All posts tagged: Deitch Projects

BSA Film Friday: 11.15.19

BSA Film Friday: 11.15.19

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Graffiti on the Berlin U Bahn 1
2. SWOON’S “CICADA” Opened at Deitch Projects
3. Hedof & Joren Joshua. Parees Fest 2019

BSA Special Feature: Phone video of Berlin trains this week.

What fun to see the graffiti rolling by on Berlin train tracks this week – Jaime Rojo shot these pieces and strung them together — all in slow motion so you can appreciate it more.

Graffiti on the Berlin U Bahn 1

Graffiti on the Berlin U Bahn 2

SWOON’S “CICADA” Opened at Deitch Projects

We just wanted to share with you the news about Swoon’s new show at Deitch – We’re sad to miss the opening of but happy to see this video on her Instagram and a recent interview with her on Street Art News.

View this post on Instagram

Next week! I’m getting ready to open my first animation centered exhibition with @jeffreydeitchgallery . This feels like the start of a long and rich exploration. Hope you can join us at these nascent beginnings of something good. November 14th, 6-8, 76 Grand Street, NYC.

A post shared by Swoon Studio (@swoonhq) on

Hedof & Joren Joshua. Parees Fest 2019

Parees Fest this year produced some great murals and full video interviews with their artist-guest. Here you can listen to Hedof and Joren Joshua as they complete their collaborative work and describe the process.

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Happy New Year! BSA Highlights of 2010

Year-in-review-2010-header

As we start a new year, we say thank you for the last one.

And Thank You to the artists who shared their 11 Wishes for 2011 with Brooklyn Street Art; Conor Harrington, Eli Cook, Indigo, Gilf, Todd Mazer, Vasco Mucci, Kimberly Brooks, Rusty Rehl, Tip Toe, Samson, and Ludo. You each contributed a very cool gift to the BSA family, and we’re grateful.

We looked over the last year to take in all the great projects we were in and fascinating people we had the pleasure to work with. It was a helluva year, and please take a look at the highlights to get an idea what a rich cultural explosion we are all a part of at this moment.

The new year already has some amazing new opportunities to celebrate Street Art and artists. We are looking forward to meeting you and playing with you and working with you in 2011.

Specter does “Gentrification Series” © Jaime Rojo
NohJ Coley and Gaia © Jaime Rojo
Jef Aerosol’s tribute to Basquiat © Jaime Rojo
***

January

Imminent Disaster © Steven P. Harrington
Fauxreel (photo courtesy the artist)
Chris Stain at Brooklyn Bowl © Jaime Rojo

February

Various & Gould © Jaime Rojo
Anthony Lister on the street © Jaime Rojo
Trusto Corp was lovin it.

March

Martha Cooper, Shepard Fairey © Jaime Rojo
BSA’s Auction for Free Arts NYC
Crotched objects began appearing on the street this year. © Jaime Rojo

April

BSA gets some walls for ROA © Jaime Rojo
Dolk at Brooklynite © Steven P. Harrington
BSA gets Ludo some action “Pretty Malevolence” © Jaime Rojo

May

The Crest Hardware Art Show © Jaime Rojo
NohJ Coley © Jaime Rojo
The Phun Phactory Reboot in Williamsburg © Steven P. Harrington

June

Sarah Palin by Billi Kid
Nick Walker with BSA in Brooklyn © Jaime Rojo
Judith Supine at “Shred” © Jaime Rojo

July

Interview with legend Futura © Jaime Rojo
Os Gemeos and Martha Cooper © Jaime Rojo
Skewville at Electric Windows © Jaime Rojo

August

Specter Spot-Jocks Shepard Fairey © Jaime Rojo
“Bienvenidos” campaign
Faile studio visit © Jaime Rojo

September

BSA participates and sponsors New York’s first “Nuit Blanche” © Jaime Rojo
JC2 © Jaime Rojo
How, Nosm, R. Robots © Jaime Rojo

October

Faile “Bedtime Stories” © Jaime Rojo
Judith Supine © Jaime Rojo
Photo © Roswitha Guillemin courtesy Galerie Itinerrance

November

H. Veng Smith © Jaime Rojo
Sure. Photo courtesy Faust
Kid Zoom © Jaime Rojo

December

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Specter Spot-Jocks Shepard Fairey in New York City

Specter Spot-Jocks Shepard Fairey in New York City

Ice-T is still stylin’ like an American Che Guevara, but he’s officially joined the force 19 years after “Cop Killer”.

