All posts tagged: India

Andreco: Reclaiming Air and Water for Delhi, India “Climate 05”

Andreco: Reclaiming Air and Water for Delhi, India “Climate 05”

An Art, Science and Climate Action project by Andreco

Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)

ANDRECO painted the air pollution with the air pollution itself,” say organizers in the 20 million strong New Delhi – which was declared the world’s most polluted capital, according to Reuters this month.

And the statement isn’t hyperbole, according to AIR-Ink, the company that made his ink, which is “the first ink made entirely out of air pollution,” they explain on their website.

Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)

The unique art-making material is part of the Italian Street Artist / Activist’s most recent installment of his Climate ArtProject, which he orchestrated on the streets here in New Delhi for the St+Art Festival this year. Part of a global, multi-city installation and demonstration, “Climate 05 – Reclaiming Air and Water”.

Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)

The mural, people’s march and public talks are a hybrid of activism, art and science, ANDRECO tells us. His goal is for residents in Delhi to focus on the consequences of the climatic changes and the air water pollution in their city.

“In particular the project takes inspiration by the latest studies on the Air quality and the condition of the Yamuna river,” he tells us, “and it aims to underline the best practices for air and water remediation and climate change adaptation and mitigation.”

Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)

We have published previous editions of this project and it is always good to see the images of people participating in the demonstration and march with flags, a physical commitment to the expressed goals of standing in solidarity with Mother Earth, her natural systems, and our responsibility to preserve them.

“The mural at the Lodhi Art District in Lodhi Colony, Delhi represents an artistic translation of the studies about air and water remediation,” says a press release from organizers. “The wall painting symbolizes the transition of toxic smoke and greenhouse gases, coming from unregulated emissions from industrial pollution, emissions from vehicles and crop burning, into a healthy environment with clean clouds. The transition is made possible due to the tree that stands in the middle of the wall.”

Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)

Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)
Andreco. Climate Art Project. In collaboration with St+ART India Foundation. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo Akshat Nauriyal)

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New Works St+ART Lodhi 2019 – Courtesy Martha Cooper

New Works St+ART Lodhi 2019 – Courtesy Martha Cooper

St+Art Delhi continues apace with an ever-expanding roster of artists and financial/commercial/municipal partners five years after we first began writing about it, and photographer Martha Cooper brings us today some of the newest installations and shots that she recently discovered while there.

A mural program at heart, many of the artists invited here bring a decorative character to the districts of Shahpurjat, Khirki Village and Hauz Khas Village also have roots in illegal graffiti and Street Art back home, and during their youth.

Yip Yew Chong. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Over the years that list has included an international and local array of artists invited to paint at Lohdi Colony from all the continents – well maybe not Antarctica. Names have included ECB, Lady Aiko, local students Avinash and Kamesh, Suiko of Japan, Reko Rennie from Australia, Lek & Sowat from France, Kureshi from India, Inkbrushnme from India, Dutch artist Niels Shoe Meulman, Swiss duo Never Crew, Tofu from Germany, Mattia from Italy, Artez from Serbia, M-City from Poland, Ano from Taiwan…

Yip Yew Chong. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Notable here is the architectural framing convention for most of these murals- the distinctive facades of Lodhi Colony architecture that features a central archway and four windows divided by it on a semi-ornate face forward. Some of the arches begin on the ground while others have been bricked into windows. Each provides a view inside the entry or courtyard, while others are bursting out with limbs and trees that protrude through them to the street.

Originally designed by the British-born architect William Henry Medd in the late 1930s and early 1940s as part of a program to house certain populations, this unifying pattern sets the quiet neighborhood apart from others in the city.

Yip Yew Chong. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)

As Chief Architect to the Government of India during that period, Mr. Medd oversaw much of the design of the relatively new city as well as buildings like the Cathedral Church of the Redemption and Sacred Heart Cathedral, both of which reflect his affinity for the high arches that distinguish the period.

“It’s interesting to see how the very different artists have incorporated the arch into their murals,” says photographer Cooper. “The uniform size and shape of the walls unify the disparate collection and the arches give the whole area an exotic touch.”

Aravani Art Project. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)

As is her practice many of these images also skillfully incorporate the foot traffic and community who live here and who are beginning to associate these figurative, abstract and folk-inspired murals into their daily lives. Asking people to pose in front of the new paintings gives them context, somehow also bringing them alive in certain cases. At other times, her timing and eagle eye capture the passerby who unknowingly creates a serendipitous counterpoint to the new work.

“It’s a quiet neighborhood compared to the rest of Delhi,” Martha says, “making it a very pleasant place for an afternoon walking tour.”

Aravani Art Project. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Adele Renault. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sameer Kulavoor. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sameer Kulavoor. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Tellas. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Avinash Kamesh. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Avinash Kamesh. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sajid Wajid. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sajid Wajid. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
NeSpoon. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
NeSpoon. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Aaron Glasson. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Aaron Glasson. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Dwa Zeta. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sheryo & The Yok. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Daan Botlek. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Daan Botlek. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Andreco. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Georgia Hill & Hanif Kureshi. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
David Leitner. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
David Leitner. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Samantha Lo. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Bond. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
H11235. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
H11235. St+ART Lodhi. Delhi, India. March 2019. (photo © Martha Cooper)
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BSA Film Friday: 02.22.19

BSA Film Friday: 02.22.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Escif: Magic Piano
2. Adele Renault: St+Art India. Lodhi Art Festival 2019
3. Jeff Koons at the Ashmolean Museum
4. OS Gemeos: Flying Steps at Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin

BSA Special Feature: Escif: Magic Piano

Spanish Street Artist Escif creates a museum installation that uses irony, sarcasm, and deep truths that we’re not always ready to see.

