All posts tagged: Houston Wall

JR on Houston Wall, at PACE Gallery, on Cover of Time Magazine with “Guns In America”

JR on Houston Wall, at PACE Gallery, on Cover of Time Magazine with “Guns In America”

On a day in the United States with yet another mass shooting, this one at a synagogue in Pittsburg, JR has introduced a new massive artwork that talks about guns in America, a seemingly intractable, unsolvable issue that makes the country rank as one of the most violent year after year.

JR x Time “Guns In America”. Pace Prints. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“It’s a metaphor of what’s happening in the US,” says photographer, filmmaker, Street Artist, and social commentator JR, who has just installed a new mural on the Houston Wall in New York City on a sunny Friday where hundreds of curious New Yorkers stop and examine the new artwork while heavy trucks, honking cars, and periodic police and fire alarms whiz by.

The night before at Pace Gallery in Chelsea the conservatively stylish French art phenom hosted an unveiling of the same image, rather a composited video of 245 separately shot moving images, projected across a huge wall in the space for guests to contemplate. A masterstroke of art and sociology, “The Gun Chronicles: A Story of America” presents opinions and perspectives from Americans across the range – hunters, victims, law officers, medical professionals, religious leaders, politicians, activists, surviving family members.

JR x Time “Guns In America” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As we gaze at the quietly glowing and slowly moving images, we comment to the artist that it has a strangely calming and hypnotic quality, considering the range of deep feelings and emotions that the topic of gun violence engenders throughout the country, including many of these subjects. He tells us that he didn’t necessarily know the individual stories of everyone he was filming at the time of the sessions, but “I was aware of the emotions that were happening in many of the subjects. They were quite strong.”

By providing this very thorough collection of voices to be heard inside of one project, the artist enables viewers to truly countenance the complexity of a wrenching topic that much of the talking-head media flatly reduce to its simplest polarity. He walks on the sidewalk and rides in the lift carefully scanning the faces of the subjects and talks with the handful of them who have travelled here with him to watch the installation. In a way, JR is doing the job that many have been unsuccessful at; contemplating the vast grey area and finding common ground.

JR x Time “Guns In America”. Pace Prints. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: When you went into the project did you have one idea of the issue, but after completing it something perhaps changed in your mind about it? Was there something voiced by others that helped you understand how volatile the issue is?
JR: I think that when I got into this project I knew very little about the issue except what I heard in the media and it was really hard for me to understand, being French. To see how little kids could have access to such firearms and to see that such drama can happen across the country. So I really went naively trying to understand from every angle, every perspective, trying to learn from the people’s narrative, from the people’s story, and to hear what they have to say.

And it is interesting because you find a lot of common ground between people. There is fear, fear of the other, what people might say about them or about their beliefs and actually what I realized when you listen to a lot of the stories was that a lot of people would agree on a common ground that certain people should not have access to certain firearms and they would almost all agree to a certain regulation. It’s just that that conversation is not really happening. So I hope that this mural can be one part of starting that conversation between people.

JR x Time “Guns In America”. Houston / Bowery Wall. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A collaborative project with TIME magazine, the three-page fold out cover of the November 5th edition features a carefully diagrammed listing of all the participants on the reverse side. The website created for the project gives more depth into each individual.

By clicking on the person a visitor to the site will learn their name, age, and position professionally or in life – along with a concise recorded statement from the person. The voices are resolute, halting, tender, defiant, wisened, sobbing, proud.

JR x Time “Guns In America”. Houston / Bowery Wall. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The editor of the magazine Edward Felsenthal, recalls on the website that the cover of the magazine in June of 1968 also featured a contemporary artist for that time, Roy Lichtenstein, who “marked a series of heart-breaking assassinations” with his artwork on the cover with the title “The Gun in America.”

The artwork now hangs in the National Portrait Gallery and is as relevant 50 years later as the day it was published, with the new pluralic title of “Guns in America” today possibly referring to the measureless proliferance of weapons in the US over the intervening five decades, the $13.5 billion dollar revenue of guns and ammunition sold annually and the 263,223 full-time jobs related to the firearm industry. Guns are America.

“I shoot competitively all over the country… ,” says Rob Vadasz, 44, “a firearm is as engrained in our culture as almost any other part of the American story and it’s not something that can be turned off,” says a stern looking white man with short hair who is listed on the website as an agent for the U.S. Border Patrol in Tampa, Florida.

JR x Time “Guns In America”. Houston / Bowery Wall. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Amy Dillon, 38

U.S. Marine Corps veteran and firearms instructor / Summerville, South Carolina

“We’ve been afforded certain rights by our constitution..”

Omni Jahwar, 17

High school student / Grand Prairie,Texas

“I go to school fearing that my life may be taken in Pre-Calculus or Astronomy..”

Candace Fleming, 40

Youth mentor and training director, Urban Specialists / Desoto, Texas

“My first encounter with guns was when my father was shot and killed in the head. I was five years old..”

Sung Song, 42

Respiratory therapist and U.S. Army veteran / Dallas, Texas

“My experience in the Army and in the military has helped shaped how I feel and think about the gun control debate..”

Brittany Fairchild, 30

Emergency-room nurse / Dallas, Texas

“I was in charge on the night of the police shootings. It is a very difficult subject to talk about. It’s a night that I will never forget.”

Michael Foreman, 65

Trauma surgeon / Dallas, Texas

“I deal with it professionally, taking care of victims of gunshot violence… I also am what most people would refer to as a “gun nut”.

JR x Time “Guns In America”. Houston / Bowery Wall. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)


Dianna Muller from Tulsa, Oklahoma stands in front of the JR mural on Houston Street:

“As a woman I really feel like the bottom line is, the gun issue is a woman’s issue, it’s the great equalizer. It doesn’t matter if a 250 pound man is trying to kick in my door and eventually does, I have a way to defend myself. I don’t have to be a victim, and I do not have to get raped, and I do not have to get murdered, I do not have to get beat up. I don’t want that on anybody so I really want everybody to know how to protect themselves”.


