All posts tagged: Almost Over Keep Smiling

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.21.21

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.21.21

Nowruz Mubarak! Happy Persian New Year to all the New York neighbors who celebrate it. Also, Happy Spring! Did you think it would never arrive? Already the birds are chirping in the trees, and the crocus is popping up from beneath the garbage and dog crap. That guy who lives downstairs named Manny and his brother are washing their car on the curb while blasting a mix from Marley Marl & Red Alert at top volume for the block to enjoy. All the while, there is a colorful parade of young bucks and shorties who are strutting around the neighborhood with big eyes and a burning flame of hope in their hearts.

Another reason Brooklyn is feeling hopeful is the announcement Friday by Chuck Schumer saying that New York is to get 1.6 million COVID shots every week thanks to a ‘vaccine supercharge.’ One year after the sounds of ambulances filled the air and refrigerator trucks became mobile morgues on Brooklyn streets, people are eagerly running to pharmacies and Yankee Stadium and Citi Field to get the shot.

New Yorkers are also taking to the streets to protest Anti-Asian discrimination and violence locally and nationally. Many point to Trump’s use of the term “Chinese Virus” repeatedly in the last year as a direct causal relationship to increased acts of prejudice. But once again, New Yorkers know how to re-enforce the message: “United we stand, divided we fall.” As a New Yorker and as a person, it makes you feel proud.

Finally, street art is popping off in all kinds of stylistic and thematic directions this week – from the secular American saint, Dolly Parton, posed as a vaccine nurse by SacSix, to Sticker Maul’s Priority Mail collages, to Winston Tseng’s subtle and damning phone booth campaign of Walmart and McDonald’s workers who represent our formerly middle-class neighbors who are paid so little that they actually qualify for food stamps.

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring: Almost Over Keep Smiling, City Kitty, D7606, Damien Mitchell, Ethan Minsker, Invader, LET, Matt Siren, Mort Art, NET, Rambo, Raw Raffle, Royce Bannon, SacSix, Sara Lynne Leo, Sticker Maul, Tram, Voxx Romana, and Winston Tseng.

SacSix (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Damien Mitchell (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tram (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Invader (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sticker Maul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sticker Maul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rambo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mort Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A Cat called LET (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ethan Minsker (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Matt Siren . Royce Bannon (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raw Raffe (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty. Vox Romana. D7606 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Daniel Mastrion (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Manhattan, NYC. March 2021.(photo © Jaime Rojo)
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COVID-19 365 Days Later; Art in the Streets That Narrated a Pandemic

COVID-19 365 Days Later; Art in the Streets That Narrated a Pandemic

What the hell just happened? Has it been a year? Or has it been 10 years? Or just one long nightmare/daymare? Or has it been 10 years? Did we already ask that?

In March 2020 we awoke to a world that was transforming before all of our eyes, yet we felt so cut-off from it and each other. The first days seem so long ago as we mark the first anniversary of the pandemic. Still, the initial shock of those days resonates in our chests so strongly that we confidently talk about a collective global trauma that has indelibly marked a generation.

Pobel. Stavanger, Norway. March 14, 2020. (photo © Tore Stale Moen)

From Stockholm to Mexico City to Barcelona to Bethlehem to New York to LA, BSA brought you street art that was responding with fear, derision, critique, hope, and humor to the never-static, always evolving barrage of Covid news. Stuck inside and afraid to expose ourselves to each other, we New Yorkers became accustomed to experiencing the outdoors only through our windows, connecting with neighbors we’ve never met who were also banging pots and pans or clapping and waving and yelling.

We listened to ambulances screaming past our windows every half hour or so during those first weeks, imagining the torn families, the terrified fellow New Yorkers now being rushed to the hospital and separated from their loved ones without a goodbye, gasping for air. We wondered if we would be next.