Brooklyn_Street_Art_740_Specter_Shepard-Fairey_Before_After

photos © Jaime Rojo

As part of a string of strikingly personalized spot-jocking intended to send shivers through the New York Street Art scene, artist Specter is brazenly re-crafting other artists pieces, including high profile names like Swoon, Faile, Skewville, and Shepard Fairey.

This discovery side-busted our heads when we saw the radically altered Shepard Fairey piece – a myriad of nested ironies that takes “homage” to a new level. Or is that a “diss”?

The Fairy piece he’s messing with is a 2010 version of his Nubian Signs that appeared on walls during the run-up to his May Day gallery show this spring at the now closed Deitch Projects in Soho. Since that time, the wheat-pasted piece has weathered and faded. As part of Specters reworking of the piece, the portrait of Ice-T, itself criticized for incorporating the iconic image of Che, is now backed up by his fictional TV partner Detective John Munch from Law and Order: SVU. Ice-T has a new posse. Aside from that quizzical pairing that has left Street Art watchers dumbfounded, it’s even more confusing that Fairey’s original was restored before Specter smacked his own piece on top.

Brooklyn_Street_Art_740_Specter_Shepard-Fairey_AFTER

photo © Jaime Rojo

“It was totally defaced, you could not make out what was going on anymore,” said Specter this week when reached for comment.

Dissing doesn’t usually include restoration.

Explaining the choice of adding Ice-T’s fictional police partner to the existing Fairey piece, Specter talks about the duality of a celebrity’s image that can produce a cognitive asymmetry.

“Ice-T plays a detective on a very popular crime show that everyone likes so much. (My piece) is kind of poking at these popular figures – who maybe were seen as a visionary. This was a rebellious figure, who is now on prime time television playing a police detective, who he previously was talking about shooting.” According to the show’s website, the rapper-turned-actor “formed the thrash metal band Body Count”, whose “1991 self-titled debut contained the controversial single ‘Cop Killer.’”

In an additional homage to Fairey, Specter appears to have used a copyrighted promotional photo off the internet to interpret Detective Munch – calling to mind the current lawsuit Fairey is defending himself against that accuses him of incorporating copyrighted material to create his famed Obama poster of two years ago.

In this piece by Street Artist Swoon that has been up for perhaps two years and has sufferred wear, tear, and sprayed out faces, Specter meticulously repairs the visages and adds a bit of fabric. (photos © Jaime Rojo)

In this piece by Brooklyn Street Artist Swoon that has been up for perhaps two years and has sufferred wear, tear, and sprayed out faces, Specter meticulously repairs the visages and adds a bit of fabric. (photo left © Specter, right © Jaime Rojo)

In each of the cases where Specter is hitting the street art of somebody else, the style and technique closely mimics that of the original artist, creating a counterfeit that so closely resembles their own body of work that it could be confused theirs. This alone opens up a discussion about high-jacking a message, misleading a passerby, or even damaging a reputation.

A new piece by Swoon! Wait, maybe not. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A new piece by Swoon! Wait, maybe not. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This new crop of “side-busts” may get him in hot water, but Specter is giddily unapologetic to the other street artists whose work he’s jocking. In an extensive interview he talked about the nature of impermanence implicit in the Street Art scene, his own weariness with attempts at codification of rules that some have endeavored to create for the street, and the fact that many of these pieces already have run for a long time – so they’re fair game according to his rules. For Specter, it is evident that this project is a social experiment as much as an expression of creativity and an attempt to shake open a can of conversation.

Brooklyn_Street_Art_740_Specter_Skewville_Before_After

For a series of posters by Brooklyn Street Artists Skewville, who have done their own block-letter wisecracking spot-jocking in the past with street pieces by Fairey, Elbow Toe, and Gaia, Specter shoots close to the bone. (photos of Skewville and Specter above © Jaime Rojo)

Poking the Monkey

Is Specter sort of poking the monkey to see what will happen? Surely he knows that someone is going to see it as a sign of disrespect.

The cheerful Specter replies, “Yes, of course. I also thought it was also kind of good to push the button. It might piss them off, or they might love it or they might hate it. The point is I can do it regardless because of the nature of the work.”