JR x Time “Guns In America”. Houston / Bowery Wall. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JR x Time “Guns In America”. Houston / Bowery Wall. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JR x Time “Guns In America”. Houston / Bowery Wall. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)


Lauren Hartnett of Staten Island, New York stands in front of the JR mural on Houston Street:

“As an advocate for the second amendment it gives me a different perspective on a lot of other issues that have been brought up and are a high topic of discussion. One of those being feminism and women empowerment, and in my opinion nothing is more empowering, or nothing screams feminism like a woman being capable and able to take care of herself and protect herself and her family”.


JR x Time “Guns In America”. Houston / Bowery Wall. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)


Antong Lucky from Dallas, Texas stands in front of the JR mural on Houston Street:

“Once I got out of prison I began a war to end the cycle of gangs and guns in our community. I wanted people to understand that we got a lot of stuff in common than we do against each other and that we needed to work together. A lot of times in this culture you can never find the common thread, the common cause because we are so busy screaming our point and trying to be right. I wanted to make sure that for me and for my kind in order to be able to find the right solutions you have to be able to listen, you have to be able to talk and you have to be able to find a common ground and agree on a common ground.”


JR x Time “Guns In America”. Houston / Bowery Wall. New York City. The team who helped JR installed the mural on the wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JR x Time “Guns In America”. Houston / Bowery Wall. New York City. JR shown here with Jessica Goldman Srebnick of Goldman Global Arts and owner of the Houston Wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JR x Time “Guns In America”. Houston / Bowery Wall. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 


For more on this project and to know about each of the subjects featured on the photograph and to listen to each of their stories and opinions on the issue click on the link below:

http://time.com/guns-in-america/

 

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 08.28.16

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.28.16

brooklyn-street-art-logan-hicks-jaime-rojo-08-28-2016-web-3

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

“Back in the USSR” comes to mind as we touched down in Moscow yesterday to see and speak with the 60+ Street Artists who are creating this impressive 2nd Street Art biennale “Artmossphere” just a stone’s throw away from the Kremlin, Red Square and The International Military Music Festival that runs all week as well. We’ll be bringing you new stuff all week as part of our partnership with Urban Nation Museum for Urban Contemporary Art (UN), investigating the creative process with artists, curators, and the organizing force behind all of this event.

In the mean time, we bring you work from New York and elsewhere in this week’s fine edition of BSA Images of the Week.

So, here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Aduk, Buff Monster, Crisp, Hiss, Lena Shu, Logan Hicks, Olek, and Wolfe Work.

Above: Logan Hicks. Detail of his mural “Story of My Life” on the Houston/Bowery wall,  which pays tribute to the personal and professional friends and family who have helped him in the last 10 years in NYC. New York City. August 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-logan-hicks-jaime-rojo-08-28-2016-web-1

Logan Hicks at work on his Houston Wall mural. New York City. August 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-logan-hicks-jaime-rojo-08-28-2016-web-4

Logan Hicks. Detail. Houston Wall. New York City. August 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-logan-hicks-jaime-rojo-08-28-2016-web-2

Logan Hicks. Houston Wall. New York City. August 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-Olek-Finland-08-28-2016-web

Olek Our Pink House for Kerava Art Museum. Finland. August 2016. (photo © Olek)

Our Pink House is a new crocheted covering for a house (the second) by Street Artist OLEK – this one associated with Kerava Art Museum’s upcoming exhibition Yarn Visions, which will place the spotlight on knitted, crocheted, tufted and embroidered works.

Drawing an analogy of protection and safety in these pink crocheting patterns that stretch from the top of the chimney to the foundation of stone, this building in Kereva in southern Finland, where many bombs fell during The Winter War of 1939-40. Olek says she is concerned about the 21 million people worldwide who lost their homes due to war and conflicts in 2015 and she wants to create community based projects like this one to draw attention to the topic, and to provide some healing as well.

This particular project enlisted the help of a large group of volunteers, immigrants and women from a reception centre for asylum seekers who she brought together to crochet this covering. “Our Pink House” is about the journey, not just about the artwork itself.  It’s about us coming together as a community.  It’s about helping each other. We can show everybody that women can build houses, women can make homes,”she says. – OLEK

brooklyn-street-art-hiss-jaime-rojo-08-28-2016-web

Nailed it! Hiss is caught up in the Pokemon Go craze that has captured the attention of children, teens, and a certain photographer we know who is a perennial child at heart. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-buff-monster-jaime-rojo-08-28-2016-web-1

Buff Monster (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-buff-monster-jaime-rojo-08-28-2016-web-2

Buff Monster (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-buff-monster-jaime-rojo-08-28-2016-web-3

Buff Monster (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-wolfe-work-jaime-rojo-08-28-2016-web

Wolfe Work (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-08-28-2016-web

Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-crisp-jaime-rojo-08-28-2016-web

CRISP (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-aduk-jaime-rojo-08-28-2016-web

ADUK (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-lena-shu-artmossphere-jaime-rojo-moscow-08-28-16-web

Lena Shu in progress for Artmossphere – Moscow International Biennale of Street Art 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-moscow-08-28-16-web

Unintended collaboration on the streets of Moscow.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-untitled-moscow-08-28-16-web

Untitled. Moscow, Russia. August 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Please follow and like us:
Read more
FUTURA At The Houston Wall, Heart of the Concrete Jungle

FUTURA At The Houston Wall, Heart of the Concrete Jungle

The Houston Street Wall took a turn for the abstract, atmospheric, and the futurist imaginings of New York artist Futura these last few days. Pushing his own borders and in a reductionist state of mind, the graffiti writer abandons the splashy colors and recalls the monochrome pallet of the NYC train yards he ventured into as a teen; black of night, steel grey, the glint of light on the tracks that lead out through the city.

