All posts tagged: photography

BSA “Images Of The Year” For 2018 Video

BSA “Images Of The Year” For 2018 Video

Here it is! Photographer Jaime Rojo of BSA selects a handful of his favorite images from his travels through 9 countries and around New York this year to present our 2018 BSA Images of the Year.

Seeing the vast expressions of aesthetics and anti-aesthetic behavior has been a unique experience for us. We’re thankful to all of the artists and co-conspirators for their boundless ideas and energy, perspectives and personas.

Once you accept that much of the world is in a semi-permanent chaos you can embrace it, find order in the disorder, love inside the anger, a rhythm to every street.

And yes, beauty. Hope you enjoy BSA Images of the Year 2018.


Here’s a list of the artists featured in the video. Help us out if we missed someone, or if we misspelled someones nom de plume.

1Up Crew, Abe Lincoln Jr., Adam Fujita, Adele Renault, Adrian Wilson, Alex Sena, Arkane, Banksy, Ben Eine, BKFoxx, Bond Truluv, Bordalo II, Bravin Lee, C215, Cane Morto, Charles Williams, Cranio, Crash, Dee Dee, D*Face, Disordered, Egle Zvirblyte, Ernest Zacharevic, Erre, Faith LXVII, Faust, Geronimo, Gloss Black, Guillermo S. Quintana, Ichibantei, InDecline, Indie 184, Invader, Isaac Cordal, Jayson Naylor JR, Kaos, KNS, Lena McCarthy, Caleb Neelon, LET, Anthony Lister, Naomi Rag, Okuda, Os Gemeos, Owen Dippie, Pejac, Pixel Pancho, Pork, Raf Urban, Resistance is Female, Sainer, Senor Schnu, Skewville, Slinkachu, Solus, Squid Licker, Stinkfish, Strayones, Subway Doodle, The Rus Crew, Tristan Eaton, Vegan Flava, Vhils, Viktor Freso, Vinie, Waone, Winston Tseng, Zola

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TOR STÅLE MOEN : Wishes & Hopes for 2017

TOR STÅLE MOEN : Wishes & Hopes for 2017

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As we near the new year we’ve asked a special guest every day to take a moment to reflect on 2016 and to tell us about one photograph that best captures the year for him or her. It’s an assortment of treats for you to enjoy and contemplate as we all reflect on the year that has passed and conjure our hopes and wishes for the new year to come. It’s our way of sharing the sweetness of the season and of saying ‘Thank You’ for inspiring us throughout the year.

Tor Ståle Moen is a Norwegian executive turned passionately engaged Street Art fan and photographer whom we first met in Stavanger during the Nuart Festival a few years ago. Donating his vacation time to volunteer with the artists at Nuart, the atmosphere is charged with Tor’s enthusiasm and knowledge about Street Art, artists, and the history of the people and Norway. Today Mr. Moen shares with us one of his photos from this year of art on a very quiet Norwegian island.


Artists: Ella & Pitr from Saint Etienne, France
Location: Utsira Island on the west coast of Norway
Date: August 27, 2016.
Photograph by Tor Ståle Moen

The beautiful island Utsira was the first public financed port in Norway. Since it was finished in 1870, it has provided safe shelter for lobstermen and merchant ships in the harshest part of the North Sea.

Today there are only 200 residents left on the tiny island – a vibrant mix of people of all ages and different corners of the world who share the love of nature and the windy life on an island far at sea.

Even though the community is tiny and isolated, their living tradition of welcoming strangers in distress sets an example to us all. In a time when world leaders calls for protective walls against foreign trade, religion and people escaping war and poverty – the people of Utsira reflects the opposite. They are known for their philanthropic engagement and heartfelt empathy.

Also when it comes to art, they have open-mindedly welcomed a number of street artists to work on their tiny island. The inhabitants are very proud of the art and memories the artists have left behind. The artists visiting have been struck for life by the beauty of the place and the warm, safe and welcoming atmosphere they experienced here.

