All posts tagged: Miss Bugs

Black Book Gallery Presents: “Knock it Out” A group Exhibition And Fundraiser (Denver, CO)

Black Book Gallery is using art as a platform to support Love Hope Strength Foundation’s (LHSF) mission of saving the lives of people with cancer. Cancer took the life of Co-owner Thomas Horne’s twin brother, Tim, as well as millions of others world-wide each year. The show titled, “Knock it Out” is Tom’s tribute to all the families,patients, and victims of this devastating disease. (www.knockitout.org). Everyone, in every corner of the world, knows someone affected by cancer, and on the evening of Friday, April 5th, 2013, Black Book Gallery invites us all to come together to celebrate the lives of our loved ones.

Horne and his partner, Will Suitts, at Black Book Gallery, have been working tirelessly to put together an amazing group of both national and international artists; many of whom are creating original works specifically for this show. These artists are leading the way in supporting LHSF’s “Get On the List” campaign, as well as LHSF’s Children’s Cancer Center in Tanzania. The night will be filled with art, music, fun, and a bone marrow drive which will allow you to register with the Get On the List Campaign. Black Book Gallery hopes to make a donation of $10K from original artwork sales that will help fund a Doctor at the Love Hope Strength Children’s Cancer Center in Tanzania.

Featuring

Bask, Miss Bugs, Shepard Fairey, Doze Green, Retna, Lucy Mclauchlan, Faile, Rich Jacobs, Niagara, Mr. Brainwash, Mel Kadel, Travis Millard, Alex Pardee, Rowdy, Cope2, Dean Zeus Colman, James Reka, ROA, Swoon, Judith Supine, Handiedan, Greg Lamarche, Mike Stilkey, Eelus, Dave Kinsey, Pure Evil, Jason Thielke, CEPT, Alex Lukas, Souther Salazar, The London Police, Titi Freak, Lisa Solberg, Blek Le Rat, Dabs & Myla, Indie 184, Pose, Luke Chueh, ESPO, Adam Wallacavage, Sam Flores, Hush and more!!!!!!

DETAILS

OPENING RECEPTION:
April 5th, 2013
6-11PM
Free & Open to the public

http://www.theblackbookgallery.com/knock-it-out/

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Me Collectors Room Berlin Presents: “At Home I’m A Tourist” The Collection of Selim Varol (Berlin, Germany)

Selim Varol

“my collection, that’s me –
my childhood, my friends, my heroes, my role models, what i enjoy, what moves me. pictures from my journey: ‘at home i’m a tourist’” (Selim Varol)

From 26 May to 16 September 2012, me Collectors Room Berlin will be presenting the collection of Selim Varol. The exhibition will thus mark a return to an essential leitmotif of the foundation: the theme of collecting and the passion of the collector. The 39-year-old collector from Düsseldorf with Turkish roots has been collecting toys since his childhood and owns one of the largest collections of figurines in Europe, numbering some 15,000 pieces. A further focus of his collection lies in works by artists who trace their origins back to street art and ‘Pop Surrealism’. One characteristic shared by all the works in this collection is the close link between art and the everyday, as well as their often playful and humorous or subversive character.

The world of toys, most of which are produced in Asia, is a world full of plastic and vinyl. The figurines are detailed miniature sculptures that have variously emerged from the imaginations of contemporary urban artists and designers, or from politics and current events (Andy Warhol, Fidel Castro, Hitler), the dream factory of the film industry (Batman, Superman, Rambo and many others) or comics and manga. Many works in this collection are well-known due to their presence in public spaces. Shepard Fairey helped create a groundswell for Barack Obama with his iconic ‘HOPE’ poster during the United States presidential race in 2008. And JR, the current TED Prize winner, attracted international attention in 2008 with his film ‘28 millimètres: Women Are Heroes’ in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro, where he mounted giant images of female residents on the façades of houses in order to raise awareness about their life stories and give these women a voice. The New York artist KAWS (Brian Donnelly) is another artist who has exerted a major influence on Selim Varol’s collection, with Varol’s first acquisition of his work in 1999. KAWS first made a name for himself in 1998 with his alienated images on bus stops, phone boxes and billboards (for instance the ‘Christy Turlington Calvin Klein Ad Disruption’). He is represented in this

exhibition with more than 160 works. The exhibition includes a total of 3,000 works by more than 200 artists & designers from over 20 countries.

