All posts tagged: Alex Emmart

Miami Recap ’12 : Brand New Art in the Streets

Shots from the weekend here by photographer, artist and frequent BSA contributor Geoff Hargadon. He caught a lot of new pieces as they were being installed, as well as some newly fresh ones.

Heads were rolling as soon as Anthony Lister hit the ground in Miami. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

These tires on the back of large vehicle looked like they were going to burst loose, which alarmed some and thrilled others. Rob “Bear” Fogle. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Obey was there to meet people at the dead end of the tracks.  Shepard Fairey (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Obey .  Shepard Fairey (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Obey .  Shepard Fairey (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

People took a break on the grass in front of the wall-sized Tony Goldman tribute at Wynwood Walls by hepard Fairey (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Artists are often asked to give their work for free. You don’t typically see signs like this for accountants or plumbers. ISO… (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Invader (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Cash For Your Warhol has something new in Miami this year. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

CFYW (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

The ever more conceptual Cash For Your Warhol takes it to a abstract level here, purposely obscuring his own message while placing the real thing in relief. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Action shot of one of Paris’ early stencil artists, Speedy Graphito, at the Art Miami fair. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Melbourne’s REKA on tour and in town. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Os Gemeos. Detail. The Brazilian Twins were represented by their Brazilian Gallery at the Main Fair: Art Basel this year. From the Street to the Glitz. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

A Nathan Vincent and Alex Emmart collab exhorts you to behave at Fountain via Mighty Tanaka Gallery. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Asif’s Guns. A pop-up with cardboard replicas of the machines that kill. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Asif’s Guns (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Banksy. Is the guard there to protect or to reclaim stolen goods? (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

While there was some mindlessly pompous chatter surrounding the heralded display of actual walls by Banksy at the Context fair, the sometimes vandal’s work was surprisingly unremarkable to most attendees, who glanced at it and kept walking.  If anything, the security guards helped garner a little interest. It is illuminating to find that outside of the hyper-excited Street Art fandom bubble that we are often in, an actual Banksy work doesn’t have as much magnetism that you might expect.

The walls (or pieces of walls) that were on display are said to have been stolen and the artist is said to be angered about it, but no arrests have been made and no property seized. Since the majority of graffiti or Street Artists are not wont to ask for permission to do their thing, most understand that no “rules” are typically invoked to protect their work on the street, or off it. Now that Banksy’s work is so high profile and sells at auctions and is in museums, it’s like putting a luxury watch or crystal vase on a wall out in the public – its market value is just too tempting for certain individuals. While this is an unsavory outcome to some, it’s not likely to change much.

“I am not a fan of what Bankrobber did, but, presuming it’s not some elaborate collaboration, I’m amused by the fact that Banksy doesn’t control it, and how his work is being displayed: among people who apparently don’t care about it nor did they come to see it… where Banksy is not necessarily the center of attention,” says Hargadon, remarking that one piece is shown behind a velvet rope.

La Pandilla returns to Miami again. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Chanoir and El Xupet Negre (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Occupy All The Streets…with parties. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

En Masse collective took over a wall in their monochromatic way(photo © Geoff Hargadon)

The Bask Truck was giving out free stickers from a leggy art lover (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

DWOT . All Nation Team from Vancouver was doing some night work in the Miami heat. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

DWOT . All Nation Team. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

Dabs & Myla collab with Craola and Witnes. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

 

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“F*ck Art” Opens Wide at Museum Of Sex (Not Safe for Work / School)

Be Sure to Ride the 14 Foot Long “F*ck Bike”

“F*ck Art”, an undulating and adventurous group show by New York Street Artists opens its arms and legs to you at the Museum of Sex (MoSex) tomorrow and whether it’s the human powered penetrating bicycle or the glass bead encrusted dildo, it endeavors to satisfy.

Miss Van. Detail. Oil on Canvas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Co-curated by Emilie Baltz (Creative Director) and Mark Snyder (Director of Exhibitions), the show selects 20 current Street Artists who have pushed notions of propriety into provocation on the street and it invites them to let it loose behind closed doors.  Not that Miss Van needs anyone’s permission; her sensual role-playing painted ladies have been playfully preening on graff-piled walls and blue-boarded construction sites for much of the 2000s.  Similarly the powerfully stenciled sirens by Street Artist AIKO have been bending over in high heels on walls all over the world with just a hint of the geishas from her native Japan for over a decade.