This person, painted by the french artists Ella & Pitr on a roof top on Utsira, has obviously found his own peaceful and safe haven – and together with him I  wish all BSA friends a relaxing festive season and a tolerant and peaceful 2017

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Ethel Seno : Wishes & Hopes for 2017

Ethel Seno : Wishes & Hopes for 2017

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As we near the new year we’ve asked a special guest every day to take a moment to reflect on 2016 and to tell us about one photograph that best captures the year for him or her. It’s an assortment of treats for you to enjoy and contemplate as we all reflect on the year that has passed and conjure our hopes and wishes for the new year to come. It’s our way of sharing the sweetness of the season and of saying ‘Thank You’ for inspiring us throughout the year.

Author, editor, curator, and cultivated corraler of unruly Street Artists for exhibitions like “Art in the Streets”, Wynwood Walls, Coney Art Walls, and this falls’ “Magic City” in Dresden, which she co-curated with Carlo McCormick, Ethel Seno is the sage point person for many Street Art, graffiti, and contemporary art heads. Endlessly curious and steeped in the geo-political influences and activist roots of Street Art, Seno shares with us this powerful image that shook her conscience this year.


Ieshia Evans in a Black Lives Matter protest
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Date: July, 2016.
Photograph by Max Becherer / AP

I love this photo by Max Becherer, which went viral this summer, because it is an inspiring example of peaceful resistance against state violence. The photo is of a nurse named Ieshia Evans in a Black Lives Matter protest in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in July 2016 after the fatal shooting of Alton Sterling.

Unfortunately the November presidential election marks 2016 like a historical turning point, and makes it more urgent to act on what we believe in; to stand up against any unprovoked aggression, bullying, or terror being inflicted on innocent people, and against the destruction of our social and natural environments.

I am planning to go to the Women’s March on Washington on January 21st because so much is at stake. As a good friend said, we must never normalize rhetoric rooted in fear, hate, greed, and ignorance. My wish for the new year is that we are braver and more empowered to move forward together.

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Photograph by Max Becherer / AP

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Fernando Alcalá Losa : Wishes & Hopes for 2017

Fernando Alcalá Losa : Wishes & Hopes for 2017

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As we near the new year we’ve asked a special guest every day to take a moment to reflect on 2016 and to tell us about one photograph that best captures the year for him or her. It’s an assortment of treats for you to enjoy and contemplate as we all reflect on the year that has passed and conjure our hopes and wishes for the new year to come. It’s our way of sharing the sweetness of the season and of saying ‘Thank You’ for inspiring us throughout the year.

Fernando Alcalá Losa is a talented photographer from Barcelona who has been shooting artists as they create their work on the street for some time. His momentary glimpses into an artists world, or of our world from their viewpoint, are a poignant gift that Fernando captures in a way that few other photographers can.


L’Hospitalet de Llobregat
Barcelona, Spain.
Date: September, 2016.
Photograph by Fernando Alcalá Losa

How important is it to show street art pieces when you are taking pics of street art? Of course, it’s important. All of us love it, don’t we?

But after years of hitting the streets, lots of walking, climbing walls, being on rooftops and sneaking into other people’s houses in order to get the best possible shot of the final result, I’m starting to think that this is not the most important issue for me.

Everyone can go for a walk and shoot a wall. Everyone. But not everyone has the chance of being there during the creative process. And this is what this shot is about.

It’s about being there, right there, feeling the energy of creation. It’s about intimacy, about detail, about the personal connection with the artist, because you were able to be that close. And not everyone can be that close, that’s for sure…

I’m grateful for having the chance of living these moments of proximity, knowing that those artists that you’re shooting at trust you and allow you to be there, right there. And this is what really matters to me as a street art photographer right now.

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Artists: Reskate and Cinta Vidal. Cinta is not shown in the pic. Assistant to the artists: Chea

Project: 12+1 by Contorno Urbano

 

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Chip Thomas’ New Mural, Indigenous People, and #NoDAPL

Chip Thomas’ New Mural, Indigenous People, and #NoDAPL

Street Artist and activist Jetsonorama (Chip Thomas) saw his work pull together a number of people in Durango, Colorado on October 10th as the city and the college celebrated their first ever “Indigenous People’s Day”. His photograph of an indigenous youth named JC Morningstar swinging and kissing her dog was chosen by a group of students from Fort Lewis College, where 24% of the population is indigenous.

