All posts tagged: Avoid Pi

AVOID PI: Street Art, Graff, Fine Art, and Pantheon

In a few weeks the former Donnell Library on 53rd Street across from MoMA will be host to a grassroots funded and curated historical view of New York’s art from the streets. That phrase is specifically chosen by the show’s curators, Joyce Manalo and Daniel Feral, as an inclusive term for all manner of public art on the streets here since the 70s including graffiti and Street Art.  A show visible through the giant windows from the street, Pantheon will feature live performance as well as installation, printed materials for you to read about history, guerilla librarians, and incognito street docents – a sparkling job description that sounds like a naughty librarian fantasy involving Julie Andrews.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Copyright-AVOID-nowhereaction-CRAvoid “Nowhere Action” (photo © Chelsea Ragan)

We recently spoke with one of the exhibiting artists of Pantheon who goes by the name Adam Void (or AVOID pi) and who plumbs the murky depths between fine art, graffiti, and Street Art with no apparent desire to align himself with any one of them. An experimenter and explorer, a lot of his early stuff looks clearly like a small survey of graffiti’s modern vocabulary. Sometimes raw gestural markings with perhaps cryptic meaning, his love for symbolism, data, abstraction, wordplay, and a recently begun formal art education all are a swirl inside his head. Where it all settles will be a surprise to everyone, including him. This search also seems emblematic of the moment.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Copyright-AVOID-everythingsmall

Avoid “Everything Small” (photo © Mike Sachse)

A wisenheimer of the highest order, he describes himself this way; “AVOID likes to take long walks on the beach, riding freight trains, and destroying the dominant paradigm.” We’ll just say that he’s a rebel inquisitively looking for a cause, making art along the way.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Copyright-AVOID-doihaveavoice

Avoid “Do I Have a Voice” (photo © Mike Sachse)

Mr. Void spoke with Brooklyn Street Art about labeling art movements and the current state of a very fluid story of art on the streets and in the galleries.

Brooklyn Street Art: As you look at the evolution of graffiti and street art some people have observed that there appears to be an erosion of once distinct practices. Where do you see these two going at the moment?
AVOID: The distinctions between the two genres are disappearing. Graffiti Artists are becoming multi-media with the inclusion of zines, posters, stickers, rollers and blasters into the already full table of tags, throws and pieces. Street Artists are experimenting with the use and importance of signatures as well as expanding into sculpture and video. Both groups have a dialogue on the streets and in their personal lives. Recently Graffiti and Street Artists have shown their fine art together with many big name art world’ers at big name galleries. This is an exciting time for the intermixing of worlds.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Copyright-AVOID-avoidadh-CR

Avoid ADH (photo © Chelsea Ragan)

Brooklyn Street Art: Is it crucial to the understanding or appreciation of someone’s work to describe it as Graffiti or Street Art or Fine Art?
AVOID:
Often times the artist’s intentions are misunderstood. I personally enjoy the ability to make a painting either in the street or in a gallery and not have to explain the meaning, to have it remain an enigma. A word or phrase can be interpreted a million different ways by a million different viewers. Am I a Graffiti Writer, a Street Artist, a Fine Artist, a Musician, a Writer, a Filmmaker, or am I just an artist? This is decided by the context the work is seen and the viewer’s interpretation.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Copyright-AVOID-luckystrike-in-progress

Adam Void, “Luckystrike”, a work in progress. Detail (photo © Avoid)

Brooklyn Street Art:What role does Street Art play in New York today?
AVOID:
Well, if anything, Street Art has allowed for the illumination of the giants of my personal history. Through shows like PANTHEON as well as 112 Greene St. and many others, the once unsung heroes of graffiti’s past are coming to light, thankfully while many of the writers are still alive to see it happen.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Copyright-AVOID-seaside-adam-void-w-ryan-neely-detail

A rather painterly painting by Mr. Adam Void, “Seaside”; a brand new collaboration with Ryan Neely. Detail (photo © Avoid)

Brooklyn Street Art: How has your artwork changed in the last year?
AVOID: The literal “street” art of Brooklyn and NYC has been replaced by spotwork on Baltimore’s abandoned spaces, freight trains and track sides. I get more time to experiment as well as a chance to hang out and soak up some mental space. I am continuing to not categorize my work. I’m just making what I want, when I want, where I want.

BSA >><><>>><> BSA >>><><><<<<>><> BSA ><<><<>><>>>

3 days left to Support Pantheon – if they don’t hit 5K, they lose it all.

http://kck.st/gw3L7J @pantheonnyc #streetart
Please help Daniel and Joyce, the curators of “Pantheon” by donating to the Kickstarter Campaign. They are very close to reach their goal and you can make this happen. With only less than three days left on the Kickstarter timer your involvement is crucial. Click on the link below and please give:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1959564116/pantheon-a-history-of-art-from-the-streets-of-nyc

PANTHEON extends its gratitude to its Media Partner Brooklyn Street Art, it’s Media Sponsors , Hyperallergic, The Street Spot, Gothamist, Streetsy; the Exhibition Sponsors WM Dorvillier & Company, Inc.; Crescent ArtistsConveyor Arts. Special thanks to the Woodward Gallery, NYC for the loan of Richard Hambleton’s, Fountain of Youth, 1982.

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Happy New Year! BSA Highlights of 2010

Year-in-review-2010-header

As we start a new year, we say thank you for the last one.

And Thank You to the artists who shared their 11 Wishes for 2011 with Brooklyn Street Art; Conor Harrington, Eli Cook, Indigo, Gilf, Todd Mazer, Vasco Mucci, Kimberly Brooks, Rusty Rehl, Tip Toe, Samson, and Ludo. You each contributed a very cool gift to the BSA family, and we’re grateful.