By hi-jacking some of the current interactive nomenclature enabled by augmented/mixed realities and the normalizing of tablet use, he alerts viewers to the connection of age-old mineral mining that is just as contemporary as the hi-tech gadgetry many have embraced.

Since you can use the device to contemplate human suffering and make music, it is an indictment of modern attitudes that dehumanize and turn real stories into a video game.

From the artist:

“Coltan is a mineral, found specially in eastern Congo, used to make cells and computer chips. Violent rebel groups are exploiting coltan mining to help finance a bloody civil war which is now in its 12th year.

The link between the bloodshed and coltan is causing alarm among high-tec manufacturers slowly they are beginning to realise that their products may contain the tainted fruits of civil war. Since the outbreak of fighting in august 1998: an estimated 5.4 million people have died; 45.000 continue to die each month; Children account for 47% of these deaths.

Magic Piano is a music installation. With the help of a tablet (that obviously contains coltan) you will be able to play the piano. Use the device to navigate on the wall. When you pass on the screen over a charater, a sound will be activated. If you push the character with your finger a sound loop will be activated. You will also activate the animation of each character.”

Adele Renault: St+Art India. Lodhi Art Festival 2019

A couple of weeks ago we shared with you new photos by Adele’s mom of the Street Artist painting this wall for St+Art India in New Delhi. Today we share a video made of her installation.

📺Lodhi Art Festival 2019 || Adele RenaultAdele's imprints are visible in the winged beauties that now adorn the walls at Lodhi. Laying on a main arterial road know the colony, her birds now peek through the trees and woo passersby.Watch the film to get a closer look into her creative process! 📽 Pranav Gohill & Jay NuEdited by Filterkaypee Festival supported by Asian Paints.#artforall #startindia #startdelhi #startdelhi2019 #asianpaints #lodhiartdistrict #lodhiartfestival2019

Posted by St+art India on Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Jeff Koons at the Ashmolean Museum

“It lacks all the give and the breath of fresh art,” the bespectacled art critic intones with all the weight of a final damnation.

“We need haters out there. They are affirmations that we’re doing something right,” says the streetwise pop star with clever sunnies and sans big hat.

Taking a break from the Banksy beat, Doug appears to put forth that supposition that Jeff Koons is proving once again that as long as you are a white guy and you reference European art history you are 80% on your way as an artist whose work will be collected and exhibited.

OS Gemeos: Flying Steps at Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin

A splendid hybrid that sends heartbeats racing, even involuntarily, here is a trailer for Flying Steps and Os Gemeos as they interpret Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition”, the famous piano composition that has become a showpiece for virtuoso pianists. Good to see museums of contemporary art truly stretching, redefining the street and Street Art.


Another interpretation by ELP from December 1970.

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The Yok & Sheryo: Wishes And Hopes For 2018

The Yok & Sheryo: Wishes And Hopes For 2018

As we draw closer to the new year we’ve asked a very special guest every day to take a moment to reflect on 2017 and to tell us about one photograph that best captures the year for them. It’s an assortment of treats to surprise you with every day – to enjoy and contemplate as we all reflect on the year that has passed and conjure our hopes and wishes for 2018. This is our way of sharing the sweetness of the season and of saying ‘Thank You’ to each of you for inspiring us throughout the year.

*******

The on-the-road nature of this graffiti-illustration-Street Art couple is becoming legend, with the Australian Yok and Singaporean Sheryo professionally spray-cationing across the world regularly, monthly, annually with their own particular hybrid of skater-tattoo-cartoon-rebel-traditional-culture reinventing itself in the moment, in the space. Officially Brooklyn citizens, the two wield aerosol cans as much to entertain themselves as to confound you, with their two aesthetic styles now seamlessly becoming one. Not content to present a pretty world, Yok and Sheryo investigate and analyze darker human impulses and psychological eccentricities with their characters and the trouble they can get into with monsters and pizza. Today Y&S tell us about an improvised piece they did this year in Bombay just for good luck.


THE YOK & SHERYO

We chose this photo because it is a glimpse of us on the road, this was an extra piece we painted while at a festival. A wall opportunity fell through so we made this piece instead.

These spontaneous paintings are what we enjoy most about traveling and we wish for more of these adventures in 2018.

The text translates to “Good Luck Cobra”

We like to leave little good luck charms in places we visit.

The Yok & Sheryo. Bombay, India. November 24, 2017. (photo © The Yok & Sheryo)

The Yok & Sheryo

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BSA Film Friday: 03.18.16

BSA Film Friday: 03.18.16

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bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

 

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. Olek’s Crochet Group Performance in India
2. Narcelio Grud and a Mobile Restroom
3. Más by Mateo in Montreal

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: Olek’s Crochet Group Performance in India

An original idea combining art and activism as performance in public space, again conceived of, directed, and performed by Olek. Her second trip to India, Olek intimately studies the sociological structures that enable some while restrict others and in a gentle and firmly inspirational manner begins a crochet revolution.

The physical practice of creating crochet taps deeply into historical roles based on gender and class, among others. It is art, craft, and work simultaneously. The artful placing of non-performer persons performing in a public space – a crochet flash mob, if you will – activates the environment powerfully. Add to this a symbolic denial of speech or sight by way of gag or blindfold and you have a silently shocking referendum on societal inequality, and a very personal appreciation for the path of the individual.

