All posts tagged: Feral

Welling Court: A New York Mural Block Party Like No Other

The community mural: A time honored urban tradition rooted in local flavors and tastes. Every major city and many small towns have them and most people who live near one of these colorful creations also have stories they can tell you about them. Apart from the graffiti scene or the Street Art scene, Allison and Garrison Buxton have one focus in mind when curating artists into this neighborhood in Queens to paint for the third year in a row: The nexus of community and creativity.

El Kamino. Work in progress. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The styles, perspectives, and command of the aerosol can may vary, but the enthusiasm and refreshing lack of attitude at this non-commercial weekend event are undeniable. This year the number of participating artists grew to over 90 and the number of dishes served by neighbors on folding buffet tables in the middle of the street was probably 10 times that. It’s easy to see that this working class neighborhood full of racing kids on bikes and people posing for photos in front of murals is one true definition of New York today. For this sunny summer event, it’s the electricity of live creativity on the street that draws people out to talk with each other.

ENX tagged by Free 5 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Free 5 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Flying Fortress at work with MOST (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Chris and Veng from Robots Will Kill (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gilf! at work. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

UR New York (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

See One . Too Fly (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Yok at work with Never. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sheryo at work. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

The duo called Sinned at work. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sinned (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Kiji at work. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Score (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Queen Andrea (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Alice Mizrachi takes a break to chat with photographer Martha Cooper. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Joe Iurato (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Stain steadies Billy Mode (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hellbent (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Feral at work. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

LMNOP (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more photos of completed murals on Welling Court 3 click on Images of the Week 06.17.12

Thank you to Garrison and Allison Buxton for their indefatigable efforts to bring the community of artists together. Thank you to the families and business of Welling Court for opening their doors and their walls to the creative spirit.

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Brooklyn Street Art: 2010 Year In Images (VIDEO)

We’re very grateful for a wildly prolific year of Street Art as it continued to explode all over New York (and a lot of other places too). For one full year we’ve been granted the gift of seeing art on the streets and countless moments of inspiration. Whether you are rich or poor in your pocket, the creative spirit on the street in New York makes you rich in your heart and mind.

To the New York City artists that make this city a lot more alive every day we say thank you.

To the artists from all over world that passed through we say thank you.

To our colleagues and peers for their support and enthusiasm we say thank you.

To the gallery owners and curators for providing the artists a place to show their stuff and for providing all of us a safe place to gather, talk, share art, laugh, enjoy great music and free booze we say thank you.

To our project collaborators for sharing your talents and insights and opinions and for keeping the flame alive we say thank you.

And finally to our friends, readers and fans; Our hearts go out to you for lighting the way and for cheering us on. Thank you.

Each Sunday we featured Images of the Week, and we painfully narrowed that field to about 100 pieces in this quick video. It’s not an encyclopedia, it’s collage of our own. We remember the moment of discovery, the mood, the light and the day when we photographed them. For us it’s inspiration in this whacked out city that is always on the move.

The following artists are featured in the video and  are listed here in alphabetical order:

Aakash Nihalani,Bansky, Barry McGee, Bask ,Bast, Beau, MBW, Bishop ,Boxi, Cake, The Dude Company, Chris RWK, Chris Stain, Dain, Dan Witz ,Dolk ,El Mac, El Sol 25, Elbow Toe, Faile, Feral,  Overunder, Gaia, General Howe, Hellbent, Hush, Imminent Disaster, Jeff Aerosol, Jeff Soto, JMR ,Judith Supine ,K-Guy ,Labrona, Lister, Lucy McLauchlan, Ludo, Armsrock, MCity, Miso, Momo, Nick Walker, Nina Pandolfo, NohjColey, Nosm, Ariz, How, Tats Cru, Os Gemeos, Futura, Pisa 73, Poster Boy, QRST, Remi Rough, Stormie Mills, Retna, Roa, Ron English, Sever, She 155, Shepard Fairey ,Specter, Sten & Lex, Samson, Surge I, Sweet Toof, Swoon, Tes One, Tip Toe, Tristan Eaton, Trusto Corp, Typo, Various and Gould, Veng RWK, ECB, White Cocoa, Wing, WK Interact, Yote.