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Chip Thomas. Indigenous People’s Day at Fort Lewis College. Durango, CO. (photo © Chip Thomas)

The unveiling ceremony for the mural began with a traditional pow wow prayer by a drum circle and Chip says “the highlight of the day for me was having JC, her dog and her family travel 4 hours to Durango to attend the unveiling before going to the Tribe Called Red show that evening.”

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Chip Thomas. The original photograph of JC Morningstar holding her dog on a swing. Indigenous People’s Day at Fort Lewis College. Durango, CO. (photo © Chip Thomas)

Included in the days’ events were speeches, poetry readings and a demonstration addressing social and indigenous issues including police brutality and solidarity with #NoDAPL in Standing Rock, North Dakota. In fact so many small and large communities and demonstrations have been showing their support with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in its battle against the $3.78 billion Dakota Access Pipeline, that on a recent September day a map showed 100 demonstrations in 35 states and 5 countries.

Clearly Indigenous communities are eager to have their voices heard and their issues addressed. Jetsonorama says he hopes his mural helps.

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A real pow wow, and a prayer. Chip Thomas. Indigenous People’s Day at Fort Lewis College. Durango, CO. (photo © Chip Thomas)

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Chip Thomas’ mural of JC and her dog on the wall with JC’s family on the stage to take a bow. Indigenous People’s Day at Fort Lewis College. Durango, CO. (photo © Chip Thomas)

 

 

 

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Capturing Energy and the Figurative Cosmos Acording To Dustin Yellin

Capturing Energy and the Figurative Cosmos Acording To Dustin Yellin

Countless elements pulling together into one form, directed by will, energy.

Science tells us that we are matter, theologians say that we are spirit. Today we accept that humans are energy. Some innate ordered intelligence allows this energy to direct the laws of attraction/repulsion, commanding quarks and gluons to pull with and against; adding, arranging, discarding elements to the mass of distinct particles and facets that comprise us.

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Dustin Yellin. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

At any moment the inventory of our composition is not what it was yesterday, particular from what it will be tomorrow, always in motion, within it a record of our history. Energy is what dancers summon by their will – then command, allow, direct, capture, release – their collections of atoms electric, a magnetic pulling and propelling together as one, as many, with nuance.

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Dustin Yellin. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Here in February these forms and their energy are frozen in layers of glass, arranged on enormous slides, their components visible without microscope. Dustin Yellin neatly spaces the stacked slices of stilled movement across the cosmos of this great minimalist hall at Lincoln Center and hits them with focused beams of light.

And what do they reveal? A myriad of found objects, clippings, images, textures, mirrors, gestures, memories, imaginings, emotions. The forms and their components blast apart and swirl and swarm and realign. All are in motion, and all are stilled, better seen when you exert your command of motion, your willful direction of energy.

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Dustin Yellin. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. Cross section. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. Detail. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. Detail. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. Detail. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. Detail. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. Detail. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. Detail. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. Detail. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. Detail. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dustin Yellin. New York City Ballet/Art Series. February, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

New York City Ballet is offering free, open hours for the general public to view this exhibition, fifteen works of a larger collection entitled Psychogeographies, on the following dates: Thursday, February 12 through Sunday, February 22 – Mondays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays from 10 a.m. to noon; and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. For further information go to: nycballet.com

 

 

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This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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YZ and Her “Amazone” Women Warriors on Senegalese Walls

YZ and Her “Amazone” Women Warriors on Senegalese Walls

According to historical accounts of the First Franco-Dahomean War, in the 1890s it was the highly trained military women who were chopping off the heads of the French.  Sometimes while they slept.

French Street Artist YZ Yseult has begun her own campaign to pay tribute to the fierce female fighters of the 19th Century West African country of Dahomey, who are more commonly referred to as Amazons. A startling narrative of female power not often heard today for some, but as YZ is researching her own history as a descendent from slaves, her portraits reflect a personal impetus to tell these stories with a new force.  She has named this series of strong warriors on the street “Amazone”.

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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)

Back in her former Senegal now to do research for the project, she says there are many female figures who we may not know of in current times, but who may provide crucial inspiration, possibly bolstering the confidence of women in 2015 to advocate for their positions and opinions. “I want to show warriors from ancient times; revolutionists, anti-colonialists, intellectual women who have written the story of Africa. We need figures to be proud of our roots, to keep fighting for our rights, and to write the story of tomorrow.”