Among her many missions is to support Maitri to reduce gender based violence. “They are doing so much for those who need,” she tells us.

 

Narcelio Grud and a Mobile Restroom

A social scientist of a different stripe, Narcelio Grud constructs the project and places it in the public sphere to observe how you/we interact with it. Knowing what details are necessary to provoke a reaction is part of his genius and the product of insightful study. Encountering one of his installations, people are unwittingly, willingly, the performers. Welcome to the show.

Más by Mateo in Montreal

Covering a ruddy multi-planed surface like exposed brick by brush and roller is no quick and easy feat. Mateo shows us how to use brush, aerosol, and stencil to bring to this Montreal wall a reminder to sit quietly and calmly contemplate. Her eyes have been blindfolded with a sign that says Más; as in “No Más“, no more visual information flooding at you from different directions. Be calm.

“In a society of consumption where everything keeps going faster and we always desire more,” he says. “We shouldn’t fail to remind ourselves to slow down, and therefore take time to better ourselves as individuals.”

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St+ART India 2016: Niels “Shoe” Meulman, Reko Rennie, Anpu Varkey & Chifumi

St+ART India 2016: Niels “Shoe” Meulman, Reko Rennie, Anpu Varkey & Chifumi

Amsterdam based designer, artist, calligrafitti writer Niels Shoe Meulman appears to have had an excellent time in all the photos we’ve been seeing from his time in India. Tagging since the turn of the eighties, “Shoe” is still making meaningful and fresh marks around the world in a way that tells you he continues to push himself as an artist and to do more to expand his unique visual vocabulary.

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Niels Shoe Meulmuan for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

The producers of ST+ART India continue to demonstrate a proclivity for quality programming – at least the general mix is of higher caliber thinkers and feelers than we are seeing in bigger (and more commercial) blow-out festivals. BSA readers are starting to become very accustomed to seeing great impactful work coming out of this relatively young mural event.

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Niels Shoe Meulmuan for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

You’ll also notice a fair contingent of local talent on the roster in addition to more internationally recognizable Street Art names, which is always a good sign because it suggests an integration of community. With a few more days to go before the end of the 2016 program, we’ve already seen plenty.

Here’s our 3rd installment from this years events with Niels Shoe Meulman, Reko Rennie, Anpu Varkey and Chifumi – and we’ll do a round-up once its all wrapped.

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Niels Shoe Meulmuan for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

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Niels Shoe Meulmuan for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

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Anpu Varkey for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

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Anpu Varkey for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

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Anpu Varkey for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

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Reko Rennie for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

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Reko Rennie for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

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Reko Rennie for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

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Reko Rennie for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

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Chifumi for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

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Chifumi for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

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Chifumi for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

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Chifumi for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © @BlindEyeFactory)

 

Our most sincere thanks to BSA Contributors Lorenzo and Giorgio at BlindEyeFactory.com for sharing their photos with BSA readers. Stay tuned for a full photo essay of this year’s edition of St+ART India with more photos from these gentlemen.

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Borondo and Agostino Iacurci at St+ART India 2016

Borondo and Agostino Iacurci at St+ART India 2016

St+art India is coming on strongly this year with their Delhi festival of Street Artists and related talents meeting at the Inland Container Depot (ICD) and creating works on shipping containers. A walk-through installation that uses 100 shipping containers as canvasses and sculpture, approximately 25 national and international artists are painting here during the month of February.

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Borondo for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © BlindEyeFactory)

Included in this years’ program are assorted walls in the newly created Lodhi Arts District which lies between Khanna Market and Meherchand Market. Now back in Rome, Italy after their visit to the ongoing events, Lorenzo Gallitto and Giorgio Base of Blind Eye Factory tell us, “India was incredible! We really enjoyed it! “

The guys also share with BSA readers these fresh new exclusive photos of walls by their countrymen, Agostino Iacurci and Gonzalo Borondo. Distinctly different styles, they are two of the real talents on the scene whose work we continue to keep our eye on.

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Borondo for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © BlindEyeFactory)

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Borondo for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © BlindEyeFactory)

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Agostino Iacurci for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © BlindEyeFactory)

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Agostino Iacurci for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © BlindEyeFactory)

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Agostino Iacurci for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © BlindEyeFactory)

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Agostino Iacurci for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © BlindEyeFactory)

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Agostino Iacurci for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © BlindEyeFactory)

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Agostino Iacurci for St+ART India 2016. New Delhi, India. (photo © BlindEyeFactory)

 

Our most sincere thanks to BSA Contributors Lorenzo and Giorgio at BlindEyeFactory.com for sharing their photos with BSA readers. Stay tuned for a full photo essay of this year’s edition of St+ART India with more photos from these gentlemen.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-St-Art-India-WIP-Show-map-2016-740

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BSA Top Stories As Picked by You from BSA and HuffPost in 2015

BSA Top Stories As Picked by You from BSA and HuffPost in 2015

You picked them!

Last week you saw the Top Murals and the Top Videos. Today here are our Top Stories of 2015.

BSA readers told us by your direct comments and online sharing – that you love our coverage of Street Art festivals: 8 of the top 15 postings in ’15 were about them.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-740-TOP-15-Stories-of-2015

The rest of the most popular stories can be described as being about powerful personalities and consequential work on the street that is not simply visually impactful but is backed by a story that runs deeper.

Following are your top 15 postings from the year on BSA and our articles on The Huffington Post along with an excerpt from the original posting.