Plans are under way to enable artists involved in the exhibition to paint or paste designated facades in the area around the venue.

The exhibition will be accompanied by an extensive catalogue of the collection that will include a text by Jeffrey Deitch.

Events:

Saturdays, 3 p.m.: Public guided tour

01.06.2012, 6.30 p.m.: Expert talk with Selim Varol

September: Reading with Autonama & Participation in “Internationales Literaturfestival Berlin”

Children’s Programme: For schools and kindergartens (upon agreement); scavenger hunt (anytime)

Pop-Up Shop: In collaboration with Toykio, a selection of designer toys and exclusive editions will also be on offer in our shop.

Prior registration is required for all events. Programme details are available on our website: www.me-berlin.com

List of artists:

123Klan, Rita Ackermann, Adam5100, Chiho Aoshima, Giorgio Armani, Suki Bamboo, Banksy, Garry Baseman, Bäst, Beast Brothers, Beejoir, Andrew Bell, Biff, Bigfoot one, Tim Biskup, Blek le Rat, Blu, Bob Dob, Bountyhunter, Randy Bowen, Brin Berliner, Bshit, Buffmonster, Milton Burkhart, Thomas Campbell, Case, James Cauty, Mori Chack, Henry Chalfant, Chip Kidd, David Choe, Luke Chueh, Coarse, Martha Cooper, Harmony Corine, Matias Corral, Robert Crumb, Dalek, Date Farmers, Dehara, Delta, Devilrobots, Dface, DJ Shadow, Dolce & Gabbana, Dolk, Doma Dr.Romanelli, Dran, Dust, Tristan Eaton, Eelus, Ben Eine, El Mac, Ron English, F.C .Ware, Fafi, Faile, Shepard Fairey, Ferg, Jeremy Fish, Florian Flatau, Sam Flores, Flying Fortress, Pete Fowler, Glen E. Friedman, Friends with you, Phil Frost, Daniel & Geo Fuchs, Hiroshi Fujiwara, Futura, Rene Gagnon, John Galliano, Jean Paul Gaultier, Huck Gee, Os Gemeos, Doze Green, Sadi Güran, Eric Haze, Evan Hecox, Herakut, Jean-Louis Dumas Hermes, Jamie Hewlett, Damien Hirst, David Horvath, David Horvath & Sun-Min Kim, Marc Jacobs, Todd James, Jamungo, James Jarvis, Oliver Jeffers, JR, Nathan Jurevicius, Alex Katz, Rei Kawakubo, Audrey Kawasaki, KAWS, Peter Kennard, Josh Keyes, K-Guy, Margaret Kilgallen, Dave Kinsey, Jeff Koons, Frank Kozik, Charles Kraft, Curtis Kulig, Kurt Vonneggut & Joe Petro III, Christian Lacroix, Lady Aiko, Karl Lagerfeld, Helmut Lang, Michael Lau, Joe Ledbetter, Karin Lehmann, Matt Leines, Michael Leon, Paul Leung, Anthony Lister, Livingroom Johnston, London Police, Robert Longo, Lunartik, MAD*L, Herman Makkink, Mantis, Martin Margiela, Marok, Mars 1, Ben Mathis, Barry Mcgee, Lucy McLauchlan, Bill Mcmullen, Dennis Mcnett, Tara McPherson, Alexander McQueen, Eugenio Merino, Mexxer, Anthony Micallef, Donny Miller, Miss Bugs, Miss Van, Mist, Brendan Monroe, Polly Morgan, Mr. Clement, Takashi Murakami, Scott Musgrowe, Muttpop, Yositomo Nara, Caleb Neelon, Nigo, Tim Noble & Sue Webster, Steve Olsen, Katsushiro Otomo, Tony Oursler, Jose Parla, Paul Insect, Marion Peck, Perks & Mini, Stefano Pilati, Ricky Powell, Miuccia Prada, Rob Pruit, Pure Evil, Pushead, Oliver Räke, Jamie Reid, Retna, Terry Richardson, Rocketworld, Jermaine Rogers, Rolitoboy, Ryca, Mark Ryden, Saber, Erick Scarecrow, Todd Schorr, Semper Fi, Since, Jason Siu, Sket-one, Skewville, Skullphone, Hedi Slimane, PaulSmith, Hajime Sorayama, Jeff Soto, Space Invader, Spanky, SPQR, SSUR, Jeff Staple, Stash, Static, Tyler Stout, Stefan Strumbel, Suckadelic, Superdeux, Judith Supine, Swoon, Tado, Gary Taxali, Osamu Tezuka, Tilt, Tokidoki, Touma, Tim Tsui, Nasan Tur, Unkl, Urban Medium, Usugrow, Valentino, Gee Vaucher, Mark Dean Veca, Donatella Versace, Viktor & Rolf, Amanda Visell, Nick Walker, Vivienne Westwood, Dondi White, Kehinde Wiley, WK interact, Jim Woodring, Word to Mother, Bubi Au Yeung, Zevs