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-houston-wall-09-15-web-5

Futura. Houston Wall. September 2015. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stepping back and leaning in you can see the exposed vertical trussing of an NYC that always under construction with cranes stirring the sky; once building factories now high-rises and thin ultra luxe finger towers, these steel structures are adorned with ivy, razor wire, plastic bags fluttering in the gritty breeze.

As he sat cross-legged on the pavement before his “Concrete Jungle” for a cluster of photographers while holding open the double page spread of his 1980 train paintings, “Break,” only Martha Cooper could claim to shoot both this scene and the one thirty five years earlier.

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-houston-wall-09-15-web-11

Futura. Houston Wall. September 2015. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This wall can sometimes feel like a backdrop for a family reunion, with all manner of friends, associates, peers, culture critics, photographers, fans, family, writers, photographers, fashion models, and selfie-stick carrying tourists stopping by to check the progress and say hello.

With hometown hero Futura at the brush, this heart of a concrete jungle becomes more of resting place by a tree, a welcoming urban oasis without the rose-colored glasses. Actually, now that you think of it, this guy posing gamely with open arms and happily signing your sketchbook or dollar bill does have red reading frames on, and his New York stories smooth over the rough patches and frequently look for a positive tone to strike.

As you see him painting and creating his massive piece in-the-moment here while people swarm by, cars honk their horns, trucks roar their engines, and sirens scream, it strikes you that this is New York then and this is New York now, thanks to the truly contemporary Futura.

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-houston-wall-09-15-web-4

Futura. Houston Wall. September 2015. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-houston-wall-09-15-web-6

Futura. Houston Wall. September 2015. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-houston-wall-09-15-web-2

Futura. Houston Wall. September 2015. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-houston-wall-09-15-web-7

Futura. Houston Wall. September 2015. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-houston-wall-09-15-web-3

Futura. Houston Wall. September 2015. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-houston-wall-09-15-web-1

Futura. Houston Wall. September 2015. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-houston-wall-09-15-web-8

Futura. Houston Wall. September 2015. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-houston-wall-09-15-web-9

Futura. Houston Wall. September 2015. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-houston-wall-09-15-web-10

Futura. Houston Wall. September 2015. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-houston-wall-09-15-web-12

Futura. Houston Wall. September 2015. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Ron English and the “American Temper Tot” Pop Out In New York City

Ron English and the “American Temper Tot” Pop Out In New York City

All American Temper Tot is the name of the new installation by Street Artist Ron English on the Houston Bowery Wall in Manhattan, and the US flag-based design may be comforting to the average patriotic New Yorker until you realize he is offering a not-so-subtle critique of mindless consumerism that indicts probably everyone who passes it. Part of his Popaganda series, a sort of retrospective of it actually, the famous subverter of billboards has just delivered a one-two punch to the culture of comfortable consumerism that reduces all life experiences to a commodity.

brooklyn-street-art-ron-english-jaime-rojo-04-15-web-1

Ron English (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The enormous nose-tweak is more ironic perhaps on this island that has raised its rents so high that most artists have had to abandon it and little genuine Street Art actually is on its walls anymore. This particular high-profile spot has become revered not only because of its lineage of Street Artists (Haring, Scharf, Faile, Fairey, HowNosm, Swoon among others) but because greed and gentrification has effectively wiped out the sort of organic scene that gave it birth.

brooklyn-street-art-ron-english-jaime-rojo-04-15-web-2

Ron English (photo © Jaime Rojo)

While some passersby will see references to Jasper Johns here we are reminded of another more grassroots politically satirical flag. As early as the 1990s we began to see anti-corporate protesters carrying flags with the stars replaced by corporate logos and those may be a closer analogue to the stripes on display here.

In the last decade and a half as media was consolidated into a fewer hands and tabloid TV began serving up absurdity as normality, everything from pesticides to wars to gas fracking became slickly commercialized products to brand and sell and artists like Ron English has been drawing attention and alerting the public to the mindless consumers that we are becoming via his postering and illegal billboard “takeovers”. With playful parody on fast food purveyors, sugary cereal sellers, and right wing news channels, these were more comedic satire like those you may find in MAD magazine than the pointed approach of early 1970s takeover artists like “The Billboard Liberation Front” or the full frontal lobe subvertising of folks like the Adbusters.

brooklyn-street-art-ron-english-jaime-rojo-04-15-web-3

Ron English (photo © Jaime Rojo)

In one more twist to this new wall story, a few will undoubtedly argue that this installation is also a billboard advertisement itself since a print of the piece went on sale this week on the artists website, and it’s central figure, the Temper Tot, is also a 3-dimensional vinyl toy that is highly collectible. But not everyone is scandalized by this — the print already sold out.  This is the soup we are all swimming in – even while the little green hulking monster baby flexes his muscles and trembles with fury at what has been happening to that flag behind him.

Like his site says in the sales copy for the toy “The only thing worse than a toddler with a tantrum is a very STRONG one!”  Terrifyingly strong and terrifically immature, don’t get in the way of this well armed boy nearly popping off the wall and running across Houston Street to punch someone’s lights out. English has poked his finger in the chest of popaganda and we all will see how it responds.

brooklyn-street-art-ron-english-jaime-rojo-04-15-web-5

Ron English (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ron-english-jaime-rojo-04-15-web-6

Ron English (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ron-english-jaime-rojo-04-15-web-7

Ron English (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ron-english-jaime-rojo-04-15-web-8

Ron English (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ron-english-jaime-rojo-04-15-web-9

Ron English (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

This article is also published on The Huffington Post.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-740-Huffpost-Ron-English-Screen-Shot-2015-04-29-at-11.52.25-AM

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Happy New Year 2015 – BSA Readers Choice Top 10

Happy New Year 2015 – BSA Readers Choice Top 10

Happy New Year to All! Thank you for inspiring us to do our best and to those of you who continue to support our personal art project / cultural examination, we extend our gratitude more than ever.