Jilly Ballistic and Sack Six. Manhattan, NYC. March 23, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

When we did go to the streets, they were empty – or nearly. In New York this was unheard of. In this bustling, noisy metropolis, we experienced a daily disconcerting quiet. That is, until the killing of George Floyd by cops finally pushed the anger/anxiety into the streets all summer.

The deadly hotspot of New York quelled, but the fires of Covid spread west, grabbing communities who thought they would avoid impact. At the same time, local, state, and national leaders fumbled and argued or famously callously ignored the desperation of citizens, occasionally admirably filling the shoes they were elected to occupy, often misstepping through no fault of their own.

Pure Genius. Manhattan, NYC. March 23, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We have no particular wisdom to offer you today beyond the obvious; this pandemic laid bare inequity, social and racial and class fault-lines, the shredded social net, the effect of institutional negligence, the ravages of 40 years of corporate privatization, and the power of community rising to the occasion to be in service to one another in ways that made us all more than proud.

Here are some of our favorite Covid-themed street art pieces from over the last year, a mere sampling of the artistic responses. Interspersed we paste screenshots of the daily events (via Wikipedia) in 2020 that shaped our lives, and our society.

We mourn the losses of family and friends and the broken hearts and minds in all of our communities. And we still believe in the power of art to heal and the power of love to balance our asymmetries.

Trusto Corp. Los Angeles, CA. March 26, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Lapiz. Hamburg, Germany. March 30th, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Tag Street Art. Tel-Aviv, Israel. March 31, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Phlegm. April 6, 2020. London, UK. (photo courtesy of the artist) Phlegm created a visual diary of his experience with the Pandemic. We published his diary HERE
Don Langrend for USA Today Network. On April 13, 2020, we published a compilation of political cartoons with views on the Pandemic. Click HERE to see the whole collection.
Alessio-B. Padua, Italy. April 15, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Banksy. London, UK. April 19, 2020. (photo Instagram)
Shepard Fairey. Los Angeles, CA. April 20, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Banksy “The Girl with a Pierced Eardrum” Bristol, UK. April 23, 2020. (photo © Reuters/Rebecca Naden)
Cake Stencils. Bethlehem, Israel. May 10, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Almost Over Keep Smiling. Manhattan, NY. May 15, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captain Eyeliner. Manhattan, NY. May 15, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SacSix. Manhattan, NY. May 15, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Oliver Rios. May 15, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Teo Vazquez. Barcelona, Spain. May 25, 2020. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Adam Fujita. Brooklyn, NYC. May 25, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada. Queens, NYC. June 2nd. 2020. (photo © Just A Spectator)
Russian Doll NY. Manhattan, NYC. June 6, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Gianni Lee. Manhattan, NYC. June 13, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Various & Gould. Berlin, Germany. June 19, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artists)
Sara Lynne-Leo. Manhatttan, NYC. June 27, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stikman. Manhatttan, NYC. June 27, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentifed artist. Brooklyn, NYC. July 18, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
De Grupo. Manhattan, NYC. August 1, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sticker Maul. Manhatttan, NYC. August 6, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fintan Magee. Queensland, Australia. August 16, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Persak. San Miguel De Allende, Mexico. August 23, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Novy. Manhatttan, NYC. August 29, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Asbestos. Cork, Ireland. September 8, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
1111 Army. Brooklyn, NYC. September 12, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Brooklyn, NYC. September 12, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raddington Falls. Manhattan, NYC. September 26, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Faust. Manhattan, NYC. September 26, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pure Genius. Manhattan, NYC. October 31, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
I Heart Graffiti. Manhattan, NYC. November 14, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
UFO 907 in collab with MUK 123. Manhattan, NYC. December 15, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Creator. Manhattan, NYC. December 28, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty. Manhattan, NYC. December 28, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Karma. Barcelona, Spain. January 4, 2020. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Pobel. Stavanger, Norway. February 11, 2021. (photo © Tore Stale Moen)
Aya Brown. Brooklyn, NYC. February 27, 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Manhattan, NYC. March 06, 2021 (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Paolo Tolentino. Manhattan, NYC. March 07, 2021 (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Manhattan, NYC. March 07, 2021 (photo @ Jaime Rojo)

As NYC went on complete lock-down and New Yorkers were ordered to remain in their homes in complete isolation the city’s residents organically joined together in a collective 7:00 pm ritual in support to the first responders. To the nurses, doctors, paramedics, trash collectors, public transportation, police, fire fighters, supermarkets workers etc…with their services and sacrifices we, the residents of this megalopolis were able to keep out hopes for brighter days to come.