We looked over the last year to take in all the great projects we were in and fascinating people we had the pleasure to work with. It was a helluva year, and please take a look at the highlights to get an idea what a rich cultural explosion we are all a part of at this moment.

The new year already has some amazing new opportunities to celebrate Street Art and artists. We are looking forward to meeting you and playing with you and working with you in 2011.

Specter does “Gentrification Series” © Jaime Rojo
NohJ Coley and Gaia © Jaime Rojo
Jef Aerosol’s tribute to Basquiat © Jaime Rojo
***

January

Imminent Disaster © Steven P. Harrington
Fauxreel (photo courtesy the artist)
Chris Stain at Brooklyn Bowl © Jaime Rojo

February

Various & Gould © Jaime Rojo
Anthony Lister on the street © Jaime Rojo
Trusto Corp was lovin it.

March

Martha Cooper, Shepard Fairey © Jaime Rojo
BSA’s Auction for Free Arts NYC
Crotched objects began appearing on the street this year. © Jaime Rojo

April

BSA gets some walls for ROA © Jaime Rojo
Dolk at Brooklynite © Steven P. Harrington
BSA gets Ludo some action “Pretty Malevolence” © Jaime Rojo

May

The Crest Hardware Art Show © Jaime Rojo
NohJ Coley © Jaime Rojo
The Phun Phactory Reboot in Williamsburg © Steven P. Harrington

June

Sarah Palin by Billi Kid
Nick Walker with BSA in Brooklyn © Jaime Rojo
Judith Supine at “Shred” © Jaime Rojo

July

Interview with legend Futura © Jaime Rojo
Os Gemeos and Martha Cooper © Jaime Rojo
Skewville at Electric Windows © Jaime Rojo

August

Specter Spot-Jocks Shepard Fairey © Jaime Rojo
“Bienvenidos” campaign
Faile studio visit © Jaime Rojo

September

BSA participates and sponsors New York’s first “Nuit Blanche” © Jaime Rojo
JC2 © Jaime Rojo
How, Nosm, R. Robots © Jaime Rojo

October

Faile “Bedtime Stories” © Jaime Rojo
Judith Supine © Jaime Rojo
Photo © Roswitha Guillemin courtesy Galerie Itinerrance

November

H. Veng Smith © Jaime Rojo
Sure. Photo courtesy Faust
Kid Zoom © Jaime Rojo

December

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Fun Friday 05.21.10 from BSA

Fun-Friday

Thanks to everybody for the shout-outs about Fun Friday.  We love you too.

Style Curator Natalie Kates Went to the “Street Art New York” Auction with her Video Camera

I saw her at the party/auction/fundraiser on April 24th at Factory Fresh but I didn’t know she was shooting a video!  So cool because she captured the fun crowd and the funnier DJ mixologists Sifunk and Garmunkle, who really rocked our already over stimulated brains with a rhythmic cut-copy-paste blend of funkiness. (get Paul’s New Mix FREE here) Anyway, thanks Natalie!

Free Arts NYC

And on that note, thank you to all of the street artists who generously donated their time and work and creativity to the auction, which raised $16,000 for the programs at Free Arts NYC.  Thank you also to the staff and many volunteers who helped make that show work – BSA recommends these people and these programs that provide valuable services to our neighbors and to NYC kids.  A number of Street Artist already know about their programs and have volunteered as Big Brother/Sister mentors and worked with kids and families in the programs.  Here, Cynthia and Alexis talk about their experience:



This year again, Free Arts NYC has committed to serving an additional 1,000 children to meet the high demand in New York for their programs. We hope you will consider donating today by clicking here to help them reach this important milestone and close the remaining $25,000 gap needed to expand their programs.

“UR New York” Shows You How They Do It

UR New York, true born and raised New Yorkers, not transplants like most of us, are taking their street art game another step forward in a positive way. You see their cool canvasses, but do you have any idea how many steps are involved in making a print?

Here’s a studio stop-action video that shows how the New York Duo 2Easae and Ski just churned out their first print called “Arsenic” with Art Asylum Boston.  They only made 10, but it looks like a lot of effort.  Using cans and brushes, these brothers are combining the best of their experience into their work.

Ron English Hits the Welling Court Walls Early

UR New York, Street Artist Ron English has put up a bunch of new wheat paste posters on the Welling Court Mural Project in Queens, NY. The festival starts tomorrow and already the stuff that is up is worth the trip for this community event. English is taking the opportunity to lambaste Consumerism, Greed, Militarism, Religious Hypocrisy, Romanticizing Guns, and Advertising Hammerlocks on your Head — you know, all the lite topics – with a variety of graphic lampoons a la Mad Magazine in the 70’s.ee

Ron English's new work at Welling Court Walls this weekend

Ron English's new work at Welling Court Mural Project this weekend (image courtesy Ron English)

See more pictures from Ron English’s online journal at Juxtapose HERE.

ROA on the Roof

You may have missed this, and I’m so happy with it – so that’s two really good reasons to post this new NEW YORKY video we made with ROA this week.  Have a great weekend!


