All posts tagged: Klone

Elle + Klone. Up North Fest X BSA: Røst, Norway. Dispatch 5

Elle + Klone. Up North Fest X BSA: Røst, Norway. Dispatch 5

This is the third year for Northern Norway’s UPN Festival and this year it’s on an Island called Røst and includes a collection of artists eager to do site-specific and environmental works – one evolutionary development in the mural festivals that blossom throughout the world right now. This week BSA is proud to bring you images and interviews along with Urban Nation this year at UpNorth, where the seagulls never stop calling and the sun never goes down this time of year.


We wind up the week on the island of Røst with almost a mystical sense, perhaps because of the inspirational messages we continued to see within the statements of this year’s artists. Today we see the metaphorical storytelling of Elle at war on the seas and the striking installation by Klone Yourself (or Klone) called “The Songs of the Vikings”
______________

A surrealist illustrator experimenting with different styles and mediums on Street Art pieces and murals in cities, Klone’s works on walls often feature simplified and distorted forms, figures, and creatures occupying a space that is seemingly suspended in air. An uprooted Ukrainian immigrant now from Tel Aviv, the mid-30s artist is looking at existential matters today in the way you do when you have had to adjust to a radically new environment.

Klone. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

One examines fundamentals and pillars of a culture, its history, norms and language – and then struggles to find a place within it. For his installation in Norway, the artist studied the location and the history of the region, combined that study with his own history, and constructed “Viking” swords for a site specific piece that takes on many shadings of significance.

“The texts on the swords are coming from various sources: Viking poetry and songs, contemporary references like music and literature we grow up on, and personal remarks and thoughts on life and daily struggles,” says Klone about his striking installation by the sea. “In a way this is a series of protective runes, planted in the ground, like after a big battle, some of the text disappearing, some still exposed. Some of the truth is always gone, and it’s all relative.

Klone. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

BSA: Can you talk about this striking and meaningful installation you did by the sea for UpNorth?
Klone: My main goal for the UpNorth festival was to complete my installation that was planned specifically for it. The installation consists of wooden swords, cut out by me from found wood (mostly wood that was used for building houses on the island), with text written on the swords.

Later those swords got stuck into a hill structure on the island. This installation has and can have so many meanings, to both me and the random viewer, so I’ll explain some of my intention – and anyone else can take it somewhere else, as people already did while I was installing my piece and directly after it was completed.

The sword is a symbol of power through thousands of years. A wooden sword is a toy, meant to play with. In a way it is to prepare us for one day holding a real sword, real power, or at least real representation of it, no matter how prepared or not we are.

On a personal note – my name is Igor, and this is the name my mother gave me when I was born and later explained to me that she gave me a Viking name so I could grow to be a strong man. In a way I hope I did become kind of a Viking. A free man, at least as much as I’d like to think so, somewhat a pirate, and always on the move with deep respect for history and traditions as well as a love for innovation. For me this was a kind of a closure, to bring this installation to a place that felt like it’s meant to be.

Klone. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

BSA: How would you describe the environment working in Røst?
Klone Yourself: The Røst environment is insane. It feels like another planet over there and with the 24/7 daylight, its easy to feel so.

I think it’s amazing to experience a place so old and yet so wholesome and not destroyed by modern civilizations. Yes they have machines, Internet and restaurants, but it seems like the people just want to live their lives and are not really bothered by what’s happening around them.

BSA: How are you challenging yourself as an artist right now?
Klone Yourself: I’m challenging myself as an artist on a daily basis. My practice is always on a few levels of perception, depending on the time and the place of course. As I work in drawing, painting, installation, video and mural painting, the limits are far to be seen, and there’s so much to try and learn yet.

The most appropriate personal title for the piece is – “Song of the Viking” , as a tribute to songs written by Vikings to their gods, and as a tribute to this land now and then.

Klone. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)


The American experimentalist Elle tries anything once – including fire extinguishers, rollers, aerosol, wheatpastes, silkscreens and bus stop takeovers – legal and illegal. Her illustrative style often centers around a fantastical avatar, a heroic and sensual woman who is exploring new psychological landscapes.

Here in Røst the heroine of a shipwreck casts a wide eye at you as she climbs through a tumultuous and harrowing sea storm. The metaphors are many and so is the range of Elles ever-increasing skills.

ELLE. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

ELLE. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

ELLE. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

ELLE. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

ELLE. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

ELLE. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

Our thanks to our partner Urban Nation (UN) and to photographer Tor Ståle Moen for his talents.


See our Up North roundup piece on The Huffington Post

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 08.23.15

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.23.15

brooklyn-street-art-qrst-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

Such a pleasure and honor to give a tour to Brooklyn Museum members yesterday – mainly because of the mixture of people who traipsed through Brooklyn streets with us: older, younger, academic, street smart, curiosity seeking, students, teachers. The questions and observations helped push our perspectives wider.

Good to be schooled by someone who knew a lot about REVS & Cost, and to learn that LMNOP may have chosen her name with QRST’s in mind. Who knew? It was also great to describe the linotype process as it pertains to Swoons’ practice – and only a block later to discover an original carved plywood version of a linotype drilled to a wall by TipToe!

It was especially refreshing was talking with the woman who had not heard of Banksy or Faile or JR but thought she had heard of Swoon – and to see her write these names in a small book for further research.  Sometimes we think all this Street Art stuff is such a big deal, then that “perspective” thing kicks in.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Dain, DeeDee, Don Rimx, Elbow Toe, Faile, Gilf!, Klone, LMNOPI, London Kaye, Myth, Os Gemeos, QRST, Rae, Royce Bannon, She Wolf, and TipToe.