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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)

Wheat pasted on walls in a few cities on the west coast of Senegal, south of Dakar, these proud figures project images of strength and determination even when placed on the corrugated metal of small humble structures. “Many times these small handmade metal shops are owned by women for selling breakfast or bread,” she says of the hut-like edifices. “While doing research on women in Africa, I have been compiling a photographic archive,” she says.

“I’ve been searching for the places that could come into resonance with the subject. I’m looking for locations that communicate the historic perspective of the project as well as those that may draw a parallel with present issues.”

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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)

The campaign is only a few months old, but it is a work in progress and YZ is sure to discover more as she continues to research over the next two, possibly three years. She says she is strongly moved by what she has learned about women who emerged as slaves and from slavery and she feels a connection to that history.

“Many women have fought for their rights and the rights of their people, yet few of them have been recognized for their achievements and many stayed unknown,” she says. “To know where we are going we need to know where we have been, and these stories are important to educate the next generation, especially women.”

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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)

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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)

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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)

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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)

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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)

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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)

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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)

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YZ “Amazone” Senegal. West Africa (photo © YZ)

 

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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This article is also published on The Huffington Post

 
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Jaime Rojo and His Glimmering Series “The Last Picture”

Jaime Rojo and His Glimmering Series “The Last Picture”

The fog rolls in and your city gently disappears into it.

A young man tenderly clings to his lover under a bridge, or is he strangling her?

You are studying the secret and slow language of moving construction cranes traversing and bobbing backward and forward when suddenly a passenger plane cuts silently across the geometry in motion.

These are moments to witness, here and now gone.

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Untitled. Williamsburg Bridge and the stately Empire. Brooklyn, NY. January, 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Capricious.
Magical.
Flowing.

Jaime Rojo describes his photography in the city with those adjectives that evoke movement and something more ethereal than concrete, steel, and glass.

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Untitled. Midtown, Manhattan from the L Train on the Williamsburg Bridge. Brooklyn, NY. January, 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Known for his images of art in the streets, his photos of Street Art appear once a week in a parade on BSA called ‘Images of the Week’. But he always tacks one more at the end – one last picture.

It is always something unrelated to street art. That is, unless you think the city itself is art.

“NYC is compelling whether you are approaching from an airplane or driving in from the outer boroughs or on the train crossing a bridge. It’s just amazing how much industry, how much invention and design has gone into building this city,” explains Rojo about an environment continuously in flux.

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Untitled. Manhattan, NYC. February 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“At the same time it is surrounded by water that provides it with an amazing atmosphere that keeps evolving, depending on the climate. Even though the buildings don’t move it feels like the buildings are constantly changing because of the light, the season, or even the intense fog – it’s like a dream sequence in a movie because you know the buildings aren’t moving but it seems like they are,” he says.

Siting photographers like Wolfgang Tillmans and Richard Avedon as artists whose work inspires him, Rojo hopes to capture a singular poignant moment in a moving scene. “New York is very dense – It’s kind of magical for me to be able to capture an individual in the middle of the street in a city that is so crowded that invariably we are smelling the breath of each other at some juncture. So when I see the opportunity of an individual who is standing or doing something by himself or herself, I have to capture it as one New York minute.”

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Untitled. Times Square, NYC. February, 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“This is a busy intersection in Times Square. People are always going by. It is a cold night. People are hyped up with the Super Bowl. They are wearing, for the most part, monochromatic dark colors. And there is this guy who is trying to make a dollar playing Spiderman. And no one is paying attention to him. He’s doing every single thing possible to get attention and no one cares. I have a series of frames of this but this is the one I wanted to capture. There he is in the middle of this crowd in the intersection with that bright outfit and no one is paying attention.”

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Untitled. SOHO, NYC. February, 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Manhattan, NYC. January, 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Lower East Side, NYC. October, 2012. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Union Square, NYC. July, 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. DUMBO, Brooklyn. August, 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Greenpoint, Brooklyn. October, 2012. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Houston Street, NYC. July, 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Gowanus Canal, Brooklyn. March, 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. East River from Brooklyn, NYC. March, 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Manhattan sky landscape. January, 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Williamsburg, Brooklyn. February, 2012. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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This article is also on The Huffington Post.