Specter adds a waving American flag to the partially destroyed collage image by BAST. (photos © Jaime Rojo)

Specter adds a waving American flag to the partially destroyed collage image by BAST. (photos © Jaime Rojo)

In the Street Art world, as in the graffiti world before it, the unwritten “rule book” (existing mainly in the heads of the participants) pretty clearly marks ones territory. Putting up your piece too close to someone else’s, let alone over part or all of it, can occasion vendettas, retaliation, or at least some trash talk. Never mind that this claim to real estate sometimes refers to a building actually owned by somebody else entirely – a bothersome contradiction that falls to the wayside when street rules are in effect.

That's no mare! Specter re-genders the scuba diving horse of Street Art duo Faile (photos © Jaime Rojo)

That’s no mare! Specter re-genders the scuba diving horse of Street Art duo Faile (photo left © Specter, right © Jaime Rojo)

“I was talking to another Street Artist who was saying that people were angry with him for spot-jocking and I said that’s what these pieces are about: the ridiculousness of these kinds of ideas. It all harkens back to these ‘rules’ of this anarchistic form of art. Street Art can be this unauthorized kind of art form and people are like, ‘Oh you shouldn’t come within 12 feet of me’. This project talks about that too and it’s supposed to bring up this dialogue. I really think that these issues need to be discussed because people take it very seriously”

Perhaps a reference to recent street art stencils dealing with LGBT issues, Specter uses pulp-fiction styled lettering and a pretty bow to give this Faile piece a sex change. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Perhaps a reference to their recent stencils dealing with LGBT issues, Specter uses pulp-fiction styled lettering and a pretty bow to give this Faile piece a sex change. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Free Screening Tonight of “Flood Tide” at Socrates Sculpture Park

brooklyn-street-art-swoon-flood-tide-stillDuring the collaboration called “Swimming Cities of Switchback Sea”, a project by Street Artist Swoon that included a colorful and handsome cluster of artists, performers, and neo-enviro-hippies for a dying planet, the fictional “Flood Tide” was directed and shot.  The seven large floating sculptures made of re-claimed materials were constructed by the crew and floated down the Hudson River (itself a dump site for industry that is being reclaimed by citizens) stopping occasionally for supplies and theatrical and musical performance.

Tonight a pre-screening of the tale that uses the Swimming Cities project as backdrop will be shown for free as part of RoofTop Films project. In case you haven’t been there, Socrates is sited at the edge of the East River in Long Island City, Queens, where the same flotilla made a voyage before arriving at Swoon’s solo installation at Deitch Gallery that same summer.

Eventual touring of the film will include museums, performance spaces, community centers, as well as more conventional theaters with a live musical score performed by Dark Dark Dark.

Learn more at http://www.rooftopfilms.com/

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OBEY MARTHA: Shepard Fairey Pays a Large Tribute to Martha Cooper and “Defiant Youth” in New York

OBEY MARTHA: Shepard Fairey Pays a Large Tribute to Martha Cooper and “Defiant Youth” in New York

Sidewalk Philosopher Fairey Talks about New York, LA, Hype, May Day and this country of immigrants while pasting a building-sized ovation to a photographer and her work.

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey and Team begin placement of large new piece in Soho.

Street artist Shepard Fairey was out on the streets of New York again yesterday in advance of his Saturday opening at Deitch Projects.  This time it was to put up a large portrait based on a black and white photograph by Martha Cooper called “Defiant Youth”.

"Defiant Youth", by Martha Cooper (©)

“Defiant Youth”, by Martha Cooper (©)

While the original photo presented a group of young boys aligned in a semi-militaristic configuration, the Fairey version slightly altered the number and postures to achieve his graphic sense of balance.  Cooper’s images have served as inspiration for many artists over the years and also have been re-interpreted. Read our interview with her about the subject HERE.

Martha Cooper (foreground) Shepard and Tanley from Arrested Motion (background)

Martha Cooper (foreground) with Shepard and Tanley Wong from Arrested Motion (background) (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ms. Cooper, an ethnographer, was also on hand to capture the moment yesterday, snapping many photos and happily reflecting on what it was like to be a female on the scene running around with graffiti writers in the 70’s.  While she could see how some female photographers might have run into sexism in a predominantly male enterprise, Martha said that most of the writers thought little of her gender. They were taking photos of their work anyway and were happy to have a photographer around capturing their stuff before it disappeared.