Top image above >>> QRST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-london-kaye-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web

London Kaye (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web

Artist Unknown with Bast on top. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-tip-toe-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web

Tip Toe didn’t just put a printed poster up. He put the actual printing device with which you make the posters. This could indicate that he wants you to bring your own paper and ink! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-myth-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web-3

Myth had his text crossed out -originally it said “Bovine lives matter! Go Vegan”. The cartoon image stayed.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-myth-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web-2

Myth quotes Lenin here: Freedom in capitalist society always remains about the same as it was in ancient Greek republics: Freedom for slave owners.”(photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-myth-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web-1

Myth has the Venom character quoting the feminist Lucy Parsons, “Never be deceived that the rich will allow you to vote away their wealth.” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-she-wolf-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web

She Wolf (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-klone-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web

Klone (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dee-dee-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web-1

Dee Dee (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dee-dee-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web-2

Dee Dee (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-don-rimx-la-rumba-08-23-15-web

Don Rimx “La Rumba” in Little Havana, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-rae-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web

Rae is back on the street sculpture tip, a little bit pop this time (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-elbow-toe-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web

Looks like Elbow Toe gave Royce Bannon some flowers. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faile-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web-2

Faile does a piece from their series about native peoples coming to reclaim lands. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faile-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web-1

Faile (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web

Gilf! going for a conceptual timepiece that recalls names of Americans shot by police, with reference to how often it occurs. This is one of two recent time pieces.  The other contains high profile nationally known names that have sparked protests – this one has names that are more recent but we didn’t recognize them or understand their significance till we started Googling. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-lmnopi-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web-1

LMNOPI depicts Indira, a child who works in a marble quarry with her parents near Katmandu. The same image was also featured in her Welling Court mural this year. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-lmnopi-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web-2

A child soldier forced into conscription in Myanmar by LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-os-gemeos-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web

Os Gemeos (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dain-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web-2

Dain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dain-jaime-rojo-08-23-15-web

Dain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-times-square-nyc-08-23-15-web

Untitled. Times Square, Manhattan. August, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Graffiti Haven “American Flats” Slated for Destruction in Nevada

Graffiti Haven “American Flats” Slated for Destruction in Nevada

The news of the impending destruction of a primary spot for graffiti fans in Nevada has saddened a number of artists who have spent long hours painting and socializing at the former site of the American Flat Mill in Virginia City. According to the Reno Gazette-Journal in late October the Bureau of Land Management has just awarded the contract “to dismantle, crush and bury what’s left of the massive mill.” As an abandoned industrial site for the last ninety years or so, it is catnip for graff writers and street artists. Even though it is one of Nevada’s most culturally fascinating relics anyone would admit that it can be hazardous because of its state of neglect, even if its an open secret that it is well trafficked by thrill seekers. For former Brooklyn-now-Reno Street Artist Erik Burke, the news signals the end of an era for him not only as an artist, but because he married his wife on the site. Today Erik provides an essay for BSA readers about his perspective on the loss of this site that holds many memories for tourists, artists, filmmakers, and countless others.
brooklyn-street-art-meryl-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-3

American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 . Please help ID the artists on this photo. (photo © Meryl Burke)

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
by Erik Burke

Over the last week there has been increasing talk of the imminent demolition of The American Flat Mill. In case you are not familiar with this place, the CliffNotes version of the American Flat is that it was a gold, silver and low-grade ore processing plant that opened in 1922 and after a painstakingly brief period of boom it went bust in 1926. Since that time it has been a sightseeing and activity playground for countless visitors. Since local nostalgia is currently running a fever and countless people are sharing their experiences I feel compelled to share my unique bond with this skeletal ruin of Nevada’s formative mining days.

brooklyn-street-art-meryl-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-4

American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014. Please help ID the artists on this photo. (photo © Meryl Burke)

The American Flat will always hold a special place the relationship between my wife and I. It had been the destination of one of our first dates and in April of this year we were married there. The fact that we were able to share this experience with our closest friends and family was truly astonishing given the fact that our hallowed ground was on hollow ground.

The smell of sage and spray paint mingled with our Pastor’s words as we confided our eternal love for one another in a makeshift church, and while we forgave those who trespassed against us we too hoped the Sheriff would return the favor. It was in those time-slowing moments that we all could attest that there truly is beauty in ruins.

brooklyn-street-art-meryl-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-5

American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Meryl Burke)

During the prior week my closest friends and I spent whole days preparing for the ceremony by secretly removing fallen obstacles, assembling monumental towers of rusty barrels, creating mirrored mosaics, sweeping aisles through rubble, tie-wiring bouquets of brush and wild flowers. We also installed works by artist friends from Berlin, Tel-Aviv, Portland, Seattle, Minneapolis, and New Orleans.

Each morning we would arrive to a bit of un-curated vandalism that happened during the night and we would have to do damage control. When people say, ‘how would you like it if I tagged your house?’ I can now sympathize.

brooklyn-street-art-meryl-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-1

Arnz . Rogue. Yesir . Sunset. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Meryl Burke)

By the day of the wedding we had completely transformed the place, and like so many current testimonies about the Flats, the site had also transformed us. Whether you perceive the ruins as a backdrop to your fashion shoot, canvas to your creative whim, or, as my wife and I did, center stage for exchanging your vows, I think The American Flat should be preserved for generations to come.

