All posts tagged: Said Dokins

BSA Film Friday: 03.06.20

BSA Film Friday: 03.06.20

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. “Offset” by Nevercrew at Urvanity in Madrid
2. Icy & Sot: “Our house is on fire” By COlabs / Marco Figueroa
3. Said Dokins on Cultura Colectiva

BSA Special Feature: “Offset” by Nevercrew at Urvanity in Madrid

Welcome to BSA Film Friday with a new mural from the Urvanity commercial art fair in Madrid that culls together 30 or so galleries and mounts a public art campaign during the same week. “Offset” by the Swiss muralists called Nevercrew presents a massive pile of bears, one stacked upon the other.

The manner of arrangement of the bears presents creatures of the wild as no more than commodities, in the same way that corporations and countries think they can “purchase” offsets through a surreal trading market where one purchases the right to pollute and kill our atmosphere. In a positive light, the title “Offset” may refer to the practice of biodiversity offsetting, where previous wrongs are righted following a mitigation hierarchy to produce “no net loss” of biodiversity.

Also, bears are really cute.

“Offset” NEVERCREW in Madrid for Urvanity Art Fair 2020

Icy & Sot: “Our house is on fire” By COlabs / Marco Figueroa

The pacing is quick, the reversal of the timeline adds a sense of mystery and mastery to the brothers’ fox-witted ability to communicate horror in a rather elegant way.

See more in yesterdays’ posting Icy & Sot say “Our House Is On Fire!”

Said Dokins on Cultura Colectiva

Mexican muralist Said Dokins talks about his practice and his underlying social practice through coded calligraphy

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BSA Film Friday: 07.12.19

BSA Film Friday: 07.12.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. “Melania”, Directed by Brad Downey
2. Said Dokins. “Runaway Writings” Solo Show
3. “Who’s the Daddy?” A film by Wong Ping

BSA Special Feature: “Melania”, Directed by Brad Downey

Street Artist/Interventionist Brad Downey widens his oeuvre with a documentary, and his exquisite critiques of hypocrisy – and his appreciation of life’s beautiful ironies are still fully intact.

Here in a grassy area between a dirt service road and the Sava River Mr. Maxi Z creates his ode to Melania, a girl born in the same hospital and year as he. Using his chainsaw to coax the immigrant/model/First Lady Melania from this tree whose roots go deep into her Slovenian homeland, the sculptor creates a painted tribute and a direct connection between art and life for all to see publicly. Hearing him describe his work is important, as is appreciating the struggle and sacrifice he speaks of. Hearing a traditional song and reading its lyrics, well crafted with nostalgia and heartache, buttresses the storytelling with context.

For us Mr. Downey’s brilliance is his examination of the assumed, his breakdown of folly, his ability to see. Here he shares his view with us, with warmth and satire. Among his targets, implied at least, may be the art world, the Street Art world, social anachronisms, international power structures, craven corruption. Among his tributes are the creative spirit, individual ingenuity, and the will to overcome. Long live Melania.

“Melania” 2019, Sevenica, Slovenia
A film by Brad Downey Featuring Maxi Z. Production Miha Erjavec Camera Aljaž Celarc Editing Eva Pavlič Seifert Song pevski zbor Bunkarji Sound Editing Simon Kavsek Translation Ana Bohte Assitance Jaka Erjavec Thanks to Son of Maxi Z, wife Jožica, Graveks d.o.o


Said Dokins. “Runaway Writings” Solo Show

Graffiti artist, contemporary artist, calligrapher and curator Said Dokins organizes images, objects and personal questions in his new exhibition at Centro Nacional de las Artes in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. 

With works on paper, on canvas, video, light, and photograph, the show speaks of conflict, community, the empire to the north, and his expansive practice with calligraphy. With each letter, each word, Said Dokins’ strokes free the steps of those who lived between these walls.

“Who’s the Daddy?” A film by Wong Ping

Hong Kong film director/animator/artist Wong Ping creates with the excesses and superficiality of non-stop consumer culture – humorously mixed and mingled with a young man’s insecurities, search for identity, and desire to get laid. His social, racial, cultural, political observations resonate beneath the eye candy. His sense of humor makes the formerly difficult easier to contemplate, the questions now tempered with the colorful absurdity of the world. Consider here, his ruminations on the length and curvature of the penis, among other things one might write in an online public diary.