Video of four former presidents urging people to “roll up your sleeve and do your part” and get the vaccine.

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BSA Images Of The Week: 09.06.20

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.06.20

Anarchists and lawlessness on the streets of New York? Where are you looking exactly? This is a narrative that charlatans like to slander our fair city with, where we spent 8 hours hanging out on blankets on the grass yesterday in Prospect Park, performing anarchist acts like eating sandwiches, reading books, taking naps, going for walks with thousands of our neighbors. So far this is one of the most beautiful Labor Day Weekends we’ve seen in ages and there was no army present.

Every time the fearmonger’s from outside of NYC try to scare people into voting for something, you have to be amused by their ignorance and obvious disinformation – and wonder if it isn’t a generalized fear of black and brown people that drives their critiques. Maybe they are fearful that New Yorkers are the most ethnically diverse population in the country and we are always getting along just fine with each other, even liking and loving each other on a daily basis and we have been doing so for years. Gorgeous and expansively green Prospect Park in the middle of Brooklyn is a fine example of it this weekend – you’ll see people of many backgrounds hanging out happily and civilly, barbecuing meats and vegetables, playing volleyball with the youth group, tossing the frisbee with their girlfriend, sitting on blankets and playing board games with their kids and neighbors, helping babies take their first steps, helping grandpa into a folding chair.

We didn’t see one fight or argument Saturday, and the park was completely teeming with people, and we saw maybe one or two police officers throughout all day – because apparently tens of thousands of us co-New Yorkers know how to enjoy a sunny day in the park with each other and without invoking chaos. On blankets, in lawn chairs, on picnic tables – there we all were; Indians, Africans, Mexicans, Germans, Italians, Jews, Conservatives, Liberals, Koreans, Chinese, Europeans, Buddists, LGBTQI, singles, couples, families, church groups – too many to list here. You could see all kinds of different foods if you walked around and heard music being played – some of it live and spontaneous, like the Dixieland jazz band, the violin quartet, the guy on the flute. We love New York and we love New Yorkers more than ever before.

So, no, Mike Huckleberry or the Foxes or the Divider in Chief, we don’t fall for it because we know the great people of our city. Scare people in the middle of the country with stories about lawlessness in our city, but you don’t fool us for a second. For the record, 93% of the Black Lives Matter marches across the country this year have been peaceful. We’re all capable of having the hard conversations, despite what you and your networks want people to believe – New York has been proving that for years. Sorry, society is moving on – or in many cases already has moved on – from the cultural hegemony phase. It ain’t perfect, but Jesus sometimes it can feel like it.

And now some street art images recently shot – our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Almost Over Keep Smiling, Antennae, Damon NYC, JKos Art, Little Ricky, Raw, Stikman, and Urban Russian Doll NYC.

Alt-right symbol sticker – Pepe the Frog with Q Anon eyes, is smacked over a happy cat – alongside “Help Each Other.” Unidentified artists (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JKos Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Urban Russian Doll NYC for East Village Walls (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Antennae brings the much feared Asian Killer Hornet to NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
RAW (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist on a fence in the park (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Damon NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 08.16.20

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.16.20

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week. Kamala and identity politics are IN, workers are OUT, and the US Postal Service is being dissembled before our eyes. Are we supposed to find a light-hearted rejoinder to this news?

Let’s see what the streets are telling us.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Almost Over Keep Smiling, Billy Barnacles, Gianni Lee, City Kitty, CRKSHNK, Early Riser NYC, Seven Line Arts Studio, M*Code, Ori Carino, Sticker Maul, Turtle Caps, Urban Russian Doll NYC, and You Go Girl!

Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sticker Maul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ori Carino. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ori Carino (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
7 Line Arts Studio (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Early Riser NYC for East Village Walls (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty in collaboration with Turtle Caps. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty . Turtle Caps (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Urban Russian Doll NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
No Sleep (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
M*Code in collaboration with crkshnk. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Billy Barnacles (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Gianni Lee (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
You Go Girl (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Williamsburg, Brooklyn. August 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 07.26.20

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.26.20

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week.

A painted portrait of Emmett Till, who would have turned 79 yesterday, leads the collection of images this week. A 14 year old sweet faced boy who was brutally mutilated and killed in Mississippi by white men in 1955 for allegedly flirting with a white woman. He was a year younger than representative John Lewis, who was eulogized rest yesterday in Alabama and will lay in state at the Capitol this week. Our legacy of racism haunts us just as abhorrently this summer as it did sixty-five years ago, two hundred years ago…

But in many ways, you have to suspect that these raucous cries are the dying wheezing of racists who have lost the argument and frankly demographics, and it frightens them. They know that the new generations don’t support them, actually resist against them, are determined to light a new path toward reconciliation and healing and equality.

Covid-19 is out of control in the United States thanks to the utter mis-management and lack of leadership in the country. Yesterday, “150 medical experts, scientists and other health professionals signed a letter organized by a prominent consumer group and delivered to government leaders Thursday calling for new shutdowns to bring case counts down and ‘hit the reset button’ to implement a more effective response.” They forecast that we are going to hit 200,000 deaths by November 1.”

Conversely, and indicative of how well Europe has been handling this virus, this week a Berlin court rules BDSM parlours can open as long as everyone wear masks.

As that showtune-singing satirist Randy Rainbow belted out this week, “We’re in Hell, We’re in Hell, We’re in Hell Hell Hell”.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Almost Over Keep Smiling, Billy Barnacles, Catt Caulley, Dyne Elis, Knor, Koffee Creative, Liza and the Clouds, Lorena Tabba, Maya Hayuk, Oliver Rios, One Rad Latina, Ron Haywood Jones, Siva Stardust, Snoe, and Zalv.

Liza And The Clouds, Catt Caulley #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Maya Hayuk, Snoe. #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Oliver Rios (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Siva Stardust (photo © Jaime Rojo)
#blacktranslivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist on the left. #blacklivesmatter Poem on the right by Dyme Elis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Is anyone else thinking about Pink Floyd right now? Lorena Tabba (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Koffee Creative (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Zalv (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ron Haywood Jones brings his
American Urbanite to the street. #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Billy Barnacle (photo © Jaime Rojo)
One Rad Latina (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Knor. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Knor (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 07.19.20

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.19.20

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week. The weather has been beautiful in NYC and the organic art popping up on the streets is still forcefully advocating for social and political solutions amidst great upheaval, even while…

Police groups want to paint a ‘Blue Lives Matter’ street mural in New York City, Federal officers are using unmarked cars to arrest Portland protesters, Trump Administration Strips CDC of Control of Coronavirus Data, Governor Cuomo Announces $1.5 Million for ‘Feeding New York State’ to Assist Food Insecure New Yorkers and State’s Farmers, 5.4 million have lost health insurance , Biden will not support Medicare for All and Liz Cheney joins forces with Nancy Pelosi to ensure taxes go to fund endless war in Afghanistan after 19 years.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Adam Fujita, Almost Over Keep Smiling, Billie Barnacles, Black Lives Matter, Bosko, Detor, Downtown DaVinci, Eric Haze, Fumero, Insurgo, Marco Santini, Marina Zumi, Praxis VGZ, Sara Lynne Leo, and Who is Dirk.

