All posts tagged: Faith47

Never Crew: “Inhuman Barriers” and Cities Of Hope

Never Crew: “Inhuman Barriers” and Cities Of Hope

Manchester in UK hosted a street art convention in May called “Cities of Hope” and 10 international artists worked on pieces that often addressed issues of social justice. Swiss duo Christian Rebecchi and Pablo Togni, who comprise Nevercrew, addressed the theme of immigration and there piece gives a sense of the seemingly impossible odds that many people face when attempting to escape war and persecution in search of a refuge.

brooklyn-street-art-NEVERCREW-Inhuman-barriers-Manchester-Cities-of-Hope-2016-web-2

Never Crew. Inhuman Barriers. Manchester Cities Of Hope. Manchester, UK. June 2016. (photo © courtesy of Never Crew)

“We are extremely glad to have been part of this project based on social justice issues and so strongly connected to the city and to its people,” the guys say in reference to the experience painting “Inhuman Barriers.” The two worked in support of the local solidarity group WASP (Women Asylum Seekers Together).

Additional participants in Cities of Hope include Axel Void, C215, Case Maclaim, Faith47, Phlegm, Martin Whatson, Pichi&Avo, Hyuro, and Dale Grimshaw.

brooklyn-street-art-NEVERCREW-Inhuman-barriers-Manchester-Cities-of-Hope-2016-web-3

Never Crew. Inhuman Barriers. Manchester Cities Of Hope. Manchester, UK. June 2016. (photo © courtesy of Never Crew)

brooklyn-street-art-NEVERCREW-Inhuman-barriers-Manchester-Cities-of-Hope-2016-web-1

Never Crew. Inhuman Barriers. Manchester Cities Of Hope. Manchester, UK. June 2016. (photo © courtesy of Never Crew)

Please follow and like us:
Read more
“The Art Of The Mural: Volume 01” Captures a Moment

“The Art Of The Mural: Volume 01” Captures a Moment

Murals hold their own place onstage in public space today for a variety of reasons that we discuss regularly on BSA. From grassroots and public, to private and corporate, we have watched the genre professionalize as Street Art festivals and other initiatives are often coupling artists with brands and are selling canvasses through the organizers galleries. Today we have the first of a promised four-part book series by Art Whino gallerist and organizer of the Richmond Mural Project in Virginia, Shane Pomajambo, that features many artists he has worked with in the brand new “The Art of the Mural”.

brooklyn-street-art-the-art-of-the-mural-volume-one-shane-pomajambo-jaime-rojo-05-16-web-1

Shane Pomajambo The Art of The Mural Volume 01 Foreword by Carlo McCormick. Schiffer Publishing. 2016

Featuring more than fifty current graffiti/Street Artists, the survey pays special attention to the show-stopping eye candy that commands attention for these nomadic painters who are developing their craft before an ever larger and more appreciative international audience.

Culture critic and curator Carlo McCormick, who writes the introduction to the Schiffer published hardcover, notes that this mural renaissance is quite unlike the US government funded New Deal era mural programs that produced “hundreds of thousands of murals for schools, hospitals, post offices, housing projects, and various government facilities”. And he’s right, these are emanating from a different place entirely.

brooklyn-street-art-the-art-of-the-mural-volume-one-shane-pomajambo-jaime-rojo-05-16-web-2

Antony Lister. Shane Pomajambo The Art of The Mural Volume 01 Foreword by Carlo McCormick. Schiffer Publishing. 2016

The world-traveling media-soaked artists, of which this collection is subset, have had vastly more exposure to corporations and branding perhaps than, say, arts institutions, and a sophisticated self-handling is often on display with artists ever more savvy in their choices of style and content.

A greater percentage are now entering into private collections, galleries, and museums thanks to unprecedented platforms for huge exposure on the Internet, and their public works are adding rich character and dialogue to our neighborhoods and public spaces.

brooklyn-street-art-the-art-of-the-mural-volume-one-shane-pomajambo-jaime-rojo-05-16-web-3

Curiot. Shane Pomajambo The Art of The Mural Volume 01 Foreword by Carlo McCormick. Schiffer Publishing. 2016

With academia, art critics, and auction houses all grappling with the rightful place of these artists in contemporary art and society at large it will be instructive to know the history and their lineage, content, context, and patronage. One has to agree when McCormick says that all of these “are helpful for us to consider in looking at and understanding the artists’ walls of today.”

This collection of talent is strong, with many of the mid-large names that are at play in this generation of painters whom are primarily born in the 1970s and 80s. In their work is a cultural appreciation for modern graffiti history as they now channel it along with formal training, art history, advertising, and a multitude of media. With few exceptions, it’s a tight list of artists, the images are riveting (though uncredited to their photographers), and the brief introductions by Pomajambo contain just enough biographical information and artist’ quotes to ground the story and give it context.

“As with everything I do,” says the Queens, New York native Pomajambo, “I always question and observe, and as we reach critical mass with murals I felt compelled to create this project and capture a moment in time.”

brooklyn-street-art-the-art-of-the-mural-volume-one-shane-pomajambo-jaime-rojo-05-16-web-4

Evoca 1. Shane Pomajambo The Art of The Mural Volume 01 Foreword by Carlo McCormick. Schiffer Publishing. 2016

brooklyn-street-art-the-art-of-the-mural-volume-one-shane-pomajambo-jaime-rojo-05-16-web-5

Fintan Magee. Shane Pomajambo The Art of The Mural Volume 01 Foreword by Carlo McCormick. Schiffer Publishing. 2016

brooklyn-street-art-the-art-of-the-mural-volume-one-shane-pomajambo-jaime-rojo-05-16-web-6

Miss Van. Shane Pomajambo The Art of The Mural Volume 01 Foreword by Carlo McCormick. Schiffer Publishing. 2016

brooklyn-street-art-the-art-of-the-mural-volume-one-shane-pomajambo-jaime-rojo-05-16-web-7

MOMO. Shane Pomajambo The Art of The Mural Volume 01 Foreword by Carlo McCormick. Schiffer Publishing. 2016

brooklyn-street-art-the-art-of-the-mural-volume-one-shane-pomajambo-jaime-rojo-05-16-web-8

Onur & Wes 21. Shane Pomajambo The Art of The Mural Volume 01 Foreword by Carlo McCormick. Schiffer Publishing. 2016

brooklyn-street-art-the-art-of-the-mural-volume-one-shane-pomajambo-jaime-rojo-05-16-web-9

Telmo & Miel. Shane Pomajambo The Art of The Mural Volume 01 Foreword by Carlo McCormick. Schiffer Publishing. 2016

brooklyn-street-art-the-art-of-the-mural-volume-one-shane-pomajambo-jaime-rojo-05-16-web-10

Tone (Robert Proch). Shane Pomajambo The Art of The Mural Volume 01 Foreword by Carlo McCormick. Schiffer Publishing. 2016

 

All photos of the spreads by Jaime Rojo

 

The Art of The Mural: Contemporary International Urban Art. Volume 01 by Shaen Pomajambo. Schiffer Publishing. Atglen, PA. USA.