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BSA Film Friday: 06.01.18

BSA Film Friday: 06.01.18

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. “The US Tapes” with Fatheat and TransOne
2. Said Dokins: Stories of a Word
3. INO: Lost in Greece
4. Low Bros x Viva Con Agua

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BSA Special Feature: The US Tapes with Fatheat and TransOne

“Listen, my only request…. When you’re done doing your thing, do an Italian flag with my daughter’s name on it,” says a guy who is shouting up from the street to the roof where two Hungarian graff writers are preparing to hit a wall with a giant rat in Jersey. That rat looks fantastic as it basks in the blinking glow of the marquee for Vinny Italian Gourmet on the streets in the Newark night below.

That scene alone can stand as their American iconic moment for the US Tapes, but Fatheat and TransOne documented a number of golden moments on their trip this winter to New York, Wynwood, LA, and Las Vegas. Travel with them as they try to square the television mythology of modern America with the one they are encountering in all its ridiculous free-wheeling self satisfied unreflective emotional consumerist funkified freedom*.  Standby for sonic blasts from the cultural pulp soundbook and prepare for a celebrity visit.

Slyly they observe and sample and taste and catalogue the insights by traversing the main stage and the margins, smartly not taking it too seriously, finding plenty of places for wide-eyed wonder and wiseguy sarcasm. Steeped in graffiti history with mad skillz themselves, this is all an adventure. Generous of heart, they also share it with you.

Ready for your Friday road trip?

 

 

Said Dokins: Stories of a Word

You saw great shots and heard the story this week on BSA :

Said Dokins in Queensland: Ghosts, Memories & Language.

Now you can see the video. Oh, word?

 

INO: Lost in Greece

A perfect wistful interlude that turns this massive mural into an interlude.  See more earlier on BSA with “INO and ‘LOST’ in the Port of Piraeus, Greece”.

 

Low Bros x Viva Con Agua

A brief shot with Berlin’s Low Bros as they create a wall “in our own visual language” in Los Angeles.

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Said Dokins in Queensland: Ghosts, Memories & Language

Said Dokins in Queensland: Ghosts, Memories & Language

“This history represents the aboriginal ghostly inscription that circulates between the past and the present, says Mexican Street Artist and muralist Said Dokins as he describes his two new murals in Queensland, Australia.

Said Dokins. “Stories Of A Word” Queensland University of Technology. Brisbane, Australia. May 2018. (photo © Toks Ojo Photography)

As we slowly wake to the idea of decolonizing our institutions, Dokins says he is including the names and stories of people he met in Brisbane to create a collective history, “where the words that describe nature and cultural diversity are intertwined with colonial and globalization references.”

Said Dokins says he asked people to share with him a story of Queensland with a single word. “Stories Of A Word” Queensland University of Technology. Brisbane, Australia. May 2018. (graphic courtesy of the artist).

The new Dokins murals are compositions comprise of his unique calligraphic lettering style, sparkling and ornately street savvy as their curvilinear movement and medallion shapes catch your attention in metal and black. Part of the ‘Brisbane Street Art Festival’ (BSAF) taking place in April and May, Dokins joined other international artists such as Kenji Chai y Cloakwork from Malaysia, Tuyuloveme from Indonesia, Bao Ho from Hong Kong, Rosie Wood from England, and Gris One from Colombia as well as local artists like Sofles, Gus Eagleton, Fuzeillear to create 50+ public facing murals across neighboring towns with a variety of themes and styles.

Said Dokins. “Stories Of A Word” Queensland University of Technology. Brisbane, Australia. May 2018. (photo © Toks Ojo Photography)

Supported by real estate and civic/business interests along with art organizations – Said tells us that the festival of music and arts also worked very close to Alethea Beetson, director of Digi Youth Arts, an organization dedicated to protect aboriginal cultures.

In his research many with the goal of recognizing the decimated, destroyed, and marginalized aboriginal cultures of Australia, Dokins says he used an exercise of participatory art. By speaking with and interviewing local people he found key words and specific phrases. Eventually he asked participants to share with him a story of Queensland with a single word.