BSA…………BSA…………BSA…………BSA…………BSA…………BSA…………BSA…………BSA…………

Artists that were part of the “Street Art New York” Auction Benefit for Free Arts NYC were Abe Lincoln Jr., Alex Diamond, Anera, Avoid Pi, Billi Kid, Bishop 203, Blanco, BortusK Leer, Broken Crow, C Damage, C215, Cake, Celso, Chris RWK, Chris Stain, Creepy, Dain, Damon Ginandes, Dan Witz, Dark Clouds, Dennis McNett, Elbow Toe, EllisG, FKDL, Gaia, General Howe, GoreB, Hargo, Hellbent, Imminent Disaster, Infinity, Jef Aerosol, Jim Avignon, JMR, Joe Iurato, Jon Burgerman, Keely, Know Hope, Logan Hicks, Mark Carvalho, Matt Siren, Mint and Serf, Miss Bugs, NohJColey, Nomadé, Peru Ana Ana Peru, PMP/Peripheral Media Projects, Poster Boy, Pufferella, Rene Gagnon, Roa, Royce Bannon, Skewville, Specter, Stikman, Swoon, The Dude Company, Tristan Eaton, UR New York (2esae & Ski), Veng RWK

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Symbols and Signals: An Interview with Avoid Pi and “infinity”

Symbols and Signals: An Interview with Avoid Pi and “infinity”

brooklyn-street-art-infinit

“Babel Code <osmotic transmissions> Opens Tomorrow night at Mighty Tanaka

The Ozmotic Transmission Screen is luminescently iterative

The Ozmotic Transmission Screen is luminescently iterative. The artists stand behind the screen used for creating their show print. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

A visit to the studio with street artists “infinity” and Avoid Pi is much like a trip to a darkened pre-historic cave in the foothills of the Pyrenees with writings and symbols scratched into the wall. Main differences in this case are A. there was carpeting, and B. no archaeologists were there to help me decipher the markings on the walls, moldings, ceilings, tables, shelves, and art work.

Screening the new prints, the second series from Mighty Tanaka featuring a collaborative duo. 20 of the prints will be available. (photo Steven P. Harrington)

Screening the new prints, the second series from Mighty Tanaka featuring a collaborative duo. 20 of the prints will be available. (photo Steven P. Harrington)

 

But I know a silkscreening when I see it, and one was in progress for the bi-color print created by both artists for their show opening tomorrow. The excited art scientists/ laboratory technicians/ secular shamans pulled art out of large zip-locked bags, pointed to pieces in progress on the wall, and hung new screen prints on a makeshift clothesline, – all while talking in great depth about their new collaborative show, and how much they have enjoyed preparing for it.

Hanging out the prints to dry (photo Steven P. Harrington)

Hanging the prints to dry after the first color is screened on. (photo Steven P. Harrington)

 

You will be hard pressed to find a more organized and intellectually charged approach to art-making in the street art milieu; the signs and exegesis and calendars – all handwritten – are helpfully displayed everywhere in the studio. If these methodic mad artfessors are not completely ready at showtime with a beaker of martini in hand, I’ll eat my pad of graph-paper.

The two artists took time to answer some questions for Brooklyn Street Art below:

The finished collabo print ready to fly out the window (photo Steven P. Harrington)

The finished collabo print ready to fly out the window (photo Steven P. Harrington)

 

Brooklyn Street Art: Is this your first collaboration in a show? AVOID pi : In 2009, we both painted the ceiling for the “Work To Do” group show at 112 Greene St . infinity: Later in the year, Avoid collaborated on a duo performance of my day-long composition, SPOOL: DRAWING IN SPACE .

An splash of collaborative inspiration from infinity and Avoid Pi (photo Steven P. Harrington)

An controlled explosion of collaborative inspiration from infinity and Avoid Pi (photo Steven P. Harrington)

Brooklyn Street Art: Who had the idea that your styles would compliment one another? infinity: The first time i saw AVOID’s pi symbol in 2007, I posted a picture to Flickr with the title “Kindred Spirits.” Eventually we met, hit it off due to a surprising amount of shared interests, started including each other in group shows, and painting together. Specifically though, AVOID hooked up this exhibition last fall with Alex Emmart from The Mighty Tanaka Gallery. Alex used to work at AdHoc and has now started his own gallery in DUMBO.

Avoid's series of re "These were just secondary products made from the creative process. They are highly inspired by DarkClouds stickerboard pieces from his show with GoreB and Armer, where he used the leftover results from the sticker making process - and the incidental marks created.

Curtains from a Fung Wa Chinatown bus – I am not kidding. Avoid Pi sewed them together for this canvass and stretched it. DONE! Smells like cigarettes and Moo Goo Gai Pan. Kidding! (photo Steven P. Harrington)

Brooklyn Street Art: Can you talk about the significance of symbols to you as an artist? AVOID pi : Symbols simplify complex concepts into easily and quickly understood images. The single or two-word street tag name can be isolated into a series of symbols or letters to allow for abstraction and reinterpretation while remaining in the graffiti tradition. Bronze and Peyote ADHD are currently leading the streets in symbolic tag innovation.

infinity: Culture is a semiotic haze of signs stratified and codified in the systems they inhabit, becoming an aura enshrouding, circumscribing, and permeating everything with a cerebral vibration, an osmotic transmission, signals mediating our interpretation of reality. From the tangible transmissions of fashion to the ethereal wraiths of language, symbols not only contain the consciously constructed messages of the sender, but also their cultural biases influence our comprehension of the world. The mentally-rendered shapes of symbols, these shadows of meaning, are ephemeral containers, historically maleable forms, constantly changing and evolving for many reasons, including the indefatigable imagination of the human spirit, the capitalist system’s need to feed its novelty engine, and for the anti-status quo’s mission to challenge and break down prevailing systems. Once a symbol is emitted as street art or graffiti into our culture, it becomes imbued with a subversive power that may irrupt into and infiltrate the dominant system through it’s demiurge circuitry, hopefully creating aspirational sparks that resonate on an immanent level, a DNA depth charge, uplifting and inspiring a positive trajectory for human kind’s next level mutation.