While some individuals and entities see the demise of the flats as a trash-strewn, rotting liability of juvenile vandalism, a far larger majority see it as an Americana gestalt. Sadly, Building Solutions Inc. out of Reno recently won the contract with a $1.3 million bid for an un-building solution and they will begin dismantling shortly.

brooklyn-street-art-meryl-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-2

American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Meryl Burke)

When the Reno Gazette Journal interviewed Dave Erbes, a BLM geologist working on the project, he said, “There is going to be more known about the site after it is gone than there ever was before. In a couple of months hopefully you will be able to go online and tour the whole thing.”

Sadly the difference between knowing and experiencing is quite significant. Future generations will never know the feeling of clinging to the sun-warmed iron stairs as pebbles of concrete ping their way into a darkened tunnel or the sight of dropping a cheap flashlight into a pool of cyanide and watching it illuminate.

brooklyn-street-art-erik-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-3

American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

Mark Twain said, “an honest politician is an oxymoron”, and he would be rolling in his grave at the thought of an online “experience”. It’s disheartening to live in a western society that chisels history off the totem pole and places a fence around the remainder all in the name of liability. While it seems that salvation of the mill is not in our cards perhaps this demolition will serve as a good kick in the ass for us to get out there and truly experience our diminishing back yard.

American Flats, we’ll miss you.

brooklyn-street-art-erik-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-2

American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-author-erik-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-1

Author. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-clairvoyance-meryl-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-1

Clairvoyance. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Meryl Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-dirtTBK-overunder-erik-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-1

Dirt TBK . Overunder. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-abc-art-attack-erik-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-1

ABC Art Attack. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-various-and-gould-erik-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-1

Various & Gould. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-overunder-meryl-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-1

Overunder. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Meryl Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-overunder-meryl-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-2

Overunder. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Meryl Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-irgh-the-reader-erik-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web

IRGH . The Reader. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-klone-erik-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-1

Klone. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-joins-cbs-erik-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-1

Joins CBS. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-overunder-joins-cbs-klone-erik-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web

Overunder . Klone . Joins CBS. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-mike-fitzimons-erik-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-1

Mike Fitzimmons. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-erik-burke-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-1

American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

brooklyn-street-art-lindsey-pisani-american-Flats-reno-2014-web-1

Erik and Meryl’s wedding ceremony at American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Lindsey Pisani)

 

Please help ID artists whose names we didn’t know in this article. Thank you.

 

 

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please follow and like us:
Read more
Eye on London Street Art : Spencer Elzey in Europe

Eye on London Street Art : Spencer Elzey in Europe

Brooklyn-Street-Art-2-Spencer-Elzey-Residency-Banner-Nov-2013

Brooklyn-Street-Art-LONDON-Spencer-Elzey-Residency-Banner-Nov-2013

For the first week-long “residency” on BSA, Spencer Elzey has been sharing his experiences and Street Art photos from his recent trip to Europe. Today we finish with London, a polished and presentable collection of some of the current scene from the streets.

The city has long played host to a rolling panoply of urban art and artists and is a prime example of the professionalization of the practice featuring a greater absorption into the culture and economy at large with galleries, museums, shops, and paid tour guides all joining in. The upshot is you will see some of the best examples of talent and it may at times seem all quite combed over and generally safe for a general audience.  Not that there isn’t dynamism and risk taking, and you will still find unsanctioned work to be seen inside and outside of the tourist hotspots.

brooklyn-street-art-sweet-toof-roa-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Sweet Toof and Roa (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Hosting the Olympics last year brought a self cleansing of much of the organically grown graffiti and Street Art, and the chilling effect of living in an electronically surveilled society with cameras nearly everywhere will undoubtedly be sited to when historians look at the nature of art on the streets from this era.

“London had a lot of Street Art but it felt more corporate and organized for the masses,” says Elzey of his time walking through Shoreditch, Brick Lane, Hackney, Bethnal Green, and Camden. “In the week that I was there I walked by around five Street Art tours.”

brooklyn-street-art-sweet-toof-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web-1

Sweet Toof (photo © Spencer Elzey)

“Most of London’s street art is confined to these places – The other areas that I explored around London all seemed pretty clean. This may have been due to the fact that there are security cameras everywhere,” he says. An international first world city, London usually is a destination for the international “circuit” of Street Artists whose names tend to reappear on lists of the various street/graffiti/urban art festivals that now pop up in global cities from Lima to Łódź and Living Walls to Nuart to Upfest and the recently ended FAME.

As with any art form that begins as transgressive and underground and evolves to be adopted by the dominant culture, at times the whole scene begins to resemble the commercial and institutional interests it once mocked or attempted to subvert. “London is great but felt more catered to the bigger players and had the most street art in commissioned form (by the various Street Art organizations), which is good to see some amazing work but cheapens the art a little,” he says.