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Judith Supine: Unmasked Bridge Climber, Gender Bending and Art

Judith Supine: Unmasked Bridge Climber, Gender Bending and Art

Looks like Judith Supine is probably having a helluva week. He unmasked himself publicly for all, opened a new gallery show, climbed a NYC bridge over the East River to install a sculpture, and released a video of it that inadvertently sparked a mini media/bridge security frenzy.

Also, he created twin “hermaphrodites” with cigarette penises.

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Judith Supine “Golden Child” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Last week during a an open press interview at Mecka Gallery he only talked about the new “Golden Child” show and the fact that he had decided to stop hiding his face – which itself was sufficient news. Most fans of his art never had seen him and many thought Judith was an actual woman because he took his mom’s name as a prank. The stunt-loving Street Artist has always had a penchant for light trouble, whether it was dangling big freakish images off bridges, floating them down the river (reportedly nearly drowning himself), or simply smacking them up in doorways; these twisted fluorescent hallucinations he creates have more personalities than a Sunday talk show with LSD in the candy dish. And we’re not even mentioning his career-long examination of the he/she continuum that could inspire a syllabus in gender studies.

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One of Supine’s new ladies puffing away and staring blankly while nursing a cocktail above the traffic streaming on the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge into Manhattan. (photo © Steve Duncan/Undercity.org)

The video of him on the Ed Koch Queensboro bridge looks like it was coordinated to promote the show, and he has said as much in interviews since then, but now it probably seems ill-timed. He had done bridge art installations at least twice in the past (on the Manhattan Bridge in ’07 and the Williamsburg Bridge in ’09) but recent news items about thrill-seekers trespassing at the new World Trade Center put this video in a new light and caused concern about bridge security.

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A still from a live interview with Greg Kelley and Rosanna Scotto on Fox 5 “Good Day New York” (© Fox5)

The video brought sudden interest and even live televised interview time for the newly unmasked Supine as well as the news that police were reviewing the video and would probably like to interview him as well.

And yet for all his exotic subject matter and the media hubbub swirling around him right now, last week he was perplexed about how to supercharge his creative process  – the same mundane challenge to stay fresh that most artists have.

“Sometimes I get ‘art block’, or I feel like I start to make repetitive images. It’s frustrating. I try to break that by playing little tricks on myself by saying, ‘Alright I’m going to make like ten collages in an hour’ and they are all going to be shitty. But I’m forcing myself to work quickly, so I’m not over-thinking things and I’m trying to break through because its easy for me to get into a pattern,” he explained at Mecka where his new sculptures laid across benches and a couple of assistants helped to finished their construction.

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Judith Supine “Golden Child” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For this show Supine began assembling collages 12 weeks earlier, and through a process of elimination he saw the few images that emerged above the others.

“I began by making 50 or more collages – going through multiple extremes, edits, trying to cut things and edit things down to the core goodness, get rid of the shit”

In kind of a stream of consciousness process, a pulling-together that attracts him?

“Yeah, it varies from day to day. When I do try to make a more narrative set image, I have difficulty doing that, and I feel like it comes off kind of stilted. So I try to keep it loose, and do lots, and then edit and try to find that little kind of gem amongst the crap.”

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Judith Supine “Golden Child” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

With more attention and friendly sorts around than before, who does he look to now that the proverbial road to stardom is getting crammed with yes-men? He points to his brother, a writer of prose with whom he has collaborated creative projects continuously since they were kids.

“I kind of like to make things with my brother as the audience, so I make things that I think he would enjoy. So I have one person that it is directed towards,” he explains as he recalls one of their childhood collaborations, a zine that he illustrated and his brother provided the text for.

“He would also draw and we would staple it all together. Like we kept it in a huge thing we called ‘The Picture Book’. It was almost like a series of them and for a few years we did that. He continued on with that and I think that’s when I started making collages, actually, around that time.”

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Judith Supine “Golden Child” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I would say that I wasn’t directly trying to illustrate. He wouldn’t want me to illustrate. It was more a feel for it. I was more inspired by our visual, written conversation that we had. It was like this ongoing thing where we would like bounce. It was this thing where I was kind of this creative obsessive, and I was living with another creative obsessive. And we were just constantly bouncing things off of each other and being comfortable saying ‘Oh, that looks like shit’.”