With these words he created art.

Said Dokins. “Stories Of A Word” Queensland University of Technology. Brisbane, Australia. May 2018. (photo © Aimee Catt)

Said Dokins. “Stories Of A Word” Queensland University of Technology. Brisbane, Australia. May 2018. (photo © Toks Ojo Photography)

Said Dokins. “The Lost River” Bowen Hills. Brisbane, Australia. May 2018. (photo © Toks Ojo Photography)

Said Dokins. “The Lost River” Bowen Hills. Brisbane, Australia. May 2018. (photo © Toks Ojo Photography)

Said Dokins. “The Lost River” Bowen Hills. Brisbane, Australia. May 2018. (photo © Toks Ojo Photography)

Said Dokins. “The Lost River” Bowen Hills. Brisbane, Australia. May 2018. (photo © Toks Ojo Photography)

Said Dokins. “The Lost River” Bowen Hills. Brisbane, Australia. May 2018. (photo © Toks Ojo Photography)

Said Dokins. “The Lost River” Bowen Hills. Brisbane, Australia. May 2018. (photo © Toks Ojo Photography)

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“The Art Of Writing Your Name” Expands Potential for Both Art & Writing

“The Art Of Writing Your Name” Expands Potential for Both Art & Writing

Niels Shoe Meulman on the cover of The Art Of Writing Your Name by Patrick Hartl & Christian Hundertmark. Publikat Verlags. Mainaschaff, Germany, 2017.

“Writing”, as in the graffiti sense of the word, has become quite tastefully adventurous of late, as calligraffiti pushes and pulls it in height, dimension, finesse. Evolved from our first recorded history, the modern stylizing of the letter form is as fascinating and wild as it is domesticated, the mundanity of your particular tag now veritably swimming in many depths and swirling currents, weaving complex melodies, hitting notes previously unheard.

JonOne The Art Of Writing Your Name by Patrick Hartl & Christian Hundertmark. Publikat Verlags. Mainaschaff, Germany, 2017.

This was inevitable, now that you think of it, this organic and ornate practice of making your mark, and the freedom to explore it came from the street. Mark-making indeed. You can call it “The Art of Writing Your Name,” as have the authors/artists Christian Hundertmark and Patrick Hartl.

Born of many late night talks and collaborative painting sessions together, merging Christian’s abstract graphics and collage with Patrick’s calligraphy and tagging, the two slowly discovered a mutual collection of writers and artists whose work they both admired, a book slowly taking form in their minds. “Our late night sessions also implied long conversations about the evolution of Graffiti to Street Art to urban calligraphy,” the authors say in their preface.

Poesia The Art Of Writing Your Name by Patrick Hartl & Christian Hundertmark. Publikat Verlags. Mainaschaff, Germany, 2017.

Graff writers in the mid 90s Munich scene, both had developed their individual styles beyond the classic street vocabulary, now evermore interested in discovering new materials, forms, processes, influences. Just released this summer, this new collection confidently illustrates what until now may have been evident to only a few; the aesthetics of writing have expanded and permutated far beyond their own roots in graffiti, tattoo, traditional calligraphy.

“Every artist brings a different approach with their calligraphy artwork,” says perhaps the most prominent of the genre today, Niels Shoe Meulman, who blazed into the publishing world with his tome “Calligraffiti” in 2010 after bringing his practice to the street and gallery. “We all come from different experiences and have different things to say.”

SheOne The Art Of Writing Your Name by Patrick Hartl & Christian Hundertmark. Publikat Verlags. Mainaschaff, Germany, 2017.

Indeed the list here includes the literal interpretations to those so far dissembled as to appear purely abstract, the aerosoled, the inked, the drippy, the purely light, the monstrously brushed acrossed floors and rooftops, the molded and bent and aroused into sculpture. Here the letter form is stretched to its limits, far beyond its relevance as part of codified language, more so the malleable warm putty in the hands of the artist, molded and mounted and even mystifying in the service of energy, kineticism, emotion.