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Images Of The Week 09.05.10

Brooklyn-Street-Art-IMAGES-OF-THE-WEEK_05-2010Our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring BHNL, BP, F, OverUnder, Paul Richard, Tip Toe, Tucalin, Feral, Brummel and White Cocoa.

You Are So Fine (© Jaime Rojo)

Hey Bully You’re So Fine, You’re So Fine You Blow My Mind. (© Jaime Rojo)

Feral with Overunder (© Jaime Rojo)
Feral with Overunder (© Jaime Rojo)

BP (© Jaime Rojo)

Brummel. BP’s responsible for the worst oil spill ever, killing millions of animals and endangering humans – and it continues to inspire street art (© Jaime Rojo)

Tucalin (© Jaime Rojo)

Lemme House You, Gurl….  Tucalin (© Jaime Rojo)

BHNL (© Jaime Rojo)

BHNL (© Jaime Rojo)

F (© Jaime Rojo)

F (© Jaime Rojo)

Overunder (© Jaime Rojo)

Overunder (© Jaime Rojo)

Paul Richard (© Jaime Rojo)

Ever clever Mr. Paul Richard (© Jaime Rojo)

Tip Toe (© Jaime Rojo)

Tip Toe (© Jaime Rojo)

Blends (© Jaime Rojo)
I got your charm right here baby. Blends (© Jaime Rojo)

White Cocoa (© Jaime Rojo)
Apparently this happens to women who have had a few drinks too! Wet White Cocoa (© Jaime Rojo)

White Cocoa. Detail (© Jaime Rojo)
White Cocoa. Detail (© Jaime Rojo)

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Images Of The Week 08.29.10

Brooklyn-Street-Art-IMAGES-OF-THE-WEEK_05-2010

Our Weekly Interview with the street; this week featuring Anera, Feral, Indigo Blue, Love Billy, Mr. DiMaggio, OverUnder, and White Cocoa

Indigo Blue "Rosemary Brown" (© Photo Indigo Blue)
Indigo “Rosemary Brown” (© Photo Indigo)

“My part of the Beatty St. mural. The wall is a compilation of portraits of important people in the history of Vancouver, past present and future. I painted Rosemary Brown, the first black woman in Canadian history to be a member of a Canadian parliamentary body.”~ Indigo Blue

Love Billi (© Jaime Rojo)

“Soon as I finish this sock I can go for a nice bike ride.” Love Billy (© Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Dimaggio (© Jaime Rojo)

Mr. DiMaggio (© Jaime Rojo)

White Cocoa (© Jaime Rojo)

A study of omnipotence.  White Cocoa (© Jaime Rojo)

Overunder Upsidedown (© Jaime Rojo)

Overunder, Brummel Upsidedown (© Jaime Rojo)

Mr. DiMaggio in Paris (© Luca)

Mr. DiMaggio in Paris (© Luca)

Anera (© Jaime Rojo)A Taking liberties with Anera with this highly digitized effect (© Jaime Rojo)

Mr. DiMaggio (© Jaime Rojo)

Mr. DiMaggio (© Jaime Rojo)

Feral (© Jaime Rojo)
Feral (© Jaime Rojo)

White Cocoa (© Jaime Rojo)
“He obviously idea has no idea what he is talking about regarding the right to free speech.  On the other hand the tone of the program makes me think he has some legitimacy.  They wouldn’t give a forum to someone who is a crackpot, right?  I’m confused.” White Cocoa (© Jaime Rojo)

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FERAL CHILD: Living Walls Update 08.19.10

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Living-Walls-Update2

by Jayne McGinn
images by Jenna Duffy

When I arrived at Feral Child’s mural for The Living Walls Conference on the side of Homegrown, a local Atlanta restaurant, the last rays of the Georgia sun were pounding down on him. Brooklyn-Street-Art-WEB-Feral-Child-copyright-Jenna-Duffy_MG_1201-1

photo © Jenna Duffy

Unable to access the wall directly, Feral was hidden behind a barbwire fence, surrounded by a cluster of damaged cars in the parking lot of an adjacent body shop.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-WEB-Beware-Dog-Copyright-Jenna-Duffy-MG_1152photo © Jenna Duffy

