All posts tagged: Ino

BSA Film Friday: 06.25.21

BSA Film Friday: 06.25.21

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening:
1. Guido Van Helten – L’attesa – (The Wait) – 2017
2. “Spaciba” INO in Athens, Greece.
3. TrueSchool Hall of Fame via Dope Cans

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BSA Special Feature: Guido Van Helten – L’attesa – (The Wait) – 2017

Today we look back a couple of years to a massive yet poignant project from artist Guido van Helten in Ragusa, Sicily where he honors the history of a modern place and an age-old practice of youth finding their own significant part of a city to meet up and socialize casually. Part of the third edition of FestiWall, a public art festival, he photographed friends and invited them to write their names in aerosol along the base of a wall while he painted their portraits above on a lift.

“It’s very much an expression of the young people and it is their space,” he says.

“I invited the class who I took photos of to write their names all along the base of that wall. It was a good symbol of them taking back the wall in that space.The wall is a popular space where people come to hang out so there is an energy in that wall and in energy of that space which I really enjoyed”

Guido Van Helten – L’attesa – (The Wait) – 2017

“Spaciba” INO in Athens, Greece.

Accessing a difficult wall using only rope suspension, INO paints this Athens mural of young girl with a big hammer. He says it is a symbol of ” a new generation breaking barriers of equality.”

TrueSchool Hall of Fame via Dope Cans

A short Hall of Fame video with writers from Wrocław, Poland featuring Dope Cans Classic & Dope The Wall

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INO: Breaking Barriers in Greece.

INO: Breaking Barriers in Greece.

Greek muralist INO just knocked out this huge wall in Athens and the results are smashing. With a theme of “Breaking Barriers of Equality”, he says, “I created a little girl with a huge hammer; symbolizing the new generation that is able to break stereotypes and bring a better future.”

INO. Athens, Greece. (photo © Jenny Brahimi)

Painted with acrylic ecologically friendly paint, INO also tried a technique that is uncommon for large murals like this – “I made the whole action with a new technique I am working on with ropes.”

INO. Athens, Greece. (photo © Jenny Brahimi)
INO. Athens, Greece. (photo © Jenny Brahimi)
INO. Athens, Greece. (photo © Nasos Papadokostopoulos)
INO. Athens, Greece. (photo © INO)
INO. Athens, Greece. (photo © INO)
INO. Athens, Greece. (photo © INO)
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BSA Film Friday: 02.26.21

BSA Film Friday: 02.26.21

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening participants at Festival Asalto 2020:
1. Silence Shapes by Filippo Minelli
2. Apocalypse Now / INO
3. Vesod x Wasp Crew / Urban Art Field

BSA Special Feature: “Silence Shapes” by Filippo Minelli

“Most of my process is about finding the right place and finding the right time to start,” says Italian public space interventionist Filippo Minelli. During URVANITY 2019, the artist created billowing bending funnels of prodigious color that poured into the air, interacted with architecture, and redefined spatial relationships in the public realm. Our worldwide survey of ephemeral art is surpassed in brevity by this category of interactive art installation that quickly changes its dimensions and fills and evaporates.

He refers to it as giving shape to silence.

Silence Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Apocalypse Now / INO

With music by The Flood and smooth-paced shooting from Constantino Flood, Greek muralist INO is captured as he paints his masked figure in Athens at great scale.

Vesod x Wasp Crew / Urban Art Field

A quick look at the works completed by Vesod and Wasp Crew for the urban art festival hosted in the municipality of Cavagnolo for the second intervention of the three-year project. The artists say that it “addresses the issues of Sustainability and Equality, in terms of respect for the climate and the right to live in a healthy environment.”

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BSA Film Friday: 09.13.19

BSA Film Friday: 09.13.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. “Word on the Street” Debut
2. INO – “Freedom For Sale” in Athens
3. Two in a Row from Alex Prager: “La Grande Sortie” & “Despair”


BSA Special Feature: “Word on the Street” Debuts

“Fuck the old days. Graffiti is now!”

The last five years have been explosive for Street Art worldwide, and with “Word On The Street” you have a good indicator that the graff writing game is alive and well in New York as well – and tenaciously prolific.

Anonymous filmmakers infused the doc with vibrating audio and visual distortion and a sense of ever-present surveillance, or the implication of it cloaked in darkness. Interviews, late night runs, frozen wire fences, loose footing, bloody scrapes, and the sweet smell of aerosol lightly purring from cans across a shadowed wall. The labor of love for the filmmakers is the only thing that pushes a project like this to fruition. And fumes of course.

