All posts tagged: Thailand

A ROA Diary Update in Pictures

A ROA Diary Update in Pictures

A ROA update today – with many exclusive photos here for BSA readers with personal pictures taken and selected by the artist himself.

The Belgian Street Artist, whom we long ago christened as an “Urban Naturalist”, has quite defined the category. He’s well traveled and well regarded. He can’t seem to stand still; Borders for him are an imaginary nuisance – or at least he would love them to be. By his own admission he is most at ease while up high on a boom lift battling a wall, or making friends with it.

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ROA. BukRuk. Bangkok, Thailand. 2015 (photo © ROA)

From highly commercial and corporate sponsored events to respected grassroots driven or socio-politically rooted organizations with whom he works, ROA brings the animal world into the conversation, sometimes tragically and other times comically. In an inter-connected view of the world and its various natural systems we somehow blind ourselves to our neighbors in the animal category. ROA makes sure that their voices are being considered in enormous and more subtle ways, giving them center stage and first billing.

Here are new pieces from Hawaii, New Jersey, Tahiti, Copenhagen, Italy, Denmark, Coney Island, Australia, Puerto Rico, Arkansas, Harlem (NYC), Bangkok, Dubai, and Belgium. Our sincere thanks to ROA for bringing us on this massive and glorious tour with him so far.

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ROA. Ødense Harbor, Denmark. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Ødense Harbor, Denmark. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Perc Tucker Regional Gallery – Townsville City Counsil. Townsville, Australia. 2015 (photo © ROA)

“Thanks Tegen for dancing in front of the Crocodile and Turtle”

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ROA. Perc Tucker Regional Gallery – Townsville City Council. Townsville, Australia. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Perc Tucker Regional Gallery – Townsville City Council. Townsville, Australia. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Jersey City, NJ. Jonathan LeVine Gallery – Mana Contemporary. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Vieques, Puerto Rico. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Vieques, Puerto Rico. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Just Kids Residency. San Juan, Puerto Rico. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Just Kids Residency. San Juan, Puerto Rico. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Just Kids Residency. San Juan, Puerto Rico. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. The Unexpected. Forth Smith, Arkansas. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. The Unexpected. Forth Smith, Arkansas. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Surface with Soren Solkaer. Copenhagen, Denmark. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Monument Art. El Barrio. East Harlem. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Festival ONO’U. Tahiti – Papeete. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Coney Art Walls. Coney Island, Brooklyn. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. POW WOW 15. Hawaii. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Muratista. Sadali – Sardinia, Italy. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Muratista. Sadali – Sardinia, Italy. 2015 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Dubai Walls. Dubai. 2016 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Dubai Walls. Dubai. 2016 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Chrystal Ship Festival. Ostend, Belguim. 2016 (photo © ROA)

 

 

 

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D Young V and Eddie Colla in Thailand

D Young V and Eddie Colla in Thailand

New images today from Thailand as California artists and frequent collaborators Eddie Colla and D Young V marked the end of ’14.

D Young V creates fearful images of a violent militarized society where people are trapped and distressed, the child-like expressions pinched, the color/bw compositions littered with navigational and directional symbols from software applications, heads swimming in digits, mouths gagged with graphics. Colla’s female figures are rendered perhaps more realistically, but equally spent spiritually, sexually idealized, defiant, and at war.

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Eddie Colla. Thailand. 2014. (photo © Eddie Colla)

In the descriptive text accompanying these images about their year-end excursion and touristing, they paint an apocalyptic scene – references to sex and prostitution and corruption and citywide celebrations at temples as they say they spread their large format wheat-pastes across Bangkok, Pattaya and Koh Samet.  Here are the images they contributed to the Thai streetscape and various abandoned lots. One can only imagine what the children and workers and families walking in these neighborhoods think when they see these images. For their part, the artists returned to their homes and studios in Oakland and San Francisco to create more work.

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Eddie Colla. Thailand. 2014. (photo © Eddie Colla)

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Eddie Colla. Thailand. 2014. (photo © Eddie Colla)

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Eddie Colla. Thailand. 2014. (photo © Eddie Colla)

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Eddie Colla. Thailand. 2014. (photo © Eddie Colla)

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Eddie Colla and we think we can spot a Kora Lee in the background. Thailand. 2014. (photo © Eddie Colla)

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D Young V . Eddie Colla. Thailand. 2014. (photo © Eddie Colla)

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D Young V . Eddie Colla. Thailand. 2014. (photo © Eddie Colla)

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D Young V. Thailand. 2014. (photo © Eddie Colla)

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D Young V. Thailand. 2014. (photo © Eddie Colla)

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D Young V. Thailand. 2014. (photo © Eddie Colla)

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D Young V. Thailand. 2014. (photo © Eddie Colla)

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D Young V. Thailand. 2014. (photo © Eddie Colla)

 

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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Opiemme in Thailand and the Centrifugal Force of Flying Text

Opiemme in Thailand and the Centrifugal Force of Flying Text

Did you see that movie Words and Pictures? A bit sappy and chock-full of 1st world problems, but some good acting and an underlying premise that has been argued for centuries; The battle between the power of words and the power of visual art.

