All posts tagged: Vincent Cornelli

Street Layers from Paris, Berlin and Vienna

From the Editor:

In the past I breezed by destroyed posters and flyers that amass on construction worksites and abandoned buildings with little thought. Thanks to the work of photographer Vinny Cornelli I have learned to see them entirely differently – like Earth Science, like strata; a layer of text or design or photography with internally consistent characteristics that distinguishes it from contiguous layers. The destruction and consequent revealing of shapes, color, and texture create haphazard new compositions. Sometimes it doesn’t work, but hell yeah, some times it does, and Vinny is always on the lookout.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

From photographer Vincent Cornelli:

After my recent trip photographing street art in Hamburg, it brought me back to some of the photos I took last  summer in Paris, Berlin and Vienna.  I thought it would make the perfect follow-up piece for my bi-weekly posts for BrooklynStreetArt.com.  I think I would rather let the pictures speak for themselves.  Hope you enjoy them.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

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Bushwick Beat: Stalking the Wild Street Art with Vincent Cornelli

by photographer Vincent Cornelli

Sure, Jef Aerosol had his show 2 Fridays ago, and he’s now back home in France. But it seems worth revisiting the amount of amazing moments I captured in Bushwick that day as a result of his energy and inspiration while he was in New York; One cannot help but feed off of it.

I want to give you some behind-the-scenes photos of the art and street scene that surrounded the artist at work. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did photographing and capturing them.

Carlito Brigante and C215 in an unlikely collaboration © Vincent Cornelli

Carlito Brigante and C215 in a subtle collaboration © Vincent Cornelli

Te Amo © Vincent Cornelli

Te Amo © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

C215 on a firebox © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

Know Hope © Vincent Cornelli

Know Hope © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

Bast and Clown Soldier © Vincent Cornelli

Bast and Clown Soldier © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

Robots Will Kill © Vincent Cornelli

Robots Will Kill © Vincent Cornelli

Mac and Remed © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

Eine in the center of the Ad Hoc entrance © Vincent Cornelli

Eine in the center of the Ad Hoc entrance © Vincent Cornelli

See more of Vinny’s work HERE

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Pics from Jef Aerosol Opening

From photographer Vincent Cornelli comes this fun collection of images from last nights opening of “All Shook Up”, Jef Aerosol’s opening at Ad Hoc/Eastern District in Bushwick, Brooklyn, curated by Brooklyn Street Art.  A steady crowd carried through the evening to check out the new pieces and to meet the artist in person.

Jef strikes a pose in front of his giant canvas, a reprise of his mural of Jean-Michel Basquiat that he did on a rooftop in Brooklyn last week. Etched into Basquiat's eyebrow is the word "Brooklyn". (photo © Vincent Cornelli)

Jef strikes a pose in front of his giant canvas, a reprise of his mural of Jean-Michel Basquiat that he did on a rooftop in Brooklyn last week. Etched into Basquiat's eyebrow is the word "Brooklyn". (photo © Vincent Cornelli)

Classic muses of Jef's 30 year love affair with stencils were joined by Brooklyn-based icons like Jay-Z, a brand new one of M.I.A., graffiti legend Dondi White, and street art photographer Luna Park (who was in attendance). (photo © Vincent Cornelli)

Classic muses of Jef's 30 year love affair with stencils were infused with new blood by Brooklyn-based icons like Jay-Z and M.I.A., graffiti legend Dondi White, and street art photographer Luna Park (who was in attendance). A new piece on wood (the smiling boy) was a benefit for Haiti. (photo © Vincent Cornelli)

A man of the people, Aerosol made sure to include smaller affordable pieces for fans (in foreground) just in front of this New York Warhol Factory/ Punk scene grouping - including Iggy Pop, John Cage, Sid Vicious, Lou Reed, and the Ramones (photo © Vincent Cornelli)

A man of the people, Aerosol made sure to include smaller affordable pieces for fans (John Lee Hooker and Jimi Hendrix in foreground) just in front of this New York Warhol Factory/ Punk scene grouping - including Iggy Pop, John Cage, Sid Vicious, Lou Reed, and the Ramones. He also did a small 10 piece Basquiat edition for the show (think there are a few left). (photo © Vincent Cornelli)