It’s first public screening is coming up September 29 in Brooklyn. Click HERE for more information.

It’s first public screening is coming up September 29 in Brooklyn. Click HERE for more information.

Featuring 143, AJES, BIO, BRAT, CASH4, CARL WESTON, CLAW, CHRIS RWK, DEK 2DX, DIVA, DSR, EDO, EL7, FAES, FLASH, JAKEE, JESUS SAVES, KLOPS, LEX, LOOSE, MERK, MRS, MUTZ, NEG, NOXER, PANIC, PLASMA SLUG, POE, SCAE, SEO, SILON, SMURFO, SPRAY, STOR, STU, and VEW.

INO – “Freedom For Sale” in Athens

Constantino Mass adds just the right amount of slickly pounding wipes and cuts to this installation by INO in Athens. We published photos from this a few days ago so have a look and enjoy the video.

Two in a Row from Alex Prager

Alex Prager debuted a new short film at Lehmann Maupin Gallery in New York this month, and it has piqued the interest of many in her work of disconnected, reconnected narratives. Impeccably styled, humorously shot, it’s a staged invoking of old Hollywood and street scenes, enveloped in drama and frequently suspense. Often the LA born director provides just the deconstructed portion of the scene you have seen, and keeps reworking it in surprising ways. Go to the gallery to see the new “Play the Wind”. Below are two of her short films from five and nine years ago respectively.

“La Grande Sortie” by Alex Prager

“Despair” by Alex Prager

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INO: “Freedom For Sale” in Athens

INO: “Freedom For Sale” in Athens

It’s true, Athens is still in the throes of austerity, but not for everyone, darling.

The severe financial austerity imposed on Greece’s government and people by the international bankers was never meant for everyone – vulture capitalism is designed with winners in mind.

INO. “Freedom For Sale”. Athens. August 2019. (photo © INO)

Just check out the clubs and nighttime entertainment near Kolonaki Square where this new INO mural is.

Once you pass the phalanx of security, you are welcomed into the party – preferably wearing designer labels – the men are in blazers and “casual cool” as they watch barely dressed women in high heels dancing on the stage, sometimes acting out fantasies to the aural euphoria and plumes of smoke blown skyward. In these thumping houses of free-market hedonism, you can feel free while waving your hands and glow sticks in the air at the DJ booth, but for a comparably hefty price.

INO. “Freedom For Sale”. Athens. August 2019. (photo © INO)

The average annual salary in Athens is €21,618, or about 60€ a day. A visitor to one of these clubs reports that “prices start from 90€ (bottle of proseco/wine), 290€ for a bottle of vodka, and 145€ for a bottle of gin”.

This financial inequality may have been on his mind when INO painted this new mural. “They did not give me a specific theme and I chose to create an image that from the first point of view may look optimistic but it is not,” he says. The title is “Freedom for Sale”.

Who’s buying?

INO. “Freedom For Sale”. Check out the 1UP extinguisher tag across the street. Athens. August 2019. (photo © INO)
INO. “Freedom For Sale”. Athens. August 2019. (photo © INO)
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BSA Film Friday: 11.09.18

BSA Film Friday: 11.09.18

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. GAIA “Still Here”
2. Jorge Rodriguez Gerarda at DEN Culture Space in Barcelona
3. INO – BOMBER in Łódź
4. TrumpRat by Jeffrey Beebe courtesy of BravinLee Offsite.

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BSA Special Feature: GAIA “Still Here”

“The ability to paint realistically is magical. And so it is nice to possess a little bit of magic,” says Street Artist, muralist, social observer, citizen anthropologist, lecturer GAIA as he talks about his new mural project in Providence, Rhode Island.

A student and avid practitioner of multi-sectionalism the 30 year old Baltimorian researched the area and its history long before he began the project in September. Invited by Avenue Concept and its residency manager Nick Platzer, the artist partnered with the Tomaquag Museum in Exeter and artist Lynsea Montanari, a member of the Narragansett tribe, who is depicted in the mural holding a picture of Princess Red Wing, a Narragansett elder who founded the museum in the 1950s.

Follow the process, and hear GAIA speak about the path in “Still Here.”