“Most people are not comfortable telling you that, even when they think it and they wait and tell someone else afterwards. So it was good to have a true honest critic and a true sounding board and we still do that with each other. When he writes or finishes a chapter he sends me a chapter. When I’m working on stuff I show it to him and ask his opinion and he’ll be like, “no it’s boring” or “that’s good”. I know when he says ‘it’s good’ that it is genuine, you know, sincere. Like creatively we have this sincere honest relationship with each other.

And what would be the best reaction to an artwork that he could get from his brother?

“I like that one”, “That one’s great”.

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A new piece with the collage that inspired it at Judith Supine’s “Golden Child” show. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Presumably Judith’s brother would approve of the pair of dual gender darlings hanging in the main gallery space, a white washed former industrial spot in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn. But the artist thought the average visitor might want to have a cocktail first.

Brooklyn Street Art: So when an individual walks into this space and sees this piece, what is their reaction going to be?
Judith Supine: Probably, “Where’s the bar”?

Brooklyn Street Art: Can you describe these twin greeters that are going to be hanging from the ceiling?
Judith Supine: Yeah they are kind of, you know I’m very interested in the kind of the hermaphrodite* thing, so these are kind of hermaphroditic – is that a word?

Brooklyn Street Art: Yeah that’s a word.
Judith Supine: So these are kind of hermaphrodites with these cigarette penises smoking vaginas with mouths. When you see the front image they form what I would consider a beautiful image and in the back is – a kind of Apollonian/Dionysian sort of thing. The back is a woman getting choked out. It’s sort of an optical illusion thing – like the one face with the two wine glasses inside. So when you walk around back it forms another image.

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Judith Supine. Outdoor, unrestricted installation. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Is it another aspect of that person’s character, the dual nature?
Judith Supine: I mean I know it’s a very well trod path to talk about the duality of man, or personalities. To me I think I would be bullshitting if I didn’t just say I thought it looked cool and it was interesting. It’s not like ‘the duality of man’ or some – there is like a grey area of trying to be honest and sincere and then… it’s not that when I work on these I don’t have these ‘deeper thoughts’ about art but saying them out loud kind of takes the power out of them, trying to articulate them just kind of sounds like bullshit.

So I try to just describe things at face value. But also maybe I have difficulty articulating, translating the thoughts in my head into words and I’m better at translating them into images.

Brooklyn Street Art: Maybe you are just concerned about sounding trivial.
Judith Supine: Maybe. It might be anxiety.

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Judith’s off-the-cuff show with a piece of ripped painting.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: What’s it feel like to be more public with your face?
Judith Supine: On the one hand I think it shouldn’t matter, because I do try to live my life according to the law of God and not the law of man – That type of thing. And I do what I feel is right. But I don’t know, it’s probably fucking stupid.

Brooklyn Street Art: It’s probably stupid?
Judith Supine: I mean it’s probably ill-advised, for obvious reasons. But who knows, I’ve done dumber things.

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Judith Supine models something for spring outside last week as he prepared for his show at Mecka, “Golden Child”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Judith Supine

 

 

Judith Supine “Golden Child” is currently on view at Mecka Gallery in Brooklyn. Click HERE for further information.

 

*Editor’s Note: HuffPost and BSA acknowledge that the more appropriate term here would be intersex and intersex individuals.

 

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Brock Brake Photographs at Shooting Gallery Tonight in San Francisco

Brock Brake Photographs at Shooting Gallery Tonight in San Francisco

In the tradition of modern street photography, Brock Brake is finding places for you to get access to. Sometimes these are physical locations, like under a cavernous underpass and skateboarder hangout at the moment when a police officer is looking at you. Other places are more luminous and ethereal – a singular plane overhead framed by high rise angles flat against the sky. No matter the place he takes you, there is a certain emotional power and a singularity of the experience as you travel in the urban landscape.

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Brock Brake “Roger’s Hand” (photo © Brock Brake)

Featured tonight as one of the new artists who have been in the White Walls / Shooting Gallery ecosystem, it is good to see a talent developing and getting recognition among his peers. Brock has contributed his photos focusing on others work in the streets here on BSA a number of times, so it is a pleasure to see these shots that highlight his unique perspective.

