All posts tagged: Vlady Art

Vlady Art: Storing “Temporary Files” Under a Stockholm Bridge

Vlady Art: Storing “Temporary Files” Under a Stockholm Bridge

Writing large messages with sticky post notes is part of the visual lengua oficina* for many whose career ladder has been in corporate offices for years, decades.

Stockholm based street artist Vlady shares with us a public application under a bridge that also triggers your memories of early pixelated video games with its digitally inspired message “temporary files”. 

Vlady. Stockholm, Sweeden. (photo © Vlady)

The meaning of the term “temporary files” is not familiar to the casual user of consumer-class computers. More likely your local IT professional can tell you dryly. As you think about it, you may see how it takes on a rather existential realm to the poet, as a temporary file is created to temporarily store information in order to free memory for other purposes. Mention “memory” and we realize that the vocabulary for man and machine are braiding together more daily before our eyes.

Here we are at the dawn of Artificial Intelligence and our memories are at full capacity, needing temporary files to store them.

Vlady. Stockholm, Sweeden. (photo © Vlady)

*a fictional term that seems appropriate

Read more
Vlady Converts Ad Kiosks into “Ice Lolloy” Art

Vlady Converts Ad Kiosks into “Ice Lolloy” Art

A couple of years ago Vlady discovered that the back of these advertising kiosks looked very much like the shape of a popsicle and his imagination took flight. Now for the third year since 2017 he goes to Turku in Finland to add “6 more Ice Lolly”, he says.

Vlady Art. Turku, Finland. (photo © Vlady)

The humor of turning advertising into frozen desert is probably obvious . What we find more laudable is the artist’s ability to re-frame what is quotidian and transform it to something that alights one imagination.

Vlady Art. Turku, Finland. (photo © Vlady)
Vlady Art. Turku, Finland. (photo © Vlady)
One of Vlad Art’s first icelollies back in 2017.
Read more
Vlady Art Spreads A Poem Across Stockholm : “Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep”

Vlady Art Spreads A Poem Across Stockholm : “Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep”

When you live in a city your everyday interaction with the built environment may make one feel quite divorced from nature. Thanks to the parks and trees and the changing of the seasons, however, you can be poignantly reminded of the passage of time and a touch upon a somewhat grounded awareness of life’s cycles.

Somehow we know that the proximity to the sun and the tilt of the globe determines the length of our days, and seasons appear in literature and lyrics across our various screens for all of our lives.

Vlady Art. Do not stand at my grave and weep” (Mary Elizabeth Frye, 1905-2004) (photo © Vlady Art)

Stockholm Street Artist Vlady Art says that he waited through all of the seasons of a year to install a poem throughout his city that speaks to the season of loss, and remembrance. Using recycled real estate lawn signs, Vlady reprised in portions the poem “Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep”, written in 1932 by the American Mary Elizabeth Frye.

“Today is one of the most popular poems in the world, crossing national boundaries for use on bereavement cards and at funerals regardless of race, religion or social status. Its spiritual words demonstrated a remarkable power to soothe loss,” he says as he describes his text-based interventions that span locations as well as seasons.

Vlady Art. Do not stand at my grave and weep” (Mary Elizabeth Frye, 1905-2004) (photo © Vlady Art)

“As the poem openly talks about nature and elements, I found that the perfect set for those spiritual words would have been outside. There the people should have it. The poem seemed to contemplate the same places that I admired while walking or cycling. Here in Sweden we have a close relation with the seasons and the outdoors. It’s not strange at all even for a Stockholm person to have a stroll in the forest or bath in a lake in the silence of the midnight light,” he says.

“During the summer days one of the most popular activities here is to wait the sunset on a top of a hill. And this is not a farming countryside, but a million’s people capital. I specify this because that might explain the mood behind the work. Also by disconnecting the verses and isolating them, I find it pleasant. Yes, I had to wait for the snow, the autumn rain or the mature grain. Is quite normal to handle more projects in the same time and wait for the right moment to strike.”

Vlady Art. Do not stand at my grave and weep” (Mary Elizabeth Frye, 1905-2004) (photo © Vlady Art)

Obviously the foresight, planning, and dedication that this took to fully implement is much more than the more common Street Art interventions that we are familiar with. Viewing the documentation today makes it all seen worth it.

In case you’re wondering, Vlady is hooked on the process and will have more installations to come. “For another project involving the autumn leaves I waited also about a year. I have already a good idea for the next Christmas, as well!”

Vlady Art. Do not stand at my grave and weep” (Mary Elizabeth Frye, 1905-2004) (photo © Vlady Art)

Vlady Art. Do not stand at my grave and weep” (Mary Elizabeth Frye, 1905-2004) (photo © Vlady Art)

Vlady Art. Do not stand at my grave and weep” (Mary Elizabeth Frye, 1905-2004) (photo © Vlady Art)

Vlady Art. Do not stand at my grave and weep” (Mary Elizabeth Frye, 1905-2004) (photo © Vlady Art)

Vlady Art. Do not stand at my grave and weep” (Mary Elizabeth Frye, 1905-2004) (photo © Vlady Art)

Vlady Art. Do not stand at my grave and weep” (Mary Elizabeth Frye, 1905-2004) (photo © Vlady Art)


Do not stand at my grave and weep (Mary Elizabeth Frye, 1905-2004)

Do not stand at my grave and weep,
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,

I am the diamond glints on snow,

I am the sun on ripened grain,

I am the gentle autumn rain.

When you awaken in the morning’s hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
of quiet birds in circling flight.

I am the soft star-shine at night.

Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Do_Not_Stand_at_My_Grave_and_Weep


Read more
Vlady Art: Gossiping Sicilians and “Old School CCTV”

Vlady Art: Gossiping Sicilians and “Old School CCTV”

brooklyn-street-art-vlady-art-10-23-16-web-1

Vlady Art. Agata. Old School CCTV. Sicily, Italy. October 2016. (photo © Vlady Art)

A prankster and social critic in his public manifestations of art and installation, Vlady Art is one of a few artists whom we can think of in Europe today who consider their efforts an important catalyst for public dialogue. At times high-minded and conceptually sophisticated, at other times more obvious, the body of work thus far is often experimental with flashes of brilliance that engage.

Without a doubt, Vlady Art wants you to be involved in questioning your baseline assumptions about the foundations of society – and to observe your role in it. Heavy work, but not as confrontational as it sounds. Last year at the Emergence, an international urban actions festival in Giardini Naxos he even went as far as creating Rorschach tests on walls last year with a small clean tagline saying “you see what you want to see.”

brooklyn-street-art-vlady-art-10-16-web-2

Vlady Art. Concceta. Old School CCTV. Sicily, Italy. October 2016. (photo © Vlady Art)

A new project on selected balconies of the Sicilian city of Catania is memorable for its shock and humor value, but beyond that the viewer will need to make their own evaluation of its possible meanings. The figures are mannequins posed on balconies, their bodies in attractive floral printed house dresses, the head of each figure supplanted by a surveillance camera that is looking down to the street.

The artist himself tells us that “An anthropological and social explanation is a must to understand the background of this artwork.” With many possible interpretations possible, the best outcome will be some open debate on the street. The worst would be that few see it.

brooklyn-street-art-vlady-art-10-16-web-3

Vlady Art. Antonia. Old School CCTV. Sicily, Italy. October 2016. (photo © Vlady Art)

For the sake of brevity, we condense the extensive description that he gave us this series of installations called “Old School CCTV” as a commentary of the intrusive surveillance type observation practices of senior women and homemakers who exert an underestimated amount of social control over the population.

While this is a comical satire and the replacement of heads with electronic cameras could also be seen as derisive in the view of some, the greater critique is of a limited and limiting patriarchal system that gives Sicilian women few roles or options in society aside from serving their families and gossiping with one another.

He blames the lack in social mobility and opportunity on many culprits; chauvinism, a vertical hierarchy that is rigid, power vacuums filled by organized crime and the church, and conservative clan-based structures. It’s not just the limitation of women’s roles or access to power that is affected, he says, “any liberal, secular and open-minded concepts have always found plenty of obstacles here.”

brooklyn-street-art-vlady-art-10-23-16-web-4

Vlady Art. Giuseppina. Old School CCTV. Sicily, Italy. October 2016. (photo © Vlady Art)

Vlady kindly describes for BSA readers more the background for “Old School CCTV” :

So why the mannequins? This is what you will see once you visit Sicily or the south of Italy; lots of signora cleaning, chatting or chilling out on their balconies and secretly (or not so) spying/staring at you. Is it still like this, like in the old days? Yes, it is an undeniable fact, at least, in the popular, inexpensive and working-class areas.

Women, while at home, are in control of the house: Nothing can happen around the premises without their acknowledgment. The other people’s life is being constantly under monitoring. Most of the old condominiums have a central yard called a cortile: this is exactly like a public arena or a modern Facebook, where women exchange useful or useless information.

The petty talks are here called “cuttigghi”, from word cortile. The cuttigghiare (the petty, small talkers) can be chatty and loud at times. They are relaxed and jovial on one hand, always arguing and complaining on the other. If you want to know if something has happened, you better ask a signora.

 

brooklyn-street-art-vlady-art-10-16-web-7

Vlady Art. Nunzia. Old School CCTV. Sicily, Italy. October 2016. (photo © Vlady Art)

To be in somebody else’s affair (“not to mind your own business”) is both an indisputable characteristic and a strong prejudice about women and it persists today. As in the most of petty talks, the core subject is people. This can sound apparently funny and trivial but in reality it is a negative social control system in which many cannot live their own life without intrusions and in complete freedom without judgments.

In small towns youngsters and women are often under tight control and undergo strong criticism from their parents, relative, neighbors; for being different or simply looking “unusual” is perceived as a threat or a disappointment for the group.

brooklyn-street-art-vlady-art-10-16-web-8

Vlady Art. Rosa. Old School CCTV. Sicily, Italy. October 2016. (photo © Vlady Art)

Sicilians, who were farmers for much of the last century frequently use dogs for the safety of their own premises, rather then installing CCTV. Fences are ridiculous high, considering that people aren’t rich. People stare at you more, much more than anywhere else, except possibly for some Arabic countries or those in Latin America. They control anything that moves and that is not “normal”.

The clan (or better, the herd) mentality is unfortunately very strong in some closed and archaic communities. The authority is not the major, the president or the prime minister, but the boss of the neighborhood, the father or the elder brother. Retired, widow or housekeeper ladies from the quartieri (neighborhoods, not the central or wealthy areas) are spending their existence on balconies, watching life from a window or throughout a railing. This custom or this routine isn’t unusual even in the main cities, such as Palermo or Catania.

Ignorance, sexism, prejudices, superstitions, wrong beliefs, the gender gap and a lack of know-how are still an evident setback that condemns the land to an eternal stagnation.

“Old school CCTV”, while being an apolitical, surreal and even hilarious artwork, is meant to include an activist and social message, quiet evidence for those who live or lived in this specific cultural background.  –  Vlady, 2016

brooklyn-street-art-vlady-art-10-16-web-6

Vlady Art. Grazia. Old School CCTV. Sicily, Italy. October 2016. (photo © Vlady Art)

Read more