BSA-READERS-CHOICE-TOP-10

Begun as an enthusiastic discovery of what was happening in a few neighborhoods in New York, we continued to expand our view into more cities around the world last year and into the history and future of the scene. We also aimed to provide you with a critical platform for examination of the street art/ graffiti / public art/ contemporary art continuum with interviews with artists, curators, collectors, organizers, observers and thinkers in the street, studio, gallery, and museum – trouble makers and taste makers alike.

In the end, it’s your observations and the conversations on the street that are most important. As we begin the year with over 300K fans, friends, and followers on social media platforms and 225 articles on the Huffington Post (thanks HuffPost team!), we feel like we get a valuable good survey of current opinions heading our way daily.

With in-depth interviews, investigative articles, opinion infused examinations, plain celebratory reverie, occasionally silly non-sequitors, and public appearances where we get to meet you, we get a good analytical look at an ever-evolving movement, glittery polish and warts and all.

As the new year begins we take a look back at the top stories chosen by BSA Readers in the last 12 months. Among them are two takeover pop-up shows in soon-to-be demolished buildings, a story about commercial abuse of artist copyrights and the effort to fight back, a street art community’s response to the sudden death of an activist street artist, a Street Art tourist trip, and a few inspirational women, men, and Mexican muralists.  Even though we published at least once a day for the last 365 days, these are the most popular pieces, as chosen by you, Dear BSA Reader.

10. Exploring Lisbon as a Street Art Tourist

brooklyn-street-art-os-gemeos-blu-stephen-kelley-lisbon-04-14-web-4

Os Gemeos / Blu (photo © Stephen Kelley)

9. Kara Walker and Her Sugar Sphinx at the Old Domino Factory

brooklyn-street-art-kara-walker-jaime-rojo-creative-time-domino-sugar-05-14-web-9

Kara Walker. The artist portrait in profile with her sugary sphinx in the background. (photo via iPhone © Jaime Rojo)

8. Women Rock Wynwood Walls at Miami Art Basel 2013

brooklyn-street-art-fafi-martha-cooper-wynwood-walls-2013-miami-web-2

Fafi (photo © Martha Cooper for Wynwood Walls)

7. A Sudden Secret Street Art House Party in Manhattan

brooklyn-street-art-icy-sot-jaime-rojo-01-10-14-web-4

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

6. Niels Shoe Meulman Balancing “Unearthly” Paintings

brooklyn-street-art-niels-shoe-meulman-brock-brake-white-walls-gallery-web-2

Niels “Shoe” Meulman. Process shot. (photo © Adele Renault)

5. It’s All the Rage, Street Artists Filing Lawsuits Left and Right

Brooklyn-Street-Art-copyright-msk-copyright-cavelli-graffiti-artists-revok-reyes-steel-suing-roberto-cavalli-for-copyright-infringement-01-960x640

4. Shok-1 Street Art X-Rays Reveal a Unique Hand at the Can

brooklyn-street-art-shok1-jaime-rojo-03-14-web-1

Shok-1 (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

3. 12 Mexican Street Artists Stray Far from Muralism Tradition In NYC

brooklyn-street-art-sego-jaime-rojo-dorian-grey-gallery-05-14-web-9

Sego (photo © Jaime Rojo)

2. Army Of One, Inspiration To Many : Jef Campion

brooklyn-street-art-army-of-one-jc2-jaime-rojo-01-14-web-3

Army Of One AKA JC2 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

1. Graffiti and Street Art Lock Up “21st Precinct” in New York

brooklyn-street-art-pixote-jaime-rojo-08-14-web

Pixote in action. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
Please follow and like us:
Read more
It’s All the Rage, Street Artists Filing Lawsuits Left and Right

It’s All the Rage, Street Artists Filing Lawsuits Left and Right

In what could be charitably described as a sign that Street Art has entered a new phase of cultural acceptance and appropriation, some creators of art in the public sphere are attempting to lay legal claim to the profit-making that they didn’t necessarily sign on to. In just the last few months a handful of artists from New York, Los Angeles, and Buenos Aires have discovered their murals have been used in fashion, music, and cinema to great effect, but sadly, they say, without their knowledge or permission.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-copyright-msk-copyright-cavelli-graffiti-artists-revok-reyes-steel-suing-roberto-cavalli-for-copyright-infringement-01-960x640

Of course this sort of inspiration/appropriation has been going on for years – if you want to meet models on the sidewalk just move to Bushwick, Brooklyn and you’ll probably accidentally end up in a fashion spread yourself. Here is where countless fashion shoots, video shoots, movie scenes all happen continuously and money is exchanging hands to make it happen – just not for the artists. Usually they are essentially unpaid, uncredited backdrop artists for the edgy “street” fantasies of stylists.

The courts ultimately will have to decide the relevance of these recent claims but the topic does raise fascinating questions about public space, intellectual property, copyright, and the reasonable expectations of the artists once their work is set free into the streets.  In these cases the artists had permission and encouragement to create their works and perhaps thousands of images of the works are in existence since the work is made public. The concern here is raised once those images are privatized or pass into the purely commercial world of selling product.

More interesting will be to see if these lawsuits will extend in the future to include the unsanctioned, un-permissioned, acts of vandalism that appear on private property as well. Will artists seek protection from a legal system they actively transgressed? Can the pieces of art placed illegally be re-claimed by the artist when the work is found printed on a lycra bodysuit or embossed on a wallet? If so, how will the artist claim ownership?

Here are just three recent examples of lawsuits reportedly being filed by artists laying claim to the benefits of their work.