 

Jorge Rodriguez Gerarda at DEN Culture Space in Barcelona

Cuban-American contemporary artists and large-scale terrestrial public artist Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada has worked in culture jamming and degrees of détournement on billboards in the street but is featured here today for his recent project with the tender ephemeral charcoal drawings many know him for. Part of an initiative with the JET8 Foundation the artist is receiving an art and technology grant to be used to support social and artistic projects. More on that later, but in the mean time, here is his mural of his friend Desislava Staneva, a Barcelona based art curator.

INO – BOMBER in Łódź

A quick flick of INO’s “Bomber” wall that he did with Urban Forms in Łódź, Poland. Whose the bomber, you ask? Atlas of course.  Look out below!

TrumpRat by Jeffrey Beebe courtesy of BravinLee Offsite.

The midterms are over, but Trump is still great TV! The corporate media loves him and hates him and is absolutely hooked on him because he keeps bringing them advertising money. Don’t worry, they’ll quit him in 2024. Promise!

Democracy? That is a different matter.

Trump Rat and Democracy at Jeffrey Deitch “Protest Factory”


 

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Praying for Money with INO in Ibiza

Praying for Money with INO in Ibiza

Yes, money falling from the sky, that’s what people pray for sometimes.

As long as those metal coins flying at high speed don’t hit you or your dog, it would appear to be a splendid idea. INO had the scenario in mind in Ibiza, Spain for the BLOOP festival, and he painted this mural of a girl on the side of a hotel. He’s calling it “Hopeless’.

INO. “Hopeless” Bloop Festival 2018. Ibiza, Spain. (photo © INO)

While we don’t sidestep the financial suffering of the many millions of families who are neighbors on the Earth, you also know that sometimes money is not the solution to everything.

Recently The Simple Dollar website compiled a list of 100 things to do for free, and while they don’t apply universally, especially when your fundamental needs are not being being met, the list is an excellent way to imagine larger parts of life without seeing them through the prism of cash.

For INO, this mural is likely a topic more serious – when one feels so desperate as to pray for money.

INO. “Hopeless” Bloop Festival 2018. Ibiza, Spain. (photo © INO)

INO. “Hopeless” Bloop Festival 2018. Ibiza, Spain. (photo © INO)

INO. “Hopeless” Bloop Festival 2018. Ibiza, Spain. (photo © INO)

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BSA Film Friday: 06.01.18

BSA Film Friday: 06.01.18

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. “The US Tapes” with Fatheat and TransOne
2. Said Dokins: Stories of a Word
3. INO: Lost in Greece
4. Low Bros x Viva Con Agua

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: The US Tapes with Fatheat and TransOne

“Listen, my only request…. When you’re done doing your thing, do an Italian flag with my daughter’s name on it,” says a guy who is shouting up from the street to the roof where two Hungarian graff writers are preparing to hit a wall with a giant rat in Jersey. That rat looks fantastic as it basks in the blinking glow of the marquee for Vinny Italian Gourmet on the streets in the Newark night below.

That scene alone can stand as their American iconic moment for the US Tapes, but Fatheat and TransOne documented a number of golden moments on their trip this winter to New York, Wynwood, LA, and Las Vegas. Travel with them as they try to square the television mythology of modern America with the one they are encountering in all its ridiculous free-wheeling self satisfied unreflective emotional consumerist funkified freedom*.  Standby for sonic blasts from the cultural pulp soundbook and prepare for a celebrity visit.

Slyly they observe and sample and taste and catalogue the insights by traversing the main stage and the margins, smartly not taking it too seriously, finding plenty of places for wide-eyed wonder and wiseguy sarcasm. Steeped in graffiti history with mad skillz themselves, this is all an adventure. Generous of heart, they also share it with you.

Ready for your Friday road trip?

 

 

Said Dokins: Stories of a Word

You saw great shots and heard the story this week on BSA :

Said Dokins in Queensland: Ghosts, Memories & Language.

Now you can see the video. Oh, word?

 

INO: Lost in Greece

A perfect wistful interlude that turns this massive mural into an interlude.  See more earlier on BSA with “INO and ‘LOST’ in the Port of Piraeus, Greece”.

 

Low Bros x Viva Con Agua

A brief shot with Berlin’s Low Bros as they create a wall “in our own visual language” in Los Angeles.

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INO and “LOST” in the Port of Piraeus, Greece

INO and “LOST” in the Port of Piraeus, Greece

She’s lost, so much on her mind.