In the images he shares with BSA readers today you can see the really strong work that is throughout those neighborhoods as many of the artists consider strongly what they will do – and it results in some quite striking pieces. As always, you want to keep an eye on London. Surely it will keep an eye on you.

brooklyn-street-art-miss-van-b-schu-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Miss Van and B. Schu (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-otto-schade-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web-4

Otto Schade (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-otto-schade-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web-3

Otto Schade (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-otto-schade-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web-1

Otto Schade (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-otto-schade-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web-2

Otto Schade (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-shok-1-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Shok 1 (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Ibrooklyn-street-art-gnasher-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Gnasher (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-alexis-diaz-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Alexis Diaz (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-ben-eine-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Ben Eine (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-cranio-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web-1

Cranio (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-cranio-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web-3

Cranio (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-cranio-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web-2

Cranio (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-cranio-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web-4

Cranio (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-for-the-love-of-dog-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

For The Love Of Dog (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-banksy-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Banksy (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-dface-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

A sculptural installation by D*Face (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-roa-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

ROA (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-swoon-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Swoon (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-guy-denning-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Guy Denning (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Ibrooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Urban Solid (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-sokaruno-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Sokaruno (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-vinie-reaone-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Vinie and Reaone (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-lister-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Anthony Lister (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-finabarr-dac-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Finabarr DAC (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-phlegm-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Phlegm (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Faith 47 (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-el-mac-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

El Mac (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-conor-harrington-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web-1

Conor Harrington (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-conor-harrington-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web-2

Conor Harrington (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-klone-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Klone (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-dal-east-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Dal East (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-dscreete-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Dscreete (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-insa-broken-fingaz-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Insa (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-martin-ron-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Martin Ron (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-jana-js-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Jana & JS (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-christian-nagel-spencer-elzey-london-10-13-web

Christian Nagel (photo © Spencer Elzey)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please follow and like us:
Read more
Unbridled Berlin Street Art : Spencer Elzey in Europe

Unbridled Berlin Street Art : Spencer Elzey in Europe

Brooklyn-Street-Art-2-Spencer-Elzey-Residency-Banner-Nov-2013

Brooklyn-Street-Art-BERLIN-Spencer-Elzey-Residency-Banner-Nov-2013

Berliners are hard to crack, they say, but probably not for New Yorkers. We “get” them because of their no-nonsense frankness, sometimes sharp tongues, and because their “creative types” are unhinged in a way that New Yorkers have been historically.

When it comes to the volume and variety of art that is being loosed in Berlin these days, they are setting some standards that many are still catching up with. Right now when you look at the freewheeling expression that bolted out from a broken wall more than 20 years ago and never looked back, you realize that Street Artists in Berlin are not hard to crack, they may simply be a little bit cracked.

brooklyn-street-art-various-gould-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web-2

Various & Gould (photo © Spencer Elzey)

In the third city of our series this week for Spencer Elzey’s residency on BSA, we visit Berlin, which some argue is the preeminent scene for urban art right now. It does appear to have a perfect mix for vibrant arts growth – a creatively permissive atmosphere and affordable lifestyle prevails in this city of design. And while uncommissioned public art is not legal, it is also not verboten.

The kids may come for the music and the art collectives and the dance parties, but they stay for the aerosol and the expressive faces and figures that accompany you while you walk. So far, people seem happy to let this arts scene continue to evolve and not surprisingly, tourists are magnetically drawn to it.

brooklyn-street-art-victor-ash-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Victor Ash (photo © Spencer Elzey)

As you walk through certain neighborhoods you may prepare to have your pre-conventions subverted and inverted. Awash with a decade plus of unbridled art, the scale, style, influences, and techniques of pop, illustration, and graffiti are all truly playing with each other.

Where a large spate of legal mural work has monopolized creative energies of many Street Artists in New York recently, some players have commented that the content is being tamed and neutered and the resulting scene is less risk-oriented stylistically. As you look at the work Elzey found in Berlin, you are reminded what it looks like when art laborers don’t have to self-censor or look over their shoulder. Also, it is still affordable for artists. Oh, wait, did we already mention that?

brooklyn-street-art-robi-the-dog-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Robi The Dog (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Out of the cities I visited the one that contrasted the most with NY was Berlin. It felt like a beautiful lawlessness with graffiti and rollers everywhere,” says Elzey as he tries to put his finger on the attitude of exploration and discovery that floods large areas of the city.

“Berlin by far had the most graffiti and Street Art in its most raw and authentic form, which is how I think it should really be experienced. It felt more free and genuine. Besides RAW and Urban Spree, which are commissioned areas, Berlin felt like a giant playground. There was graffiti and rollers everywhere and lots of abandoned factories to explore and have fun in.”

brooklyn-street-art-blu-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web-1

Blu (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Berlin has been an international draw for artists and arts institutions for the last decade at least and many of the Street Art world make sure to head here at least once, sometimes staying months and couch surfing and partying an staying out all night.  Since the graffiti scene and the Street Art scene are not so polarized in the minds of people here there is also a freedom to experiment without fear of upsetting your peer group.

Luckily for BSA, local Street Artists Various & Gould were very hospitable and more than helpful and willing to tour Spencer around some of the hot spots and to give him some background on the Berlin streets. “Meeting someone you admire, be it an artist, musician, or actor, is always a special experience,” he says about being with V&G, “It feels a little different when that person is a Street Artist, or at least it does to me. The fact that part of their job means that they do illegal things, being trusted enough to be welcomed into their inner circle has deeper meaning.”

 

brooklyn-street-art-blu-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web-6

Blu. Detail. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

So he was in good hands with these two who have deep roots with the artist community and who frequently challenge themselves to look at their own work with new eyes – and to find new ways to engage with passersby with their art and a bit of theater. “In the case of Various & Gould in Berlin and C215 in Vitry I was able to meet these artists on their own turf. They showed me some of their new work in their studios and then toured me around the neighborhoods that they know best,” he recalls with some delight.