gf

Avoid’s series of re “These were just secondary products made from the creative process. They are highly inspired by DarkClouds stickerboard pieces from his show with GoreB and Armer, where he used the leftover results from the sticker making process – and the incidental marks created. “Incidental Abstractions”. In layman’s terms, the canvasses are clothing that Avoid Pi wore making art. It’s kind of like when Elvis used to mop his brow with a towel onstage and throw it into the audience. Avoid Pi does not have sideburns however. (photo Steven P. Harrington)

Brooklyn Street Art: When you think about the art you both have done on the street, it appears to be a form of communication but the messages are not necessarily obvious. How would you like people to be affected by your work? AVOID pi : Whether it’s white out tags, scratchies, drip tags, spraypaint, stickers, wheatpaste, rollers, blasters, zines, videos, music or fine art; ALL MY SONGS ARE PROTEST SONGS. All of my artistic techniques and methods are DIY: accessible & reproducable by the public at large. I want the viewer to feel empowered to interact and participate in the public discussion.

infinity: Unlike many street artists, I am not a populist. More like a pure research scientist. The best form for visual or textual communication is not always the simplest and clearest presentation. In order to express some subjects or challenge prevailing forms, a new alien language may need to develop. Epiphany can’t always be expressed or understood through archaic or prosaic aesthetics. As time passes, new ideas become slogans and singular expressions become cultural cliches. Rallying the masses is one thing; Enlightenment is another. Mystification as cerebral provocation. Babel code.

A canvas too tall for the studio is merely accordion-folded up the wall onto the ceiling for "infinity".

A canvas too tall for the studio is merely accordion-folded up the wall onto the ceiling for “infinity”. Infinity, “Yeah, I like the way this started turning out, once I figured out how the materials worked. I got here because I enjoyed DeKooning so much and I like the way he tends to put a lot of lines down and then erase and like the palimpsest creates a lot of layers. I think the mistakes that you leave or the parts that maybe look unfinished create a certain tension that is more interesting than a piece that looks so completed and perfect” BSA: “There looks like a lot of nesting of your lines that create a tension.” Infinity: “Right. And also the grid between the more organic shapes. There is a lot of ‘going back-and-forth’. I end up erasing and re-drawing more than actually laying down the first lines. Some of my other pieces are totally improvised, which I like also. It’s very exciting, very primal.”

Street artists are such slackers, aren't they? (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Street artists are such slackers, aren’t they? Here are some “Notes To Self” from “infinity” on the completion of his piece. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Brooklyn Street Art: When you think of public art or street art, is the dialogue between artists only, or is it meant to create a dialogue with the public? I ask this because frequently the graffiti tradition was more about dialogue between writers as peers. This seems to have been dismantled with the opening up of “street art”.

AVOID pi: All public mark-making from modern graffiti, to advertisments and memorials functions simultainously on both the industry and layperson perspectives. Advertising insiders think about campaigns in a different way than their prospective customers. The average pedestrian sees public art differently than the artists themselves. Street Art has opened the dialogue between the artist and the viewer through placing the artists in the context of the gallery and museum; the understood cultural signifiers of artistic value.

infinity: I’m not intentionally out to create dialogue with anyone in particular. it’s more about the idea of a subtle influence, a homeopathic injection, an osmotic transmission of the sign through the walls of our buildings, our culture, our cell walls, our DNA.

Avoid in High Definition: a selection of pieces framed from Avoid Pi will also be on display (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Avoid in High Definition: a selection of pieces framed from Avoid Pi will also be on display (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Brooklyn Street Art: After the challenge of creating pieces collaboratively, how do you think your individual work will change, if at all? AVOID pi: infinity has enhanced my abillity to see culture as multiple layers of systems and symbols that constantly mutate, combine and divide. This helps me understand how multiple contradiciting theories and practices can co-exist.

infinity: Collaboration is essential for me because of the challenge and inspiration of exploring someone else’s aesthetic vocabulary in relation to my own. Burroughs and Gysin’s THIRD MIND is an interesting theory about the phenomenon of a “third mind” being created when artists collaborate. Our collaborative pieces were an experiment in this kind of supportive, complementary, and recombinant atmosphere. AVOID and I probably differ most in terms of composition. He tends towards a calmer, spacious feel, whereas I always want to fill every spot on the page with marks, creating a busy, frenetic space. So it was interesting attempting to leave the negative spaces alone or guide them into taking on a graphic quality. Also, more specifically, I bought a wood burning pen and carving set which I used in our collaborations, and plan to use more in the future.

A piece on the wall in the studio that will not be in the show but was obviously consulted in the planning. A table top from the studio that 'infinity' and Avoid and other visiting artists have added to over the last few years will be on sale as a canvas however. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

A piece on the wall in the studio that will not be in the show but was obviously consulted in the planning. A table top from the studio that ‘infinity’ and Avoid and other visiting artists have added to over the last few years will be on sale as a canvas however. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Brooklyn Street Art: Can you talk about the cool zine you’ve made for the show? infinity: the zine is a collage of images and texts by current compatriots (Factory Fresh, ELC, ADHD, Pandemic, etc), historical aesthetic influences (McGee, Panter, Revs, Doury, etc), quotes from revolutionary readings of street art and graffiti (Baudrillard, Mailer, etc), and images of the art from BABEL CODE. Kind of a catalog in the format of a zine. It was inspired by AVOID’s zine series called PERMANENT INK *****************)(&)(^)*%*&_)(*_)*)(^(*%$(^(&**_)*(_)&)(^(^&$&^#!^$#*%* Avoid pi and infinity would like to give thanks to Skewville for preparing the silkscreens to print the cover, Royce Bannon for PR and marketing, Devon Groomes for PR and silkscreening, and Kat Amchentseva for photographing the art and the opening. And of course Alex Emmart at Mighty Tanaka Gallery, Brooklyn Street Art and Chashama, the arts organization. ………….BSA………….BSA………….BSA………….BSA………….BSA………….BSA………….BSA………….BSA