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#5 Miss Bugs: 12 Wishes for 2012

#5 Miss Bugs: 12 Wishes for 2012



For twelve days we’re presenting twelve wishes for 2012 as told by an alternating roster of artists and BSA readers, in no particular order. Together, they are a tiny snapshot of the people who are part of the street art scene around the world today. Individually, each adds their personal expression of hope for tomorrow.

Today’s wish comes from Miss Bugs, an English Street Art duo who blew up the joint this summer with easily the most riveting show we saw this year at Bed Stuys’ own Brooklynite Gallery (left). Graphic by nature, and splendidly anonymous, Miss Bugs surreally turns your head and helps you question what you are seeing when you are on the street. And they continue the practice with their submission for 12 Wishes for 2012.

Miss Bugs sends this photo, entitled “The Great Beyond,” taken “near where we grew up in a place called Shirehampton, a suburb of Bristol.”  Their wish for 2012?

“To make more time for old friends”

Image © Miss Bugs

Read more with BSA and Miss Bugs in 2011 here:

Miss Bugs “Back Talk” Conversation

Miss Bugs in Brooklyn: Girls, Sex and a Car Crash in the Forest

Miss Bugs Top Feature on Huffpost ARTS Today

 

 

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“Wall & Frames”, Today’s Street Artists, Tomorrow’s Masters

There is an uneasy reluctance among some artists in the graffiti and the Street Art community to let themselves be seen hanging with art collectors or even entering galleries sometimes because they might lose credibility among peers for not being ‘street’ enough. Seeing well manicured men in pinstripes and shrieking birdberry women with tinted/straightened/plumped everything looking at your shit hanging on a wall and asking vaguely patronizing questions about it like you are an exquisite curiosity could make you go out and slice their tires after downing a few white wines.  Not surprisingly, “keeping it real” sometimes translates to keeping it out of private collections.

Even as there is an every-growing recognition of art and artists who work sometimes illegally in the street, it’s a sort of high-wire act for anyone associating with art born in margins, mainly because it forces one to face the fact that we marginalize.

Sociological considerations aside, over the last decade there is a less traditional definition of Street Artist entering the fray. The graffiti scene originally boasted a sort of grassroots uprising by the voiceless and economically disempowered, with a couple of art school kids and the occasional high-minded conceptualist to mix things up. It’s all changed of course – for myriad reasons – and art in the streets takes every form, medium, and background. Now we see fully formed artists with dazzling gallery careers bombing right next to first time Krinks writers, graffiti writers changing gears and doing carefully rendered figurative work, corporations trying their hand at culture jamming (which isn’t a stretch), and all manner of Street Art referred to as an “installation”.