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey holding one of the roses soon to be stuffed in the end of a gun (photo ©Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey  (photo ©Jaime Rojo)

During a break from the job, Mr. Fairey talked to BSA for a couple of minutes:

Brooklyn Street Art: What’s the difference between putting work up in LA and putting up in New  York

Shepard Fairey: Well, in LA you have to do everything big because everybody’s in a car. In New York there is a lot of foot traffic so even the smallest sticker is going to get seen by people walking around. I think also in New York  you want to integrate your stuff into the landscape in a way that makes sense with all the other art and architecture. LA is more sort of a wasteland – you know it’s built on top of a desert and there are a lot of flat spaces and a lot more open spaces.

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

I think New York has got more character and you can really put your work up in a way that makes sense with the other structures and the other art.  LA is more of a free-for-all; You’ve got billboards and walls and fences and boarded up things that are always changing.  Other than that it’s just the scale. For years I didn’t put anything up in New York. I just put up stickers and stencils on the lamp bases, which were a perfect canvas. And then later on I started to go a little big bigger with posters and then even bigger so I could do roof tops because getting yourself higher up where it’s harder to get to makes it run longer.  I just enjoy walking in New York – and you’ve gotta do everything driving in LA.

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: How about the reception from the public? Do you think there’s more hype in LA? Are people warmer in the way they relate to your work – or do you see any difference?

Shepard Fairey: I think people are more aggressive and caustic in New York in general. It’s more dense. There’s more of an old-school sort of proprietary nature to all of culture and sub-culture in New York: whether it’s an old landlord or an old graffiti writer, people are sort of full of piss and vinegar in New York. But I think the challenge of doing things in New York against all these elements is one of the great things about it.  It’s a little more laid-back in LA.

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As far as hype – there is hype everywhere.  In LA I think, recently street art became more of a popular thing so all sorts of young actors and people like that who don’t know that much about the culture latch onto it so it trends in a way that’s a little bit different but…. You know, there is hype everywhere.

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey at work against a clear NYC sky. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard with his assistants

Shepard with his team at the end of the job (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: As May Day approaches, people have been talking about the current anti-immigration laws in this country, specifically in Arizona, which are very draconian and harsh. Are you going to do a campaign in response to it, or how do you feel about the topic?

Shepard Fairey: You haven’t been looking at my website. My immigration reform posters that I actually created last year for May 1st are back up.  I’ve printed up a new batch and collaborated with my friend Ernesto, who I worked on stuff last year with also.  I’m working with some different organizations.

From the Obeygiant.com website, "The continual persecution and exploitation of immigrants continues to grow in the United States of America. Anti-immigrant laws like Arizona’s SB1070 and national initiatives like Secure Communities and the 287(g) program have set this country back 60 years to a civil rights crisis. Hate crimes and racial hate groups are on the rise targeting latinos and immigrants, blaming these communities for the ales of society. On May 1st 2010 the voices of this community will be heard once again throughout this country denouncing the anti-immigrant sentiments. The purpose of these images and prints are to gain awareness and action to help change and improve immigration policy and perceptions. All the proceeds from these prints will go towards community based projects. "

From the Obeygiant.com website, “The continual persecution and exploitation of immigrants continues to grow in the United States of America. Anti-immigrant laws like Arizona’s SB1070 and national initiatives like Secure Communities and the 287(g) program have set this country back 60 years to a civil rights crisis. Hate crimes and racial hate groups are on the rise targeting latinos and immigrants, blaming these communities for the ails of society. On May 1st 2010 the voices of this community will be heard once again throughout this country denouncing the anti-immigrant sentiments. The purpose of these images and prints are to gain awareness and action to help change and improve immigration policy and perceptions. All the proceeds from these prints will go towards community based projects. “

Yeah, I’m an immigrant.  My family is originally from Europe. Everybody in this country other than the Native Americans are immigrants so to me it’s really ridiculous to not treat people like human beings just because they are not citizens.  It’s a country that’s really founded on the idea of pursuing a better life and so it seems very ridiculous to not respect that ambition today but respect it from a hundred or two hundred years ago.  It’s a complex issue because populations are growing and we are running out of space and resources but I think the way it’s being handled – it’s not aligned with the ideas about human rights that I think this country was founded on so I’d like to see it done a little differently.