 


NO. 15

 A Mexican Mural ‘Manifesto,’ Blackened Flags And Censorship (March 04 2015)

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Erica il Cane (photo © Fifty24Mex)

“Striking and massive murals by international street artists have been populating the walls of Mexico City for the last five years thanks to the emergence of a global Street Art scene, a rise in mural festivals, and the country’s tradition of institutional support for murals that further a socio-political mission. There hasn’t been much of the latter lately, however, and it is doubtful that a new politically charged mural campaign underway in certain central neighborhoods is likely to receive tax dollars for the paint and ladders.

Without sighting a specific ill to address, the new mural initiative named “Manifesto” is challenging a select group of local and international street artists to express their opinions on weighty and topical matters through murals, “using art as a social tool to propose, reflect and inform.” Among possible topics that might be addressed, the manifesto for “Manifesto” says, are increasing poverty, glorified materialism, the exhausting of natural resources, a fraying social web, and a dysfunctional justice system.”

More…


NO. 14

Malik and ‘Note’ Bring 17 Street Artists To A Swiss Prison (November 04, 2015)

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(photo © Malik)

“Initiated by Aarau-based graffiti/street/fine artist Malik in May of 2012, the project eventually corralled 17 street artists, all but one from Switzerland, to enter the confines of the new high security Lenzburg Prison to paint murals on exterior walls, courtyards, hallways, and common areas.

‘I was looking for a new challenge and a new and exciting project where I could show my art,’ says Malik and while the 18 month project originated with his vision of getting a nice wall for himself, quickly the project grew far beyond his expectations to become an educational, sociological meditation on the penal system, the appropriate role of art within it, and our collective humanity.”

 More…

 


NO. 13

The Coney Art Walls: First Three Completed and Summer Begins  (May 27, 2015)

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Kave (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Instead of being hunted down for catching a tag or bubble-lettered throw-up, a couple dozen graffiti/street art painters are invited to hit up Coney Island this summer — and since we’ve just marked the unofficial first weekend of summer in New York — we’re bringing you the first three freshly completed pieces.

Part of “Coney Art Walls”, the muralists began taking the train out to this seaside paved paradise that is re-inventing itself once again, this time courtesy of art curator Jeffrey Deitch.”

More…


NO. 12

50 Years From Selma, Jetsonorama and Equality in Brooklyn  (June 27, 2015)

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Jetsonorama (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“From Selma to Ferguson, Birmingham to Charleston, Jimmie Lee Jackson to Michael Brown, Street Artist Jetsonorama is crossing the country from Arizona to New York and a half-century of America’s struggle with our legacy of racism and injustice.

As marches have continued across the country in cities like Ferguson, Oakland, Baltimore, New York, Dallas and Cleveland in the past year addressing issues such as police brutality and racism, the south is taking down confederate flags on state houses and the US is mourning another mass shooting.

Now as Americans everywhere are pulling out and waving the stars and stripes to celebrate freedom, this new powerful installation on a Brooklyn wall reminds us of what New York poet Emma Lazarus said, ‘Until we are all free, we are none of us free.’ ”

More…


NO. 11

Gender, Caste, And Crochet: OLEK Transforms A Shelter In Delhi  (March 25, 2015)

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Olek (photo © Street Art India)

” ‘It felt like I gave a birth to an oversize baby without any pain killers. I had to pull the black magic to make it happen. Physically and emotionally drained. Was it worth it? Absolutely YES,’ she types onto her Facebook page to let friends and fans know that she has finished the seven-day marathon of crocheting and directing a full team of volunteers and St+Art Delhi organizers. Triumphant, she stands atop the woman’s shelter, a one story structure of corrugated metal and concrete 40-feet long and 8-feet high, with a fist in the air, a symbol of celebration as well as a show of solidarity with the sisterhood of those who helped her make it and those will seek refuge here when other options have been exhausted.”

 More…

 


NO. 10

A Tidal Wave of Lodz Reborn: ‘Lodz Murals’ Distinguishes a Polish City (October 28, 2015)

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Alexis Diaz (photo © Maciej Stempij)

“Now I don’t want to create any new festival, any new brand — just want to keep the name as simple as possible,” he says of Lodz Murals, an ongoing program that functions year round rather than focusing specifically on a short-term festival. With all responsibilities for organizing, promoting, and working with city and private business under one roof, Michał says that his vision is to create the same sort of iconic image of Lodz with murals as Paris with the Eiffel Tower.

“I would like that people on the global scale would think of Lodz as a city with exceptional public art,” he says grandly while acknowledging that public art shines in many other cities as well. “When you are thinking about public art, one of the first places that you will see in your mind’s eye is Lodz. Of course, comparing the mural project to the one of the most important “pearls” of modern architecture is pure overstatement, but I would like to create this type of mechanism, this type of association.”

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NO. 9

WALL\THERAPY 2015: Surrealism and the Fantastic (July 29, 2015)

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Never Crew (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“We don’t know for sure if it was our current funhouse mirror atmosphere that drove the Wall\Therapy festival in Rochester, NY to choose this years’ themes. It may simply be a way of organizing artists whose work reflects these notions back to us and to illuminate one specific growing trend in street culture and murals.

Surely Magritte, Dali and Ernst would be very pleased by the uptick of modern surrealists and practitioners of the bizarre, fantastical, and dream-like in galleries, in the public sphere, and throughout popular culture in recent years.”

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NO. 8

NUART 2015 Roundup: A Laboratory on the Street (September 12, 2015)

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Ella & Pitr (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“As we mark the halfway point of this decade and see the institutional discussions of Street Art taking form while academics try to place it in the canon of art-making and decide upon the nature of its impact, they do it with the knowledge that gallery shows, museum exhibitions, high-profile auctions, individual collecting, lifestyle marketers, and public festivals of many configurations and aspirations are already embracing its relevance. No one can possibly gauge this story in all of its complexity but some will capture its spirit. Being on the street helps.