INO. “Lost” Greece. May 2018. (photo © INO)

The triangulation of financial, governmental, and corporate power locked Greece (and Europe) in a downward spiral only three years ago, and although there are some signs of stabilization this year, the downturn “wiped out a quarter of the nation’s economic value (and) runs deep and is still vivid in the minds and pocketbooks of the country’s 11  million citizens.

INO. “Lost” Greece. May 2018. (photo © INO)

Perhaps this contributes to the troubled mind of INO’s latest full mural on the side of a hotel in the Port of Piraeus, Greece.

And what a port! Now 51 percent owned by the China Ocean Shipping (Group) Company (COSCO) , Piraeus is on track to be the busiest port of the Mediterranean in terms of container traffic by 2019.

Surely she must be overwhelmed by that prospect as well.

INO. “Lost” Greece. May 2018. (photo © INO)

Possibly, she’s just mad about a boy – and springtime tends to mess with young people’s hearts more than others. Reminds you of that blues standard, “I’ve Got it Bad and That Ain’t Good.”  In a more contemporary vein she may be closer to Rianna’s new standard, “Love On The Brain.”

In any case, “They finally took off the scaffolding,” INO tells us. He says, “It’s a pretty woman who is thinking. She has a blue vortex on her mind.”

The title is “Lost”.

INO. “Lost” Greece. May 2018. (photo © INO)

INO. “Lost” Greece. May 2018. (photo © INO)

INO. “Lost” Greece. May 2018. (photo © INO)

INO. “Lost” Greece. May 2018. (Constantino Mass)

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INO and “Broken” in Fortaleza, Brazil

INO and “Broken” in Fortaleza, Brazil

The Greek Street Artist INO has been consistently observing the social and political factors that are at play in modern society and has been addressing these themes through his work painting large murals in more cities around the world. This week in Fortaleza aside the Atlantic in northeastern Brazil, INO created a headless female form that for him is evocative of a socio-political order that is “Broken”.

INO. “Broken”. Festival Concreto. Fortaleza, Brazil. November, 2017. (photo © INO)

“This is a place where someone can see very big contradictions,” he tells us, “the poverty in the street, people begging for food – while you eat in the restaurant, the prostitutes every night in the streets.”

He shows us a photo of a street scene where  women are being questioned by the police that he took at night while he was painting his wall from the vantage point of his lift up above. His imagination is activated by the scene, and he thinks of the frightening circumstances that women in the sex trade are put in that exploit them repeatedly.

“All of this, together with the rich people, the expensive apartments in huge luxury buildings that look empty, surrounded by barbed wire fences in each condominium yard…” It all is disturbing to him, and a scene repeated in many cities in so-called developed nations where the stratification between rich and poor is getting more pronounced than ever before in the modern era, leaving more feeling powerless and easily victimized.

For his new mural entitled “Broken”, completed here during the 4th Concreto Festival, the anonymous form is an obvious reference to people caught in a de-humanizing system. “The piece is depicting a naked thin woman in a position of offering her body, with a black splash coming from the head,” he says.

INO. “Broken”. Festival Concreto. Fortaleza, Brazil. November, 2017. (photo © INO)

INO. “Broken”. Festival Concreto. Fortaleza, Brazil. November, 2017. (photo © INO)

INO. “Broken”. Festival Concreto. Fortaleza, Brazil. November, 2017. (photo © INO)

INO. “Broken”. Festival Concreto. Fortaleza, Brazil. November, 2017. (photo © INO)

INO. “Broken”. Festival Concreto. Fortaleza, Brazil. November, 2017. (photo © INO)

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The “Melting Earth” and INO at Bloop Fest Ibiza 2017

The “Melting Earth” and INO at Bloop Fest Ibiza 2017

Topical and timely, street artist INO has the scoop on global warming right now at the Bloop Festival in Ibiza, Spain.

INO “Melting Earth”. Bloop Festival 2017. Ibiza, Spain. July 2017. (photo © Mr. Mini)

A woeful visual play on the cold summer treat that kids in many countries have associated with good times, this Ice Cream man from Greece tells us that the situation is getting messy.

“Our world is changing because of the worst animal that has ever lived on earth – the human,” INO tells us, “And we’re all denying it.” The piece is on the side of a school, so certainly it will spark many conversations among students and teachers – a powerful example of how public-facing art can have an impact.