A visitor with Joe Strummer of the Clash looking over his head (photo © Vincent Cornelli)

A visitor with Joe Strummer of the Clash looking over his head (photo © Vincent Cornelli)

Brigitte Bardot and Magpie at the end of the wall (photo © Vinny Cornelli)

Brigitte Bardot and Magpie at the end of the wall (photo © Vinny Cornelli)

Beauty was in attendance (photo © Vinny Cornelli)

Beauty was in attendance (photo © Vinny Cornelli)

Jef and fellow stencil artist Chris Stain (photo © Vinny Cornelli)

Jef and fellow stencil artist Chris Stain (photo © Vinny Cornelli)

Rocker and experimental music artist Andrew Hurst kept the garage inspired classic and obscure music coming, with a break for Louis, who played electric guitar with his amp in the middle of gallery for five songs. (photo © Vinny Cornelli)

Rocker and experimental music artist/producer Andrew Hurst kept the garage inspired classic and obscure music coming, with a break for Louis, who played and sang rock-n-roots inspired pieces accompanied by his electric guitar and amp in the middle of gallery for five songs. (photo © Vinny Cornelli)

Stéphane and Magli and Jean-Michel (photo © Vinny Cornelli)
Stéphane and Magli and Jean-Michel (photo © Vinny Cornelli)
(photo © Vinny Cornelli)

(photo © Vinny Cornelli)

Detail of Jef Aerosol canvas (photo © Vinny Cornelli)

Detail of Jef Aerosol canvas (photo © Vinny Cornelli)


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Vinny Cornelli: Jef Aerosol in Bushwick

Photographer Vincent Cornelli was out on a legal wall tour with international stencil artist Jef Aerosol this Saturday; With a name like Aerosol, you don’t invite photographers to watch you work otherwise. The sunny January afternoon pretty much blew Vinny’s mind, and he writes here about how he got such rockingly cool pictures:

sfaf© Vincent Cornelli

On Saturday, I had the privilege of showing Jef Aerosol around the streets of Bushwick, Brooklyn. I think the day was the perfect example as to why the Street Art Movement is so special…and it is deserving of capital letters.  Encounters such as these are not only incredibly rewarding and inspiring, but they foster an intimate connection between you and a city that is changing right in front of you.  It was one of the greatest of days

Skewville and Aerosol  © Vincent Cornelli

Skewville and Aerosol © Vincent Cornelli

When I met Jef, I was photographing the front door of Eastern District/Ad Hoc Gallery.   It was a warm greeting, with instant recognition of the other before exchanging “hellos.”

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Jef-Aerosol-Copywrite-Vincent-Cornelli-201004
I’m not sure which direction you’re going, but I’m headed up. © Vincent Cornelli

Everything from start to finish breed this notion of connectedness – from Eric of Eastern District giving us a ride to Veng’s wall; to catching up with Ali and Garrison of Ad Hoc, listening to their exploits up and down the eastern side of the US; to Veng offering up a nice piece of real estate on a wall he often works with.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli
Fast Action: On foot while texting…sort of like walking and chewing gum, but this guy makes it look so cool. © Vincent Cornelli

It was also quite nice to have company from Stephan Missier and Becki Fuller, two great street art photographers who were around for a better part of the day.  It was a day where everyone just seemed to fit so well with one another.

 © Vincent Cornelli
Becki Fuller at work © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli
Jef taking it all in; the street art textures on this popular Brooklyn shack. © Vincent Cornelli

Jef and I spoke briefly of this sense of community, and family.  He mentioned what a great feeling it is to be able to travel the world, always having another artist, gallery, blog or photographer willing to show you their city.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli
Something about these blue stockings made everything look even better. © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli
While heading back to Eastern District /Ad Hoc Gallery for a couple other stencils, we had to say hello to these 2 ladies, and the photographer who was shooting them on the streets of Bushwick. Jef received a friendly Brooklyn welcome. © Vincent Cornelli

veng, becki, stephane, and myself looking on at the very personable, warm and talented Jef Aerosol. © Vincent Cornelli
Veng, Becki, Stephane, and me looking on at the very personable, warm and talented Jef Aerosol. © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli
Out of body, out of mind. © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli
© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli
I dunno, it breathes “Rock Star” to me. © Vincent Cornelli

I felt so comfortable with Jef that I even asked him for some thoughts on a couple larger life-changing decisions in my own life.  I thought the perspective he offered was quite spot on.  He is a warm, witty and well-spoken man, confident in his outlook and mindset.  It shows in his detailed and carefully placed stencils, and in his smile.