Maya Hayuk

Street Artist and fine artist Maya Hiyuk is reportedly suing pop star Sara Bareilles, Sony, and Coach for using her Houston Street wall in New York as a back drop to sell their products.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-740-copyright-Page-Six-Maya-Hiyuk-Bareilles-Screen-Shot-2014-09-13-at-4.01

Hayuk on the left, the wall used in a campaign on the right (Screenshot from New York Post, Page Six)

brooklyn-street-art-maya-hayuk-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web-2

A detail from the Houston street wall by Maya Hayuk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Revok, Reyes and Steel

MSK crew members Revok, Reyes and Steel have filed a claim saying that designer Roberto Cavalli was a little more than just inspired by their collaborative mural in San Francisco when designing a line for his “Graffiti Girls” collection sold through the website. A quick Google search shows that the line extends to clothing, accessories, sneakers, even a phone case and is sold at stores like Nordstom, Neiman Marcus, and online giant Amazon.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-copyright-Cavelli-740-Screen-Shot-2014-09-13-at-4.44

Worse, says the claim, “Sometimes, Cavalli added what appears to be a signature, creating the false impression that Roberto Cavalli himself was the artist.”

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Copyright-Cavelli-2-740-Screen-Shot-2014-09-13-at-4.46

Brooklyn-Street-Art-copyright-msk-graffiti-artists-revok-reyes-steel-suing-roberto-cavalli-for-copyright-infringement-01-960x640

An view of the original wall by Revok, Reyes and Steel (image © MSK) and a screenshot of one of the dresses for sale at Cavalli’s website.

See more about this at Mass Appeal.

Jaz, Ever, and Other (aka Troy Lovegates)

Street Artists and muralists Jaz, Ever, and Other are suing for copyright infringement because the newest Terry Gilliam (Twelve Monkeys, Brazil) film The Zero Theorem allegedly featured a mural that looks startlingly similar to one they painted together in Buenos Aires about four years ago.

You can actually still see a number of stills from it it on The Zero Theorem Facebook page right now if you like.

 Brooklyn-Street-Art-740-2-Screenshot-Facebook-Zero-Sum-theorem-Screen-Shot-2014-09-13-at-4.37

See a pdf of the lawsuit here.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Copyright-Other-Troy-Lovegates-Ever-Jaz-740

From Other’s Flickr page, the original mural in progress (image © Other)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Tagging Somebody’s Painting : Two Walls Interrupted

Tagging Somebody’s Painting : Two Walls Interrupted

Whose voice gets to be heard, and at what cost? It’s an ongoing battle with companies and politicians and citizens fighting to control the radio airwaves, broadcast television, cable providers, news outlets, the Internet. In the conversations that take place on walls in public, the struggle is just as strong and often as vehement. We just aren’t happy when somebody else gets the mic if we can’t grab it and rock it too.

brooklyn-street-art-maya-hayuk-jaime-rojo-02-14-web-2

Maya Hayuk. Detail. Houston Wall, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A couple of recent visual disruptions of Street Art installations have us thinking about the need to be heard at the expense of an artist’s work mostly because we learned about them both within a few days of each other.  Maybe it was the amount of time and labor that went into the walls, or maybe it’s because it can still be shocking even when you know it goes along with the rules of the street.

It’s always been part of the game; once you put it on the street you must be prepared to let it go, even though you secretly hope it will ride a while. Without doubt it will be buffed, slashed, ripped, taken, crossed out, tagged over, and deteriorated by the elements. If you’re going to play, you might get played and most artists know it and accept it.

brooklyn-street-art-maya-hayuk-jaime-rojo-02-14-web-1

Maya Hayuk. Houston Wall tagged while the artist was in the process of completing her work. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Houston Street wall in Manhattan has become a touchstone for many a graffiti and Street Artist over the last few decades thanks to its early beginnings as a canvas for artists like Keith Haring and Kenny Scharf and because as Soho and the Bowery gentrified most available walls disappeared. Now its an honor to get chosen to do your thing on the wall, even as it often provides a stage for the the still breathing battle between some graffiti writers and the rest of the Street Art making world.

Before the latest painter finished her piece last week, Maya Hayuk found her eye crossing color jam geometry had some unexpected collaboration. It’s not the first time Street Artists have been hit by graffiti on this wall; Shepard Fairey’s installation famously got hit so heavily that holes were literally punched into the wall, and Swoon’s community collabo with the Groundswell kids got wrapped with a thick belt of throwies last fall.

brooklyn-street-art-maya-hayuk-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web-1

Maya Hayuk. Completed and restored. Houston Wall. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hayuk tried to shrug it off like a champ and uttered a few terse words – but ultimately recovered her poppy patterning and finished the wall victorious.

The new tagging on Hayuk’s wall brought a fussilade of opinions, wizened philosophical observastions and bromides on social media, including this sampling from Instagram:

“Ever since Banksy month these toys having been running rampant” @phillip_s

“We love your work. Forget the jealous ones” @christianguemy

“It sucks that the work wasn’t even finished buuuut you paint something on the street you run the risk of it getting dissed/painted over. End of story” @jaackthebeard

“That’s too bad, but sadly part of the life of a work on the street. Still an absolutely beautiful piece though.” @denverstreetart

“Someone who wants pristine work that persists is always free to paint privately on canvas. The chaos and struggle of the image on the street is part of what makes graffiti awesome. This doesn’t strike me as a spoiler bomber and their throwie looks great on the piece. There are no tears in street art. I know what its like to have someone hit up your piece. You can get good with it, go over it, or move on.” @zoharpublishing

“Wow. What is wrong with people” @erromualdo

“So rude! It’s just takes one a/hole. Looking great anyway” @lisakimlisakim

After completing the new wall and taking a bow, it was hit again. This time harder.