A new book by Maximiliano Ruiz called “Walls & Frames”, just released last month by Gestalten, presents a large collection of artists who have traversed the now permeable definitions of “street”, gallery, collector and museum. Admittedly, this may be a brief period of popularity for Street Art, if the 1980s romance with graffiti is any indication, but there is evidence that it will endure in some form.  This time one defining difference is that many artists have already developed skill, technique, and a fan base. Clearly the street has become a venue, a laboratory for testing and working out new ideas and techniques by fine artists, and even a valued platform for marketing oneself to a wider audience.

A spread of work by Conor Harrington in “Walls and Frames”.

The resulting work, whether hanging on a nail inside or painted on a street wall, challenges our previously defined boundaries. The current crop of street art stars and debutantes, many of the strongest whom are collected here by Ruiz, continue to stay connected with the energy of the street regardless of their trajectory elsewhere. Some are relatively new, while others have been evolving their practice since the 70s, with all the players sliding in and off the street over time. The rich and varied international collection is remarkable and leaves you wanting to see more work by many of the artists. All considered, “Wall and Frames” is a gorgeously produced book giving ample evidence that many of today’s artists in the streets are tomorrow’s masters, wherever they practice.

Augustine Kofie in “Walls and Frames”.

 

Sixe in “Walls and Frames”.

Remed in “Walls and Frames”.

Anthony Lister in “Walls and Frames”.

Judith Supine in “Walls and Frames”.

Alexandros Vasmoulakis in “Walls and Frames”.

D*Face in “Walls and Frames”.

Interesni Kazki in “Walls and Frames”.

Jorge Rodriguez Gerada in “Walls and Frames”.

M-City in “Walls and Frames”.

 All images © of and courtesy of Gestalten and Maximiliano Ruiz.

Artists included are Aaron Noble, AJ Fosik, Alexandre Farto aka Vhils, Alexandros Vasmoulakis, Alëxone Dizac, Amose, Andrew McAttee, Anthony Lister, Antony Micallef, Axel Void, Basco-Vazko, Base 23, Ben Frost, Blek le Rat, Bom-K, Boris Hoppek, Boxi, C215, Cekis, Conor Harrington, D*Face, Dan Witz, Daniel Muñoz aka San, Dave Kinsey, Der, Dixon, Docteur Gecko, Doze Green, Dran, Duncan Jago aka Mr. Jago, Eine, Ekundayo, El Mac, Evan Roth, Evol, Faile, Faith 47, Fefe Talavera, Gaia, George Morton-Clark, Herakut, Herbert Baglione, Interesni Kazki, Jaybo, Jeff Soto, Jeremy Fish, Jesse Hazelip, Johnny “KMNDZ” Rodriguez, Joram Roukes, Jorge Rodriguez Gerada, Josh Keyes, JR, Judith Supine, Katrin Fridriks, Kevin Cyr, Kofie, L’Atlas, Lightgraff, Logan Hicks, Ludo, M-City, Mark Jenkins, Mark Whalen aka Kill Pixie, Maya Hayuk, Medo & Demência, Meggs, Miss Bugs, Miss Van, Morten Andersen aka M2theA, Mr. Kern, Mudwig, Nicholas Di Genova, Okuda, Patrick Evoke, Paul Insect, Pedro Matos, Peter Owen, Pose, Pure Evil, Remed, Remi/Roughe, René Almanza, Retna, Ripo, Ródez, Sam3, Sat One, Shepard Fairey, Sixe, Smash 137, Sowat, Sten & Lex, Stephan Doitschinoff, Tec, Tilt, Troy Lovegates aka Other, Turf One, Vitché;, Wendell McShine, Will Barras, and Zosen.

 

The launch; “Walls & Frames” will be presented at Gestalten Space Berlin on December 15th.