I heard I wouldn’t be able to get back there unless I wanted to be the lunch of a “junkyard” dog. I felt like I was in a Jim Croce song in this strange setting for Feral Child, whose first impression is so peaceful.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-WEB-Feral-Child-copyright-Jenna-Duffy____MG_0680

The dog wasn’t the only hurdle that Feral had to jump; the Georgia heat cooks like a convection oven, the blistering heat comes from all sides. After half a day outside baking, Feral’s cans were too hot to touch and risked explosion. He was forced to bring them indoors and chill them in a refrigerator before taking them back to his wall in a cooler.Brooklyn-Street-Art-WEB-Feral-Child-copyright-Jenna-Duffy___MG_0581

photo © Jenna Duffy

Brooklyn-Street-Art-WEB-Feral-Child-copyright-Jenna-Duffy_____MG_0849

photo © Jenna Duffy


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Images Of The Week 08.15.10 on BSA

Brooklyn-Street-Art-IMAGES-OF-THE-WEEK_05-2010

Our weekly interview with the Streets: This week featuring Os Gemeos, Futura, Feral, MOMO, Overunder, Peat Wollaeger, URNewYork, $howta, White Cocoa, QRST, Michael Williams, Yote, and Tip Toe

Os Gemeos, Futura (© Jaime Rojo)

Os Gemeos, Futura (© Jaime Rojo)

See our interviews with Futura and Os Gemeos

Feral (© Jaime Rojo)

Feral (© Jaime Rojo)

Momo (© Jaime Rojo)

MOMO (© Jaime Rojo)

Overunder (© Jaime Rojo)

OverUnder (© Jaime Rojo)

Peat Wollaeger and URNewYork (© Jaime Rojo)

Peat Wollaeger and URNewYork (© Jaime Rojo)

$hota (© Jaime Rojo)

$howta (© Jaime Rojo)

White Cocoa (photo © Jaime Rojo)
White Cocoa (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Feral (© Jaime Rojo)

Feral (© Jaime Rojo)

QRST (© Jaime Rojo)

QRST (© Jaime Rojo)

Michael Williams (© Jaime Rojo)

Michael Williams (© Jaime Rojo)

Yote Mail Bunny. (© Jaime Rojo)

Sumbunny’s waiting for a letter. Yote. (© Jaime Rojo)

© Jaime Rojo

© Jaime Rojo

Tip Toe (© Jaime Rojo)

Tip Toe (© Jaime Rojo)

Os Gemeos, Futura (© Jaime Rojo)

Os Gemeos, Futura (© Jaime Rojo)

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Year In Images 2009 from Jaime Rojo

Street Art photographer Jaime Rojo captured a few thousand images in 2009 to help document the wildly growing Street Art scene in New York.

A veteran of 10 years shooting the streets of New York, Rojo has amassed a collection of images that capture the scene with the appreciation of an artist. To celebrate the creative spirit that is alive and well on the streets of New York, this slide video gives a taste of what happened in ‘09, without pretending to present the whole scene or all the artists, known and anonymous, who add to the ongoing conversation.

Included in this collection of images (in no particular order) are pieces by Skewville, Specter, The Dude Company, Judith Supine, C215, WK Interact, Anthony Lister, Miss Bugs, Bast, Chris from Robots Will Kill (RWK), Os Gemeos, Cake, Celso, Imminent Disaster, Mark Cavalho, NohJ Coley, Elbow Toe, Feral, Poster Boy, Bishop203, Jon Burgerman, Royce Bannon, Damon Ginandes, Conor Harrington, Gaia, JC2, Logan Hicks, Chris Stain, Armsrock, Veng from Robots Will Kill (RWK), Noah Sparkes, Robots Will Kill, Heracut, Billy Mode, Revs, Skullphone, Spazmat, Mint and Serf, Roa, Aakash Nihilani, Broken Crow, Peru Ana Ana Peru, & Cern

All images © Jaime Rojo

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Vinny Cornelli shoots Crosby Street in NYC

Bold street splashes and Hacullean mayhem from Manhattan.