INO “Melting Earth”. Bloop Festival 2017. Ibiza, Spain. July 2017. (photo © INO)

INO “Melting Earth”. Bloop Festival 2017. Ibiza, Spain. July 2017. (photo © Mr. Mini)

INO “Melting Earth”. Bloop Festival 2017. Ibiza, Spain. July 2017. (photo © INO)

INO “Melting Earth”. Bloop Festival 2017. Ibiza, Spain. July 2017. (photo © INO)

 

 


For more information on Bloop please go to:

www.bloopfestival.com #bloopfestival

For INO please go to:

www.ino.net #inoexpo

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Isaac Cordal + INO. Up North Fest X BSA: Røst, Norway.  UPN Dispatch 1

Isaac Cordal + INO. Up North Fest X BSA: Røst, Norway. UPN Dispatch 1

This is the third year for Northern Norway’s UPN Festival and this year it’s on an Island called Røst and includes a collection of artists eager to do site-specific and environmental works – one evolutionary development in the mural festivals that blossom throughout the world right now. This week BSA is proud to bring you images and interviews along with Urban Nation this year at UpNorth, where the seagulls never stop calling and the sun never goes down this time of year.


Today we look at new work by Isaac Cordal from Spain and INO from Greece, with each artist telling us about their street practice up north.

“I think it was very interesting as Upnorth subtly left its footprint without overturning the aesthetics of the Island,” says Isaac Cordal about his experience at the UPN festival. You may be familiar with the miniature sculptural interventions by Isaac Cordal, whose corporate businessmen have sold their souls and are looking down at the traffic of the city from a ledge, contemplating their existence, dread, and guilt. Partly social critique, partly comedic play, partly redefining public space and scale, Cordal’s figures are reliably surprising. You can see that at UpNorth this year some of them are evolving as well.

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Brooklyn Street Art: Can you tell us about the new figures that you did for UpNorth?
Isaac Cordal: In a way they are part of the same series called “Isolated in the modern outdoors”. They are covered by a blanket with the colors of the houses of Røst. They are isolated in the middle of the sea with no possibilities of returning, without a house, like a kind of shipwreck. Unfortunately blankets have become the street fashion for many homeless people. Blankets remind us of other times, of the devastation, of the migratory crises and of the human being succumbing to the hostilities of the outside.

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Brooklyn Street Art: We notice that they look quite different from the little businessmen that many have become familiar with. What inspired you to change them?
Isaac Cordal: As I said before perhaps the idea is a little dense. In modernity itself we have intense reflections of the Middle Ages, there are still different speeds outside exponential progress, too many contrasts between rich and poor, the so-called globalization leaves a trail of images of people delocalized, confused in space and lost in time.

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

Brooklyn Street Art: How would you describe the environment working in Røst?
Isaac Cordal: Working in Røst was an interesting experience since you had to adapt to the peculiar nature of it; there were not many buildings to intervene so that gave me the opportunity to experiment with its geography. With its 24 hours of light its landscape became something completely hypnotic at certain times. The hours of sleep are altered and the perception of time changes in a certain way.

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

Brooklyn Street Art: How are you challenging yourself as an artist right now?
Isaac Cordal: I’m going to try to work more in the studio after an intense year from one side of the world to the other. Perhaps I will decrease a little more – until disappearing.

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

 

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Isaac Cordal. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)


Muralist INO uses a monochrome palette and a splash of color with most of his photorealist/surrealist figurative metaphors to talk about society. Not exactly critique, often the commentary comes across as straightforward observation, openly stated.

INO. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

An aerosol bomber in his teens in Athens, his hard work in his early thirties has brought his murals to many international cities and he says UPN was a great opportunity to address a favorite issue of late, our lack of privacy. The new piece is called “Photobombing”.

Brooklyn Street Art: Can you tell us about the piece that you did for UpNorth? 
INO: The invasion of privacy in our societies is constantly increasing with the pretext that our lives are improving. This exposure may not concern some, but maybe they should think again about it.

INO. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

Brooklyn Street Art: How would you describe the environment working in Røst?
INO: It was interesting working on an island  that has only one policeman and 24 hours daylight.

Brooklyn Street Art: How are you challenging yourself as an artist right now?
INO: The production of images that will remain on people’s mind in this era of over-information could be a challenge.

INO. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

INO. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

INO. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

INO. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

INO. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © INO)

Our thanks to our partner Urban Nation (UN) and to photographer Tor Ståle Moen for his talents.


See our Up North roundup piece on The Huffington Post

 

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