Participating Artists
Amose, Arraiano, Augustine Kofie, Axel Void, Bezt (Etam Crew), Chazme 718, Chor boogie, Clog Two, Curiot, Cyrcle, DALeast, Decertor, Dface, ETNIK, Faith47, Fintan Magee, Hense, INTI, Jade, Jaz, JR, Kenor, Lister, Logan Hicks, Low Bros, Meggs, Miss Van, Momo, Mr Thoms, Muro, Natalia Rak, Nosego, Onur, Pener, Reka, Robert “Tone” Proch,Ron English, Rone, Sainer (Etam Crew), SATONE, SEACREATIVE, Sepe, Smithone, Sten Lex, Stormie Mills, Telmo Miel, Tristan Eaton, TWOONE HIROYASU, Vhils, Wes21 and Zed 1

Please follow and like us:

Read more
BSA Film Friday: 01.08.16

BSA Film Friday: 01.08.16

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Faith47-Rowan-Pybus-740

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

 

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. Faith47, No Standing Anytime
2. Graveyard For The Forgotten: Sonny
3. Andreco: Climate 01 in Paris
4. LODZ Murals in 2015

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: Faith47, No Standing Anytime

A gorgeously ambient tribute to New York through the eyes of a visitor who takes some alternate routes through the city along with the more obvious ones to capture vignettes of mundanity and of wonder. Rowan Pybus shoots this city poetry as a series of visual stanzas stacked unevenly, accompanied by the occasional Faith47 mural (she has accumulated a few in NYC now) as well as the wistful sound recordings of lemurs by Alexia Webster that melt into the gentle audio cacophony of the street as designed by Jonathan Arnold. The combined passages allow you to slow down and contemplate the whirring city and a handful of its moments as sweet parenthesis in this run-on sentence called New York. Okay, that’s enough, move along now, no standing.

Graveyard For The Forgotten: Sonny

Sonny may be feeling likewise disjointed or haunted in the detritus of this hulking flying machine, but rather strikes a pose as hoodlum instead. As he blankets the fuselage in black you wonder how he will resolve the matter.

Andreco: Climate 01 in Paris

A brief look at the new mural by Andreco in Paris, which he says is meant to be a commentary on the consequences of Climate Change and the alteration of the Earth’s natural cycles.

Location: Richomme School, Goutte d’or, 18e, Paris

 

LODZ Murals in 2015

A combination of stop-action and drone fly-bys gives this latest collection of murals from LODZ a modern treatment.

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA “Images of the Year” for 2015 : New Video

BSA “Images of the Year” for 2015 : New Video

Was 2015 the “Year of the Mural”?

A lot of people thought so, and the rise of commercial festivals and commissioned public/private mural programs probably brought more artists to more walls than in recent history. Judging from the In Box, 2016 is going to break more records. Enormous, polished, fully realized and presented, murals can hold a special role in a community and transform a neighborhood, even a city.

But they are not the “organic” Street Art that draws us into the dark in-between places in a city, or at its margins.

We keep our eyes open for the small, one-off, idiosyncratic, uncommissioned, weirdo work as well, as it can carry clues about the culture and reveal a sage or silly solo voice.  It also just reinforces the feeling that the street is still home to an autonomous free-for-all of ideas and opinions and wandering passions. For us it is still fascinating to seek out and discover the one-of-a-kind small wheatpastes, stencils, sculptures, ad takeovers, collages, and aerosol sprayed pieces alongside the enormous and detailed paintings that take days to complete.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-2015-Images-Of-The-Year-Eric-Simmons_copyright-Jaime_Rojo-740

The main image above is from a vinyl subway advertisement that was high-jacked and we published it in February of this year on our Images of the Week posting. It’s small, personal, and very effective as you can see someone suspiciously similar to Batman is jumping out of the mouth of someone looking awfully similar to Hedwig of “Angry Inch” fame.

Of the 10,000 or so images photographer Jaime Rojo took in 2015, here are a selection 140+ of the best images from his travels through streets looking for unpermissioned and sanctioned art.

Brooklyn Street Art 2015 Images of the Year by Jaime Rojo

 

Brooklyn Street Art 2015 Images of the Year by Jaime Rojo includes the following artists;

365xlos43, Amanda Marie, Andreas Englund, Augustine Kofie, Bisser, Boijeot, Renauld, Bordaloli, Brittany, BunnyM, Case Maclaim, Casg, Cash4, CDRE, Clet, Cost, Curve, Dain, Dal East, Dan Budnik, Dan Witz, David Walker, DeeDee, Dennis McNett, Don Rimx, Ricardo Cabret, LNY, Alex Seel, Mata Ruda, Don’t Fret, Dot Dot Dot, ECB, El Mac, El Sol25, Ella & Pitr, Eric Simmons, Enest Zacharevic, Martha Cooper, Martin Whatson, Ever, Faile, Faith47, Findac, Futura, Gaia, Gilf!, Hanksy, Hellbent, Hot Tea, How & Nosm, Icy and Sot, Inti, Invader, Isaac Cordal, James Bullough, Janet Dickson, Jef Aerosol, Jilly Ballistic, Joe Iurato, John Fekner, Le Diamantaire, Li Hill, LMNOPI, London Kaye, Low Brow, Marina Capdevilla, Miss Van, Mr. Prvrt, Mr. Toll, Myth, Nafir, Nemos, Never Crew, Nick Walker, Nina Pandolofo, Old Broads, Oldy, Ollio, Os Gemeos, Owen Dippie, Paper Skaters, Pet Bird, Kashink, Smells, Cash4, PichiAvo, Pixel Pancho, QRST, ROA, Ron English, Rubin415, Saner, Sean 9 Lugo, Shai Dahan, Shepard Fairey, Sheryo & The Yok, Sinned, Sipros, Skewville, Slikor, Smells, Sweet Toof, Snowden, Edward Snowden, Andrew Tider, Jeff Greenspan, Specter, Stray Ones, Sweet Toof, Swil, Willow, Swoon, The Outings Project, Toney De Pew, Tristan Eaton, Various & Gould, Vermibus, Wane, Wk Interact