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BOO! Monstrous BSA Halloween Photo Essay

Happy Halloween to all you good boys and ghouls lurking behind heavy closed doors with frogs in your pockets and bats in your hair. Do you dare venture out this All Hallows Eve? What will you see tonight in the cold black air?

“What beckoning ghost along the moonlight shade
Invites my steps, and points to yonder glade?”

Alexander Pope: To the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady
 

We know that BSA fans dig Halloween more than many holidays. Almost more than your birthday, but not quite, but almost. From his year round collecting of images, here’s a monstrous 39 photo essay from photographer Jaime Rojo of werewolves and vixens and frankenfreaks and zombies and ghosts just for you today.

Judith Supine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

D*Face (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Skullphone (photo © Jaime Rojo)

QRST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dust Lust (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sweet Toof (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kid Zoom (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ghost (photo © Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tristan Eaton (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Steiner (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ludo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Charm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cfer (photo © Jaime Rojo)

WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jennier Catron and Paul Outlaw (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jennifer Catron and Paul Outlaw (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled from a David Barton Ad (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Royce Bannon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lichiban  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ms. Klu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cake (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kid Zoom (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Krisna (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Flower Face Killa (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Miss Bugs (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mark Jenkins (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kriest (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Casper (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Haculla (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister Talks to BSA : Analysis and Constant Consideration

“I’m like a hairdresser I guess.”

Painter Anthony Lister is also a Street Artist. His surreal pop and celebrity culture-infused abstractions are candy encrusted apples which may have something sharp inside. Many are figurative studies and wire frames bending wildly into characters who cavort and mock with blunt swipes of color, overlaid by costumed sexual role play… or is that a personal projection?  Did I mention elegance, defiance, wit? Wait, there is so much here!  Truth is, his work can be a cock-eyed psychological tempest, jarring to the head, strangely sweet.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A decade of discovery under his superhero belt, Mr. Lister continues to analyze and build his creative practice and it always includes work inside the gallery and outside on the street. He’s currently preparing for his solo show in Sydney called  “Bogan Paradise” at Gallery A.S. At the same time he’s part of a group show with a gaggle of his Aussie expats on view at 941 Geary in San Francisco for “Young and Free”, including Kid Zoom, Dabs & Myla, Dmote, New2, Ben Frost, Meggs, Ha-Ha, Reka, Rone, Sofles and Vexta.  Not to mention his participation in our show last month in Los Angeles at C.A.V.E. with Thinkspace, “Street Art Saved My Life : 39 New York Stories“.

The artist took some time recently to talk to Brooklyn Street Art about his practice;

Brooklyn Street Art: How much of one of your painted portraits is autobiographical? In other words, what portion of Mr. Lister is super hero, super model, furtive schoolboy, or Homer Simpson?
Anthony Lister: I don’t really think about myself when I paint. My figurative works are more like reflections of characteristics I absorb from real life day to day.

Brooklyn Street Art: If you were to wear colored glasses, which color do you think you would most likely screen the world through?
Anthony Lister: Pink, like John Lennon.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Francis Bacon said, “The creative process is a cocktail of instinct, skill, culture and a highly creative feverishness.” Would you drink that cocktail?
Anthony Lister: Nice words. I agree.

Brooklyn Street Art: What role does analysis play in your creative process when bringing a painting to fruition?
Anthony Lister: Analysis is the outcome of considered processing. Constant consideration is crucial.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: A big piece you did on Metropolitan in Brooklyn – you reworked that face a couple of times over a period of months, producing what appeared as a slowly morphing image. Were you covering up tags, or were you unhappy with the original, or maybe combating the effects of age with a little nip and tuck?
Anthony Lister: When I re-work street paintings I think of it like I am a hairdresser. When something is in the public it has a different existence to something living privately in a residence. I’m like a hairdresser I guess.

Brooklyn Street Art: You have spoken about your work as reality, or a reaction to realities. What realities are you depicting these days?
Anthony Lister: I just finished a body of work for a solo show in Sydney. This next body of work is about contemporary Australian culture. The exhibition is titled “Bogan Paradise.”