One way to get a pulse on the present is to attend shows like Nuart and witness the diverse stratagems that artists are using to engage their audiences and judge if they are successful at realizing their intentions. With a deliberately mixed bag of thinkers, feelers, documentors, aesthetes, and pranksters culled together for your edification, this show stokes the discussions.”

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NO. 7

Coney Art Walls: 30 Reasons to Go to Coney Island This Summer  (June 24, 2015)

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Daze (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The gates are open to the new public/private art project called “Coney Art Walls,” and today, you can have a look at all 30 or so of the new pieces by a respectable range of artists spanning four decades and a helluva lot of New York street culture history. We’ve been lucky to see a lot of the action as it happened over the last five weeks and the range is impressive. These are not casual, incidental choices of players lacking serious resumes or street/gallery cred, but the average observer or unknowing critic may not recognize it.”

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NO. 6

Barcelona: “Open Walls” Mural Festival and Conference 2015 (November 11, 2015)

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RocBlackBlock (photo © Fernando Alcalá Losa)

“Barcelona was known as a city at the epicenter of a bustling lively organic street art scene in the mid 2000s. Today that has greatly been cracked down upon by authorities, but the Spanish city now boasts a mural festival called Open Walls, which celebrated its third edition last month with public works spanning a great number of influences and styles. Of course there is still plenty of autonomous, non-comissioned street art to be seen as well.”

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NO. 5

Basquiat’s Rarely Seen Notebooks Open At The Brooklyn Museum (April 01, 2015)

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Basquiat (photo © Jaime Rojo)

In ‘Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks,’ now running at the Brooklyn Museum until August 23, the genius of his fragmenting logic is revealed as a direct relationship between his private journals and his prolific and personally published aerosol missives on the streets of Manhattan’s Soho and Lower East Side neighborhoods in the late 1970s and 1980s.

These notebooks were for capturing ideas and concepts, preparing them, transmuting them, revising them, pounding them into refrains. In the same way his text (and glyphic) pieces on the street were not necessarily finished products each time; imparted on the run and often in haste, these unpolished missives didn’t require such preciousness.”

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NO. 4

Borås ‘No Limit’ 2015: Graffiti Tags, Murals, Greco-Roman Antiquities (September 17, 2015)

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Pichi & Avo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“This is No Limit, the second installation of murals done primarily by street artists in Borås, a pristine and pleasant city about 45 minutes east of Gothenberg. With the leadership of artist Shai Dahan and organizers Stina Hallhagen and Anders Khil the local tourism office works year round to promote this festival and the quality of the pieces are top notch due to the careful choices of international big names and up-and-comers.

In addition to this diversity, the scale is varied with massive walls like those by the Chilean Inti and Poland’s Robert Proch, and more personal-sized installations in surprise locations around town by American illustration artist David Zinn and New Jersey’s sculptural stencilist Joe Iurato.”

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NO. 3

Street Art Sancocho: ArteSano Project Brings Dominican Flavor  (January 08, 2015)

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Mario Ramirez (photo © Tots Films)

It could be the name influencing our perception, but in one way or another it looks like these artists are chosen for their down-to-earth hand hewn approach. Sometimes decorative, sometimes storytelling, there are familiar themes and motifs that play well to their local audience as well as the virtual gawker.

Even with two dozen artists, it isn’t bloated: no logos or product tie-ins or DJs or high flying scissor lifts scaling massive multi-story walls with abstract surrealism, hyper photo-realism or dark pop human/animal/robot hybrids here – yet. Well, we take that back on the surrealism score; Pixel Pancho is here with a brood of chickens bobbing their industrial mesh necks atop fired tile bodices, hunting and pecking their way toward the beach, and Miami artist duo 2alas & Hox created a portrait of a boy with a partial mask overlay that calls to mind cyborgs (and Sten & Lex). But here in the loungey bare-foot tropical DR coastal area, even Pixel Pancho mutes the hues toward sun-bleached pastels, more easily complimenting their surroundings.”

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NO. 2

Renaissance Masters, Keith Haring and Ninja Turtles in Brooklyn Streets (July 15, 2015)

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Owen Dippie. (photos © Jaime Rojo)

And so it made sense last week when Dippie skillfully merged imagery spanning five centuries, two continents, and two distinctly different art movements. Call it a measured miracle, a ratherish revelation that Dippie completed a deftly realized mashup of Raphael and Keith Haring, with the Madonna del Granduca holding Haring’s icon-symbol that is variously referred to as ‘Radiant Baby,’ ‘Radiant Child,’ and ‘Radiant Christ.’ ”

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NO. 1

YZ and Her ‘Amazone’ Warrior Women On Senegalese Walls (January 14, 2015)

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YZ (photo © YZ Yseult)

“French Street Artist YZ Yseult has begun her own campaign to pay tribute to the fierce female fighters of the 19th Century West African country of Dahomey, who are more commonly referred to as Amazons. A startling narrative of female power not often heard today for some, but as YZ is researching her own history as a descendent from slaves, her portraits reflect a personal impetus to tell these stories with a new force. She has named this series of strong warriors on the street ‘Amazone’.”