With the proverbial “a picture is worth a thousand words” sending writers into nose bleeds and apoplexy to the delight of painters who insist they illustrate a greater universe, we need to ask what happens when someone uses words to paint pictures? Street Artist Opiemme makes work that embodies the battle, celebrating both.

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Opiemme with Kanaet on the right. (photo © Opiemme)

Here we have recent images of text and letters flying apart and magnetically clinking back together into shapes. These are lyrics, poems, prose. All are written across walls, like their cousin graffiti, but using the technique associated with Street Art – the stencil, sometimes the brush.

It is no surprise that Opiemme is poetic when describing these various new installations while travelling in Thailand. It’s all theoretical, theatrical, mythological, philosophical. He even quotes Italian biologist/geneticist Giuseppe Sermonti.

“We are discovering that we are made of stars,” Opiemme says, “stars born in nebula by materials from the Big Bang. Thanks to gravity, the elements are in a whirlwind-vortex.” As you look at the forms coming together and splitting apart with spiral movements in outer space, clearly the words and the paintings are both fundamental for Opiemme.

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Opiemme with Kanaet on the right and Sanchai on the left. (photo © Opiemme)

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Opiemme. Vortex. Detail. (photo © Opiemme)

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Here is a tribute to Kurt Cobain in the 20th anniversary of his death, featuring a left handed Fender guitar comprised of lyrics from “Even in His Youth”, by Nirvana. Opiemme (photo © Opiemme)

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Opiemme (photo © Opiemme)

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Opiemme (photo © Opiemme)

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Opiemme (photo © Opiemme)

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Opiemme (photo © Opiemme)

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Opiemme (photo © Opiemme)

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Opiemme (photo © Opiemme)

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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Street Art Dispatch from Bangkok, Thailand

Street Artist Blanco grabbed his camera while visiting Bangkok, Thailand this month and discovered walls full of color, character, and even some graff names he’s familiar with in New York. “Utah and Ether are all over the city, crushing it,” he remarks.

His timing for visiting the city was good too because it coincided with the BukRuk Street Art Festival that ran from February 16 through March 17 and featured 27 artists from Thailand and Europe painting murals and installations in the downtown area of Bangkok.

Thanks to Blanco for sharing with BSA readers these new shots he took of both the sanctioned murals and the unsanctioned works left behind by numerous crews on the streets of Bangkok.

Rukkit (photo © Blanco)

Rime (photo © Blanco)

Low Bros (photo © Blanco)

Irak Crew (photo © Blanco)

Akacorleone (photo © Blanco)

UFO 907 (photo © Blanco)

Bangkok local flavor. (photo © Blanco)

Utah . Ether (photo © Blanco)

Tika (photo © Blanco)

Space Invader (photo © Blanco)

MSK (photo © Blanco)

Jace (photo © Blanco)

Jace (photo © Blanco)

Ether (photo © Blanco)

Armandine Urrity . Nicolas Barrome (photo © Blanco)

Utah, Ether, BNE, MMT (photo © Blanco)

Click here for further information about the BUKRUK Street Art Festival

Artists participating in BUKRUK included;

AKACORLEONE Portugal,

ALEX FACE Thailand

AMANDIN URRUTY France

BEN EINE England

BON Thailand

BONOM Belgium

DAAN BOTLEK Netherlands

DEM Italy

HARITORN AKARAPAT Thailand

HATTIE STEWART England

IBIE Spain

KOBBY Thailand

KRUELLA D’ENFER Portugal

LEE Thailand

LOW BROS Germany

MAMAFAKA Thailand

NICOLAS BARROME France

P7 Thailand

RICK HEDOF Netherlands

RUKKIT Thailand

SADDO Romania

SAN Spain

TAWAN WATTUYA Thailand

TIKA Switzerland

TRK Thailand

YUREE Thailand

 

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Images of the Week 06.17.12

Welling Court, in Queens, NYC is a city block where three-family homes intermingle with small family owned business — a nice old-fashioned model with today’s 1st and 2nd generation immigrants taking a crack at an American dream. The art-minded Buxtons, Allison and Garrison, never seem to tire of providing a safe, roomy space to artists to create within and for the third year they have hosted “Welling Court” here in this neighborhood. But it’s more than a bunch of mismatched weirdo art kids getting up on walls with their own vision and isolated from their surroundings. Allison and Garrison want all the kids to play together nicely and that’s why yesterday there were also bicycle races down the main block with a chalk finish line, a section of wall reserved for all ages to try their can skillz, and that’s why moms and dads  brought out food in metal trays and set up barbecues and used a truck as a mobile dj booth to blast cumbias and reggae inflected dance/hip-hop/two-step/classic rock all up and down the block.