“While seeing art on the streets is one thing, getting the first hand history behind it makes it more meaningful,” he says. “You get more history and depth that way.”

brooklyn-street-art-blu-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web-4

Blu (photo © Spencer Elzey)

How long Berlin will continue to be a petrie dish for experimentation and discovery? Forever. Just kidding. But for the moment this ephemeral art movement is fiercely alive and more independent than many cities. Artists have always made life a bit of a moveable feast. Today its Berlin, tomorrow it could be Mexico City, or Lima, who knows?

“I think I would recommend it if you were a younger artist who was trying to break into the game and establish a name for yourself,” says Elzey.

brooklyn-street-art-blu-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web-5

Blu (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-blu-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web-3

Blu (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-blu-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web-2

Blu (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-alaniz-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Alaniz (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-herakut-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Herakut (photo © Spencer Elzey)

 

brooklyn-street-art-various-gould-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web-1

Various & Gould (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-various-gould-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web-3

Various & Gould (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-os-gemeos-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Os Gemeos (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-nunca-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Nunca (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-jr-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

JR (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-cooked-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Cooked (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-vhils-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Vhils (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-mto-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web-2

MTO (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-mto-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web-1

MTO (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-mto-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web-3

MTO gives Alias a shout out. (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-klone-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Klone (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-neurotitan-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Neurotitan (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-vidan-the-weird-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Vidan The Weird (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-tafe-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Tafe (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-reaktor-paulito-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Reaktor and Paulo Ito (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-g-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

G (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-inti-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Inti (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-ema-jones-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Ema Jones (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-klub7-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Klub 7 (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-broken-fingaz-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Broken Fingaz (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-blek-le-rat-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Blek le Rat (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-bio-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

BLO (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-maclaim-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Maclaim (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-roa-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

ROA (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-otto-schade-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Otto Schade (photo © Spencer Elzey)

brooklyn-street-art-nychos-spencer-elzey-berlin-10-13-web

Nychos (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Our sincere thanks to Various & Gould for their hospitality and time.

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more

BSA Film Friday: 07.26.13

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening: Bomb It 2 by Jon Reiss launches and Sampo Graffiti: Ignoto from Brazil. 

BSA Special Feature: Bomb It 2
by director Jon Reiss

About to debut in August and through the fall, the sequel to the global graffiti documentary Bomb It travels to a number of far-flung cities you are vaguely aware of, much less imagine as locations of a graffiti or Street Art scene. In fact, one of the strengths of this movie is the subtle and not-so-subtle imparting of  the realities of daily life elsewhere that are revealed while in the course of tracking graffiti and Street Art. Yes, Street Art makes a much heavier impression in this tale than one might expect from a movie called Bomb It 2, but don’t let terminology blind you from seeing the people behind the paint.

Using a tiny camera that jumps to the beat of the always-gyrating soundtrack, Reiss takes you to the Palestinian refugee camps on the West Bank and you can feel the utterly constrictive hand around your neck while people nervously paint at night under guard. A short time later you learn the details of the brutal punishment called caning as it applies to graffiti writers in Singapore. Next you are in Thailand where painting on a wall almost feels like a spiritual practice. As much as graff writers like to generalize about the “rules” of graffiti in your city, the Bomb It movies tell you that they don’t apply universally.

Painting under cover of night in Bomb It 2 (screenshot © Jon Reiss for Bomb It 2)

Of course it doesn’t pretend to interview every single writer and Street Artist in every single city on the globe (as will be a critique no doubt), but that would require a movie that is 400 hours long. However you will witness the intensity of feelings that bombing/painting/pasting evokes in people and see the fierce devotion that some writers have, learn how it can be an art practice or an act of pure defiance, and hear at least one writer say unequivocally that graffiti saved his life.

With scenes from previously unexplored areas of the Middle East, Europe, Asia, the United States and Australia – Bomb it 2 represents a wide range of cultures, styles and beliefs and includes interviews with Klone, Know Hope, Great Bates, Twoone, Darbotz, Killer Gerbil and Zero, Bon, Alex Face, Sloke, Husk Mit Navn, Ash, Phibs, Stormie Mills, Beejoir, Zero Cents, Vexta, MIC, and Xeme, and many more.

Here is a small trailer for you, but for the full show you still have a few days to wait.

SAMPA GRAFFITI / Ignoto

A new installment from a series that focuses on graffiti artists in São Paulo, here is a relaxed installation from Ignoto. The laidback style of his whole approach tells you he’s chilled and the action on the street is unusual because steps away from him are a handful of kids flying kites while he does his work. Click on the CC at the bottom to see a translation of Ignoto’s thoughts on graffiti and art in general.

Please follow and like us:
Read more
The New Face of Tel Aviv Street Art

The New Face of Tel Aviv Street Art

As more cities join the world Street Art scene, thanks largely to an enthusiastic youth culture sharing images across the Internet and handheld devices, you see new artists popping up on the street almost daily. While there certainly is a developing global visual vocabulary on walls that is influenced by high profile international stars, you will still hear the local voice steering the Street Art conversation as well.

For Tel Aviv, known by many as a vibrant party city that never sleeps, the interest in Street Art has been high and there has been a blooming scene in the last five years that mimics some of those international styles even as it clearly is developing it’s own local aesthetic.