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: When you consider the Street Art scene that evolved around Melbourne, how would you characterize its nature in a way that differentiates it from the work in other cities around the world?
Anthony Lister: No different. This whole street art thing has sprung up post the turn of the digital revolution so it is on the Internet quick and the artists who inspire others and the ones who are easily inspired are constantly swimming in the same aesthetic pools of consciousness. Not to mention that most of the prominent artists travel lots so it is easy to see work of the same artist in multiple cities around the world at the same time.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: The titles you give your gallery pieces are entertaining, instructive, illustrative. Do you ever want to place a placard near a piece you’ve done on the street – just to make sure the message gets across?
Anthony Lister: No. My street practice is less thoughtful and therefore needs less commentary.

Brooklyn Street Art: When is a painting complete?
Anthony Lister: When it tells me so.

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Anthony Lister in Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in Manhattan (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in Miami for Primary Flight. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in Los Angeles. LA FreeWalls (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Anthony Lister in Los Angeles LA FreeWalls (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Cry me a rainbow, Anthony Lister in Los Angeles. LA FreeWalls (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in Venice Beach CA. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anthony Lister in San Francisco for Young and Free at 941 Geary (photo © Andrius Lypia)

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Screensave-Anthony-Lister-Website-Sept-2011

Want to see more work? Just “Lister” it.

www.anthonylister.com

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Gilf! “Back Talk” Conversation

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Juxtapoz-BANNER-Back-Talk-Street-Art-Saved-My-Life

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Juxtapoz-GILF-Back-Talk-Street-Art-Saved-My-Life

To introduce readers to some of the Street Artists in the show “Street Art Saved My Life: 39 New York Stories”, BSA asked a number of the artists to take part in “Back Talk” with one of our most trusted and underground and sweet sources for modern art, Juxtapoz.

Today we hear from Gilf!

One reason you make art: I make art to change people’s perspectives, and to bring awareness to major issues that face our whole planet. I also do it to make people smile. Street art is an amazing tool that allows me to speak to people with whom I wouldn’t get the chance in real life.

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Gilf! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Read “Back Talk: A conversation with Gilf!” on Juxtapoz: http://www.juxtapoz.com/Current/back-talk-a-conversation-with-gilf

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Rene Gagnon “Back Talk” Conversation

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Brooklyn-Street-Art-Juxtapoz-RENE-GAGNON-Back-Talk-Street-Art-Saved-My-Life

To introduce readers to some of the Street Artists in the show “Street Art Saved My Life: 39 New York Stories”, BSA asked a number of the artists to take part in “Back Talk” with one of our most trusted and underground and sweet sources for modern art, Juxtapoz.

Today we hear from Rene Gagnon.

The first record or CD you ever bought? The last album you downloaded?
“First has to be RUN DMC – with the Krush Groove jam. Eminem, ‘Relapse & Recovery.’ “

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Rene Gagnon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Read “Back Talk: A conversation with Rene Gagnon” on Juxtapoz: http://www.juxtapoz.com/Current/back-talk-a-conversation-with-rene-gagnon

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Mark Carvalho “Back Talk” Conversation

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Juxtapoz-BANNER-Back-Talk-Street-Art-Saved-My-Life

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Juxtapoz-MARK-CARVALHO-Back-Talk-Street-Art-Saved-My-Life

To introduce readers to some of the Street Artists in the show “Street Art Saved My Life: 39 New York Stories”, BSA asked a number of the artists to take part in “Back Talk” with one of our most trusted and underground and sweet sources for modern art, Juxtapoz.

Today we hear from Mark Carvalho.

Something you want the world to know about you:
“I only sing two songs for karaoke; Lionel Richie’s ‘Hello’ and Tupac’s ‘How do you want it’.”