 

 <<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><<>>><>

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><<>>><>

This article is also published on The Huffington Post

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Images-of-Year-2015-Huffpost-740-Screen Shot 2015-12-16 at 11.23.53 AM

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Faith47: “Aqua Regalia”, Mundane, Sacred

Faith47: “Aqua Regalia”, Mundane, Sacred

The mundane is made sacred in the full-wall alter created at the back of Jonathan Levine’s gallery for the first solo New York show by Faith47. Small collected ephemera is displayed in groupings of signs, cards, documents, family photos and hand painted works by the South African artist whose work on the street is large scale and at times haunting, holy.

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-JLVG-11-15-web-12

Faith 47 “Aqua Regalia” Jonathan LeVine Gallery. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As the name of the show indicates Aqua Regalia – Chapter Two is a continuation of her 2014 London exhibition at Moniker Projects and elsewhere in the show you see the artist experimenting with collage of found objects alongside of paintings on wood and canvas. Opening on a night when Manhattan was enjoying a near continuous inundating downpour, the water washes and dream-like sequences, symbols and forms were only enhanced. With references to the sanctified and the dirty politics of being human, the Aqua regalia (royal water) here is in the hands of a medium, channeling spirits with a sense of the mystic and disarming with plain truths.

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-JLVG-11-15-web-4

Faith 47 “Aqua Regalia” Jonathan LeVine Gallery. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-JLVG-11-15-web-8

Faith 47 “Aqua Regalia” Jonathan LeVine Gallery. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-JLVG-11-15-web-11

Faith 47 “Aqua Regalia” Jonathan LeVine Gallery. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-JLVG-11-15-web-7

Faith 47 “Aqua Regalia” Jonathan LeVine Gallery. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-JLVG-11-15-web-6

Faith 47 “Aqua Regalia” Jonathan LeVine Gallery. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-JLVG-11-15-web-10

Faith 47 “Aqua Regalia” Detail. Jonathan LeVine Gallery. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-JLVG-11-15-web-9

Faith 47 “Aqua Regalia” Detail. Jonathan LeVine Gallery. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-JLVG-11-15-web-3

Faith 47 “Aqua Regalia” Detail. Jonathan LeVine Gallery. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-JLVG-11-15-web-2

Faith 47 “Aqua Regalia” Detail. Jonathan LeVine Gallery. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-JLVG-11-15-web-1

Faith 47 “Aqua Regalia” Jonathan LeVine Gallery. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-JLVG-11-15-web-5

Faith 47 “Aqua Regalia” Detail. Jonathan LeVine Gallery. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Faith 47 “Aqua Regalia” is open for the general public at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in Manhattan. Click HERE for details.

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Technology, Festivals, and Murals: 15 Years on the Street Art Scene

Technology, Festivals, and Murals: 15 Years on the Street Art Scene

It’s good to be asked to write an essay once in a while as it makes us take a step back and more fully examine a topic and appreciate it. On the occasion of Nuart’s 15th anniversary and it’s accompanying print publication last week Martyn Reed asked us to look at the street art / urban art / graffiti scene and to give an analysis about how it has changed in the time that the festival has been running. The essay is a long one, so grab a cup of joe and we hope you enjoy. Included are a number of images in and around Stavanger from Jaime Rojo, not all of them part of the festival, including legal and illegal work.

Technology, Festivals, and Murals as Nuart Turns 15

Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo

Nuart is turning 15 this year and like most brilliant teenagers it is alternately asking you challenging questions, finding you somewhat uncool, or is on your tablet ordering a new skateboard with your credit card. Nuart started with mainly music and is now mainly murals; an internationally well-regarded venue for thoughtfully curated urban art programs and erudite academic examination – with an undercurrent of troublemaking at all times. Today Nuart can be relied upon to initiate new conversations that you weren’t expecting and set a standard for thoughtful analysis of Street Art and its discontents.

brooklyn-street-art-dface-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Pøbel (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We are in the thick of it, as it were, this great expansion of a first global grassroots people’s art movement. Give it any title you like, the flood of art in the streets that knocks on BSA’s door daily is unabated. We admit that we often get caught up in the moment and forget to study our forebears, Street Art’s progenitors and contributors – and that we sometimes are unable to appreciate the significance of this incredible time. So we are happy when the Nuart team asked us to take a long view of the last fifteen years and to tell them what we see.

As we mark Nuart’s milestone, we see three important developments on the Street Art scene while it evolves: Technology, Festivals, and Murals.

And just before we discuss these three developments in Street Art we emphasize what has stayed the same; our own sense of wonder and thrill at the creative spirit, however it is expressed; we marvel to see how it can seize someone and flow amidst their innermost, take hold of them, convulse through them, rip them apart and occasionally make them whole.

What has changed is that the practice and acceptance of Street Art, the collecting of the work, it’s move into contemporary art, have each evolved our perceptions of this free-range autonomous descendant of the graffiti practice that took hold of imaginations in the 2000s. At the least it hasn’t stopped gaining converts. At this arbitrary precipice on the timeline we look back and forward to identify three impactful themes that drive what we are seeing today and that will continue to evolve our experience with this shape-shifting public art practice.

 

brooklyn-street-art-ben-eine-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Ben Eine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Technology

Hands down, a primary genesis for the far flung modern embrace of Street Art/Urban Art/Graffiti/public art lies in the booster rocket that propelled it into nearly everyone’s hands; digital communication and all its sundry technologies. From the early Internet websites and chat rooms accessed from your desktop to digital cameras and photo sharing platforms like Flickr in the early-mid 2000s to ever more sophisticated search technology and its accompanying algorithms, to blogs, micro blogs, and social media platforms, to the first generations of laptops and tablets, iPhones and Android devices; the amazing and democratizing advance of these communicative technologies have allowed more of us to access and share images, videos, experiences and opinion on a scale never before imagined – entirely altering the practice of art in the streets.