Klone . Latzi (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Today we feature new images from local artists in Tel Aviv by a photographer and scientist from New York who lived for a while in this city on the Israeli Mediterranean coastline. An urban wanderer who pokes through fences, over walls, and along small  streets on the hunt for what’s new, Yoav Litvin says he “views the urban environment as the perfect melting pot between humanity and nature, history and modernity, life and death.” We talked to him about his recent explorations in the city and asked him to talk about his observations in this snapshot of a growing scene.

Brookyn Street Art: What captured your attention about the Street Art scene in Tel Aviv?
Yoav Litvin: It’s in your face! While walking in Tel Aviv, especially the city’s southern parts, it was impossible to ignore; very diverse and colorful Street Art and graffiti are everywhere.

035 Crew (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Brookyn Street Art: Many of these shots are in abandoned buildings. For some photographers it is like an adventure discovering these sorts of spaces covered with art. What is it like for you?
Yoav Litvin: There’s a lot of character in abandoned buildings; the crumbling walls, the colors, the decay, the piles of rubble, the scattered tools or buckets of paint, the puddles of water, the beautiful imperfections. Every new space one discovers is surprising. You can sense a life history of an abandoned building, now turned bare skeleton. It’s cozy in that sense, it is accepting, non judgmental and unpretentious. On the other hand, it keeps you on your toes with its broken stairs, sharp edges, crumbling floors, stinking trash, used needles and even an occasional inhabitant who surprises you. I find that art works beautifully in such settings, blending and mutually complementing the cracking paint and occasional crevice.

As a photographer I find that abandoned buildings are fun spaces to play with light and composition. Most of these buildings have broken windows and doors, if any, letting in light that breaks, angles and reflects in a symphony of colors, lights and shadows.

Sboy . Dede (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Brookyn Street Art: Most large cities have a certain amount of work on the street from international artists with a higher profile. What made you concentrate on just the locals?
Yoav Litvin: I love seeing work produced by internationally well-known artists. But I find that when I walk the streets of any town, I particularly enjoy seeking art that is new and fresh to my eyes, art produced by local artists that are not as well known, many of them incredible talents that have just not had their international breakthrough. As a past inhabitant of Tel Aviv, I especially wanted to pay tribute to the local scene, artists who by nature integrate their city into their art, and their art into their city.

Wonky Monky (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Brookyn Street Art: Street Art can be a good barometer of public tastes and a reflection of the culture that it is part of. Is there anything distinctly Israeli about the work you see represented, whether thematically or stylistically?
Yoav Litvin: From my recent short visit to Tel Aviv, I noticed great diversity in both styles and mediums used. I also noticed graff and street art ranging from simple tags any kid can do, to beautiful murals and elaborate pastes. As far as distinct content, I did notice some politically oriented street art that directly addressed internal Israeli corruption, the ongoing occupation of the Palestinian territories and some social issues.

Other than that, I can’t say I noticed something distinctly Israeli as far as style, but I do blame that on the shortness of my visit- With more time actually spent there, maybe I would be able to pick that up. It’s clear though that just like any urban artists in today’s interconnected world, both their local scene and other artists worldwide influence Tel Aviv-based artists.

Brookyn Street Art: What is your favorite kind of shot as a photographer and when do you know you captured it?
Yoav Litvin: My favorite shot is when I spot something beautiful in good light, and can frame it perfectly so that it somehow relates to its environment in an interesting way. If it includes an opportunity to capture a particularly beautiful instant in time, that’s especially rewarding. When I snap such a shot, I usually just know it.

Raez (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Know Hope . Korse (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Klone . 035 Crew (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Gidi (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Dede . Dioz . Ros Plazma (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Dede . Latzi (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Dioz . Untay (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Dioz . Wonky Monky (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Ros Plazma (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Ros Plazma (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Ros Plazma (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Ros Plazma (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Klone (photo © Yoav Litvin)

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

This article also appears on The Huffington Post

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Fun Friday 03.30.12

Fun Friday 03.30.12

1. Wooly Bully! (VIDEO)
2. “International Woman” at The Warrington Museum (UK)
3. “While Supplies Last” at Pawn Works (Chicago)
4. Crossing Borders at MSA Gallery (Paris)
5. Isaac Cordal “Waiting for Climate Change” at Beaufort 04 (Flemish Coast, Belgium)
6. HOW & NOSM show you HOW they made “Reflections” (VIDEO)
7. Kid Zoom Crashes Cars (VIDEO)

WOOLY BULLY! Straight from the Desert Island – Sam the Sham and the Pharoahs!

Let’s see if you can shake it as fast as the back-up dancer lady in this video!

“International Woman” at The Warrington Museum (UK)

“International Woman” the new group show at The Warrington Museum and Gallery in Warrington, UK is open to the general public with a lineup of brilliantly talented women artists from around the world including many Street Artists: Catalina Estrada, Cheryl Dunn, Elizabeth Mcgrath, Faith 47, Hera, Kukula, Mel Kadel, Miss Van, Pam Glew, Sarah Joncas, Stella Im Hultberg, Swoon, Tara Mcpherson and Xue Wang. With so much female talent under one roof this promises to be one hot and interesting show not to miss, Miss!

Faith 47. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mel Kadel (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

“While Supplies Last” at Pawn Works (Chicago)

The Pawn Works Gallery in Chicago new show “While Supplies Last” opens this Saturday. For this show the space would be transformed into a site specific retail environment where you’d be able to purchase items from books to art from a list of artists that include: Shawnimals, Skewville, Kosbe, 5003, Ader, Amuse 126, Snacki, JC Rivera, Montgomery Perry Smith, Left Handed Wave, Max Kauffman, Nice-One, Swiv, and Jon Burgerman.