“I consider this mural a gift to New York City and a gift to the world,” says Eric Haze of this design he created in response to the killing of George Floyd and the ensuing Black Lives Matter protests in our city and across many others. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Adam Fujita (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Adam Fujita (photo © Jaime Rojo)
July For Art . #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
#blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Billie Barnacles (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Billie Barnacles (photo © Jaime Rojo)
“Don’t talk about it…. Be about it ! ” Detor . Bosko (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Downtown DaVinci (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Praxis for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Who Is Dirk . Insurgo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Marco Santini for The Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fumero (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The New York street artist who works under the moniker “Almost Over Keep Smiling” reinterprets slightly this Boston warning poster telling anybody who was black in a “free” state like Massachusetts or New York to stay away from the police because the federal government had passed a law empowering people to capture them and return them to slavery.

From Wikipedia: The Fugitive Slave Act or Fugitive Slave Law was passed by the United States Congress on September 18, 1850,[1] as part of the Compromise of 1850 between Southern slave-holding interests and Northern Free-Soilers.

The Act was one of the most controversial elements of the 1850 compromise and heightened Northern fears of a “slave power conspiracy”. It required that all escaped slaves, upon capture, be returned to their masters and that officials and citizens of free states had to cooperate. Abolitionists nicknamed it the “Bloodhound Bill,” for the dogs that were used to track down runaway slaves.[2]

The Act contributed to the growing polarization of the country over the issue of slavery, and is considered one of the causes of the Civil War.

The original appearance of a poster in Boston looked like this.
Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Marina Zumi (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Central Park, NYC. July 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 06.21.20

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.21.20

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week and welcome to summer in NYC here on its 2nd day. Also Happy Father’s Day in the US.

Juneteenth. White Fragility. Defund the Police. How to Be an Antiracist. All of these new terms and phrases erupting on the main stage of the public lexicon today speak to a fundamental disgust with the system that’s been in effect. As uncomfortable as it may be, our better selves know that the conversations and changes that have started are vitally necessary to have if we ever want to move forward as a society.

Right now in New York people are marching, protesting, drinking on the street, setting off fireworks, and holding doors open for one another with a new sensitivity thanks to internal bruising. We also see people disregarding safety precautions in the spread of Covid-19, and honking their car horns more often.

All of this is against a backdrop of Americans being unceremoniously slid into poverty and unheard of unemployment, with nary a mention in the national media and near silence from both national parties. It’s good to know that the LGBTQ can’t get fired for being LGBTQ, and children of undocumented immigrants born here will be protected under DACA. Unfortunately there are no jobs!

But on the streets, the messages and the energy and the defiance and determination and the comedy are all there, running on the hot pavement.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Almost Over Keep Smiling, Cash4, Chris Tuorto, C0rn Queen, Crisp, KAWS, Menacersa, Nico, Skewville, Smells, and Tag Street Art.

Chris Tuorto #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
#blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
#blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
#blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
#juneteenth (photo © Jaime Rojo)
#TAG in Tel-Aviv. #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mena-Ceresa. #blacklivesmatter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CASH SMELLS (photo © Jaime Rojo)
C0rn Queen (photo © Jaime Rojo)
NICO (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Crisp / Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)
KAWS (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Williamsburg, Brooklyn. June 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)


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BSA Images Of The Week: 05.31.20 / Dispatch From Isolation # 70

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.31.20 / Dispatch From Isolation # 70

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week.

The streets are alive with street art and pointed political protest. NYC citizens are joining the cities and communities across the country who are demonstrating furiously over the newest examples of systemic, latent, and explicit racism and police brutality that have characterized our society for so long. Of course it’s just one fire that has been waiting to spark as economic conditions run parallel with social inequity. In the face of sky-high unemployment, unpaid rents, increasing food insecurity, a “rescue” program that gave the store to the rich, and the ever-growing gap between hyper-rich and the chronically poor/ newly poor, the summer here looks like it could be torrid.