The tags are mostly unreadable to the average public passerby, but it is not those people who these additions are usually speaking to but rather to their peers. So the collaboration is insistent, and in some way perfectly New York.

brooklyn-street-art-maya-hayuk-jaime-rojo-02-14-web

Maya Hayuk. Houston Wall tagged once more after the original was restored and completed. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The other sanctioned wall we’ve been thinking about is in Rochester – still in New York State, but close to the border of Canada and near Lake Ontario. Faring Purth took a long time to finish this long limbed lady throughout the autumn months, enduring wayward comments, praise and  sometimes harsh words from this upstate community who liked yelling things out their car (and school bus) windows as they drove by. “I received equally supportive and hostile attention from the public while I was painting her. It was a new experience in more ways than I can count,” she says of the mural that measures 12 feet high by 125 feet long,

brooklyn-street-art-fairing-purth-rochester-ny-01-14-web-1

Faring Purth. Detail. Wall Therapy. Rochester, NY. (photo © Faring Purth)

Ultimately the religious contingent who had badgered previous visiting artists in Rochester over perceived thematic threats to family values tagged the face of her “Etty” and put a rudimentary cross in her hand when Faring had gone a way. This was a different sort of diss. It wasn’t a turf battle, it was a theological one and more broadly, it was about community norms. As in the case of Hayuk, the aerosol writer may not even have been addressing the artist or even known who she was. They may have been just striking a victory for the Lord against the evil of the art. Who knows?

Also like Hayuk, Ms. Purth decided to repair her work.

“I fixed her. Or rather, changed her, before hitting the road. She’s different now, it taught me a great deal. So finally, stitches and all, here she is.”

brooklyn-street-art-fairing-purth-rochester-ny-01-14-web-2

Faring Purth. Restored. Detail. Wall Therapy. Rochester, NY. (photo © Faring Purth)

There is no real end or summation to this story and these two recent examples are merely a fraction of the works that get tagged or crossed out every day. It is interesting to note that although the motivations were different for the people who defaced the mural art, the aerosol tool used to express their opinion was the same.  Additionally let’s all recognize the sublime irony that we are perilously close to using the word “vandalism” in this article.

But in a way, it is still about having a voice and using it, however edifying or injurious. The continuous cycle of constructive and destructive, adorning and scarring, speaking and silencing, is likely to continue as long as artists create in the street.  As long as people have a need to be heard, they are going to find a way to get their voice out there.

brooklyn-street-art-fairing-purth-rochester-ny-01-14-web-4

Faring Purth. Detail. Wall Therapy. Rochester, NY. (photo © Faring Purth)

brooklyn-street-art-fairing-purth-rochester-ny-01-14-web-3

Faring Purth. Restored. Detail. Wall Therapy. Rochester, NY. (photo © Faring Purth)

brooklyn-street-art-fairing-purth-lisa-baker-rochester-ny-01-14-web

The complete piece Faring Purth for Wall Therapy in Rochester, NY. (photo © Faring Purth)

For more on Faring’s wall please see

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
This article also appears on The Huffington Post
 
Huffpo-740-Maya-Hayuk-Faring-Purth_Screen-shot-2014-02-19-at-10.29

 

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Images Of The Week: 02.09.14

Images Of The Week: 02.09.14

brooklyn-street-art-bradley-theodore-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2014

Maya Hayuk on the Houston Wall this week got tagged mid-job, took a moment and repaired and continued on to completion in signature glowing dripping geometrically teXt-driven style, Ben Eine ISHued a jab at entertainment culture, and QRST made a reappearance with a hand-rendered reminder of temporality on a bus stop, saw his shadow and went back into a hole.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Alice Pasquini, Ben Eine, Bone, Bradley Theodore, Ellis G., Issa, Jilly Ballistic, Maya Hayuk, and QRST.

Top Image >> Fashion profiler Bradley Theodore depicts Diana Vreeland as social x-ray (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-maya-hayuk-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web-2

Maya Hayuk. Houston Wall. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-maya-hayuk-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web-5

Maya Hayuk. Houston Wall. Detail. The beginning. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-maya-hayuk-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web-3

Maya Hayuk. Houston Wall. Process shot. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-maya-hayuk-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web-4

Maya Hayuk. Houston Wall. Process shot. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-maya-hayuk-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web-6

Maya Hayuk. Houston Wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-maya-hayuk-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web-1

Maya Hayuk. Houston Wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-qrst-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web

QRST. Bus shelter ad takeover. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-issa-jilly-ballistic-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web

Issa and Jilly Ballistic collaboration in a MTA subway platform. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ben-eine-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web-7

Ben Eine. “Thats Entertainment. ish” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ben-eine-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web-8

Ben Eine. “Thats Entertainment. ish” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ben-eine-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web-2

Ben Eine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-bone-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web

BONE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ellis-g-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web

Yes, it does seem rather harsh. Ellis G. THR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-serge-miquel-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web

Justin in time for Valentine’s Day, this smashed bouquet of flowers. Serge Miquel. “Yummy” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-alice-pasquini-joao-gordicho-barcelona-02-09-14-web-2

Alice Pasquini at work on her piece in Barcelona, Spain for ÚS Festival. (photo © João Gordicho)

brooklyn-street-art-alice-pasquini-joao-gordicho-barcelona-02-09-14-web-1

Alice Pasquini in Barcelona, Spain for ÚS Festival. (photo © João Gordicho)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-02-09-14-web

Untitled. Manhattan, NYC. February, 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
 
Please follow and like us:
Read more
The 2013 BSA Year in Images (VIDEO)

The 2013 BSA Year in Images (VIDEO)

Here it is! Our 2013 wrap up featuring favorite images of the year by Brooklyn Street Art’s Jaime Rojo.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-2013-Year-In-Images-Jaime-Rojo

Before our video roundup below here is the Street Art photographer’s favorite of the year, snapped one second before he was singled out of a New York crowd, handcuffed, and stuffed into a police car – sort of like the Banksy balloons he was capturing.

“Among all the thousands of photos I took this year there’s one that encapsulates the importance of Street Art in the art world and some of the hysteria that can build up around it,” he says of his final shot on the final day of the one month Better Out Than In artist ‘residency’ in NYC this October. It was a cool day to be a Street Art photographer – but sadly Rojo was camera-less in a case of mistaken identity, if only for a short time.