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Mark Carlvalho (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Read “Back Talk: A conversation with Mark Carvalho” on Juxtapoz: http://www.juxtapoz.com/Current/back-talk-a-conversation-with-mark-carvalho

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Indigo “Back Talk” Conversation

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Juxtapoz-BANNER-Back-Talk-Street-Art-Saved-My-Life

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Juxtapoz-INDIGO-Back-Talk-Street-Art-Saved-My-Life

To introduce readers to some of the Street Artists in the show “Street Art Saved My Life: 39 New York Stories”, BSA asked a number of the artists to take part in “Back Talk” with one of our most trusted and underground and sweet sources for modern art, Juxtapoz.

Today we hear from Indigo.

Artists you admire:

“I admire everyone who has the courage to spend hours, weeks, months and years turning thoughts and feelings into things, then putting them out into the world for others to respond with love or hate or complete indifference.  I admire anyone who has the integrity to create for themselves, first and foremost.  I admire those who are constantly pushing themselves to try new ideas, use new mediums, reach out to new audiences and immerse themselves in uniquely challenging experiences.  I admire everyone who has taken a leap of faith, fallen into dark and swirling waters and after what often seems like a lifetime of struggle, reached the sunshine on the other side – only to do it all over again.”

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Indigo (photo © Victoria Potter)

Read “Back Talk: A conversation with Indigo” on Juxtapoz: http://www.juxtapoz.com/Features/back-talk-a-conversation-with-anthony-lister

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Opening Shots from “Street Art Saved My Life” in Los Angeles

Images from the Show

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The show in Los Angeles last weekend was a lot of fun, with 500 people flowing through C.A.V.E. Gallery to see studio work by some of the artists on the streets of NYC. What impressed us the most was the number of conversations we saw taking place with two or three friends gathered around a piece and discussing it and really taking it in. Marsea Goldberg, owner of New Image Gallery told us, “This is Los Angeles, we take art seriously”, and judging by the enthusiasm and knowledgeable people we met at the opening, in the back patio, and on the street, many Angelinos are interested in street art from the east coast. After comments about the dense and layered quality of the show, the next most popular topic was, “When are you going to do an LA street art show in New York?”  After we catch our breath. Thank you LA, and thank you all the artists who came out to make work on the walls.

Thank you also to photographer Carlos Gonzalez for shooting all the pieces in the show, which follows after this collage of opening night shots by Andrew Hosner from ThinkSpace, who was our partner with C.A.V.E. to make this show happen.

See a couple of links at the end of this posting for more pictures of the opening from Andrew Hosner and Karin Freda.

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Adam Void (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Anthony Lister  (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Broken Crow (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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C215 (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Cake (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Chris Stain (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Clown Soldier (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Creepy (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Dan Witz (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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El Sol 25 (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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EMA (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Faile (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Futura (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Gaia (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Gilf! (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Hargo (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Hellbent (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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How and Nosm (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Imminent Disaster (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Indigo (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Kid Acne (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Know Hope (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Ludo (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Mark Carvalho (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Miss Bugs (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Nick Walker (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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NohJColey (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Other (AKA Troy Lovegates) (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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OverUnder (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Radical! (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Rene Gagnon (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Skewville (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Specter (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Sweet Toof (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Swoon (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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Tiptoe (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

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White Cocoa (photo © Carlos Gonzalez)

If you want to see pics of opening night on Andrew Hosner’s Facebook Page please go here:

To see Karin Freda’s Flickr page of photos from the show please go here :http://www.flickr.com/photos/karinfreda/sets/72157627427952010/

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TipToe “Back Talk” Conversation

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To introduce readers to some of the Street Artists in the upcoming show “Street Art Saved My Life: 39 New York Stories”, BSA asked a number of the artists to take part in “Back Talk” with one of our most trusted and underground and sweet sources for modern art, Juxtapoz.

Today we hear from TipToe.

Something that annoys or frustrates you about people: “Obsessions with Warhol and people who don’t know the difference between ambiguous and arbitrary”

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TipToe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Read “Back Talk: A conversation with TipToe” on Juxtapoz: http://www.juxtapoz.com/Current/back-talk-a-conversation-with-tiptoe

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