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Crossing Borders at MSA Gallery (Paris)

MSA Gallery new group show “Crossing Borders” opens this Saturday in Paris, France and arttists including are: DAL, David Walker, Stinkfish, Faith47, David Shillinglaw, Martin Whatson, Klone, Snik, Otto Schade, Ben Slow, Joseph Loughborough, Inkie and Banksy:

Stinkfish (photo © Jaime Rojo)

David Shillinglaw (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Isaac Cordal “Waiting for Climate Change” at Beaufort 04 (Flemish Coast, Belgium)

Sculptor and conceptual artist Isaac Cordal is doing a series of outdoor installations From March 31st to September 30th, 2012 in 30 Locations spread across 9 coastal municipalities throughout the Flemish coast as part of Beaufort 04.

Mr. Cordal’s army of little cement characters are sure to stop you on your heels if you see them that is. His commentary on social issues runs deep and wide always with a humorous touch and an impeccable sense of placement:

For further information regarding this event click here.

HOW & NOSM show you HOW they made “Reflections” (VIDEO)

A custom installation by How & Nosm just finished at the new show opening next week in the Bronx called “This Side of Paradise”. See BSA coverage of the show and more photos of How & Nosm’s installation along with Crash and Daze HERE.>>“Poorhouse for the Rich” Revitalized By The Arts

Kid Zoom Crashes Cars (VIDEO)

The other Australian bad boy Kid Zoom made a video of himself building a house and crashing some cars. We have video to prove it:

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more

MSA Gallery Presents: “Crossing Borders” A Group Show (Paris, France)

Crossing Borders

featuring work by

DAL, David Walker, Stinkfish, Faith47, David Shillinglaw, Martin Whatson, Klone, Snik, Otto Schade, Ben Slow, Joseph Loughborough, Inkie and Banksy

Opening Reception: Saturday, March 31, 5-9pm

MSAGallery @ L\INCONNU
17 rue Mazagran
75010 Paris, France

Please RSVP to rsvp@mystreetartgallery.com
Preview List can be requested to theshop@mystreetartgallery.com

Exhibition open to the public March 31st – April 5, 2012
MSAGallery is pleased to present Crossing Borders, a group show which brings for the first time in the heart of Paris, fifteen artists whose work activates creative conversations far from the French borders with geographically disparate cities of Bogotá, Cape Town, Beijing, Kiev, London, Oslo, Bristol, Concepcion and Tel Aviv

Artists will be present in Paris painting in the city for MSA’s open air gallery project ParisFreeWalls.

About MSAGallery:

Founded in 2011, MSAGallery focuses on a select group of artists breaking ground in painting, mixed media and sculpture. The annual program consists of a series of pop-up solo and group exhibitions that document the progress of these artists.

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Fun Friday 03.16.12

Yowsah! It’s a Triple Header for Street Artist shows in Brooklyn tonight, with Haring at the Museum, Stikman at Pandemic, and JMR/See One at Mighty Tanaka. But that’s not all that’s happening this weekend.

1. Keith Haring: 1978-1982
2. Stikman “20” at Pandemic
3. JMR and See One @ Pandemic
4. SANER @ Fifty24SF (San Francisco)
5. Chris Stain “Long Story Short” at Wooster Social Club
6. Sickboy, White Walls Gallery new show “Wonder Club”
7. Asbjorn Skou AKA Armsrock “Stedfortrædere” at  Mosh Gallery in Copenhagen
8. “My Turn” at Carmichael Gallery with Bumblebee, Hyuro, Interesni Kazki, Jaz, Klone, LineLineDot, Moneyless, Penny, Stinkfish, Zeus.
9. KEMP “Behind her Disguise” at Artsee.
10. Kid NES in Dallas. Time Lapse (VIDEO)
11. Mimi The Clown turns Superhero by OAOFB. (VIDEO)
12. Mimi The Clown turns Superhero by OAOFB. (VIDEO 2)
13. Ben Eine getting up in London by Abbie Brandon (VIDEO)

Keith Haring: 1978-1982

“This exhibition shows you how much fun New York City used to be” – Mare 139

Opening to the public today Keith Haring: 1978-1982 at the Brooklyn Museum and while Mare 139 has a point, we contend that Brooklyn is still tons of fun, if Manhattan has lost much of it’s edge. Regarding this exhibit, GO! Exquisitely curated, it welcomes the viewer to Mr. Haring’s early days in NYC when the “downtown” scene was the scene.

Keith Haring. Pia Zadora subway installation. Courtesy of Mugrabi Collection. © Mugrabi Collection. The Brooklyn Museum (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The curators have included pieces rarely or never before viewed including an amazing slide show of images taken by Kwong Chi showing the artist illegally putting work in the subways. Combined with some of Harings journals, his Cipher chart, videos and 155 works mostly on paper, it is informative, accessible and fun to see.

Keith Haring. A photo taken from the Slide show at the exhibition of images taken by Kwong Chi. Courtesy of and © The Keith Haring Foundation. The Brooklyn Museum (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more information regarding this exhibition click here.

To read our article on the Huffington Post of this exhibition with a complete photo essay and and written overview click here.