Released two hours later after the actual car-jumping trespasser was charged, Rojo was happy to hear the Chief Lieutenant tell his officer “you’ve got the wrong man”, to get his shoelaces back, and to discover this photo was still on his camera. He also gets to tell people at parties that he spent some time in the holding cell with the two guys whom New York watched tugging down the B-A-N-K-S-Y.

brooklyn-street-art-banksy-jaime-rojo-10-31-13-web

What’s everybody looking at? Jaime Rojo’s favorite image of the year at the very end of the Banksy brouhaha. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Now, for the Video

When it came to choosing the 112 images for the video that capture the spirit of the Street Art scene in ’13, we were as usual sort of overwhelmed to comb through about ten thousand images and to debate just how many ‘legal’ versus ‘illegal’ pieces made it into the mix. Should we include only images that went up under the cover of the night, unsanctioned, uncensored, uncompromised, unsolicited and uncommissioned? Isn’t that what Street Art is?

Right now there are a growing number of legal pieces going up in cities thanks to a growing fascination with Street Art and artists and it is causing us to reevaluate what the nature of the Street Art scene is, and what it may augur for the future. You can even say that from a content and speech perspective, a sizeable amount of the new stuff is playing it safe – which detracts from the badass rebel quality once associated with the practice.

These works are typically called by their more traditional description – murals. With all the Street Art / graffiti festivals now happening worldwide and the growing willingness of landlords to actually invite ‘vandals’ to paint their buildings to add cache to a neighborhood and not surprisingly benefit from the concomitant increase in real estate values, many fans and watchers have been feeling conflicted in 2013 about the mainstreaming that appears to be taking place before our eyes. But for the purposes of this roundup we decided to skip the debate and let everybody mix and mingle freely.

This is just a year-end rollicking Street Art round-up; A document of the moment that we hope you like.

Ultimately for BSA it has always been about what is fresh and what is celebrating the creative spirit – and what is coming next. “We felt that the pieces in this collection expressed the current vitality of the movement – at least on the streets of New York City,” says photographer and BSA co-founder Rojo. It’s a fusillade of the moment, complete with examples of large murals, small wheat pastes, intricate stencils, simple words made with recycled materials or sprayed on to walls, clay installations, three dimensional sculptures, hand painted canvases, crocheted installations, yarn installations etc… they somehow captured our imaginations, inspired us, made us smile, made us think, gave us impetus to continue doing what we are doing and above all made us love this city even more and the art and the artists who produce it.

Brooklyn Street Art 2013 Images of the Year by Jaime Rojo includes the following artists;

A Dying Breed, Aakash Nihalini, Agostino Iacursi, Amanda Marie, Apolo Torres, Axel Void, Bagman, Bamn, Pixote, Banksy, B.D. White, Betsy, Bishop203, NDA, Blek le Rat, br1, Case Maclaim, Cash For Your Warhol, Cholo, Chris RWK, Chris Stain, Billy Mode, Christian Nagel, Cost, ENX, Invader, Crush, Dal East, Damien Mitchell, Dase, Dasic, Keely, Deeker, Don’t Fret, The Droid, ECB, el Seed, El Sol 25, Elbow Toe, Faile, Faith 47, Five Pointz, Free Humanity, Greg LaMarche, Hot Tea, How & Nosm, Icy & Sot, Inti, Jilly Ballistic, John Hall, JR, Jose Parla, Judith Supine, Kremen, Kuma, LMNOPI, London Kaye, Love Me, Martha Cooper, Matt Siren, Elle, Mika, Miss Me, Missy, MOMO, Mr. Toll, Nychos, Okuda, Alice Mizrachi, OLEK, Owen Dippie, Paolo Cirio, Paul Insect, Phetus, Phlegm, Revok, Pose, QRST, Rambo, Ramiro Davaro, Reka, Rene Gagnon, ROA, RONES, Rubin, bunny M, Square, Stikki Peaches, Stikman, Swoon, Tristan Eaton, The Lisa Project 2013, UFO 907, Willow, Swill, Zed1, and Zimer.

Read more about Banksy’s last day in New York here and our overview of his residency in the essay “Banksy’s Final Trick” on The Huffington Post.

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 10.27.13

BSA Images Of The Week: 10.27.13

brooklyn-street-art-banksy-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web-2

This weekend Halloween began early, and with Banksy leading the way on Friday night, it looks like there will be more tricks in store before the end of October (Thursday). Another surprise came when Swoon took her turn at the Houston wall.  As of right now, everyone is keeping their eyes open for what will happen next. Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Banksy, Blanco, HDL, JR, London Kaye, and Swoon.

Top image>>> The Grim Reaper at the wheel in this performance attributed to Banksy. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-banksy-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web-1

Banksy. Live music was provided. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-banksy-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web-3

Banksy (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-blanco-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web

Blanco (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jr-martha-cooper-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web-1

JR collaboration with Martha Cooper. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jr-martha-cooper-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web-2

JR collaboration with Martha Cooper. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jr-martha-cooper-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web-3

JR collaboration with Martha Cooper. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-london-kaye-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web

London Kaye (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-hdl-steve-coy-detroit-10-27-13-web-1

HDL. “Insectivorous” Detroit, 2013. (photo © Steve Coy)

brooklyn-street-art-hdl-steve-coy-detroit-10-27-13

HDL. “Brand Take Off” Detroit, 2013. (GIF © Steve Coy)

brooklyn-street-art-hdl-steve-coy-detroit-10-27-13-web-2

HDL. “Brand Take Off” Detroit, 2013. (photo © Steve Coy)

brooklyn-street-art-swoon-groundswell-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web-4

Swoon and Groundswell collaboration in progress at the Houston Wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-swoon-groundswell-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web-6

Swoon’s “Thalassa” at the Houston Wall. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-swoon-groundswell-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web-7

Swoon’s “Thalassa” at the Houston Wall. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-swoon-groundswell-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web-3

Swoon’s “Neenee” at the Houston Wall. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-swoon-groundswell-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web-8

Swoon’s “Neenee” at the Houston Wall. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-swoon-groundswell-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web-9

Swoon’s “Neenee” at the Houston Wall. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-swoon-groundswell-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web-5

Swoon at the Houston Wall. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-10-27-13-web

Untitled. Brooklyn Bridge. Brooklyn 2012. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Talking With Crash About Popeye and The Houston Wall

Talking With Crash About Popeye and The Houston Wall

He first wrote “Crash” on New York streets and trains in 1974 but he still finds ways to entertain and challenge himself artistically. Now managing a successful gallery career that has him globe trotting much of the year, John Matos considers himself a closet pop artist, and the similarities to Lichtenstein and Rosenquist are always there, along with his nostalgia for pop iconography. But at his heart he’s still a graffiti writer from the South Bronx and that’s why he invoked the collaborative energy of the Tats Cru and other friends when putting up his latest public work – a mural for the Houston Wall now on display in New York’s lower Manhattan at the corner of Bowery.