Aiko. Detail. Collage on canvas. (photo © Jaime Rojo).

The “Fuck Bike #001”, a pedal operated plunging machine by William Thomas Porter and Andrew H. Shirley, has at its conceptual base an ode to the lengths a guy will go to reach his natural objective. The two artist met at a Black Label Bike Club event called “Ridin’ Dirty” in 2010 and later schemed together to make an entry for a bike-themed group show in Bushwick, Brooklyn that featured many Street Artists like DarkClouds, Ellis G., UFO, Noah Sparkes and Mikey 907. “I approached Tom with the idea of creating a kinetic bike sculpture which you could f*ck someone with,” remembers Mr. Shirley, “Tom is a very gifted artist and bike engineer, it took a few days for him to build our design.”

Andrew H Shirley and William Thomas Porter “Fuck Bike #001” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Visitors to the show are invited to mount the bike and take it for a spin. “This bike is more sculpture oriented, but still functions sexually. It’s also totally interactive,” explains Mr. Shirley, who has displayed the bike in cities in Europe and America, most recently at Art Basel in Miami in December. So the bike has gotten around and Shirley happily recounts stories of intimate encounters it has had with both genders. (See the very Not-Safe-For-Work film of the bike in action below.)

The street has certainly seen an increase of fairly graphic sex related Street Art in the last decade or so as people have become more comfortable with such themes and much of this show can often be seen throughout the city without the price of admission. Gay couple Bryan Raughton and Nathan Vincent have been putting large and small scaled paste-ups of sexually themed imagery as a Street Art duo called RTTP for about two years on Manhattan’s Lower East Side and in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Short for “Reply To This Post”, the line-drawn torsos and spread eagles are all part of their collaborative Street Art project that explores the desires of men seeking men on Craigslist.

 

RTTP. Collage directly on wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Describing the work, Vincent says it’s a process of lifting the mystery off of a just-below-the-radar Internet dating game – and pasting it on a lightpole. “Users post an ad with an image, title, and a short description of what they are looking for tonight. The photograph they post of themselves is drawn and titled with the ad’s title.” By putting these erotically based desires on the streets, Vincent thinks “they magnify those desires that often seem to live at the edges.” Says Raughton of the project, “We see it as an interesting way to take people private desires to the public street.”

 

Lush. Spray paint directly on wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

In discussing the origins and underpinnings of a show like this, the co-curators reveal a more academic and sociological grounding than the prurient and salacious sauciness one might infer by a display of so much “F*ck Art”.  We asked Baltz to give us a sense of the context for a Street Art driven sex show.

Brooklyn Street Art: What is your favorite part of curating a show like this?
Emilie Baltz: Seeing the different interpretations and energy that each artist brings to their work is always the most interesting part of curating – with this topic, especially, it’s the fact that they are all pushing the limits of their medium by creating such provocative statements.

 

Wonderpuss Octopus. Sex toy with paint buildup and glass beads applique. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: While these pieces are behind closed doors available to a certain audience, Street Artists typically put their work out in the public. Do you think the work should change depending on the audience?
Emilie Baltz: We don’t think it’s about changing the work, it’s about how the work changes the environment it lives in. Street art has a long history of revealing different perspectives on its surrounding environment and by placing this work in a museum it creates a certain energy and visual provocation that changes the relationship we traditionally have to the museum-going experience.

Wolftits. Painted floor mat on rubber.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Do you think there has been an increase in sex-related street art in recent years, and if so, why?
Emilie Baltz: There definitely is an increase in sex-related conversations in recent years. It’s not that there is more content suddenly, it’s just that culture is actually ready to start talking about it now, rather than ignore it.

 

Tony Bones on wood affixed to wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: We have noticed that themes of sex and sexuality are often quickly destroyed on the street, while other pieces remain for months. Is this a form of selective censorship by the public?
Emilie Baltz: Street art is a dialogue. Its creation is about expression and commentary, and therefore can become a barometer of cultural consciousness (or unconsciousness). The intimate and emotional nature of sexual content can obviously elicit strong feelings in viewers, and, given that street art is an environmental medium, either you have to live with it or get rid of it. Sex walks a fine line between acceptance and rejection. Public response to this kind of art is potentially a mirror into how our society relates to the topic.