Stikman “20” at Pandemic

One of the most prolific and hermetic Street Artists working today on the streets of New York, sometimes literally melted into the street, Stikman has a gentle legend to his name. His solo show “20” opens today at Pandemic Gallery today, offering a rare glimpse into his world of secrecy and continuous invention. The little stick character he’s been leaving for two decades is synonymous with the symbol-based tagging of graff writers and the re-inventive practice of a fine artist continuously exploring new techniques of expression.

Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

JMR and See One @ Pandemic

Fresh off their showing at Fountain last weekend, Mighty Tanaka is not skipping a beat by unveiling a brand new dual show in Dumbo tonight. If you thrill to “Color and Motion” then check out new works by JMR and See One tonight.

JMR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

SANER @ Fifty24SF (San Francisco)

Mexican Street Artist SANER has been impressing Street Art and graff fans in the last couple of years with his near magic interpretations, incredibly rendered. A down to earth fellow who often teams up with SEGO for collaborations, the artist makes his debut solo show in San Francisco tonight at the Fifty24SF Gallery.

Saner with Sego in Miami (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Chris Stain “Long Story Short” at Wooster Social Club

At the crowded opening for Chris Stain’s new show and book launch Wednesday, the vibe was a testament to his working class roots and real people charm, with Billy Mode on the turntables and Ray Cross from Bushwick Print Lab screen-printing some fresh Occupy Wall Street posters for people to take to the streets. It’s the the kind of kindred community that fostered “Long Story Short”, his new monogram on Drago, and the kind of environment that makes Stains work resonant in these times where the working person feels like they have a boot to his/her neck. Stop by The Wooster Social Club anytime to see Mr. Stain’s new body of work and catch an intimate look into his influences both as an artist and as a person.

Chris Stain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here.

Also happening this weekend:

  • San Francisco’s White Walls Gallery new show “Wonder Club” opens tomorrow. This is Sickboy‘s first US major solo show. Click here for more information about this show.
  • Asbjorn Skou AKA Armsrock new show “Stedfortrædere ” at the Mosh Gallery in Copenhagen, Denmark opens today. Click here for more information about this show.
  • Bumblebee curates the new show “My Turn” at the Carmichael Gallery in Culver City, CA opening this Saturday with artists including: Bumblebee, Hyuro, Interesni Kazki, Jaz, Klone, LineLineDot, Moneyless, Penny, Stinkfish, Zeus. Click here for more information about this show.
  • KEMP solo show “Behind her Disguise” is marks his New York debut at Artsee. This show is now open to the general public. Click here for more information about this show.

 

Kid NES in Dallas. Time Lapse (VIDEO)

Mimi The Clown turns Superhero by OAOFB. (VIDEO)

Mimi The Clown turns Superhero by OAOFB. (VIDEO 2)

Ben Eine getting up in London by Abbie Brandon (VIDEO)

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Carmichael Gallery Presents: “My Turn” A Group Show Curated by Bumblebee. (Culver City, CA)

My Turn

 

Featuring work by:

Bumblebee, Hyuro, Interesni Kazki, Jaz, Klone, LineLineDot, Moneyless, Penny, Stinkfish, Zeus

Curated by Bumblebee

Opening Reception: Saturday, March 17, 6-9pm

Carmichael Gallery
5795 Washington Blvd
Culver City, CA 90232

Please RSVP to rsvp at carmichaelgallery dot com.

Exhibition open to the public March 17 – April 7, 2012

“There are many artists in the urban / street art movement. For this show, each artist was selected based on his or her unique voice and ability to push the boundaries of the genre, while remaining true to its origins.” – Bumblebee

Carmichael Gallery is pleased to present My Turn, the first curatorial project by Los Angeles-based artist, Bumblebee. The group exhibition includes mixed media collage, sculpture and works on canvas and paper by Bumblebee, Hyuro, Interesni Kazki, Jaz, Klone, LineLineDot, Moneyless, Penny, Stinkfish and Zeus, ten artists whose work activates creative conversations with the geographically disparate cities of Bogotá, Buenos Aires, Downey, Kiev, London, Los Angeles, Milan and Tel Aviv.

About Carmichael Gallery:

Founded in 2007 by husband and wife team Seth and Elisa Carmichael, Carmichael Gallery focuses on a select group of artists breaking ground in painting, mixed media, photography and sculpture. Their annual program consists of a series of solo and group exhibitions that document the progress of these artists.

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Visual Slang 2009: The Modern Urban Imagination at Abrons Arts Center

Visual Slang 2009: The Modern Urban Imagination
Thursday June 25, 2009 at 6:00pm

Abrons Arts Center

466 Grand St.
New York, New York 10002 Get Directions

The third in a series of cutting-edge global urban art exhibits, VISUAL SLANG 2009 features an eclectic range of characters and creatures representing a broad spectrum of cultural heritages. Featured artists include: A1one, Ame72, Bastardilla, Bishop, C215, Cekis, Charm, Cern, Chris Cortes, Klone, Mefisto, Kenji Nakayama, Sien, Stinkfish, Whisper and Zero Cents.

Place: Abrons Arts Center, 466 Grand Street, NYC 10002; Dates: June 25th – August 14th;
Opening Reception: Thursday, June 25th, 6-8pm. Contact: Lois Stavsky, 917.562.8468.

A recent piece by Charm (photo Steven P. Harrington)

A recent piece by Charm (photo Steven P. Harrington)

Please follow and like us:
Read more