We won’t need or see a large number of street art festivals for a while. This show of politically/socially inspired artworks and text messages is probably just warming up on the streets and you can imagine that artists won’t find it appealing to be sitting on panels and pontificating about the genesis of mark-making, the original roots of punk anarchy, or how they are incorporating being woke or inter-sectionalism into their “street practice”. The creative class, however you define it, has suffered a huge blow and many are out of work, and patience. Based on what we have been witnessing here these past few weeks, you may predict that the more aesthetically inclined will seize the opportunity to make art for the city, on the city.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring 1UP Crew, Adam Fujita, Almost Over Keep Smiling, Billy Barnacles, Combo-CK, Denis Ouch, Indecline, Jason Naylor, Lunge Box, Matt Siren, Mr. Toll, and Woof Original.

Adam Fujita (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A literal manifestation of conversations on the street. This campaign addressing the Hong Kong pro-democracy movement is answered with spray painted x’s and attempts to rip down the posters. Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Matt Siren (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Matt Siren (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A very pink Superman has a roll of toilet paper on his chest. Denis Ouch (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lunge Box (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HOPE (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Indecline (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Billy Barnacles (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Billy Barnacles (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Should patriarchy in the Catholic church be replaced by matriarchy? Is it a matter of empowerment for women to assume the highest positions of power in religious orders? Or have those establishments become discredited too much already? The French street artist Combo CK wheatpasted these holy women in Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Woof Original (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Who you lookin’ at? Mr. Toll, surely you aren’t saying that Brooklyn is ugly, are you? (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Spring 2020. Queens, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 05.17.20 / Dispatch From Isolation # 56

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.17.20 / Dispatch From Isolation # 56

Times are tough but so are you.

Such a New York sentiment and at the heart of it we believe in our fellow New Yorkers and people in general to pull through this series of cavalcading catastrophes that are befalling us as many of our would-be leaders stand by and watch.

“Times are tough..” – It’s also a new piece this week on BSA Images of the Week from Captain Eyeliner. Let’s look for common ground, fundamental fairness and a common dream – without being tricked into fighting each other.

Meanwhile here’s some of the genius and humorous works this week on New York streets (and one from Tel Aviv), as we nurse our wounds and mourn our dead, and praise our nurses – and so many others. Hang tough people!

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Adam Fujita, Almost Over Keep Smiling, Billy Barnacles, Captain Eyeliner, CRKSNK, Lunge Box, Maya Hayuk, Merk, No Sleep, Praxis, Quasar, Sac Six, Tag, and You Go Girl!

Captain Eyeliner (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sac Six (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sac Six (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Maya Hayuk (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CRKSHNK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Billy Barnacles (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Amy Makes Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
You Go Girl (photo © Jaime Rojo)
QUASAR (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Adam Fujita (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Praxis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Merk (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lunge Box (photo © Jaime Rojo)
#tag in Tel Aviv (photo @Tag)
No Sleep (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SOHO, NYC. May 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 02.16.20

BSA Images Of The Week: 02.16.20

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Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

Here’s our weekly interview with the street featuring Add Fuel, Almost Over Keep Smiling, BR163, Crash, Degrupo, Disordered, Early Riser, finDAC, Fours, Jason Naylor, Leleus, JL, Maya Hayuk, Obey, Sara Lynne Leo, Surface of Beauty, Telmo & Miel.

Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jeleus OBEY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Degrupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Early Riser (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Crash x BR163 for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
FinDac. Wynwood, Miami. December, 2019 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Surface of Beauty (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jason Naylor (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Telmo Miel in Wynwood Miami combined their portraiture with abstraction. Detail A. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Telmo Miel in Wynwood Miami combined their portraiture with abstraction. Detail B. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Maya Hayuk work in progress. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Add Fuel (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fours (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JL (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Disordered (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Brooklyn. February 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 10.27.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 10.27.19

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week. The streets are alive!