Photo by Vinny Cornelly

Photo © Vinny Cornelli

This week photographer Vinny Cornelli shows us a few images from one spot in Gotham that gets hit with some regularity, and then destroyed and re-hit – and always visited by street art followers.

It’s entertaining how abandoned places on the street turn into a “venue” over time. Then, like Elton John taking residency at Ceasars Palace, one or two street artists seem to gravitate to the same spot again and again, nonplussed by the destruction of their last piece.

Photo by Vinny Cornelly

Photo © Vinny Cornelli

This spot on Crosby street has been a regular showcase for Haculla, a tripped out pop culture commentator and comedian who weaves criticism with private stories in bold splashes of fluorescence, black and white photos of celebs re-doctored, and thick marker freehand characters.

Of course it all gets piled on by others as part of the “conversation of the street”, and in these layers you can see Matt Siren, Cake, Feral, among others.

Cornelli pumps up the saturation to give the chaos a campy quality and lets the decrepitude dazzle.

Photo by Vinny Cornelly

Photo © Vinny Cornelli

Photo by Vinny Cornelli

Photo by Vinny Cornelli

Photo by Vinny Cornelli

Cake and Haculla - Photo © Vinny Cornelli

Photo by Vinny Cornelli

Photo © Vinny Cornelli

Photo by Vinny Cornelli

A Feral wheatpaste here - Photo © Vinny Cornelli

Click here for more street layers by Vinny Cornelli

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“The Great OutDoors” with Luna Park at ArtBreak Gallery

“The Great OutDoors” with Luna Park at ArtBreak Gallery

A true street art Opening in Brooklyn, with shutters open wide and many doorways to contemplate.

A collection of 30 artists on the street art scene are contributing to the vision of the adoorable Luna Park and her co-curator Billi Kid.  Ms. Park, a well-travelled street art photographer who calls Brooklyn home, is among a very select group of intrepid souls cris-crossing the borough by any means possible to get the right shot.

Well regarded and always smartly outfitted, Ms. Park and Mr. Kid have added a bit of poetry to the street art oeuvre by decorating the departure, edifying the entrance, festooning the frontage, and gilding the gateway!

Image by Luna Park featuring a Celso in the doorway.

Image by Luna Park featuring a Celso in the doorway.

Brooklyn Street Art: How did you and Billi Kid conjure a show using doors as canvas?

Luna Park: Last year, Billi Kid, Jim and Karla Murray, Cern and Elisha Cook Jr. decorated a room at the Carlton Arms Hotel, which is known for it’s fabulous, one-of-a-kind, artist-decorated rooms. I highly recommend it as an affordable place to send your arty guests. To capitalize on the network of artists they’d built through the hotel, in March 2008 the owners opened Artbreak Gallery in Williamsburg. When Billi Kid contacted them about the possibility of doing a doors-themed street art show, they were immediately on board. I agreed to participate last December and the rest, as they say, was a matter of logistics, logistics, logistics.

Brooklyn Street Art: As you march across the city looking for great shots, have you found that some artists gravitate to doorways?

Luna Park: Definitely! I’d even go so far as to say not only SOME, but MANY. Your average urban door is the perfect gateway to graffiti – pardon the pun – it provides a smooth, even surface, accessible to all and, most importantly, visible to all. Although I don’t subscribe to the so-called “broken windows” theory of graffiti leading to crime, I do think it holds true for doors in the sense that graffiti on doors DOES attract more graffiti. It generally starts with a lone tag and – provided that tag isn’t buffed – the tags soon multiply. Before you know it, stickers get in on the action, the odd wheatpaste sticks around and, voila, suddenly you have a proper door!

Brooklyn Street Art: Why would a doorway be better than, say, a wall?

Luna Park: I’m not saying doors are better than walls, but as a surface on which to write or stick, a doorway offers a certain degree of protection from prying eyes. No one looks twice at someone who is ostensibly fumbling for keys in front of a doorway, but that same person loitering by a wall…

Cake

Cake from “The Great Outdoors” (photo Luna Park)

Brooklyn Street Art: Where did all of these come from? Have you been dumpster diving?

Luna Park: Well, I’m certainly not one to condone any kind of illegal activity, ahem, so I’m assuming the doors were all acquired legally, perhaps through a fine, neighborhood purveyor of sundry household items.