Brooklyn Street Art: What surprised you the most about putting this show together?
Emilie Baltz: The enthusiasm from the public. People are genuinely excited to talk about sex in public space and it’s an incredible honor to be able to help facilitate that discussion.

 

Patch Whisky. Detail. Diorama with spray paint, paper collage and painted mannequins. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dickchicken. Detail. Hand colored wheatpaste directly on wall with painting on wood panel. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Droid, Gen 2, Oze 108, 907 Crew. Detail. Spray paint directly on wall with image on a light box. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Celso. Paint on Lucite. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cassius Fouler. Detail. New piece painted directly on wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Bike on Display in the Window at The Museum of Sex (NOT SAFE FOR WORK OR SCHOOL)

<<<<>>>BSA<<<>><><>>BSA<<<<>>>BSA<<<>><><>>BSA<<<<>>>BSA<<<>><><>>BSA

F*CK ART
A Street Art Occupation at the Museum of Sex in New York City, opens February 8 and will run through June 10, 2012.

Emilie Baltz, Co-Curator, Creative Director, F*CK ART
Mark Snyder, Co-Curator F*CK ART, Director of Exhibitions, Museum of Sex
Meghan Coleman and Alex Emmart of Might Tanaka Gallery in Brooklyn served as Chief Advisors.

Participating Artists:

AIKO. Andrew H. Shirley, B-rad Izzy, Cassius Fouler. DICKCHICKEN. DROID, GEN 2, OZE 108 of 907, El Celso, Jeremy Novy, JMR, LUSH, Miss Van, MODE 2, Patch Whisky, ROSTARR, RTTP: Nathan Vincent & Bryan Raughton, Tony Bones, William Thomas Porter, WOLFTITS, and Wonderpuss Octopus

 

 

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BSA Holiday Giveaway for 2011 : Books, Print, Posters, Buttons, Zines

Dear BSA Readers: We’ve invited seven artists to participate in this year’s “Twelve Wishes for 2012”. That leaves 5 empty spots.  Now we would like to invite five BSA family like you to be a part of it — and win extravagant prizes for your efforts:

All you need to do is send ONE wish and ONE picture or image file to 12for12@BrooklynStreetArt.com no later than midnight EST December 9 and we’ll pick the 5 winners. Read the rules at the bottom of this posting.

PRIZE Descriptions

PRIZES

THE DEEEELUXE PLATINUM BUCKET: This prize will go to the first submission we pick. In addition to being featured on BSA “Twelve Wishes for 2012” this lucky reader will also get:

A copy of “Eloquent Vandals”, by Marte Jølbo and Martyn Reed.
Your very own “Ca$h for Your Warhol” sign, by Street Artist Hargo
The Pantheon Prize Pack, by Street Artists infinity and Adam Void
The GRAFFITI & STREET ART Feral Diagram Poster

THE GOLD PLATED BUCKET: This prize will go to the 2nd submission we pick. In addition to being featured on BSA “Twelve Wishes for 2012” this lucky reader will also get:

A copy of “Walls & Frames :Fine Art from the Streets,” by Maximiliano Ruiz
“Rocket Pop Boy”, a silk screen print by Snyder & Gregory Siff (of an edition of 21)
The Pantheon Prize Pack, by Street Artists infinity and Adam Void
The GRAFFITI & STREET ART Feral Diagram Poster

THE SILVER PLATED BUCKET: This prize will go to the next TWO submissions we pick. In addition to being featured on BSA “Twelve Wishes for 2012” these lucky readers will also get:

A copy of “Walls & Frames :Fine Art from the Streets,” by Maximiliano Ruiz
A copy of “PANTHEON:A History of Art From the Streets of NYC”  by Daniel Feral and Joyce Manalo
The Pantheon Prize Pack, by Street Artists infinity and Adam Void
The GRAFFITI & STREET ART Feral Diagram Poster