New York doesn’t stop, even if your heart does when you are looking at the White House and the ongoing attack on institutions you believed in. No wonder The Joker is breaking records. Its a sign of the times. The brazenness in the highest offices probably explain why Harvey Weinstein went to a comedy club this weekend (and got yelled at from the stage and in the audience), and why this guy simply shoved a woman into a train. But its not all bad news, New York is a city made from immigrants, and we’re working to protect them thanks to some recent anti-xenophobic laws.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Ali Six, Anthony Lister, Chris Stain, Cogitaro, Gixy Gal, Hans Haacke, I Heart Graffiti, Jimmy C, JR, Laszlo, Lizzo, Pay to Pray, Rano, and X Vandals.

Top banner JR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Why are men great till they gotta be great?” I Heart Graffiti has an interesting candidate to take over from the circus that is this White House. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
And The Unapologetically Brown Series points out why AOC is the voice of the people in an institution almost exclusively directed by lobbyists and the 1%. And someone thinks she’s a useful idiot – a bit of Red-Baiting that is all the rage from corporate Democrats. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Meanwhile at The White House…
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pay To Pray (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Anthony Lister (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jimmy C for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hans Haacke retrospective “We (ALL) Are The People” at The New Museum. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A digital precision homeboy from Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cogitaro (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Glxy Gal (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Chris Stain’s old piece at The Bushwick Collective just got a ‘face lift” with the help of X Vandals. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rano (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Laszlo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ali Six (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR brings a portion of “The Chronicles Of New York City” to Kings Theater in Flatbush, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR brings a portion of “The Chronicles Of New York City” to Kings Theater in Flatbush, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. An artist sets up both his gallery AND studio at the entrance of the NYC Subway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 09.15.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.15.19

Did you see that micro-moon on Friday the 13th? We were up on the roof with artists and friends and weirdos celebrating “mid autumn moon” and looking at the New York skyline and that beautiful moon, which didn’t seem 14% smaller, did it? Seemed like your run-of-the-mill gorgeous Harvest Moon, right? Also, a dope opportunity to say “apogee“, which you just don’t get to say very much. No those are not those tassels that exotic dancers put on their nipples.

So here’s our harvest of Street Art and graffiti for you! The city has been producing amazing crops all year, to tell the truth.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Almost Over Keep Smiling, Crappytalism, Jason Naylor, Jocelyn Tsajh, Li-Hill, Peoples Power Assembly, Plannedalism, Pure Genius, Rider, Subway Doodle, Surface of Beauty, The Joker, Thomas Allen, and Will Kurtz.

Jason Naylor and Surface Of Beauty collab for ST.ART NOW. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jason Naylor and Surface Of Beauty collab for ST.ART NOW. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Plannedalism commentary on the polarization of our society. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Li’ Hill commentary on Climate Crisis. According to the text accompanying his art work the artists writes that the World Bank estimates that as many as 145 million people could become Climate Refugees in the near future. Global warming is causing temperatures to rise at alarming levels rendering vasts swats of the earth as inhospitable for its inhabitants. High-level heat and humidity are one of the main killers of humans by heat strokes. Humans are abandoning their lands and homes in search of a cooler environment. This exodus is causing logistical problems for the countries receiving the refugees as many lack the resources to provide and care for them. Wars, famines, and diseases are no longer the only reasons for people to abandon their homes. Global Warming has been added to the list, yet countries are reluctant to declare extreme heat waves as natural disasters. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Li-Hill. A Perilous Journey In A Changing World. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jocelyn Tsajh (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Unfortunately the only word we could read on the signature is Lily. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Collaboration between Subway Doodle and Thomas Allen. We had published a portion of this piece. It sits on a construction material business that insists on placing merchandise on the sidewalk thus the piece is almost fully blocked most of the time. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
As opposed to where? Crappytalism (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pure Genius (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unless it is. Peoples Power Assembly (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
This is an ad. The piece is not signed but it’s branded. It’s hand-painted and the artist is rendering a scene from the movie The Joker starring Joaquin Phoenix. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Will Kurts sculpture made with plastic shopping bags and tape. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rider (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Lower Manhattan. Summer 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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