© Vincent Cornelli
– Yup, i think we’re done here. Super dope, Jef…you the man. © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli
“But Jef, what is the meaning behind all of your red arrows?” © Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

********************

“All Shook Up”, the debut solo New York show by Jef Aerosol will open this Friday at Ad Hoc/Eastern District in Bushwick, Brooklyn. Read more about the show HERE.

See Jef’s BASQUIAT STENCIL from last week HERE.

See how he made his 5-layer JAY-Z STENCIL for the show HERE.

See more of Vincent Cornelli’s photography and artistry HERE.

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Fresh Pictures of “Fresh Geezers”, Vinny Cornelli shoots the London Police, Galo

Last Thursday Factory Fresh Gallery hosted “Fresh Geezers”, a new show by The London Police and Galo. In a departure from his regular street art job, photographer Vinny Cornelli takes Brooklyn Street Art to the opening with these shots.

Detail of a London Police canvass featuring Chaz and Bobbie running for their lives! © Vincent Cornelli
Detail of a London Police canvass featuring Chaz and Bobbie running for their lives! © Vincent Cornelli
f;aksdljf © Vincent Cornelli

Fans react to the news that The London Police are not actually police. © Vincent Cornelli

A colorful Galo piece (© Vincent Cornelli)

A colorful Galo piece (© Vincent Cornelli)

A sepia toned Galo (© Vincent Cornelli)

A sepia toned Galo (© Vincent Cornelli)

The back wall at Factory Fresh by Galo (© Vincent Cornelli)

The back wall at Factory Fresh by Galo (© Vincent Cornelli)

(© Vincent Cornelli)

Smiling is contagious! (© Vincent Cornelli)

Mid-western tourists in Times Square? No, it's the London Police! (© Vincent Cornelli)

Mid-western tourists in Times Square? No, it's the London Police! (© Vincent Cornelli)

Chaz (© Vincent Cornelli)
Chaz is wildly thrilled with the turnout. (© Vincent Cornelli)

Geezers (© Vincent Cornelli)
Geezers (The London Police) (© Vincent Cornelli)

Galo (© Vincent Cornelli)

Galo (© Vincent Cornelli)

Sailor felt that the show was a high-flying success (with dad Logan Hicks) (© Vincent Cornelli)
Sailor felt that the whole show was a high-flying success (with dad Logan Hicks) (© Vincent Cornelli)
(© Vincent Cornelli)

"So I says to her, I says, 'Haven't we met someplace before?'. She says, 'Yeah I'm the receptionist at the V.D. clinic'." (© Vincent Cornelli)

Galo made a bird shelter from some old canvasses (© Vincent Cornelli)

Galo made a bird shelter from some old canvasses (© Vincent Cornelli)

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"Word son, did you see when the chic unlocked their handcuffs and dragged him into another room with her?" (© Vincent Cornelli)

Time to fly home. (© Vincent Cornelli)

Time to fly home. (© Vincent Cornelli)

See More of Vinny Cornelli’s photography HERE.

text by Brooklyn Street Art

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Vinny Cornelli shoots Crosby Street in NYC

Bold street splashes and Hacullean mayhem from Manhattan.

Photo by Vinny Cornelly

Photo © Vinny Cornelli

This week photographer Vinny Cornelli shows us a few images from one spot in Gotham that gets hit with some regularity, and then destroyed and re-hit – and always visited by street art followers.

It’s entertaining how abandoned places on the street turn into a “venue” over time. Then, like Elton John taking residency at Ceasars Palace, one or two street artists seem to gravitate to the same spot again and again, nonplussed by the destruction of their last piece.

Photo by Vinny Cornelly

Photo © Vinny Cornelli

This spot on Crosby street has been a regular showcase for Haculla, a tripped out pop culture commentator and comedian who weaves criticism with private stories in bold splashes of fluorescence, black and white photos of celebs re-doctored, and thick marker freehand characters.