Obey!

Obey! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Martha Cooper’s Influence: Inspiration, Imitation, and Flattery

Martha Cooper on 12 oz. Prophet

Obey Giant Website

New York May 1 Coalition

May Day Shepard Fairey Exhibition

Arrested Motion Website

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Shepard Speaks to you on the Street, On Video, On Radio

As President Obama comes to New York this morning, some people are suggesting that he is actually coming to see the new Shepard Fairey wall on Houston Street, rather than a 3 blocks north at Cooper Union to speak about Financial Reform on Wall Street.

You can catch some more cool “on the scene” pics from Becki Fuller on The Street Spot HERE.

And listen to Shepard Fairy’s interview on WNYC with Brian Lehrer yesterday.  And a furtherance of the interview on video here:



And Big Ups to Animal New York for this funny interview with Shepard Fairy on Houston Street a couple nights ago, where he addresses Guantanamo, Obama, campaign finance reform, and how the Banksy movie was marketed and is received.

Read more interesting Shepard Fairey news at Animal New York

Watch out kids – Shepard uses swear words in some of these answers.

from ANIMALnewyork.com

Additional on the street interview:

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Shepard Fairey’s in New York – Ready for May Day?

Deitch Projects is blowing their wad for the final NY show for the gallery and Shepard Fairey is getting ready for it. The Os Gemeos wall is now under wraps, and Fairey put up a wall of his own in front. Here are some street digital verité shots by the fabulous Lera Loeb as she walked by the site and somehow resisted the temptation to jump in the scissor lift.

photo © Lera Loeb

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Lera-Loeb-Shep-Fairey2

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Lera-Loeb-Shep-Fairey3

Read more about the ‘May Day” show HERE.

mayday_poster

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Through the Eyes of Aiko: A Personal View of Street Art

A BSA Treat – Lady Aiko writes an essay remembering her early days in New York and her recent trip to Shanghai

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Street Artist Aiko is known for her powerful and sexy depictions of women – whether they are stencils, silkscreens or collage.

Aiko's site welcomes Christmas with this image that is typical of the strong and overtly sexual nature of some recent works.
Aiko’s site welcomes Christmas with this image that is typical of the strong and overtly sexual nature of some recent works.

The Tokyo-born founding member of Faile is a world tavelling artist, with her hometown these days in Brooklyn.

Among the shows she has participated in recently were the LOVE MONSTER solo exhibition at Joshua Liner Gallery NYC, the Apocalypse Wow exhibition at MACRO Future in Rome Italy, and three shows this past week in the Art Basel Miami Beach fair; “The Wynwood Walls” with Deitch Projects, “Graffiti Gone Global” with James and Karla Murray and “Mural for Electric Pickle” at Primary Flight.

"Love Monster" a piece at the Joshua Liner Gallery by Aiko
“Love Monster” a piece at the Joshua Liner Gallery by Aiko

Aside from all that fabulous globe-trotting, Aiko is a also a pretty down-to-earth person who enjoys work with artists and giving to the community. She has taken part in a number of murals in New York over the last few years as part of the Younity Collective, a 40+ member group of women in NYC who love to paint large projects together.

This image by Aiko comes from an piece she put in the
This image by Aiko comes from an piece she put in the Bicycle Film Festival Show in New York this summer

We are very excited that Aiko has written a very nice piece for BSA detailing her recent experiences in Shanghai, China this fall. In it she recalls a small event that recalled her early memories of starting out as a New Yorker and a street artist.

Shanghai street scene (photo by Aiko)
Shanghai street scene (photo by Aiko)

My Shanghai Evening
by Aiko

The last time I visited Shanghai was in the spring of 2006. It’s been only 3 years but it seems like the city became much more powerful, more of a commercial center, and more developed. Instead of finding my favorite local massage place and cute junk stores that I liked to go to, I found many squares with new buildings, luxury stores, offices, restaurants, bars, and international chains like Starbucks and Burger King.

The largest city in China, Shanghai is getting ready to hold World Expo next year. Shanghai’s landmark, The Bund, is getting fully renovated for the event and tall new buildings are flashing colorful lights and neon signs in the night sky. The whole city is full of dust caused by the never-ending demolition and construction.