More…

 

 

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INTI Strikes a “Balance” For St + ART Delhi

INTI Strikes a “Balance” For St + ART Delhi

With a new multi-storey mural in Khirki, INTI again brings the mystery and metaphor to a neighborhood. Part of the 2015 edition of St+Art India, this piece is entitled “Balance”. Yet another astounding piece by the prolific painter from Chile, this one defies gravity regarding a solemn topic of the heart.

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Inti at work on his monumental mural for St + ART Delhi 2015. (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

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Inti at work on his monumental mural for St + ART Delhi 2015. (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

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Inti at work on his monumental mural for St + ART Delhi 2015. (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

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Inti. St + ART Delhi 2015. (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

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Inti. St + ART Delhi 2015. (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

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Inti. St + ART Delhi 2015. (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

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Inti. St + ART Delhi 2015. (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

 

 

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Gender, Caste, and Crochet : OLEK Transforms a Shelter in Delhi

Gender, Caste, and Crochet : OLEK Transforms a Shelter in Delhi

The fluorescent pink and orange sari skims the svelte frame of Brooklyn’s Olek as she glides across the dirt lot in Delhi’s South Extension with bags of yarn, needles and fabric slung over arms and shoulders.

The massive new acid fluorescent epidermal transformation has taken a week to complete and the street artist is keeping her head while managing the many hands who are helping, but under the eclectic glamour is always raw labor – and a generous dollop of drama.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

“It felt like I gave a birth to an oversize baby without any pain killers. I had to pull the black magic to make it happen. Physically and emotionally drained. Was it worth it? Absolutely YES,” she types onto her Facebook page to let friends and fans know that she has finished the seven-day marathon of crocheting and directing a full team of volunteers and St+Art Delhi organizers. Triumphant, she stands atop the woman’s shelter, a one story structure of corrugated metal and concrete 40 ft long and 8 foot high, with a fist in the air, a symbol of celebration as well as a show of solidarity with the sisterhood of those who helped her make it and those will seek refuge here when other options have been exhausted.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

“Raine Basera”, a night shelter for homeless women lies just off Sarai Kale Khan here in New Delhi and it is not far from some industrial parks, surrounded by buses and noise from the traffic and temporary markets. A part of the festival called St+Art Delhi 2015 this particular project is conceived to raise awareness of the shelter and its very existence to those families who need it. Given the chaos of color and decorative motifs that have characterized many of Olek’s street works, this is one more that will be hard to miss. In this city of about 11 million, there are actually 184 night shelters in the city of Delhi, and 10 Indian artists will be working with the Urban Shelter Department to paint more.

Speaking with Olek you learn that this was a joyful, painful project – made possible with the help of a number of people, but mostly because of the steely determination of the Street Artist who is defining and re-defining what it means to be an artist in public space, as well as a woman in the art world. Her vigor and her vision is genuine and her struggles with issues regarding poverty, gender, and empowerment were brought to the fore on a daily basis during this project. As usual, we are of the opinion this is still the beginning of what Olek will accomplish in the Street Art world and in the lives of others – for her the goals are multitudinous.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

We spoke with Olek about the experience in her first trip to India in the interview below. Following that is a short interview with one of the organizers from the St+Art India Foundation and the curator of this project, Giulia Ambrogi. Both help us position the work of Olek into a greater context in Indian society during this relatively new festival effort, now in its second year.

OLEK

Brooklyn Street Art: Was there a motif that you added to your repertoire of hearts and butterflies that was specific to this project?
OLEK: You know how when you write for a newspaper or a blog you always have to keep your audience in mind so you use a specific language to describe your ideas and thoughts. So for this project I had to think about my specific audience. There were the people in the shelter and the neighbors around it. Many of them are are simple people without education and maybe even illiterate so I wanted to create a visual work that was accessible and meaningful for them.

So for this project I drew from the basic Indian Iconography such as the elephant, the butterfly and flowers. Of course I have crocheted these motifs before in my work but this time I kept an Indian aesthetic with the shapes and forms and they were more visible within the context of the overall piece. In the case of the butterfly I see it as having a special connection with women.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

BSA: Was it easy to bridge the gaps between cultures when working with the women who assisted in the project?
OLEK: Well the women I was working with found me to be fascinating. Here comes this woman with tools and yarns and crochet and I think they are used to seeing men doing most of these things – who come and boss them around and tell them what to do. In my case I was sitting with them crocheting together and we were part of a team and at some point I was also wearing Indian clothes and making things happen. They were happy to see me telling the men around us that I was in control and that things were getting done. So due to my experience working with so many different people around the world in small villages in Poland, China and Hong Kong this aspect of the project was the easy part.

The crochet was our language. Once you show them how it all works and explain the project to them you get the respect right away. They liked seeing me working so fast and were shocked that it was actually possible to do this so fast. So once you get their respect it is actually quite easy to work with them. The language of making and producing art is beautiful and universal and you get the connection right away. Some of the women were volunteers but most of them we hired to work on this project. Of course there were other elements in this project that were more difficult but I have never in my life had a problem working with women.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

BSA: In addition to its aesthetic nature, how do you think about your work when you consider that it is literally sheltering women tonight as they sleep?
OLEK: The most shocking thing for me in India was these massive amount of people who are born in poverty and under a lower class or caste and they are convinced that they will never ever see or experience anything different from what they are accustomed to and people with a higher status in their society see them as “untouchables” and inferior. They were born poor they should die poor – that is the mentality. So for the time where we were working on this project they felt that the spotlight was on them and for once they weren’t invisible as cameras and people and noise was all around them and I think they felt that there was something special about them.