Of course it all gets piled on by others as part of the “conversation of the street”, and in these layers you can see Matt Siren, Cake, Feral, among others.

Cornelli pumps up the saturation to give the chaos a campy quality and lets the decrepitude dazzle.

Photo by Vinny Cornelly

Photo © Vinny Cornelli

Photo by Vinny Cornelli

Photo by Vinny Cornelli

Photo by Vinny Cornelli

Cake and Haculla - Photo © Vinny Cornelli

Photo by Vinny Cornelli

Photo © Vinny Cornelli

Photo by Vinny Cornelli

A Feral wheatpaste here - Photo © Vinny Cornelli

Click here for more street layers by Vinny Cornelli

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Documenting Decay Part II: Seeing Art in Street Layers of Detritus

Photo Vinny Cornelly

© Vincent Cornelli

At 11 Spring Street in Nolita, a neighborhood in lower Manhattan, sits a 19th Century brick building that two centuries ago was a stable and carriage house.

As the 2oth Century turned, the building had gained a following by urban art fans and street artists from all over the world.  Over the course of the 1990’s graffiti and street artists had used the exterior walls of this building as their multi-storied canvas.  Within a short time the address had become a destination, an uncurated museum for graffiti, street artists, and tourists alike – an up-to-the-minute ever changing conversation of street culture.

Photo Vinny Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

But the blanding plague of gentrification that swept across the city claimed the urban art gallery and it succumbed to condoitus a couple of years ago.  Like the visual equivalent of a New Orleans funeral march, street artists and graffiti artists took one last chance to festoon the edifice as it’s soul departed to allow conversion to condominiums, and the local paper did a story on it. Every inch of the facade and much of the interior was covered and recovered by layers of art and graffiti. “11 Spring” took one last bow.

Photo Vinny Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

Demolition, buffing, and upgrading to the comforts of a new Manhattan wealthy class soon followed the celebration, and pinstriped men and pencil skirted women strutted through it’s white plastered interior waving their arms and referring proudly to it’s storied past; the artists that once brought attention to the location, abruptly “unfriended”.  Among the many ironies of the story, the market for the new spaces has not materialized, reportedly forcing it’s owners to cut their asking prices almost in half this year.

Photo Vinny Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

Street photographer Vinny Cornelli used to arrive at the building early in the morning, before the streets came alive with commuters and shop keepers, to gaze upon the raw collage.

He captured the thick layers of art that formed the exterior finish of the walls; covered in spray paint, wheat pastes, rubber, metal, plastic, cardboard, wood and just about anything available.  As if in a zen haze, he zoomed in on details, and stepped back to frame the visible cacophony.

Photo Vinny Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

This small sample of images show the layering of creativity in the moment before mute. The organic collage speaks to the many contributors and the conversations of the street: a collective contribution evoking chaos, humor, classical, commercial, pop and poetry.

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See more of Vinny Cornelli’s street layers HERE

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Documenting Decay: Seeing Art in Street Layers of Detritus

Street photographer Vinny Cornelli joins Brooklyn Street Art today to contribute his voice to the dialogue of the street, in what we hope will be an ongoing conversation.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

An enthusiastic traveler and documenter, with his images Vinny reveals an inner world that lies behind the camera; affecting his choices of subjects and how he frames them.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

In addition to shooting street art, he specializes in something he calls street layers; those accumulated overlapping stratum of posters and wheatpastes common on abandoned buildings and work-sites, layers of paper torn back to reveal the inside guts of the street and it’s history.  Part collage, part archeology, the resulting street layers are finished presentations in his view, as much as they are one more ethereal moment in street history.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

This week is the first of a two-part photo essay by Cornelli focusing on one of New York’s more recently famous addresses in street art’s oeuvre.  Before it became a celebrated event space, this location was one of the destinations regularly visited by myriad street artists.

© Vincent Cornelli
© Vincent Cornelli

As is often the case, it was also an urban scene of neglect and, in Vinny’s eye, beautiful decay.  Vinny takes this first opportunity to talk to BSA’s readers in these, some of his first contemplative images of the street early in this decade.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

To veterans of New York’s street art scene, see if you can identify the location, and drop us a line.

Next week Vinny shows us what it looked like when street artist’s took it over formally.

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

Vincent Cornelli

© Vincent Cornelli

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© Vincent Cornelli

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