The neighborhood of Mo Gan Shan Lu reminds me a bit of Chelsea and Soho in NYC; old industrial warehouses turned into Chinese contemporary art galleries. I’ve heard that there is a lot of tourist traffic from different countries that comes to shop for very expensive art there. As a sharp contrast, there are long graffiti walls and abandoned houses on the other side of the same street. I am sure they will be torn down and turned into more fancy buildings soon. Knowing this, I had a sudden impulse to leave a little piece of my art on this street before heading back to Brooklyn.

A typical scene of a neighborhood under construction (photo by Aiko)
A typical scene of a neighborhood under construction (photo by Aiko)

At 8pm that night, I arrived in Mo Gan Shan Lu on that same street. This was when I realized that some of those “abandoned” houses are actually not abandoned. Some of these darkened houses still have families living there; they were having dinner and drinking on the street with small chairs and tables.  I got a little nervous. What if these people start to scream at me and call the police? What if they want to charge me money or create another kind of issue?  I’ve had some trouble like that before in different cities and I was worried that this may be the moment when my first street art experience in Shanghai could be end up as the worst one…

I thought for a moment and said to myself, “Well. Let me just hit it. It takes only a few minutes anyway.”

One of the pieces made expecially for this trip. (photo by Aiko)
One of the pieces made expecially for this trip. (photo by Aiko)

As soon as I started spraying on the wall, people in the neighborhood also noticed the noise and the smell of a stranger. I had to keep going – I didn’t want to leave an unfinished piece there. A few people walked toward me and as they came closer they began talking to me.  I don’t understand Chinese, but their voices were very loud. Their loud voices attracted other people, who began to gather around me. I kept only looking at the wall until I finished it.

When I was finished, I looked around. I didn’t realize until then but I had a large audience standing behind me watching and talking.  Men and women, even a couple of security guards from across the street.

I said “Ni hao (hello)” with big smile, then “Hao?(good work?)”. A few of the guys started yelling at the painted wall, and it sounded to me like they were very upset. I asked my friend to translate.

“You don’t need a bikini on her. Next time you should better paint her just naked,” said one drunk man as he pointed out the breast. This made all of us begin laughing.

“Oh watch, a cop is coming!,” somebody else said. They pointed to an old lady slowly walking towards us to see what was happening. We all laughed at that joke too.

Amazingly, it seems like I was some entertainment for their evening and we all had a little moment together.  My mission had ended very well!

A well-dressed friend poses in front of Aiko's new pieces (photo by Aiko)

A well-dressed friend poses in front of Aiko's new pieces (photo by Aiko)

That night overlaps with memories of my early street art experiences in NYC. When I arrived in NY, I was not able to speak English at all and I felt a great disability because of it. Art was (and still is) my language to communicate with people and to get to know about a city.  I am happy to create art, share with friends and random people who I meet in the public sphere and I like to see them enjoying my art.  My experience on that night made me think about how I first got into street art and why I love street art again.

Aiko in context. (photo by Aiko)

Aiko in context. (photo by Aiko)

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OS Gemeos: Brazilian Street Artists’ Mural was a highlight of Summer’s Crop on the Streets of New York

The consensus is that the summer in the City goes by way too fast. This year is not an exception.  But the harvest has been good.

The green markets that dot NYC’s 5 boroughs boast some great fresh produce that isn’t sprayed with pesticides or that will give your children 3 eyes. From Bay Ridge to Borough Park to Bowling Green to Bronx Borough Hall to Sunnyside and St. Georges, the tomatoes were the superstars this September – big and meaty and fragrant.

And the bold brassy sunflowers have been clamoring into our little apartments and putting a smile on our worried faces.

The summer crop of Street Art of course has been bounteous! The creative output from the indomitable, wild, and restless street artists – home-grown and imported – seems record-breaking.  From commissioned public murals with photo-ops for  politicians to the secret stick-up kids on newspaper boxes, the voices of people on the streets grew.

The Mural
The mural by Os Gemeos (photo by Jaime Rojo)

One truck-load of fresh produce that won a NYC Street Art blue-ribbon this summer was the giant colorful pop-surrealist mural by the hard-working and gentle twins from São Paulo, Os Gemeos.