Babel Code : osmotic transmissions, Art from the minds of AVOID & Infinity – details

Location: Mighty Tanaka Studio in D.U.M.B.O Duration: May 21st – Jun 11th, 2010 Cost: FREE Contact: Mighty Tanaka , alex@mightytanaka.com MIGHYTANAKA.com

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Avoid PI and infinity In the Laboratory Making Preparations for their Bubbling Babbeling Show on the 21st

Babel Code : osmotic transmissions and JPEGS

You won’t find too many eggheads in the circles I run in.  Well maybe, but I’m too dim to realize it.

It is pretty evident when you meet street artists “infinity” and Avoid Pi that you may need some footnotes to follow if you want to really understand what direction they are going.  Don’t worry, I’m not completely snowed – just watch their feet, right?

A collabo called "The Treachery of Words" by infinity and Avoid Pi

A collabo called "The Treachery of Words" by infinity and Avoid Pi

The upcoming dual show by these somewhat mad scientists on the 21st at Mighty Tenaka should be a jolting trip of symbolism and secret languages and DNA strands – and a developing visual vocabulary that reliably is improving.

Avoid Pi "All One"

Avoid Pi "All One"

These are a few behind the scenes images of prep for the show,

An "infinity" 2 sided collabo.

An "infinity" 2 sided collabo.

as well as a sparky new video piece they made to promote it, which makes the hairs stand up on my arm. Fun times!

(even though it says May 20 in the video, it’s the 21st)

More about this show and these artists to come.

Babel Code : osmotic transmissions, Art from the minds of AVOID pi & infinity

  • Location: Mighty Tanaka Studio in D.U.M.B.O
  • Duration: May 21st – Jun 11th, 2010
  • Mighty Tanaka
    68 Jay St., Suite 416 (F Train to York St.)
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Click to see large

    Click to see large

    Web: www.mightytanaka.com

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    MIGHTY TANAKA PRESENTS: “OSMOTIC TRANSMISSIONS” ART FROM THE MINDS OF AVOID AND INFINITY

    MIGHTY TANAKA
    Brooklyn_Street_Art-042110BabelCodeCard-1
    Version:1.0 StartHTML:0000000179 EndHTML:0000006922 StartFragment:0000002414 EndFragment:0000006886 SourceURL:file:///Users/Jaime/Desktop/Babel%20Code%20Press%20Release.doc

    Mighty Tanaka Presents: Babel Code <osmotic transmissions>

    Art From the Minds of AVOID pi and infinity set to open May 21st – June 11th

    Brooklyn, NY – April 24, 2010 – Thought provoking Street Artists AVOID pi & infinity team up for their first duo show together entitled Babel Code <osmotic transmissions>.  Peering through a semiotic Petri dish intermixed with sub-conscious communication, Babel Code uses primitive and mystical sources as well as runic references, which charges the works of art with a power and energy beyond the objects themselves.

    Babel Code challenges the viewer to reconsider the basic notions of communication and cultural change, while providing a closer look into the artist’s own techniques of non-verbal interactions. Building upon a symbolic language shared by both artists, their influences range from a resonance of mixed signals and errant transmissions.

    Their symbolism ranges from introverted Platonic deliberation and chemical structures to numerology and DNA; anything and everything from hobo marks and astronomy to grammar diagrams and physics equations.

    About the Artists

    AVOID pi was born the year IBM released the Personal Computer. He was raised in South Carolina, on a diet of freight trains, deep forests, punk rock, and DIY. He moved to the coast on the eve of the millennium to study both graffiti and philosophy among the flooded streets of Charleston. In 2006, he moved to New York in order to interact on a global stage. He is working on a language of abstractions in the public space, as well as empowering the political potentialities of graffiti.  www.avoidpi.com

    infinity was born in 1962 in the Midwest. His family moved to Manhattan in 1970. Obsessions with comic books, heavy metal, and graffiti eventually embraced studies in expressionism, semiotics, and the sciences. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin at River Falls in 1986 and The School of Visual Arts in 1989. He has followed an erratic career path, but always continued his aesthetic and scholarly research.

    OPENING RECEPTION:
    Friday, May 21, 2010 – 6:00PM-9:00PM, and closing June 11, 2010

    Mighty Tanaka
    68 Jay St., Suite 416 (F Train to York St.)
    Brooklyn, NY 11201
    Hours: M-F 12PM to 7PM, weekends by appointment only
    Office: 718.596.8781

    Email: alex@mightytanaka.com

    Web: www.mightytanaka.com

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    Street Artists Give to NYC KIDS: A gift of Art and Self-Confidence

    With 60 artists, 73 artworks, over 500 guests, and a happy vibe created by the mad-scientists Sifunk & Garmunkle at music mission control, the Street Art New York Silent Auction Benefit for Free Arts NYC was a huge success. At the end of the night most of the walls were bare, and most of the pieces remaining had been purchased by absentee bidders. With animated conversations, excited bidding, and occasionally rambunctious dancing (Andrew), the night was really an excellent example of how the street art community is alive and well, and how the work of street artists is in demand.