THE BRONZE PLATED BUCKET: This prize will go to the final submission we pick. In addition to being featured on BSA “Twelve Wishes for 2012” this lucky reader will also get:

A copy of “Street Art New York,” by Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo
The Pantheon Prize Pack, by Street Artists infinity and Adam Void
The GRAFFITI & STREET ART Feral Diagram Poster

RULES: You must write a wish for 2012 that you wish for yourself or others; extra points for personal and respectful. Image can be anything BUT you must hold the copyrights to publish the image. Image must be at least 740 wide, and can be in .jpg, .tif, .png, or similar format.  Submissions must be received no later than December 9, 2011. Please include your postal address to receive the prizes, and the name you would like us to be published as. Final selections are made by the editors and buckets are not included. We can’t wait to hear from you!!!

5 Examples from previous participants; Martha Cooper, Broken Crow, Jef Aerosol, Hellbent, Cake

SHOUT OUTs: Maximiliano Ruiz, Daniel Feral, Joyce Manolo, Adam Void, Snyder, Gregory Siff, Geoff Hargadon, Marte Jølbo and Martyn Reed. Your generosity is truly appreciated.

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Alex Emmert- Miami Schmiami! – Brooklyn is the Schnit! Go to Mighty Tanaka!

You may have thought that the giant sucking noise you heard was all the street art being pulled down to Miami this week (or Miss California’s video tape turned up to 12).

Have NO Fear – Mighty Tanaka is Here!

Alex Emmart and Caleb James are proud to introduce MIGHTY TANAKA

Partners Alex Emmart and Caleb James are proud to introduce MIGHTY TANAKA, the gallery

Brooklyn’s Street Art Scene is so gargantuan that we can afford to let Half the Borough go to Art Basel this week and we still have enough amazingly clever artists to OPEN A BRAND NEW GALLERY TONIGHT – which will be packed thank you very much.

 

Hellbent for Metallic Lace! (Hellbent) (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

 

Mighty Tanaka Gallery, a labor of love turned a reality with the vision of Alex Emmart, who has been toiling behind the scenes for a couple of years to build a rather strong and fairly eclectic collection of art and artists – many of them fresh out the gate.

Alex also confesses to creating this new gallery in the neighborhood of Dumbo partially to force himself to get off his couch and go to work  instead of running his nascent biz out of his apartment.  He’s been painting a newly built gallery space in the Brooklyn neighborhood by the water between the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges and nearly all his clothes are covered with white paint and his brain has fried, but tonight’s the opening and he is ready.

 

Avoid (from the Inflation Project) (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

Avoid (from the Inflation Project) (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

The inaugural show “Hybridism” gives a nod to oft-expressed opinion these days that the walls between street art and fine art are continually dissolving – as fine art hits the streets and street art hits the living room over your couch.

"Vintage" by Destroy & Rebuild (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

 

Emmart brings to the game an education in museum studies, the experience of curating a handful of shows that explore the street-graff-fine art continuum, and a solid dedication to building relationships based on respect.

 

Mad sticker skillz are leading to a crazy-A fine art maker (Kosbe) (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

 

This too, may be a glimpse of the future of the art world where gallerists treat people fairly and are respected because of it.  Just ask any of the nextgen Millenial artists he is working with.

 

Fire-O-Glyphic infinity created an pyrric mantelpiece (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

 

At this auspicious opening, a statement of hope amidst an economy gone ape-crazy, Emmart takes the moment to share the credit on his Facebook page; Mighty Tanaka studio is one of the finest and most exciting spaces I know of due to the hard work of committed individuals. A VERY BIG thanks to Garrett Wohnrade, Caleb James, Adri Cowan, Mari Keeler, Heidi Alasuvanto, Insuh Yoon, John Michaels, the Mighty Tanaka featured artists and everyone else who has supported Tanaka during this transition. You all inspire me.”

Reginald Pean "Gentlemen of Leisure" (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

Reginald Pean “Gentlemen of Leisure” (courtesy Mighty Tanaka)

Mighty Tanaka Gallery/Headquarters:

68 Jay St.
Suite 416
Brooklyn, NY. 11206

Phone #: 718.596.8781

contact@mightytanaka.com

Subway: F train to York St.


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