As we celebrate Father’s Day today we gotta hand it to the ones who stay involved and engaged in their kids lives, and to the stand-in Dads who give guidance and encouragement to all of us when the real ones aren’t to be found. We also salute the Buxtons’ experiment in building art and community here, where aerosol fumes mix with barbecue smoke and an international bevy of Street Artists come to let their guard down and get their game on. It’s not commercial, often exceeds expectations, and always engenders feelings and behaviors of “family”.  And doesn’t everybody benefit from that?

We begin this Sunday’s Images of the Week with a small selection of some of the completed murals from yesterday. We’ll bring you the full account later in the week. The second part of today’s images show BSA readers some exclusive images of new Street Art sent to us from around the world. Artists include, Brett Armory, Cekis, Dan Witz, Hellbent, Michael Aaron Williams, Olek, R. Robots, Rene Gagnon, Skewville, Skount, Stormie Mills, and Yote.

Let’s start off with this little bundle of joy from New York Street Artist and fine artist Dan Witz, who may have based this portrait on someone he knows quite well.

Dan Witz. Welling Court 2012 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hellbent. Welling Court 2012 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rene Gagnon. Welling Court 2012 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stormie Mills. Welling Court 2012 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stormie Mills. Welling Court 2012 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

OLEK. Welling Court 2012 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dan Witz. Welling Court 2012 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cekis. Welling Court 2012 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Whoops, dropped one!” Rene Gagnon at Welling Court 2012 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

RRobots presents a departure from his usual street fare. Welling Court 2012 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Skewville. Welling Court 2012 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brett Amory doing a miniature portrait series on the street in San Francisco for Spoke Art Gallery. (photo © Berlin Tomas)

Brett Amory in San Francisco for Spoke Art Gallery. (photo © Brett Amory)

Getting ready for take-off! Michael Aaron Williams. Chai. Thailand (photo © Michael Aaron Williams)

Michael Aaron Williams. Chai. Thailand. (photo © Michael Aaron Williams)

Skount shares a lot of “Fisherman Color” in Tel-Aviv at the Old Seaport. (photo © Skount)

Skount. A collaged photo of “Fisherman Color” Tel-Aviv, Old Seaport. (photo © Skount)

Olek in Montreal inspired by Street Artist Stikki Peaches. (photo © Olek)

Olek in Montreal inspired by Street Artist Stikki Peaches. (photo © Olek)

Yote “Flowers for Frederick” A mural dedicated to artist Frederick Brown. (photo © Yote)

Street Artist Yote sends this tribute to an artist and teacher. “Frederick Brown recently passed away and I wanted to dedicate this mural to him. It is entitled “Flowers for Frederick.”  He was best known for his portraits of jazz singers and musicians.  I talked to him on the phone this spring in hopes to get advice on how to loosen up my style and not be such a perfectionist from a real expressionist.  He was too sick to talk for long but I do know he used to instruct students to complete two dozen paintings in a week and things like that to get them out of their head and into painting”~  Yote

Yote “Flowers for Frederick” A mural dedicated to artist Frederick Brown. (photo © Yote)

 

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Martha Cooper, Photographer of Art on the Streets for Six Decades

Martha Cooper landed in LA yesterday and will spend the next week installing her photos and their remixed new versions beside them, even flanking hers like stereo speakers. Since the press release has gone out we thought we’d share with you the bio written by Steven P. Harrington and the promo photo by Jaime Rojo which will appear in a special issue of The Art Street Journal dedicated entirely to her to come out this week.

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Martha and Pablo at home, with a portrait of her sitting on a train car with camera in hand painted by Os Gemeos overlooking the scene. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Martha Cooper, Photographer of Art on the Streets for Six Decades

Written by Steven P. Harrington, this article is featured in The Art Street Journal vol ii – issue v.

The daughter of a Baltimore camera store owner, Martha Cooper’s romance with photography began in the 1940s when bobby-soxers and penny loafers were the sign of edgy youth culture. Her dad, an amateur photographer himself, gave his small girl a camera and together they hit the streets in search of adventure. “Yeah, my father used to take me out and we would take pictures. That’s what I thought photography was…we were just looking for pictures,” she recalls. Six decades later, Cooper is still looking for pictures; meanwhile, many works from her archive are cited as pivotal recordings of the birth of hip-hop culture and its plastic art form, graffiti.