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A week after completing his part of collaboration on the same wall for photographer Martha Coopers’ birthday with artists other old school train bombers and friends, Crash hit this wall hard like Popeye, the sailor man. “The mural on Houston Street – an accomplishment for sure,” says Crash as he surveys the expanse that took about a week to complete and that will run into summer for everybody to see.

Brooklyn Street Art: Can you talk about the piece that you just finished?
Crash: When I was approached to paint it, I felt the weight of over 30 years of painters that I’ve admired and felt it an honor to be someone to be added to that group. The piece was meant to depict the mix of Pop and Graff/Street art and how it’s developed in the last 40 years.

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: How did Popeye work his way into the show? Is he an old friend, or does he just have a good PR agent?
Crash: I wanted to do a very Pop image that is known throughout history…I thought that Popeye would be a cool image. I painted Popeye recently for an installation at a museum/foundation in Switzerland and the beauty of nostalgia hit home, so I thought, “Why not do it again?”

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Did you have any help on this job?
Crash: Basically I had some young people come in to help block out areas of the wall using a simple acrylic enamel – which would make it mush easier to fill and blend the spray paint with. With them I was able to basically fill in about half of this incredibly large wall on the first day. Then on Thursday, The Tats Cru rolled by. They are family, so they came by and they helped some with the stars and stripes motif on the right side of the wall. Otherwise it was all me for three long days, but it was great fun and it always brings me back to the early subways…awesome.

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: You did a cool collaboration on Martha Cooper’s birthday wall with Daze last week. Do you remember the first time Martha photographed your work?
Crash: The first time Martha photographed me was at her studio, I think in 1980 or ’81 – and she has photographed me ever since – a long association for sure

Brooklyn Street Art:  Have you seen any good graff or street art recently?
Crash: There is some great art being made all around the world. There are so many artists out there and I don’t want to let any one out, so I don’t want to list any names and miss somebody.

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bristol based Street Artist Nick Walker stopped by to see Crash at work. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Photographer Joe Conzo’s reflection in a car window as he chats with Crash. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Getting the shot. Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Images of the Week 03.10.13: Happy 70th Birthday Martha Cooper

“I can’t believe it. I never expected this, ever.”

The Houston Street Wall was the site of a sidewalk surprise birthday party Saturday  for photographer Martha Cooper, who was planning to stop by for what she thought would be a new mural shoot. The world famous graffiti photographer had no idea that artists How and Nosm had begun masking the letters of her nickname out of their mural at 7 a.m. to prepare for an all-star cast of some big graffiti and street art names from the last 4 decades to create a larger-than-life birthday card for her.

Thanks to speedy social media, a sunny early spring day, and her stature as an historic photographer of fortitude and integrity, the impromptu guest list ballooned throughout the day for this street side celebration, while the boisterous honking New York traffic rolled by.

Above: Happy Birthday Martha Cooper (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The “Marty” wall begins at the Houston Wall in NYC as How and Nosm buff their mural and mask out her name. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

By the time Martha and her cousin Sally arrived with wall organizer Meghan Coleman just after noon, the “MARTY” letters had already been half completed and she stood staring with mouth smiling and agape, waving at the cluster of photographers shooting her atop the Houston Street meridian. A second later she was laughing and racing across the street, camera in hand, ready to capture the painting action and get mobbed with well wishers. Cooper confessed to being pretty overwhelmed by the sight of her name so big. For her part, Sally, a confidant and buddy since they attended grammar school together in their hometown of Baltimore, busted out into tears.

How & Nosm at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Just inside of one day the famed wall that has hosted the likes of Haring, Scharf, Fairey, and Faile was suddenly regaled in eye-popping color and a variety of styles by Lady Pink, How and Nosm, Bio from Tats Cru, Freedom, Free5, Crash, Daze, Terror 161, Faust, and Aiko – producing a head spinning and sweet greeting to a person whom they all respect and admire for her work and determination. In addition to the steady flow of fans, writers, artists, bloggers and photographers asking to have a photo taken with one the few photographers of New York’s 1970s subway graffiti scene, a number of friends stopped by to have some birthday cake and watch the painting – like Wild Style director Charlie Ahearn, his brother artist John Ahearn, hip-hop photographer Joseph Conzo, and master sculptor Simon Verity, among others.

The brand new “Marty” mural is up for an incredibly short time, possibly only days, so if you have an opportunity or inclination, catch this personal and public display of affection for a lady who helped us all appreciate art in the streets.

Bio from the Tats Cru at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash shows his sketch for his portion of the wall. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko(photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Martha (center) arrives and gets a big surprise. Flanked by Meghan Coleman on the left and Cousin Sally on the right. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Davide (Nosm) greets Martha. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Faust at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Freedom at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Freedom signs a book and talks to a young admirer. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Daze at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Terror 161 at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bio at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A possible devotee of the Seapunk movement walks past “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A New Yorker captures the action from the comfort of his taxi while waiting for the light to turn green. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bio does the official birthday wish.”Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lady Pink at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How & Nosm at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Aiko at work, or rather, her shadow. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Laboutins and aerosol make a riveting combination for Aiko. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

All the artists with Marty. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Marty poses for us. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA loves Martha Cooper. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko. (photo © Leah )

The final shot. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more