    Thank you to Ali and Ad at Factory Fresh for co-hosting the event, thank you to all the volunteers from Free Arts NYC who helped to hang it, pack it, and execute the auction, and special thanks to all the artists who so generously donated their pieces to the event.  Also special thanks to all the blog friends (so many!) who wrote about this event and all the people who Tweeted it continuously, as well as the print publications who helped get the word out.  We hope to thank you all personally some time, if not via email. Because of your help, the gallery and back yard were jammed with more people than anyone could remember.

    Thank you to Reid Harris Cooper for sending us these pictures he took at the crowded party (we threw in a couple crowd shots from the cellphone). Reid actually scored the Blanco piece in the auction.  If anyone else has pics from that night we would love to see them.

    [flagallery gid=2 name=”Gallery”]

    For more images by Reid Harris Cooper see his Flickr page HERE

    See images and details of the pieces at our Flickr – which will be updated by the end of the day

    Participating artists were: Abe Lincoln Jr., Alex Diamond, Anera, Avoid Pi, Billi Kid, Bishop 203, Blanco, BortusK Leer, Broken Crow, C Damage, C215, Cake, Celso, Chris RWK, Chris Stain, Creepy, Dain, Damon Ginandes, Dan Witz, Dark Clouds, Dennis McNett, Elbow Toe, EllisG, FKDL, Gaia, General Howe, GoreB, Hargo, Hellbent, Imminent Disaster, Infinity, Jef Aerosol, Jim Avignon, JMR, Joe Iurato, Jon Burgerman, Keely, Know Hope, Logan Hicks, Mark Carvalho, Matt Siren, Mint and Serf, Miss Bugs, NohJColey, Nomadé, Peru Ana Ana Peru, PMP/Peripheral Media Projects, Poster Boy, Pufferella, Rene Gagnon, Roa, Royce Bannon, Skewville, Specter, Stikman, Swoon, The Dude Company, Tristan Eaton, UR New York (2esae & Ski), Veng RWK

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    STREET ART NEW YORK BENEFIT AT FACTORY FRESH FOR FREE ARTS NYC

    Street Art New York at Factory Fresh
    SANY-BENEFIT-Header-PR

    “Street Art New York” Silent Auction Benefit for Free Arts NYC

    For more information please contact:
    Email: info@StreetArtNewYork.com; Web: www.StreetArtNewYork.com

    “Street Art New York” Silent Auction Benefit for Free Arts NYC
    Saturday, April 24, 2010
    Event Time: 7-11 pm

    Auction Time: Promptly 7 pm to 9:30 pm EST
    Absentee bidders please register with Bernadette DeAngelis at bernadette@freeartsnyc.org or call 212.974.9092.

    Location: Factory Fresh Gallery
    1053 Flushing Avenue
    Bushwick, Brooklyn, New York 11237
    between Morgan and Knickerbocker, off the L train Morgan Stop


    SILENT AUCTION BENEFIT BY STREET ARTISTS FOR “FREE ARTS NYC” AND A PARTY TO MARK THE RELEASE OF NEW BOOK
    “STREET ART NEW YORK”.

    To celebrate the release of the new book “Street Art New York” and to benefit the programs of Free Arts NYC, original artworks by a stellar array of today’s Street Artists from New York and beyond will be featured in a silent auction to take place on April 24, 2010, from 7 pm to 9:30 pm at Factory Fresh Gallery in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

    The Benefit and the Artists

    The Benefit, to be held at one of New York’s epicenters for the thriving new Street Art scene, Factory Fresh Gallery, will feature an incredibly strong selection of today’s Street Artists joining together for one night as a community to benefit NYC kids from disadvantaged backgrounds as the numbers of poor and low-income children in New York continues to rise. Representing a renaissance in modern urban art at the dawn of a new decade, this artists will very likely be the largest collection of 2010’s street artists in one location.

    With exciting new work by 60 of today’s Street Artists

    Abe Lincoln Jr., Alex Diamond, Anera, Avoid Pi, Billi Kid, Bishop 203, Blanco, BortusK Leer, Broken Crow, C Damage, C215, Cake, Celso, Chris RWK, Chris Stain, Creepy, Dain, Damon Ginandes, Dan Witz, Dark Clouds, Dennis McNett, Elbow Toe, EllisG, FKDL, Gaia, General Howe, GoreB, Hargo, Hellbent, Imminent Disaster, Infinity, Jef Aerosol, Jim Avignon, JMR, Joe Iurato, Jon Burgerman, Keely, Know Hope, Logan Hicks, Mark Carvalho, Matt Siren, Mint and Serf, Miss Bugs, NohJColey, Nomadé, Peru Ana Ana Peru, PMP/Peripheral Media Projects, Poster Boy, Pufferella, Rene Gagnon, Roa, Royce Bannon, Skewville, Specter, Stikman, Swoon, The Dude Company, Tristan Eaton, UR New York (2esae & Ski), Veng RWK

    About the Book

    Street Art New York, by Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo, with a foreword by Carolina A. Miranda, published in April 2010 by Prestel Publishing (Random House).

    The authors of the successful Brooklyn Street Art book (and founders of BrooklynStreetArt.com) expand their scope and take readers on a fast-paced run through the streets of New York, along the waterways, on the rooftops, and up the walls of today’s ever-morphing vibrant Street Art scene as only NYC can tell it.

    With an introduction by noted cultural journalist Carolina A. Miranda (C-Monster.net) putting Street Art in the context of the personal experience of a New Yorker, readers will be taken aback by this compelling portrait of the state of urban art featuring work on the streets of New York from 102 artists from around the world. With a collection of aproximately 200 images by exciting new comers as well as beloved “old masters” such as New Yorkers Swoon, Judith Supine, Dan Witz, Faile, Skewville, WK Interact, LA’s Sphepard Fairey, Brazil’s Os Gemeos, Ethos, Denmark’s Armsrock, France’s Space Invader, C215, Mr. Brainwash, Germany’s Herakut, Belgium’s ROA, London’s Nick Walker, Connor Harrington, and the infamous Banksy.