“I start with quite randomly placed fat cap tags on the white surface,” says German author/artist Hartl to describe his particular technique, “then I overpaint it like 80% with slightly transparent paint, tag the wall with markers, overpaint that layer again, then I do stickers and posters, rip parts off again, repeat all these steps again and again until I’m happy with the result.”

Said Dokins The Art Of Writing Your Name by Patrick Hartl & Christian Hundertmark. Publikat Verlags. Mainaschaff, Germany, 2017.

Without doubt many will find inspiration in these nearly 300 pages, these insightful interviews with artists like Stohead, Usugrow, Saber, Kryptic, Faust, Carlos Mare, L’Atlas, Lek & Sowat, Poesia, Tilt; the forward by Chaz Bojorquez, the singular, at times stunning, photos and supportive texts.

Made for “graffiti fanatics, hand lettering fans, street art junkies, calligraphy lovers, and type enthusiasts”, co-author Christian Hundertmark edited the respected “Art of Rebellion” series and he knows his audience and this slice of his culture. The 36 artists are not the only ones representing this evolution in calligraphy, but they are certainly some of the finest.

Lek & Sowat The Art Of Writing Your Name by Patrick Hartl & Christian Hundertmark. Publikat Verlags. Mainaschaff, Germany, 2017.

L’Atlas The Art Of Writing Your Name by Patrick Hartl & Christian Hundertmark. Publikat Verlags. Mainaschaff, Germany, 2017.

Tilt The Art Of Writing Your Name by Patrick Hartl & Christian Hundertmark. Publikat Verlags. Mainaschaff, Germany, 2017.

Carlos Mare The Art Of Writing Your Name by Patrick Hartl & Christian Hundertmark. Publikat Verlags. Mainaschaff, Germany, 2017.

Faust The Art Of Writing Your Name by Patrick Hartl & Christian Hundertmark. Publikat Verlags. Mainaschaff, Germany, 2017.


The Art Of Writing Your Name: Contemporary Urban Calligraphy and Beyond by Patrick Hartl & Christian Hundertmark. Publikat Verlags – und Handels GmbH & Co. KG. Mainaschaff, Germany, 2017.

Artists included are Chaz Bojorquez, JonOne, Niels Shoe Meulman, Poesia, Cryptik, SheOne, Said Dokins, Stohead, Usugrow, Patrick Hartl, Lek & Sowat, L’Atlas, Tanc, Mayonaize, Soklak, Mami, Tilt, Blaqk, Soemone, Jan Koke, Jun Inoue, Vincent Abdie Hafez / Zepha, Carlos Mare, Egs, Simon Silaidis, Faust, Luca Barcellona, Bisco Smith, Creepy Mouse, Defer, eL Seed, Rafael Sliks, Saber, Pokras Lampas.

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BSA Film Friday: 05.12.17

BSA Film Friday: 05.12.17

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Calligraphy, Layers and Screen Play; Said Dokins / Ugly Food House
2. Paolo Troilo: The London Afternoon
3. Elisa Capdevila & Ivan Floro for 12 + 1.
4. Jason Woodside and Ian Ross at Nashville Walls Project.
5.  The Infinite Now – Armand Dijcks

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: Calligraphy, Layers and Screen Play; Said Dokins / Ugly Food House

Happy Friday. Time for fun in the studio together.

A snappy glitch-flecked soundtrack lifts and carries this black and white series of brushstrokes, screen sprays, and inky dance steps as layers of calligraphy, automatic pens, Luthis pens, Japanese brushes and a nattering of nibs stack up and slide. Street Artist/fine artist Said Dokins is with the Master Printer of Ugly Food House, Ivonne Adel-Buereos, and the sunset is the theme that inspires all of this activity.

With the world in motion, it is an atmosphere that we desperately try to capture, to somehow document that inspirational moment. Perhaps its not in the activity, but the shared sense of possibility unleashed through play and collaboration.

 

Paolo Troilo: The London Afternoon

Let your multiple brushes at home? No worries, you can use your fingers. Return to your senses, your ability to create gestural motion upon a canvas, the tactile interaction with the world you first learned. Paolo Troilo is clearly inspired by the same beauty and makes a performance of it through the front window.