If you are in San Francisco tonight, check out his photos at this very strong group show celebrating the 11th anniversary of the Shooting Gallery that surveys the contemporary and street influenced artists who have made this spot hot for more than a decade.

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Brock Brake “Jesse and Cop” (photo © Brock Brake)

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Brock Brake “Roger” (photo © Brock Brake)

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Brock Brake “Night Plane” (photo © Brock Brake)

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Brock Brake “Fog” (photo © Brock Brake)

 

Shooting Gallery’s 11 year anniversary show An Even Eleven opens today in San Francisco, CA. Click HERE for more details on this show.

 

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MART in Argentina: “buena onda” in the Streets

MART in Argentina: “buena onda” in the Streets

“Graffiti Saved My Life”

Today Brooklyn Street Art has the pleasure to welcome Rosanna Bach as a guest collaborator. A photographer, writer, and Street Art and graffiti fan, Rosanna is exploring her new home of Buenos Aires and documenting whatever attracts her eye. Today she shares with BSA readers images from local Street Artist MART as well as an interview she had with him in his studio. Our great thanks to Rosanna and MART for this great opportunity to learn about his history as a graffiti writer and how it turned into a career as a painter.

MART (photo © Rosanna Bach)

Mart was kind enough to invite me up to his apartment/studio in the barrio of Palermo where he grew up. Palermo is also the barrio where has left his mark, a trail of colorfully spirited murals. Beginning as a graffiti writer, Mart says he has been painting since age eleven. In our interview he shares his artistic and personal evolution over the past fourteen years painting in the street. He also shows us the drawings he’s preparing for an upcoming exhibit.

As I was admiring a compilation of photographs and drawings sporadically hung above the staircase of the entrance, Mart comments to me, “I like photography more than painting.”

Rosanna Bach: Why?
MART:
I find meaning in things that I’m not familiar with. I’m familiar with painting. I know how to do draw, although I don’t draw hyperrealism for example but I know how I could do it. But photography is incredible.

Rosanna Bach: For me it’s the opposite.
MART: Because you’re a photographer.

Rosanna Bach: But anyone can take a photo.
MART: Anyone can paint. Do you understand why I like it? Because it’s not mine.  I feel like painting is my world and photography is another, like dance. I love dance. I’d much rather go to a dance recital than an exhibit. Exhibits don’t captivate me in the way that other art forms do; it’s like “Hmmm.. yes, yes, alright got it.” I’m very quickly able to read the person.

Rosanna Bach: You are interested because you want to learn about other worlds?
MART: But it’s not because I like it that I feel the need to do it myself. You respect what you do otherwise it’s like a lack of respect. I prefer seeing other “worlds” because they move me.

Rosanna Bach: So did you start out painting alone or was it something you did with your friends?
MART: I was very young – already in primary school when I started writing “Martin” all over the walls. My sister had a boyfriend (Dano) who was older then me and he exposed me to hip-hop style graffiti. He taught me how to do it – I thought it was so great. So I started writing “Mart”, Mart, Mart, Mart, Mart, Mart…. all over the streets until I got bored of writing my name, until it made no sense anymore.

Rosanna Bach: How long did it take you to tire of that?
MART: A considerable amount of time but I learned a lot of things. I learned how to paint.

 

MART (photo © Rosanna Bach)

Rosanna Bach: And your style? I’m sure it’s evolved a lot over the years.
MART: I started with graffiti but simultaneously started drawing and that’s what led me to this.

Rosanna Bach: And the figures you draw? I find them to have a lot of hope and a little magic…
MART: I think that’s how I live, in a world of magic all the time. I feel like a very fortunate person, and I’m grateful for that. I don’t take it for granted. I’m lucky that I’m well, I’m happy, my family is well..

Rosanna Bach: This is a mentality that many of us are lacking.
MART: That is the exact reason why I paint in the street; For others, not for myself .  Of course it is for me a little as well because I obviously enjoy doing it but mostly it is for others. That’s why I paint what I paint, things with “buena onda” (good vibes). To paint for myself in a frame would be strange. It’s for everyone, that’s what I find interesting about painting in the streets. And I’m not talking about graffiti because it’s made for a closed community. Like, “Dude you have a great outline” — wonderful. It’s for a micro-world and it can only be appreciated by a select few… “my name” is all about my name my name my name.