    About the Publisher, Prestel Publishing (Random House):

    With its impressive list of titles in English and German, Prestel Publishing is one of the world’s leading publishers in the fields of art, architecture, photography, design, cultural history, and ethnography. The company, founded in 1924, has its headquarters in Munich, offices in New York and London, and an international sales network.

    The Silent Auction

    Commencing at 7 p.m. and ending at 9:30 p.m., the silent auction will be administered by Free Arts NYC, and all proceeds from the auction go directly to the non-profit. Highest bidder wins!

    SANY-BENEFIT-Footer-PR

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    Images of The Week 12.20.09

    Brooklyn-Street-Art-IMAGES-OF-THE-WEEK_1009Our Weekly Interview with the streets

    Avoid for Sale
    It’s official. Avoid Pi is for Sale (© Jaime Rojo)

    5003 DADA
    5003  & Hobby Horse (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    Bast
    The never bashful Bast (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    Deeker
    Honey, why do you still go with that man?  You know he’s just trash! (Deeker) (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    Imminent Disaster
    Imminent Disaster (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    Kosbe
    Kosbe is rocking it  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    Kosbe (detail)
    Kosbe is a detailed mess of color (detail) (© Jaime Rojo)

    Horse Imminent Disaster (detail)
    Horse Imminent Disaster (detail) (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    Imminent Disaster (detail)

    Imminent Disaster (detail) (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    Imminent Disaster (detail)

    Horse Imminent Disaster (detail) (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    Police
    New technology aids the crime fighters. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    Paper Monster
    Paper Monster made this hot babe in a fur trimmed winter coat to keep her warm. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    Swoon
    Swoon is chained to the gate.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    Swoon (detail)
    Swoon (detail) (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    Peru Ana Ana Peru
    See no evil, see no evil (Peru Ana Ana Peru) (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    We Are Coming
    Simultaneously? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    UFO 907
    UFO 907 is blasting off in all kinds of directions these days; All hail the alien. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

    Veng RWK
    A very funny move toward cut outs in this piece by Veng RWK (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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    Alex Emmert- Miami Schmiami! – Brooklyn is the Schnit! Go to Mighty Tanaka!

    You may have thought that the giant sucking noise you heard was all the street art being pulled down to Miami this week (or Miss California’s video tape turned up to 12).

    Have NO Fear – Mighty Tanaka is Here!

    Alex Emmart and Caleb James are proud to introduce MIGHTY TANAKA

    Partners Alex Emmart and Caleb James are proud to introduce MIGHTY TANAKA, the gallery

    Brooklyn’s Street Art Scene is so gargantuan that we can afford to let Half the Borough go to Art Basel this week and we still have enough amazingly clever artists to OPEN A BRAND NEW GALLERY TONIGHT – which will be packed thank you very much.

     

    Hellbent for Metallic Lace! (Hellbent) (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

     

    Mighty Tanaka Gallery, a labor of love turned a reality with the vision of Alex Emmart, who has been toiling behind the scenes for a couple of years to build a rather strong and fairly eclectic collection of art and artists – many of them fresh out the gate.

    Alex also confesses to creating this new gallery in the neighborhood of Dumbo partially to force himself to get off his couch and go to work  instead of running his nascent biz out of his apartment.  He’s been painting a newly built gallery space in the Brooklyn neighborhood by the water between the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges and nearly all his clothes are covered with white paint and his brain has fried, but tonight’s the opening and he is ready.

     

    Avoid (from the Inflation Project) (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

    Avoid (from the Inflation Project) (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

    The inaugural show “Hybridism” gives a nod to oft-expressed opinion these days that the walls between street art and fine art are continually dissolving – as fine art hits the streets and street art hits the living room over your couch.

    "Vintage" by Destroy & Rebuild (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

     

    Emmart brings to the game an education in museum studies, the experience of curating a handful of shows that explore the street-graff-fine art continuum, and a solid dedication to building relationships based on respect.

     

    Mad sticker skillz are leading to a crazy-A fine art maker (Kosbe) (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

     

    This too, may be a glimpse of the future of the art world where gallerists treat people fairly and are respected because of it.  Just ask any of the nextgen Millenial artists he is working with.

     

    Fire-O-Glyphic infinity created an pyrric mantelpiece (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

     

    At this auspicious opening, a statement of hope amidst an economy gone ape-crazy, Emmart takes the moment to share the credit on his Facebook page; Mighty Tanaka studio is one of the finest and most exciting spaces I know of due to the hard work of committed individuals. A VERY BIG thanks to Garrett Wohnrade, Caleb James, Adri Cowan, Mari Keeler, Heidi Alasuvanto, Insuh Yoon, John Michaels, the Mighty Tanaka featured artists and everyone else who has supported Tanaka during this transition. You all inspire me.”

    Reginald Pean "Gentlemen of Leisure" (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

    Reginald Pean “Gentlemen of Leisure” (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

    Mighty Tanaka Gallery/Headquarters:

    68 Jay St.
    Suite 416
    Brooklyn, NY. 11206

    Phone #: 718.596.8781

    contact@mightytanaka.com

    Subway: F train to York St.


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    AD HOC hurtles BKMIA to Miami right on Time!

    When your van breaks down and dies en route to Florida from New York, you might get a little cranky and freaked out because you have 40 people’s art in the back and are somewhat behind schedule.

    You haven’t met the Buxtons.