During the cultural upheavals of the 1960s, Cooper earned a Bachelors of Art degree in Iowa, taught English for the Peace Corps in Thailand and rode a motorcycle from Bangkok to obtain a graduate degree at Oxford. As a freelancer and staff photographer in Japan, Maryland and Rhode Island in the early 1970s she moved to the media and art center of New York City to catch bigger fish. Landing a job on the staff of The New York Post in 1977, she discovered that the resistant and competitive boys club of photographers there were reluctant to countenance this scrappy young woman shooting hard news stories and Studio 54 celebrities.

Hungry for discovery, Cooper would spend her time to and from assignments in bombed-out neighborhoods, where she took pictures of kids entertaining themselves with games they devised on the street, often with the humblest of materials. It was during one of those trips that she stumbled on graffiti and the members of its community. She met a young boy who suggested she photograph the work she was seeing, then showed her a stylized drawing of his name, or piece, in his notebook.

Then he asked her if she wanted to meet “The King”.

Following this lead to Brooklyn, Cooper met Dondi, the citywide-famous graffiti writer who kept a published photo of hers in his black book because its background contained one of his graffiti throw-ups. Cooper quickly realized that she had stumbled into a lively street culture and became an avid student of the teen writers she befriended. By the time she took her last news picture for the New York Post in 1980, her primary desire was to capture as many pieces, tags, and trains as she possibly could find. Today, she remarks on her near-obsessive devotion to documenting New York’s graffiti: waking before dawn to hit the street, waiting five hours for a freshly painted #2 train to pass with the sun at her back and countless secret adventures with vandals in train yards, evading transit police in order to pursue a shot.

Joining efforts with fellow graffiti photographer, Henry Chalfant, Cooper proposed putting together a book of their documentation. The pair endured multiple rejections from publishers while lugging around a big “dummy” book with their pictures glued to the pages. Eventually, however, they landed a deal and Subway Art was published in 1984. Although not an immediate success, it came to sell half a million copies and established itself as a holy book for fans, aspiring artists and art historians worldwide.

By the time the 25th anniversary edition was published in 2009, generations of graffiti and street artists had been influenced by it and the hip-hop culture Cooper and Chalfant had captured had gone global.

In the intervening years, Martha Cooper never stopped shooting. Her love of serendipity on the street and the exploration of cultures led her to publish thousands of photos in books such as R.I.P.: Memorial Wall Art, Hip Hop Files 1979-1984, We B*Girlz, Street Play, New York State of Mind, Tag Town, Going Postal, and Name Tagging. Her work has been exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide and published in numerous magazines including National Geographic, Natural History, and Vibe. While she is still shooting graffiti, street art and the occasional break dance competition today, Cooper’s current project involves documenting people and events in Sowebo, a drug-riddled neighborhood in her birthplace of Baltimore.

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Steven P. Harrington is editor-in-chief of BrooklynStreetArt.com and co-author (with Jaime Rojo) of Brooklyn Street Art and Street Art New York, both by Prestel Publishing. He and Jaime Rojo are also contributing writers on street art for The Huffington Post.

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Photographs by Martha Cooper

Martha Cooper ; Remix

with

Original remixes of these photographs in a range of media by Aeon, John Ahearn, Aiko, Bio, Nicer & B-Gee, Blade, Blanco, Mark Bode, Burning Candy, Victor Castillo, Cey, Cekis, Claw, Cosbe, Crash, Dabs & Myla, Anton van Dalen, Daze, Dearraindrop, Jane Dickson, Dr. Revolt, Shepard Fairey, Faust, Flying Fortress, Freedom, Fumakaka, Futura, Gaia, Grotesk, Logan Hicks, How & Nosm, LA II, Lady Pink, Anthony Lister, The London Police, Mare 139, Barry McGee, Nazza Stencil, Nunca, José Parlá, Quik, Lee Quinones, Kenny Scharf, Sharp, Skewville, Chris Stain, Subway Art History, Swoon, T-Kid, Terror161 and more.

Carmichael Gallery is pleased to announce Martha Cooper: Remix, an expansive group show featuring highlights from Martha Cooper’s photographic archive and works by over 50 artists who have created their own unique interpretations of her iconic, historically significant imagery. There will be an opening reception for the exhibition on Saturday, April 9 from 6 to 8pm with Martha Cooper and several of the participating artists in attendance. The exhibition will run through May 7, 2011.

Click on the link below to read BSA interview with Martha Cooper:

http://www.brooklynstreetart.com/theblog/?p=19366

Carmichael Gallery

5795 Washington Blvd

Culver City, CA 90232

April 9 – May 7, 2011

Opening Reception: Saturday, April 9, 6-8pm



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