Maybe when they come to the shelter at night to sleep and see it transformed they will feel different and maybe they will be inspired to do something else with their lives. My intention as an artist was to show them that there might be a chance to change what was supposed to be in their lives to what it can actually could be. That of course is too little of a contribution from my part.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

BSA: What did you learn about these shelters that you would like people to know?
OLEK: Right now there are more shelters opening around Delhi than before. It is important for people to know that if they are homeless they have the shelters at night to sleep with a roof over their heads. But the sad part to me is that the conditions in the shelters are not so great. I saw them wearing their same clothes every day and I realized that what they had on them is all they have in their lives. Yet I didn’t see sadness on their faces. They are used to living under these conditions and they see it as their life. So all this time I was thinking how actually the project should be about getting them out of the shelters and provide them with education. Access to education is important everywhere. It changes everything. The beautiful kids I think don’t even go to school. They spend all day on the streets.

So I felt that the project was only half done and I didn’t have the time or resources to do the next step with them and spend more time with them. It was devastating to me to see the amount of pollution and garbage and dirt and in some cases I have this impression that some of them didn’t want to be helped because they believed that that was their lot in life by divine decree. I couldn’t understand that and the whole trip was confusing. So the experience left me half empty in way with a sense that the project was done – but only half done.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

BSA: When you were a teenager you read a biography of Jerzy Grotowski and his various travels, including his descriptions of India. How did that writing affect your experience visiting the country for the first time?
OLEK: I studied theater for a while in Poland when I was a teenager and I would go to theater festivals and that really influenced who I am right now. Grotowski had a brilliant mind and was an influential theorist and when I read that he went to India and that the trip totally changed him I was very impressed and I thought India must be a special land. I’ve been wanting to visit India for a long time but I was also waiting for the right time to visit – when there was a purpose for the trip and the right project.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

But the land that he saw with his eyes was during the 1970’s. I wish I had more time and I will have more time, to go back and travel and re-visit and really see the country more fully. But I think that what influenced me wasn’t necessarily about the religion, the colors, the textures, the beauty of the country. What influenced me the most was the poor India. I have never seen so much plastic and garbage in my life on the streets. I saw cows eating plastic on the street. The garbage and pollution is just growing and growing and it is insane. So this was my influence from this trip and I think I could never compare it to Grotowski’s trip during the 70s. But I can see how the trip to India changed him and influenced his life in theater.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

BSA: Tell us about your sari. We don’t remember seeing you making one of those for yourself before.
OLEK: I bought a sari because I was invited to attend a wedding while I was in India and I wanted to feel appropriate. I probably don’t fit in most places but when I’m invited I like to pay respect to the local customs. So together with my assistant we went to the store full of saris and took in the whole experience. You buy a sari then you have to hire someone to put it on you and I loved it. From the beginning I told people that I wanted to wear a sari while working instead of wearing western fashions. People noticed how comfortable I was wearing a sari for the first time and when they remarked about that I told them I’m around so much fabric all the time that I can easily wear a sari.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

It is interesting because to me a sari is a sexy dress. Your body is so exposed so it was confusing to me to see all the women wearing such a dress in such a conservative country. It is a very comfortable dress and nothing falls off of you. They pinned everything to keep it all in place. You go to get fitted and out of the same fabric a tailor makes the top and the underskirt and you can choose from many designs for the top. The tailor is not in the store where the sari is purchased. You have to leave and go someplace else for the fitting. But they can make it all in two hours. I loved seeing the women in India being very comfortable with their bodies. Women of all shapes and sizes wear the saris with the utmost comfort.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

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A brief interview with Giulia Ambrogi from the St+art India Foundation:

BSA: For her installation Olek was assisted by a number of diverse volunteers whom she first taught about the crochet needs of the project. What was the incentive that motivated all these people who helped her?
Giulia: Actually most of the women were already trained because they belong to the “Indian crochet community”, a reality that we were pretty surprised to discover. All of them knew Olek’s work and were extremely enthusiastic to have such an occasion to be together and to practice their passion for a wider cause. This big community doesn’t have many initiatives dedicated to crochet so this project, by being so ambitious, public and based on a social cause was per se the main incentive  for all of them.

Many other volunteers instead have been with us since the day 1 of St+art Delhi 2015. They are mostly really young and they just love urban art and what all we are bringing in the city. Thus, they are keen to be part of the project, to be in a stimulating environment and to give their contribution. It was amazing to see how all these people from different backgrounds and different ages (from 18 to 60) collaborated together and how strong was the feeling to be a big family.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

BSA: Women in India are often at huge disadvantage financially and socially when compared to the status that men hold in society. What is the significance of bringing women artists to install their work on the streets of India?
Giulia: First of all realize artworks in the streets is already a sort of revolution. Public spaces, especially if peripheral, are most of the time neglected and are crowded mostly by lower social classes. The process of creating huge artworks for everybody’s eyes and the attitude of the artists and the team of involving everyone and gathering people under the signs of art-making and artworks – which is absolutely new in India, is an empowering breakthrough or a certain kind.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

By calling women artists we enhanced this prolific dynamic. It meant that we introduced a  change, showing both to men and women that no matter the gender and the class, everyone has the same strength and rights of living, appropriating and positively acting in  public spaces. Olek’s work brings back to the streets a tradition that is usually practiced by women in the private and closed environment of their homes. Also, this work highlighted the power of people, especially women, when they cooperate together. Aiko’s work celebrates the most dangerous and powerful woman in Indian history, Rani Lakshmi Bai, who became and still is the symbol of women empowerment.

Many things are changing in India and it is a transitional moment in which we try and hope to give our contributions by designing artistic interventions based on critical and current topics.