 

Elisa Capdevila & Ivan Floro for 12 + 1. Contorno Urbano

For the 12 + 1 Project Elisa Capdevilla + Ivan Floro turn this grande dame to the side in Barcelona, an introduction of classical into everyday, for everyone.

 

Jason Woodside and Ian Ross at Nashville Walls Project.

Tough to draw the correlation stylistically between Jason Woodside and Ian Ross but Those Drones/Brian Siskind places them in a series of adoring sweeps of Nashville and it’s real estate, backed by a glowing modern reassuring nostalgia.

 

 

…And a quickie of Jason Woodside’s completed piece via Nashville Walls Project

A focused and glad review of the explosion of color and pattern that Jason Woodside plays for the business improvement district in Nashville.

 

The Infinite Now – Armand Dijcks

Not so much palette cleansing as mind-blowing, awe-inspiring oceanscapes created as cinemagraphs that basically leave you speechless.

Armand Dijcks worked with Australian photographer Ray Collins to set these into infinite motion, surrounded and regaled with music by André Heuvelman from the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra along with pianist Jeroen van Vliet.

May we all be inspired and run out to the world to create the positive change we need to have.

The Infinite Now from Armand Dijcks on Vimeo.

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Said Dokins & Lapiztola : Gentrification in Mexico City’s La Merced Market

Said Dokins & Lapiztola : Gentrification in Mexico City’s La Merced Market

Lapiztola & Said Dokins. Del Barrio / Mi Merced Mexico City. 2017. (photo © Leonardo Luna)

The writing is on the wall. Can you read what it says?

 

Lapiztola & Said Dokins. Del Barrio / Mi Merced Mexico City. 2017. (photo © Leonardo Luna)

“Social Cleansing” is a term used by Said Dokins and Lapiztola when describing the process of a gentrifying neighborhood in Mexico City where the enormous and historical public market called La Merced Market is now gradually disappearing, taking the people who made it possible with it.

Lapiztola & Said Dokins. Del Barrio / Mi Merced Mexico City. 2017. (photo © Leonardo Luna)

Their new piece looks at the destroying of a native culture by the forces of development that feed on its unique energy and character to sell real estate and investment opportunity but in the process negate its very authorship, its right to its formidable historical place in community.

Their new wall contains the messages from Said Dokins within his particular calligraffiti style that is both communication and ornamentation. The composition also features a stencil from Lapiztola of the face of a girl, perhaps from Oaxaca, where her dress would be typical.

Lapiztola & Said Dokins. Del Barrio / Mi Merced Mexico City. 2017. (photo © Leonardo Luna)

The states of Oaxaca and Chiapis have provided the life of La Merced for many decades – the market itself a jewel and historical institution in this neighborhood that has hosted commercial activities for more than five centuries.

“This mural was made within the project called WallDialogue2, which took place in a parking lot where several vendors from La Merced Market pass through everyday,” say the organizers of the program that took place January 20-22.

“The intentions of this project were to generate a discussion site focused on the relation between urban art and gentrification processes.”

Lapiztola & Said Dokins. Del Barrio / Mi Merced Mexico City. 2017. (photo © Leonardo Luna)

Appropriately, we have a poem written by Natalia Saucedo when she was 12 and a girl from this community of the market.

My MERCED (Fragment)

Alert in my heart the market that saw me grow up
Cruelly falls little by little
My life runs here
I can’t let it go.

From here I hear the noise of machines
Little by little
My market destroyed

Ladies and gentlemen, without a job have been left

Be strong
Those who love the market crying inside,
Smiling outside

Withered heart
Traveling hope.

~ Natalia Saucedo

Lapiztola & Said Dokins. Del Barrio / Mi Merced Mexico City. 2017. (photo © Leonardo Luna)

Lapiztola & Said Dokins. Del Barrio / Mi Merced Mexico City. 2017. (photo © Leonardo Luna)

 

WALL DIALOGUE 2 – Nuestro Barrio Wall Painting Jam
ATEA Topacio 25, Centro Histórico, Mexico City
January 20 – 22
Featured Artists: Billy, Blo, Johannes Mundinger, La Piztola, Libre, Mernywernz, Nelio, Pao Delfin, Said Dokins 

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