Gustavo working on the mural
Gustavo of Os Gemeos (photo Jaime Rojo)

During a brief 2-week growing period, Gustavo and Octavio labored in the fields of dreams and eye-popping colors while the curious and the hungry stood by on the sidewalk in clusters of cameras and black books, day after day watching the fantasy open up and reveling in the sunshine.

Os Gemeos
The ladder meets the scissor lift (Os Gemeos) (photo Jaime Rojo)

With cans of aerosol and buckets of latex, they worked the fertile soil of Deitch Projects orchards on the corner of Houston and Bowery under an intense heat and punishing sun.

Os Gemeos. Detail
Detail from Os Gemeos mural (photo Jaime Rojo)

In a location that had been painted in previous summers by other migrant street artists including Haring and Scharf, the Brazilians delighted the weary New Yorkers and curious tourists with their vivid imaginations.

The Twins
Octavio and Gustavo; Os Gemeos (photo Jaime Rojo)

To say goodbye to the summer of 2009 we pay homage to their industry and talent once more. Long after the summer sun fades and the grey cold winter takes us over, this bright gift from Os Gemeos will remain on Houston Street.

Octavio working couldn't help himself and found time to paint on a truck
With a history that started in writing graffiti in the late 1980’s, the brothers also found time to paint on a truck (photo Jaime Rojo)

Os Gemeos
Os Gemeos (photo Jaime Rojo)

Os Gemeos Detail
Detail from Os Gemeos (photo Jaime Rojo)

Os Gemeos Detail
Detail from Os Gemeos (photo Jaime Rojo)

Os Gemeos
A tribute to Dash Snow was added when he died during the creation of the mural, adding a historical touchstone to the event. (Os Gemeos) (photo Jaime Rojo)

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Images of the Week 08.30.09

Images of the Week 08.30.09

ur Weekly Interview with the Street

Black and White against blue backdrop
Summer Geometric Abstraction (photo Jaime Rojo)

C215
C215 with an OverUnder flyby (photo Jaime Rojo)

Deekers
Who holds the key to this Tainted Lovebox? (Deeker) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Sacer as interpreted by Deitch
Sacer as interpreted by Deitch (photo Jaime Rojo)

Gats and Gaia
Gats and Gaia (photo Jaime Rojo)

Double Cows Gaia
Double Cows (Gaia) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Haculla
Reminds me of that classic Dead Kennedy’s song (Haculla) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Haculla does Operah
Haculla has raunchy time with Britney and does Oprah the following Thursday (photo Jaime Rojo)

I Love NY
I Do Too!  (I Love NY)  (photo Jaime Rojo)

Ink
I Wanna Rock-n-Roll All Night!  (Ink) (photo Jaime Rojo)

King Kess
If you say so…. (King Kess) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Momo
(Momo) (photo Jaime Rojo)

NohJ Coley pays tribute tot he late Dash Snow
NohJColey pays tribute to the late Dash Snow (photo Jaime Rojo)

OHM
And if that’s not enough, I’ve gotta take the kids back-to-school shopping! (OHM) (photo Jaime Rojo)

OHM
The Lion King on Crack (OHM) (photo Jaime Rojo)

OHM
OHM (photo Jaime Rojo)

OHM
Do you know the way to Rockefeller Center?  I got cut-off from my tour group during a rainstorm in 1998 (OHM) (photo Jaime Rojo)

OHM
OHM (photo Jaime Rojo)

OHM
OHM (photo Jaime Rojo)

OHM
OHM (photo Jaime Rojo)

Pink lipstick on a Red Nose Pit Bull
Pink lipstick on a Red Nose Pit Bull (Tazmat Red Nose) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Bishop 203
I see you and my heart takes flight… (Bishop203) (photo Jaime Rojo)

C215
Welcome to the entrance, now tell me the secret word, you fool, and kiss me!  (C215) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Celso
(Celso) (photo Jaime Rojo)

General Howe
Battle of Bushwick! (General Howe) (photo Jaime Rojo)

General Howe
Guarding the Graffiti Kingdom (General Howe) (photo Jaime Rojo)

General Howe
Halt!  Don’t move.  Hand over that Snickers Bar before we call in the rest of the troops. (General Howe) (photo Jaime Rojo)

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