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

BSA: We have written before about Aiko’s participation in St+ART Delhi. We wrote that her contribution was a departure from her highly sexualized iconography. Would it have been impossible for her to paint her sexually charged women in India? Can you tell us about the character whom she chose to paint and why she selected that character within the context of the festival?
Giulia: By painting her characteristic women in very sexualized scenes, her work would have been meaningless within the Indian environment. Not just deeply disrespectful it would have been totally sterile because it would not have been in dialogue with the cultural context. Since the beginning of the project Lady Aiko asked about Indian culture with the intention of creating a powerful and empowering work in relation to the country.

After some brainstorming she fell in love with both the story and the iconography of Rani Lakshmi Bai. She was the most dangerous leader in Indian history, a symbol of resistance to the rule of the British Company. In her brief time she cast aside many conventions to unite peoples of all castes and religions in her cause.

She encouraged other women to do the same and trained them to fight and support the army. She cut across the social norms of the time, refusing to accept her fate ‘as a woman’. So in this case Aiko’s piece was mainly the symbol of women empowerment…and much sexier than pin ups in this sense!

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

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Olek (photo © Pranav Mehta/St+ARTIndia)

 

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The organizers would like to thank fashion companies Tarun Tahiliani and Manish Arora for contributing materials and labor, Allkraftz & Usha Sewing Machines, The Polish Culture Institute, the Delhi Urban Shelter Improvement Board (DUSIB), and all the volunteers and participants who helped make this project happen.

We would like to thank the organizers of ST+ART Delhi; the curator Giulia Ambrogi and Pranav Mehta for the photos. And of course to Olek for taking the time to answer our questions.

 

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Rukkit . OKUDA . João Samina at St+ART Delhi 2015

Rukkit . OKUDA . João Samina at St+ART Delhi 2015

Here are new exclusive shots of three artists at work for the Indian street art festival called St+Art Delhi.

Bangkok based Rukkit digs the multicolored graphic approach that Okuda works with but says he favors animals over abstract and we’ll say possibly folkloric over modern. Well versed in sculpture, Rukkit is a graphic designer/art director who digs stencil more than anything else on the street.

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Rukkit (photo © Pranav Mehta)

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Rukkit (photo © Pranav Mehta)

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Rukkit (photo © Pranav Mehta)

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Rukkit (photo © Pranav Mehta)

His second year at St.Art Delhi, Okuda began his outdoor work in the factories and rail lines of his home town of Santander, Spain in the late 90s. His body of work has matured into galleries and private collections but the energy of his street work is still present after traveling to many street/urban festivals around the world in the last five years – including Brooklyn, Miami, Lisbon, Johannesburg, and Hamburg.

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Okuda (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

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Okuda (photo © Pranav Mehta)

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Okuda (photo © Pranav Mehta)

João Samina is a self-taught artist from Lisbon who started slapping stickers in the late 90s as a teenager and worked his way into larger pieces over the next decade until he discovered stencils in 2010. He says he is working on his own language with his stencil technique and you can see influences from early Street Art master stencillists like Jef Aerosol and current ones like C215, combined with the abstract forms of Graffuturists like Remi Rough and Augustine Kofie, as well as from his interests in graphic design, painting, and architecture.

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Joao Samina (photo © Pranav Mehta)

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Joao Samina (photo © Pranav Mehta)

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Joao Samina (photo © Pranav Mehta)

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Joao Samina (photo © Pranav Mehta)

 

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Axel Void and DalEast In New Delhi for St+ART India 2015

Axel Void and DalEast In New Delhi for St+ART India 2015

Axel Void and DalEast are somehow brethren here in New Delhi at the 2015 edition of St+Art India, if not because of a shared style then because of a shared appreciation for things you cannot see – alchemists with an uncanny ability to reveal.

 

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Axel Void begins his mural. (photo © Pranav Mehta)

Today we have excellent shots of the new murals by both of these artists taken by photographers Pravan Mehta and Akshat Nauriyal, sure to make you step back a little and appreciate some people’s ability to re-cast a public space into something much more.

Axel helps us out here with a description for his mural in Azadpur Market entitled “जिं द गी” (life), part of his “Mediocre” series. It is a simple depiction of a still life, he says, ” One of the most frequently recurring themes in the history of classical painting.”

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Axel Void. Process shot. (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

He says he was inspired by the Azadpur fruit and vegetable market, one of the (or possibly the) largest in Asia, where he was surrounded by people, cars, sounds of the metro, buyers, sellers, a family of monkeys, and goats, chickens, pigs, and cows. “The wall is painted over the Delhi Cold Storage and next to the Azadpur Mosque,” he says.

After the Axel Void piece you’ll see DalEast, who tends toward the philosophical and spiritual in his compositions of forms taking shape before you. DalEast takes a somewhat typical piece of architecture and transforms it with a flooding rush of birds flowing through an open arched doorway. It is a constellation of energy and life that flying at you when the curtain goes up, instantly metamorphosing a public space into a possibly sacred place.

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Axel Void. Process shot. (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

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Axel Void. Process shot. (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

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Axel Void (photo © Pranav Mehta)

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Axel Void. The finished mural on the wall of Asia’s largest fruit and vegetable markets. (photo © Pranav Mehta)

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DALeast. Process shot. (photo © Pranav Mehta)

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DALeast. Process shot. (photo © Pranav Mehta)

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DALeast. Process shot. (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

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DALeast (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

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DALeast. Process shot. (photo © Akshat Nauriyal)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
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