Where once there had been insular localized clans of aerosol graffiti writers who followed arcane codes of behavior and physical territoriality known primarily to only them in cities around the world, now new tribes coalesced around hubs of digital image sharing, enabling new shared experiences, sets of rules, and hierarchies of influence – while completely dissolving others.

 

brooklyn-street-art-tilt-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Tilt (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As old guards re-invented a place for themselves or disappeared altogether, a new order was being remixed in front our eyes. There were a lot of strangers in the room – but somehow we got used to it. Rather than making street art pieces for your local peers, artists began making new compositions for somebody’s phone screen in London or Honolulu or Shanghai.

Cut free from soil and social station, now garden variety hoodlums and brilliant aesthetes were commingling with opportuning art collectors, curious gallerists, unctuous opinionators, punctilious photographers and fans… along with product makers, promoters, art-school students, trend watchers, brand managers, lifestyle marketers, criminologists, sociologists, journalists, muckrakers, academics, philosophers, housewives, and makers of public policy. By virtue of climbing onto the Net everyone was caught in it, now experiencing the great leveling forces of early era digital communications that decimated old systems of privilege and gate keeping or demarcations of geography.

Looking forward we are about to be shaken again by technology that makes life even weirder in the Internet of Everything. Drone cams capture art and create art, body cams will surveil our activity and interactions, and augmented reality is merging with GPS location mapping. You may expect new forms of anonymous art bombing done from your basement, guerilla image projecting, electronic sign jamming, and perhaps you’ll be attending virtual reality tours of street art with 30 other people who are also sitting on their couches with Oculus Rifts on. Just watch.

brooklyn-street-art-swoon-david-choe-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Swoon and David Choe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Festivals

Thanks to the success of festivals like Nuart, myriad imitators and approximaters have mushroomed in cities everywhere. Conceived of philosophically as a series of stages for the exhibition of artistic chops with the proviso that a cultural dialogue is enriched and moved forward, not all festivals reach those goals.

In fact, we have no reason to expect that there is one set of goals whatsoever and the results are predictably variable; ranging from focused, coherent and resonant contributions to a city to dispersed, unmanageable parades of muddy mediocrity slammed with corporate logos and problematic patronage.

brooklyn-street-art-mcity-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

MCity (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Some festivals are truly grassroots and managed by volunteers like Living Walls in Atlanta or MAUI in Fanzara, Spain. Others are privately funded by real estate interests like Miami’s Wynwood Walls or business improvement district initiatives like the L.I.S.A. Project and LoMan Festival in Manhattan, or are the vision of one man who has an interest in Street Artists, like the now-discontinued FAME festival in the small town of Grottaglie, Italy and the 140 artist takeover of a town in Tunisia called Djerbahood that is organized by an art dealer.

In some ways these examples are supplanting the work of public art committees and city planners who historically determined what kind of art would be beneficial to community and a public space. Detractors advance an opinion that festivals and personal initiatives like this are clever ways of circumventing the vox populi or that they are the deliberate/ accidental tools of gentrification.

We’ve written previously about the charges of cultural imperialism that these festivals sometimes bring as well where a presumed gratitude for new works by international painting superstars actually devolves into charges of hubris and disconnection with the local population who will live with the artwork for months and years after the artist catches a plane home.

brooklyn-street-art-dot-masters-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Dotmasters (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nonetheless, far from Street Arts transgressive and vandalous roots, the sheer number of Street Art/Urban Art/Mural Art festivals that have popped up – either freestanding or as adjuncts to multi-discipline “arts” festivals – is having the effect of creating a wider dialogue for art in the public sphere.

As artists are invited and hosted and scissor lifts are rented and art-making materials are purchased, one quickly realizes that there are real costs associated with these big shows and the need for funding is equally genuine. Depending on the festival this funding may be private, public, institutional, corporate, or an equation that includes them all.

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Faith47 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As you may expect, the encroachment of commercial interests is nearly exhaustive in some of these newer festivals, so eager are the merchants to harvest a scene they had little or no hand in planting. Conceived of as vehicles for corporate messaging, they custom-build responsive websites, interactive Apps, clouds of clever #hashtags, company logos, Instagram handles, branded events and viral lifestyle videos with logos sprinkled throughout the “content”.

You may recognize these to be the leeching from an organic subculture, but in the case of this amorphous and still growing “Street Art Scene” no one yet knows what lasting scars this lifestyle packaging will leave on the Body Artistic, let alone civic life.

 

brooklyn-street-art-icy-sot-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stylistically these festivals can be a grab bag as well with curatorial rigor often taking a back seat to availability, accessibility, and the number of interested parties making nominations. While some festivals are clearly leaning toward more traditional graffiti schools, others are a hodgepodge of every discernable style from the past fifty years, sometimes producing an unpleasant sense of nausea or even tears over regrettable missed opportunity.

Clearly the quality is often uneven but, at the danger of sounding flip or callous, it’s nothing that is not easily remedied by a few coats of paint in the months afterward, and you’ll see plenty of that. Most art critics understand that the metrics used for measuring festival art are not meant to be the same as for a gallery or museum show. Perhaps because of the entirely un-curated nature of the organic Street Art scene from which these festivals evolved in some part, where no one asks for permission (and none is actually granted), we are at ease with a sense of happenstance and an uneven or lackluster presentation but are thrilled when concept, composition, and execution are seated firmly in a brilliant context.

 

brooklyn-street-art-tuk-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

TUK (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Murals

Finally, murals have become big not just in size but popularity. Every week a street artist is exclaiming that this mural is the biggest they have every made. It is a newfound love, a heady honeymoon, a true resurgence of muralism. Even though you can’t rightly call this legal and sanctioned work true Street Art, many former and current Street Artists are making murals.