 

MART (photo © Rosanna Bach)

Rosanna Bach: But you once started like that as well.
MART: And I’m thankful for that because it’s what made me understand in time that I was painting in the streets for a reason and thanks to graffiti I learned to paint large and I learned quickly.

Rosanna Bach: So your figures are your interpretation of your life. Do you take ideas from your dreams sometimes?
MART: I love dreaming I dream a lot. But they’re not interpretations of my dreams. Or perhaps they are — But I don’t believe so.

Rosanna Bach: You could say that they’re your alter-egos?
MART: Its my feelings, my interior. So, yes.

MART (photo © Rosanna Bach)

Rosanna Bach: When did the transition occur when painting became your profession?
MART: There were two elements that paralleled with each other. One of them was a big job for the Cartoon Network that I got asked to do when I was 18 — an ad campaign with graffiti. And the other was that my friends went to prison. We’d always lived in this barrio, and when I was younger my friends and I were delinquents. So I realized that painting was a way to distance my self from that. With painting I can earn a living and not do bad by anyone. So I chose to paint. It wasn’t only an evolution of me as much as it was as a person, an adult, as a man. I chose that path. I chose the good path.

Rosanna Bach: That’s interesting because usually people relate graffiti to delinquency and vice.
MART: For me graffiti saved my life. I have my house and thanks to graffiti.

Rosanna Bach: Are your parents creative at all?
MART: No. But they’ve always been fully supportive. They’re like my angels. They used to drop me off to paint all over the place. They love me very much.

Rosanna Bach: Do you travel a lot?
MART: When I can and I want to I do. I like traveling. But how can I explain it? I like being patient and I like living peacefully. I don’t feel a burning need to travel, I do it when I want to in the time I want to. I want to live for many years and feel like I’m going to live for many years. That’s also why I don’t send photos of my work all over the place — I don’t like excess. Fame isn’t my prime objective. If people know my work it’s because I wanted them to see it in the street and that they understand what it’s about and what I’m about.

Rosanna Bach: I find that mentality to be quite true to a lot of graffiti artists around here, it comes from quite a pure place.
MART: I don’t know, but I paint for my city.

Rosanna Bach: Do you think you could paint for another city one day?
MART: Maybe. I don’t know, perhaps Berlin. I’m going there for three months this summer

Rosanna Bach: In the graffiti community here, most of them are your friends. So your friends are quite a big part of your working life. Have you ever wondered what it would be like without them?
MART: Good question. I’ve never thought about it. It would be very different. Firstly if I hadn’t met Dano I never would’ve started painting in the first place. I wouldn’t exist. And if my friends left I think I’d go and find them.

Rosanna Bach: If you weren’t painting have you ever thought of what else you would do?
MART: I have but it’s not worth wasting my time to be honest. I paint, that’s what I’m already doing. That’s what I do.

 

MART (photo © Rosanna Bach)

MART (photo © Rosanna Bach)

MART. POETA (photo © Rosanna Bach)

MART (photo © Rosanna Bach

Please visit MART at the site below to learn more about his art.

http://flavors.me/airesmart

To view more beautiful photography from Rosanna visit her Tumblr page below:

http://rosannabach.tumblr.com/

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EVER Finishes New Wall in Baltimore

Argentinian Street Artist “Ever” is still in New York for a couple of days before heading off to Barcelona to do some new paintings and while here he was in Baltimore for the Open Walls he created a huge new piece in his realist/surrealist style. During his process and as he completed the painting Wednesday, Martha Cooper was there to catch the action, as she has been for all of the artists throughout the Gaia-led enterprise this spring. With just a couple more walls to go, including one by MOMO, Open Wall Baltimore is almost. Ever says it was a great experience and sent us a few pics for you to enjoy.  Thanks Ever, y ¡Buen viaje!

Ever in Baltimore (photo © Ever)

Ever in Baltimore (photo © Ever)

Ever shoots Martha shooting Ever. Baltimore for Open Walls (photo © Ever)

Ever in Baltimore (photo © Ever)

 

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