    Ad Hoc and Eastern District in Miami Thursday Through Sunday
    Ad Hoc and Eastern District are in Miami as BKMIA Thursday Through Sunday

    Brooklyn gallerists Garrison and Alison from AdHoc found themselves at a U-Haul truck rental agency when it was obvious that fixing their jalopy wasn’t going to happen anytime soon.

    “Yeah we’re definitely making some tangy lemonade out of the lemons we’ve been collecting,” says he.

    With a show to mount and open in 2 days (Today) in Miami, they asked for a 14 foot or 18 foot truck but U-Haul was out of that size. So they upgraded to the 26 foot, which made the whole process of moving art a lot easier, and together they steered the MIGHTY BKMIA SHIP southward.

    “We just got another beautiful space today”, says Garrison, now that they’ve arrived with a truck of Brooklyn Street Art in the land of orange groves and mobs of art-hungry models in stilettos.  They are spreading out into their new giant space on 4141 Northeast 2nd Avenue, which is right across the street from their original space. They had a lot of people’s work with them, “Yeah there was no way it all was going to fit in the original space we had”

    And the art itself?  One of the first things to be unpacked was this badass sculpture.

    UFO and Ryan Doyle at BKMIA
    UFO and Ryan Doyle at BKMIA (photo courtesy Ad Hoc)

    This is an interactive kinetic piece by Ryan Doyle and UFO of 907 crew.

    What'r YOU lookin' at? (courtesy Ad Hoc)
    What’r YOU lookin’ at? (courtesy Ad Hoc)

    According to the artists, it’s made of found objects and crafted using caveman spaceship technology. Amazingly similar to the squidlike image in the photo below, this sculpture is mechanized with two worm head, gear drive electric wheelchair motors, and is fully operational with a joystick. And yes, Martha, he does look like a writer (check out the fat marker in his tentacle).

    Perhaps a sketch? (photo ©Jaime Rojo)

    Perhaps a sketch? (photo ©Jaime Rojo)

    Ad Hoc is partnering with Brooklyn neighbor Eastern District in a conceptual gallery called AE District to show off some of Brooklyn’s finest street artists, graff writers, and related contemporary artists in a 40+ name show. Names you might know like London Police and Gaia and Morning Breath will be joining talented newbies like NohJColey and Mario Brothers.

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    It’s Getting Hot Down There: ART BURN MIAMI

    Eartburner-mpresario and street artist Celso has a sense of humor about most things, and street art in particular.

    Without reading too much into it, it’s easy to understand how some of the hype surrounding the humongus Art Basel in Miami this week does tend to turn off the hot-headed anti-capitalist anti-consumerist anti-consumption anti-homogenization-of-everything-in-our culture-types in our midst.

    Not that any of these artists are in that category, but it is pretty funny to learn that this one-day only art show ends with all the art being burned, and none of it added to your burgeoning street-art collection.

    But Marge, what are they trying to say? While we prefer to create original content and not simply copy-and-paste, sometimes it just makes sense to take it directly from the press release >>

    ART BURN: The Most Combustible Art Show in the World
    International Contemporary Art Expo & Immolation

    **To be held at LAS TIAS, 2834 N. Miami Ave., in Miami’s Wynwood District at sunset on Thursday, December 3rd, 2009***

    (Miami, FL) — ART BURN, the most combustible art show in the world, will combine an international selection of original art with fire. Original works on canvas, wood and paper by a selection of more than three dozen international artists will be displayed and then flambeed in Miami on the evening of Thursday, December 3, 2009 at sunset. The exhibition/grilling, curated by NYC artist El Celso, will take place in the Wynwood Arts District, within walking distance of Miami’s lesser contemporary art fairs.

    An exclusive selection of more than three dozen exceptional pieces by the hottest renowned artists and sizzling, cutting-edge newcomers will be displayed from 1pm until sundown. After the brief exhibition, all of these original works will be burned for the public’s viewing pleasure. Nothing is for sale.

    We will be exhibiting and burning new works by:

    Stikman
    El Celso
    Aurora Robson
    infinity
    Nick Fortunato
    Skewville
    Jayne Surrena
    Darkcloud
    Fabian Pena
    Elbow-Toe
    Rex Dingler
    LA II
    Royce Bannon
    Leonardo Furtado (Brazil)
    Rednose
    Gore-B
    Buildmore
    Abe Lincoln Jr.
    Cake
    Paul Kostabi
    Ellis-G
    Jeannete Vidalia
    2esae
    Avoid Pi
    Stefano Pasquini (Italy)
    Keely
    Destroy & Rebuild
    Veng
    F. Trainer
    Ski
    Joanne Mattera
    Deeker
    Sam Horine
    Avone
    Die Dose (Germany)
    Billi Kid
    Evelyn Metzger
    Robots Will Kill
    Adam Vincentz
    Garrison Buxton (Peripheral Media Projects)
    Michael DeFeo
    James A. Willis
    Dalva
    Kristina Maria Lopez
    Hargo
    Ray Bradbury & very special guests TBA

    You can even follow the events on Twitter at @elcelso and @cmonstah.

    SPONSORS
    C-MONSTER.NET
    The official media sponsor of the ART BURN VIP Lounge

    HYPERALLERGIC
    The official blogazine, critic and beer sponsor of ART BURN

    BROOKLYN STREET ART
    The official street art and corporate snack sponsor of ART BURN

    KINGSFORD Charcoal
    The unofficial grilling partner of ART BURN

    We’ve been assured that all local laws and safety precautions will be observed.  At least Miami is a coastal town so they are near water.

    Enjoy this hunk o burnin’ luv….

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