Un-civically minded urban art rebels have inferred that Street Art has softened, perhaps capitulated to more mainstream tastes. As Dan Witz recently observed, “Murals are not a schism with Street Art as much as a natural outgrowth from it.” We agree and add that these cheek-by-jowl displays of one mural after another are emulating the graffiti jams that have been taking place for years in large cities both organic and organized.

brooklyn-street-art-jps-mizo-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

JPS . Mizo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

From illustration to abstraction to figurative to surreal and even letter-based, this eclectic injection of styles won’t bring to mind what one may typically associate with the homegrown community mural. Aside from the aforementioned festivals that are festooning neighborhoods, the growth in mural-making may be attributable to a trend of appreciation for Do It Yourself ( D.I.Y.) approaches and the ‘makers’ movements, or a desire to add a personal aspect to an urban environment that feels unresponsive and disconnected.

Philadelphia has dedicated 30 years to their Mural Arts Program and relies on a time-tested method of community involvement for finalization of designs and most municipal murals have a certain tameness that pleases so many constituencies that no one particularly cares for them.

brooklyn-street-art-herakut-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Herakut (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The New Muralism, as we have been calling it, that is popping up is often more autonomous and spirited in nature than community mural initiatives of the past with their ties to the socio-political or to historical figures and events. Here there are few middlemen and fewer debates. Artists and their advocates approach building owners directly, a conversation happens, and a mural goes up.

In the case of upstart community programs like the Bushwick Collective in Brooklyn, one trusted local person is ambassador to a neighborhood, insuring that community norms about nudity or politics are respected but otherwise acts purely as facilitator and remains hands-off about the content.

brooklyn-street-art-jps-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web-1

JPS (photo © Jaime Rojo)

On that topic, effectively a form of censoring often takes place with murals – another distinguishing characteristic from Street Art. Given the opportunity to fully realize an elaborate composition, normally wild-eyed and ornery aerosol rebels bend their vision to not offend. Sometimes an artist can have more latitude and you may find a mural may clearly advocate a political or social point of view, as in recent murals addressing police brutality, racism, and inequality in many US cities, anti-corruption sentiments in Mexico, and pro-marriage equality in France and Ireland.

This new romance with the mural is undoubtedly helping artists who would like to further explore their abilities in more labor-intensive, time absorbing works without having to look over their shoulder for an approaching officer of the law. It is a given that what they gain in polished presentation they may sacrifice as confrontational, radical, contraventional, even experimental. The resulting images are at times stunning and even revelatory, consistent with the work of highly skilled visionaries, as if a new generation of painters is maturing before our eyes in public space where we are all witness.

brooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Moving Forward

Despite the rise in festivals and mural programs and the growing volume and sophistication of technology for sharing of the images, Street Art is still found in unexpected places and the decay of neglected spaces. As before and well into the future these self ordained ministers of mayhem will be showing their stuff in the margins, sometimes identified, sometimes anonymous, communicating with the individual who just happens to walk by and witness the work. The works will impart political or social messages, other times a simple declaration that says, “I’m here.”

Whatever its form, we will be looking for it.

brooklyn-street-art-isaac-cordal-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Isaac Cordal (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-Niels-Shoe-Meulman-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Niels Show Meulman (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-nafir-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Nafir (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-john-fekner-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

John Fekner (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-blek-le-rat-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Blek le Rat (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dan-witz-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Dan Witz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-blu-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Site of an old piece by BLU (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dieche-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Dieche (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-hush-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

HUSH (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dolk-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Dolk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-strok-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Strok (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-roa-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-pleghm-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

The remnants of a Phlegm piece from a previous edition of Nuart. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

 

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
What’s The Word, Bird? Fine Feathered Friends Soar On The Street

What’s The Word, Bird? Fine Feathered Friends Soar On The Street

It’s a convivial if embarrassing juxtaposition when you witness a bird in flight in this brutish man-made city environment, so unrefined are all of our efforts next to his. He rewards us with a song or a soaring performance in air, and despite our heavy slow selves anchored to this pavement, we shield the sun with our hand and follow him with our eyes, paying some respect for his gift and his splendor.

brooklyn-street-art-mata-ruda-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Mata Ruda. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Another crosses his path mid-air. Her wings are so tempered and fine, allowing her to glide with grace, cutting across the chorus of perpendicular and parallel lines, shapes, and epochs that rise and fall and crash clumsily into one another in this hard-edged city.

How do they do it, these birds – especially when it seems like we do very little to help them? Why do they persist in this city that seems often to be unconscious of nature? Is it just our nature to be so unconscious? They should have abandoned us long ago. Yet they persist, and Street Artists here pay them tribute for all that they give us.

Is this a tone on tone Various & Gould?

Unknown artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Fly on, sea-birds! fly sideways, or wheel in large circles high in the air,” says Walt Whitman as he crosses on the Brooklyn Ferry.

brooklyn-street-art-miss-van-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Miss Van. Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Emily Dickenson writes,
“A Bird came down the Walk —
He did not know I saw —
He bit an Angleworm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw,”

brooklyn-street-art-wing-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-2

Wing (photo © Jaime Rojo)

And William Blake paints a couple as love birds here:

“He. O thou summer’s harmony,
I have liv’d and mourn’d for thee;
Each day I mourn along the wood,
And night hath heard my sorrows loud.

She. Dost thou truly long for me?
And am I thus sweet to thee?
Sorrow now is at an end,
O my Lover and my Friend!

He. Come, on wings of joy we’ll fly
To where my bower hangs on high;
Come, and make thy calm retreat
Among green leaves and blossoms sweet.”

brooklyn-street-art-wing-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-1

Wing (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-3

Goslings taking in the graffiti.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-daleast-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

DalEast in Rochester, NY for Wall Therapy. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-li-hill-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Li-Hill for the Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-1

A passenger pigeon waiting for the J train. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

These pigeons appeared on the streets of NYC at the onset of Summer. Was it an ad campaign? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-1

Faith47 for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-3

Faith47 for Wall Therapy in Rochester, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-2

Faith47 for The L.I.S.A. Project in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-2

A Robin on a fence in Manhattan. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ka-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

KA for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-blanca-blanca-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Blanca . Blanca (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-skirl-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Skirl (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-eder-muniz-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Eder Muniz in Rochester, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-mr-prvrt-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-1

Mr. PRVRT (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-mr-prvrt-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-2

Mr. PRVRT (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-4

Two sets of Cardinals in Central Park in January 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

This article is also published on The Huffington Post

Brooklyn-Street-Art-74-copyright-Jaime-Rojo-Birds-Huffpost-Aug-2015-Screen-Shot-2015-08-26-at-7.15.36-PM

Please follow and like us:
Read more
LoMan Art Festival Launches Its First Blast in NYC

LoMan Art Festival Launches Its First Blast in NYC

In a Street Art story rich with irony, Lower Manhattan has just hosted its first official mural festival.

brooklyn-street-art-invader-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Space Invader (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

It’s not that the island has been bereft of murals of late – the Los Muros Hablan festival in Harlem has been through a couple of iterations way uptown, Brooklyn has the Bushwick Collective, and Queens has been hosting the Welling Court Project.