I personally salvaged two doors from the curb down the street from my house. Billi Kid acquired his door and several others at a farmhouse sale in rural Connecticut.  A few people must have visited demolition sites, as there are a number of extraordinarily heavy fire doors as well. The doors really run the gamut of everything from vintage to factory fresh.

Brooklyn Street Art: Are most of the pieces in this show made specifically for “The Great Outdoors?”

Luna Park: Yep, with one notable exception, all of the pieces for this show are brand spanking new!

“Close the door on the past. You don’t try to forget the mistakes, but you don’t dwell on it. You don’t let it have any of your energy, or any of your time, or any of your space.” – Johnny Cash

The Dude Company

The Dude Company for “The Great Outdoors” (photo Luna Park)

Brooklyn Street Art: Every door has two sides; has anybody addressed both for the show?

Luna Park: We asked the artists to decorate only one side of the door – to make hanging them all the easier – but Celso and LA2 collaborated on one side of a door that already had a piece on the other side. I’d mention who, but that would spoil the surprise.

Brooklyn Street Art: It’s not the same as painting ox blood over the doorway, but do you think there is any symbolism to the act of decorating a door?

Street art and graffiti covered doors aside, I think the decorated door functions as a marker, defining the threshold between the private and the public spheres. There are certainly any number of cultures around the world that place markings on doors to celebrate rites of passage: in the part of northern Germany from which my mother comes from, it is not uncommon to see important family dates chalked onto doors, presumably in conjunction with some kind of religious blessing.

“we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.” – Alexander Graham Bell

Feral for "The Great Outdoors" (photo Luna Park)

Feral for “The Great Outdoors” (photo Luna Park)

Brooklyn Street Art: On a grander scale, this show could be a commentary about the times we’re in, with many doors slamming shut, while others that we scarcely imagined only two years ago are opening wide.  Do you care to philosophize?

Luna Park: I’m an optimist at heart and a pragmatist by nature, as such, I believe very much in silver linings and unforeseen occurrences. Especially in times of crisis, one has to embrace change, because only by accepting change can one move forward. When Billi Kid approached me with the opportunity to co-curate this show, you better believe I opened that door, despite initial misgivings about never having organized anything of this magnitude before.

I can only speak for myself, but having this show – something I’ve come to see as an incredibly positive force in my life – to occupy me and to look forward to has made the struggles I endure at work all the more bearable. I am slowly realizing that this show has opened doors for others, and that has made this experience all the more meaningful to me. By the same token, the outpouring of support from the street art community – BSA included – has been enormous and for that I am very grateful.

Brooklyn Street Art: Given their past locations and your personal experience shooting the streets, what does it feel like to see these doors lined up in a spare white box gallery space?

Luna Park: There is often critique of street art and graffiti work in galleries, in many cases justified in that some work simply does not translate well onto canvas. But in this case, we’re literally bringing doors in off the street and taking them to the next level (the gallery’s on the 2nd floor). Because the doors are relatively large and heavily decorated, being surrounded by a clean, white gallery wall gives each piece space to breathe. Above and beyond that, it’s nice to see the humble door elevated to a place of honor.

“Listen; there’s a hell of a good universe next door: let’s go.” – e.e. cummings

His holiness Blanco for "The Great Outdoors" (photo Luna Park)

 

Brooklyn Street Art: What door surprised you the most?

Luna Park: Without a doubt, Blanco! I’ve been following his stencils since he first started putting them out, seeing his progression with each, more intricate piece. When we invited him to be part of the show, I had high hopes, but he’s really exceeded all expectations and then some! Bravo, J!

That having been said, I’m very pleased by the quality of ALL the work and am super proud of everyone’s efforts. My sincerest thanks to everyone that helped make this show possible.

Brooklyn Street Art: What time do doors open on Saturday?

Luna Park: Doors open at 6pm. I for one can’t wait to find out if it’s Bachelor #1, #2 or #3 behind my favorite door! ;p

“Ten men waiting for me at the door? Send one of them home, I’m tired.”  Brooklyn’s own Mae West

THE GREAT OUT DOORS
MAY 2 – 29, 2009

Art Break Gallery
195 Grand Street, 2nd Floor, Brooklyn, NY 11211
Thursday through Sunday, 1-7 pm.

