryer and tumbled. Give ’em a spot, some bucket paint, and a couple of cans, and who knows what you’ll get. But you won’t be bored.

While their individual styles are distinct, with OU blending realism and figurative forms with architectural elements and ND’A giving a gritty low-brow cartoon monster treatment to his symbols and characters, the fluidity of undulating shapes and the free flow of ideas keeps these two in the same school. Here are a couple of new pieces of theirs for you to grade as they run down the hall and out the double back doors onto the playground to swing from the monkey bars and look up girls skirts. Here on this wall Overunder found a way to interact with that other devilish, horns ‘n all bad boy LNY. The results are well balanced with both pieces complimenting each other.

Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

LNY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder on the left with LNY on the right. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder and LNY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ND’A (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ND’A (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ND’A (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ND’A (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder is one of the artists participating in GEOMETRICKS currently on view at Gallery Brooklyn.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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