The irony lies in the fact that this Lower Manhattan Arts Festival (LoMan) is really the first codified effort to highlight the work of graffiti and Street Art creators in a section of NYC known from the 1970s-90s for the free-range street stylings of artists like Jean Michel Basquiat, Al Diaz, Keith Haring, Dan Witz, Jenny Holzer, Richard Hambleton, John Fekner, WK Interact, REVS/Cost, and artist collectives like AVANT, among many others.

brooklyn-street-art-Andrew-Tider-Jeff-Greenspan-edward-snowden-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

A major coup of sorts, LoMan exhibited the sculpture of NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden that mysteriously showed up in a New York park this spring by Andrew Tider and Jeff Greenspan (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

In other words, on this baked concrete slab of downtown New York that was once a creative cesspool and Petri dish for on-the-street experimentation calling upon all manner of art making, today’s newly arriving young artists have no dream of moving in. In fact, most have fled in search of affordable rent.

Now the entrepreneurial spirit of a couple of guys, Wayne Rada and Rey Rosa, is luring artists back into Lower Manhattan, if only to paint a mural and help the tourist trade in Little Italy. That is how the L.I.S.A. Project (Little Italy Street Art) began three years ago, bringing in about 40 artists – a list that includes big names and small with varying degrees of influence on the current scene.

brooklyn-street-art-dain-jaime-rojo-08-02-15-web

Dain and Stikki Peaches (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Despite the historically inhospitable demeanor of hard-bitten and often bureaucratic old New York greeting him at many junctures, Rada has had some measured and great successes along the way, convincing local wall owners to give a  mural a try and raising funding from local businesses and art fans to help artists go larger.

So LoMan Fest’s first edition has finished this year, and along with a few volunteers, a smattering of helpful partners, and nearly continuous negotiations with local building owners, art supply companies, cherry picker rentals, and a collection of local and international artists, Rada and Rosa have pulled off a new event. Impressively it included large murals, smaller street installations, a couple of panel discussions, some live music performances, outdoor film screenings, a sticker battle, a live painting battle, live podcasts, a graffiti zine table, and a sculpture garden in an emptied parking lot on Mulberry Street.

brooklyn-street-art-damien-mitchell-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Damien Mitchell (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Struggle would be a good word. But like anything else when you are starting something for the first time you are spending a lot of time putting systems in place,” says Rada of the process. “There have been interesting challenges with the building owners and with the artists but when it is all said and done it has been all worth it.”

For a scene that was initiated by autonomous un-permissioned art-making on private property, the process of organizing graffiti and Street Artists to do approved pieces on legal walls may try the patience of the rebels who look on mural festivals as lacking ‘street cred’. But Rada sees it differently.

brooklyn-street-art-Tatyana-Fazlalizadeh-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-1

Tatyana Fazlalizadeh expands on her campaign with brand new portraits for “Stop Telling Women to Smile.” (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

“You know there are people in this world that don’t appreciate this and I just want people to enjoy the pieces as long as they can. Isn’t the fun part of street art that moment when you turn the corner and discover it? That’s really what we are trying to do here. For me it’s a collaborative process of trying to find them a spot – which is also normally something bigger where they can take their time and really think it out. In turn, when that work is complete their existing fans enjoy it, and also it helps them get new fans.”

brooklyn-street-art-Tatyana-Fazlalizadeh-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-2

Tatyana Fazlalizadeh (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

A final irony is that LoMan is joining a long list of Street Art-inspired mural festivals worldwide that you might have thought New York would have been near the front of.

Brooklyn Street Art: I imagine you’ve seen the rise of Street Art festivals and you’ve seen the character perhaps of specific festivals in different parts of the world. Do you think there is something specific about New York’s current Street Art scene that has a personality or specific voice?
Wayne Rada: First of all I studied every single festival out there from Pow! Wow! to Nuart, every single one. I’ve also had conversations with people who coordinate those festivals so that I could do a better job with this. I just feel like New York is, and this is grandiose to say, the nexus of the universe for the art world. It just seemed there was something missing and it made sense to have something here.”

brooklyn-street-art-Tatyana-Fazlalizadeh-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-3

Tatyana Fazlalizadeh (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Given the history and the populations of NYC, maybe the strength is the diversity of styles and international artists who are drawn to this particular city to drop a piece throughout the year on rooftops, under bridges, on abandoned lots and doorways. After a minute, Rada decides that this may be what makes a festival like this distinctly New York.

“So in the art world there are so many artists and there are so many Street Artists – and Lower Manhattan especially is represented by something like 126 different cultures and many different races and languages that make up downtown,” he says, “so it makes sense to try to be as diverse as possible and have as many of those voices represented as we could – men and women, all ages, and all walks of life.”

Here’s your first look at LoMan, but it won’t be your last. Rada and Rosa tell us they already have 2016 all planned.

brooklyn-street-art-art-is-trash-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-2

Art Is Trash typically uses actual trash found on the street to create impromptu dioramas (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-art-is-trash-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-1

Art Is Trash (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ron-english-jaime-rojo-08-02-15-web

Ron English added a pink “Temper Tot” shortly before LoMan commenced. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-venus-nicolas-holiber-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Nicolas Holiber uses found wood to create a new “Venus” (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-mars-nicolas-holiber-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Nicolas Holiber. “Mars” (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-hanksy-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Hanksy (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-sonni-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Sonni (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ray-rosa-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

The DRiF pimping a statue of David. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-russell-murphy-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

As in “The Lower East Side” by Russell Murphy (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

Faith47 (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-buff-monster-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-1

Buff Monster (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-buff-monster-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web-2

Buff Monster (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-bd-white-JPart-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

BD White and JP Art (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Gilf! (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ori-carino-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Ori Carino (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-leon-reid-iv-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

A new sculpture by Leon Reid IV (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-tats-crew-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

Tats Cru in monochrome (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-j-morello-lomanart-fest-jaime-rojo-08-15-web

J Morello (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

At press time the works of ASVP, Beau Stanton, Crash, Solus and Ludo were either not completed or had just begun. We’ll bring you these pieces on a later article.