Opening Reception Saturday May 2, 6-10 pm

At the opening Saturday you’ll also get to see a projection show of Luna Park’s photography, specifically images of doors on Brooklyn streets and elsewhere.

Billi Kid

Luna Park

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Images of the Week 03.09.09

Aiko (photo Jaime Rojo)
Why don’t you come up and see me sometime? (Aiko) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Cake and ShinShin (photo Jaime Rojo)
Cake and ShinShin (photo Jaime Rojo)

Altered Torino (photo Jaime Rojo)
Altered Torino (Altered Beast) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Altered Brokeback (photo Jaime Rojo)
Altered Brokeback (Altered Beast) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Altered Beast (photo Jaime Rojo)
Jon Benet (Altered Beast) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Bishop 203 (photo Jaime Rojo)
Broken Heart. (Bishop 203) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Feral (photo Jaime Rojo)
Head Dress (Feral) (photo Jaime Rojo)

You’re looking good just like a snake in the grass (Hellbent) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Mark Carvalho (photo Jaime Rojo)
Spring is in the Air! (Mark Carvalho) (photo Jaime Rojo)
Pork at the Robot (Noah Sparkes and ? ) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Pork Robot (Noah Sparkes(pattern) and Roa (pig) ) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Priority Celso (photo Jaime Rojo)
Priority Celso (photo Jaime Rojo)

(photo Jaime Rojo)
Supreme Sunshine (photo Jaime Rojo)

Start Early! (photo Jaime Rojo)
Start Early! (photo Jaime Rojo)

Zoso (photo Jaime Rojo)
Never Forget Your Roots (Zoso) (photo Jaime Rojo)
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Year in Images 2008

Year in Images 2008

Paradigm Shifting and Cave Writings

Looking back at the powerful changes in ’08,

it’s not hard to see their reflection on the Brooklyn streets, which may serve as tea leaves revealing the messages swirling around us and in us. Each individual act of creating is of significance, yet it is the cumulative effect of the groundswell of new participants that seems so powerful, so hopeful in it’s desire.

Naturally, at the beginning of this selection of images from 2008, we are featuring the most visible street art piece of the year by Shepard Fairey, which appeared here on the streets of Brooklyn and transcended mediums to reach millions of people. Shepard’s graphic design style and his images of the man who would be president helped many to quickly glimpse the character and message of Barack Obama.

A Winning Campaign (Shepard Fairey) (photo Jaime Rojo)

A Winning Campaign (Shepard Fairey) (photo Jaime Rojo)

The image was replicated, adopted, adapted, transformed, re-formed, lampooned even. It became an icon that belonged to everyone who cared to own it, and a symbol of the change the man on the street was looking for. Like street art, Obama’s message was taken directly to the people, and they responded powerfully in a way that brought a historic shift; one that continues to unfold.

Elsewhere on the street we saw themes from topical to fantastical; crazy disjointed cultural mash-ups, celebrity worship or destruction, Big Brother, icons, symbols, death, war, economic stress, protest, dancing, robots and monsters and clowns and angels, and an incredible pathos for humanity and it’s sorry state… with many reminders of those marginalized and disaffected. We never forget the incredible power of the artist to speak to our deepest needs and fears.

The movement of young and middle-aged artists off the isle of pricey mall-ish Manhattan and into Brooklyn is not quite an exodus, but boy, sometimes it feels that way. The air sometimes is thick with it; the creative spirit. The visual dialogue on the street tells you that there is vibrant life behind doors – studios, galleries, practice rooms, loft parties, rooftops.

Even as a debate about street art’s appropriate placement on public/private walls continues, it continues. From pop art to fine art, painterly to projected, one-offs to mass repetition, Brooklyn street art continues to grow beyond our expectations, and our daily lives are largely enriched by it.

This collection is not an exhaustive survey – the archival approach isn’t particularly stimulating and we’re not academics, Madge. The street museum is always by chance, and is always about your two eyes. Here’s a smattering, a highly personal trip through favorites that were caught during the year.

[svgallery name=”Images of Year 2008″]

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