To learn more about the LoManArt Fest click HERE

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

This article is also published on The Huffington Post

Brooklyn-Street-Art-740-copyright-Jaime-Rojo-Invader-Loman-Fest-Huffpost-Screen-Shot-2015-08-12-at-10.57.38-AM

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 08.09.15

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.09.15

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-sean9-lugo-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web-2

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

You can feel it rippling through the streets, the impact of one strong piece after another beguiling and besting your expectations. And that’s just the organic free-range un-permissioned stuff.

The LoMan Festival is enjoying its first official edition, continuing today so you may want to head to Little Italy to see the Secret Walls battle in the lot and Cosbe surfing across a tidal wave of stickers that he and the 200-strong sticker club have procured. The festival itself is a zany mix of music, comedy, street art, murals, and live performance – you’ll probably dig it.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Apple on Pictures, Dasic, Faith47, Gold Luxe, Hunt, JR, Mint & Serf, Mr. Toll, Olek, Phoebe New York, Sean9Lugo, Solus, The Dingle Lane, and Urban Fish.

Top image above >>> Sean9Lugo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-sean9-lugo-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web-1

Sean9Lugo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web

Faith47 in Williamsburg. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-jr-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web-2

JR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-jr-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web-1

JR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web-4

A well-placed speech bubble in the subway. Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-dasic-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web

Dasic (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-hunt-jaime-rojo-08-02-15-web

Hunt (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-mr-toll-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web

Hot enough out here to fry an egg on the street. Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-mint-serf-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web

Mint & Serf (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web-2

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web-3

Artist Unknown (with an old coming apart piece by Jana & JS on the left). (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-apple-on-pictures-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web

Apple On Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-the-dingle-lane-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web

The Dingle Lane (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-urban-fish-jaime-rojo-08-02-15-web

Urban Fish (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web-1

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-gold-loxe-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web-1

Gold Loxe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-gold-loxe-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web-2

Gold Loxe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-olek-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web-1

Olek’s transformation of the Jan Karski sculpture in front of the Polish Consulate in NYC has been a very meaningful project for the artist. It is her goal to draw attention to the work of this WWII war resister and the heroic acts he took to save persecuted people during the Holocaust. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-olek-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web-2

Olek’s transformation of the Jan Karski sculpture in front of the Polish Consulate in NYC. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-phoebe-new-york-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web

Phoebe New York is playing with perspectives in a minimalist collage very effectively (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-solus-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web

Solus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-street-art-jaime-rojo-08-09-15-web

Untitled. Brooklyn, NY. July 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 07.19.15

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.19.15

brooklyn-street-art-marina-capdevila-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

Chomp chomp, slurp slurp, spraaaaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyy spray sp sp sp spraaayyyyyyyyyy. The sounds of a sidewalk barbecue and painting a new piece on a wall on a hot July day in Brooklyn. Also honking, screeching, sirens, and Action Bronson, Hot Chip, or Major Lazer pumping out the windows of a passing car. Want a cherry popsicle?

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring $howta, Barlo, BD White, Brad Robson, DAIN, Dee Dee, Denton Burrows, Faith47, Fin DAC, Jack Fox, Jorit Agoch, LOMNOPI, JPO, London Kaye, Marina Capdevila, Skirl, Sosta, and Zimer.

Top image above >>> Marina Capdevila (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-findac-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

Findac does a B-Girl in BK (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-lmnopi-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

Faith47 for The L.I.S.A. Project (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-shota-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

$howta (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-zimer-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

Zimer (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-skirl-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

Skirl (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-london-kaye-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

London Kaye (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-bdwhite-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

BD White collab with JPO. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jpoart-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

BD White collab with JPO. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jack-fox-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

Jack Fox for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-denton-burrows-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

Including traffic. Denton Burrows (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dee-dee-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

Dee Dee. We think the stache came later… (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-brad-robson-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

Brad Robson at Woodward Project Space. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-artist-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

Peace (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

I never go outside unless I look like Joan Crawford the movie star. If you want to see the girl next door, go next door.” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-barlo-sosta-hong-kong-07-19-15-web

Barlo and Sosta collaborate in Hong Kong. (photo ©  Barlo)

brooklyn-street-art-dain-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

Dain is ripping things up. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jorit-agoch-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

Jorit Agoch for The Bushwick Collective. Last Sunday we published a process shot. Here is the completed mural. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-07-19-15-web

Untitled. New York City. July 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 07.05.15

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.05.15

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-07-05-15-web-3

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

This 4th of July holiday weekend in New York is alive with art on the streets, on roofs, on stoops, in parks, on piers.  And run down back lots, tunnels, abandoned spots. Check your local listings.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring ARC, BAST, Bibbito, Bifido, Cash4, Clint Mario, Don John, Entes y Pesimo, Faith47, JR, Keely, Smells, The Yok, and WK Interact.

Top image above >>> Faith47 for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-07-05-15-web-1

Faith47 for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-07-05-15-web-2

Faith47 for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-07-05-15-web

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jr-jaime-rojo-07-05-15-web

JR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-bifido-sicily-07-15-15-web-1

Bifido in Sicily, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

brooklyn-street-art-bifido-sicily-07-15-15-web-2

Bifido in Sicily, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

brooklyn-street-art-bast-jaime-rojo-07-05-15-web

Bast and his outsider art (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-don-john-copenhagen-07-15-15-web

Don John in Copenhagen. (photo © John Don)

brooklyn-street-art-wk-interact-jaime-rojo-07-05-15-web

WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-the-yok-jaime-rojo-07-05-15-web

The Yok (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-arc-jaime-rojo-07-05-15-web

Arc (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-smells-jaime-rojo-07-05-15-web

Smells (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-clint-mario-jaime-rojo-07-05-15-web

Clint Mario (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-cash4-jaime-rojo-07-05-15-web

Cash4 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-bibbito-reggio-Emilia-italy-07-15-15-web-1

Bibbito. Reggio Emilia, Italy. (photo © Bibbito)

brooklyn-street-art-bibbito-reggio-Emilia-italy-07-15-15-web-2

Bibbito. Detail. (photo © Bibbito)

brooklyn-street-art-entes-pesimo-austtria-linz-philipp-greindl-07-15-15-web-3

Entes y Pesimo for Inoperable Gallery. Linz, Austria. (photo © Philipp Greindl)

brooklyn-street-art-entes-pesimo-austtria-linz-philipp-greindl-07-15-15-web-2

Entes y Pesimo for Inoperable Gallery. Linz, Austria. (photo © Philipp Greindl)

brooklyn-street-art-entes-pesimo-austtria-linz-philipp-greindl-07-15-15-web-1

Entes y Pesimo for Inoperable Gallery. Linz, Austria. (photo © Philipp Greindl)

brooklyn-street-art-deeker-jaime-rojo-07-05-15-web

Keely (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-4th-july-2015-jaime-rojo-web

Untitled. Williamsburg, Brooklyn. July 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Street Art Sancocho : “ArteSano Project” Brings Dominican Flavor (VIDEO)

Street Art Sancocho : “ArteSano Project” Brings Dominican Flavor (VIDEO)

New Year, new mural festival! 

Truthfully, the appearance of new mural festivals today is faster than annual – it’s more like quarterly – but this one in the Dominican Republic was inaugurated three weeks ago and brings a certain hand crafted authenticity that holds promise for its future.

brooklyn-street-art-jade-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web-3

Jade. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

“ArteSano Project” gives you an indication of the personal nature of the art you are likely to see from the 25 local and international artists invited to Rio San Juan from December 11-22.  It could be the name influencing our perception, but in one way or another it looks like these artists are chosen for their down-to-earth hand hewn approach. Sometimes  decorative, sometimes storytelling, there are familiar themes and motifs that play well to their local audience as well as the virtual gawker.

Even with two dozen artists, it isn’t bloated: no logos or product tie-ins or DJs or high flying scissor lifts scaling massive multi-story walls with abstract surrealism, hyper photo-realism or dark pop human/animal/robot hybrids here – yet. Well, we take that back on the surrealism score; Pixel Pancho is here with a brood of chickens bobbing their industrial mesh necks atop fired tile bodices, hunting and pecking their way toward the beach, and Miami artist duo 2alas & Hox created a portrait of a boy with a partial mask overlay that calls to mind cyborgs (and Sten & Lex). But here in the loungey bare-foot tropical DR coastal area, even Pixel Pancho mutes the hues toward sun-bleached pastels, more easily complimenting their surroundings.

brooklyn-street-art-jade-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web-1

Jade. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

Free-running fowl overtook a few artists thematically, including another international artist who usually paints hybrid forms with dimension and almost mythic metaphor, but who this time tried his hand at something much more folkloric. “Importacion Cultural”, the flatly bright piece by Buenos Aires born Franco “Jaz” Fasoli, presents an entire wall with hand cut and paper collage, adding to the general feeling of approachability, and introducing a form of craft-inspired art-making more common to DIY Street Art of the 2000s than recent aerosol-infused mural festivals.

“The community was transformed during those days and over two weeks they began to see these great artists’ work and create specific pieces in different places around the town,” says Mario E. Ramirez, a Puerto Rican artist who has been documenting and capturing the burgeoning graffiti/Street Art scene in his country and places like DR with his partners at Tost Films. He says that an event like this that connects with a community yields a greater dialogue than some of the more commercial Street Art and graffiti enterprises, because the artists get to interact with neighbors closely. “At the completion of the ArteSano each artist felt like a distinguished guest of Rio San Juan. They made us feel at home, it was one of the best experiences of 2014.”

brooklyn-street-art-jade-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web-2

Jade. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

One of the organizers, Dominican born artist Evoca1, has experience working as a Street Artist as well as bringing actual physical sustenance and support to a community. For about four years the Miami based artist has delivered many meals to folks living on the street with his wife and friends through an organization he began called “Sketches For Mankind.”

With Evoca1 hosting the ArteSano project it became another form of community outreach and the curatorial responsibilities for the public art initiative was offered by the folks at the Vienna based INOPERAbLE Gallery, who have represented a mix of urban artists work including some in this show and others that are range into pop, dark pop, graphic irony, and more “traditional” contemporary Street Art.

brooklyn-street-art-vero-rivera-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Vero Rivera. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

Organizers say they hope that ArteSano gains traction and that people get to know the Dominican Republic as a good place for urban arts and muralism. There is not much transgressive here; With its mix of mainly latin name-brand and local homegrown talent, it looks like ArteSano makes a respectable entry into the international mural festival mileu with what may be the emerging alchemy of the decorative and the pleasing – peppered with some more challenging themes and muted socio-political messages.

Overall no one will argue that Rio San Juan is a great location for a painter or street artist from the northern hemisphere in December. Among the invited artists were BIKISMO, JADE, 2ALAS, HOXXOH, PASTEL, JAZ, EVER, ELIAN, LEO, VERO RIVERA, MODAFOCA, ENTES, FAITH47, AXEL VOID, PIXEL PANCHO, FILIO, ANGURRIA, 3TAMAROOTS, GABZ, POTELECHE, BAD6, SHAK, RUBEN, JOHANN,SEBAS, and PAOLA.

brooklyn-street-art-bikismo-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Bikismo. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-entes-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web-1

Entes. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-entes-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web-2

Entes. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-io-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

IO. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-jaz-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

JAZ. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-elian-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Elian. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-BAD6-SHAK-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

BAD6 . SHAK. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-Fili-2alas-hox-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Fili . 2alas . Hox. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-hoxxoh-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

HOXXOH. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-hoxxoh-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web-2

HOXXOH. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-gabz-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Gabz. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-pixel-pancho-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Pixel Pancho. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-pastel-pixel-pancho-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Pastel . Pixel Pancho. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-pastel-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Pastel. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-moda-foca-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Moda Foca. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-axel-faith47-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Axel . Faith47. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-ever-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Ever. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-johann-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Johann. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-poteleche-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Poteleche. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-3tamaroots-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

3tamaroots. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

 

 

 

Thank you to Mario E Ramirez for his invaluable help to make this article possible for BSA readers.

 

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more