All posts tagged: Thrashbird

BSA Images Of The Week: 02.04.18

BSA Images Of The Week: 02.04.18

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

Stomping through the streets of New York Friday looking for new Street Art and graffiti, the cold and the wind reminded us of a saying we learned from the Norwegians during recent trips there: “There’s no such a thing as bad weather, only bad clothing”.

Cold comfort perhaps, but an apt metaphor for weathering the storms. Prepare!

These photos draw from that frozen urban exploration we embarked upon to the hinterlands of places not typically known for a Street Art scene like Sunnyside, Queens and places now slaughtered with murals and some smaller illegal pieces like the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

Hope you are as impressed by what we found as we are as Gen Z is making some of those Millenials look like old grannies out here! Real Talk.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring A Cool 55, Alex Andre, Damien Mitchell, drsc0, Alexander Evans, Ardif, Angry Red, Arrex Skulls, Below Key, Dede, Dirt Cobain, Gongkan, Keith Haring, Praxis VGZ, SacSix, Sean Slaney, Special Robot Dog, Teg Artworks, Thrashbird, and Voxx Romana .

Top Image: Thrashbird…and LBJ at the #greatwallofsavas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A Cool 55 at the #greatwallofsavas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A Cool 55 at the #greatwallofsavas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Alexandra Evans . Alex Andrae at First Street Green. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Damien Mitchell (photo © Jaime Rojo)

SacSix tribute to Biggie Smalls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dirt Cobain at the #greatwallofsavas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Arrex Skulls at the #greatwallofsavas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gongkan at First Street Green. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Special Robot Dog at First Street Green. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dede (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ardif. Detail. At the #greatwallofsavas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ardif at the #greatwallofsavas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Voxx Romana at the #greatwallofsavas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

drsc0 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Teg Artworks at the #greatwallofsavas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Below Key and friends. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sean Slaney and Angry Red at First Street Green. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sean Slaney and Angry Red at First Street Green. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Praxis VGZ (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Keith Haring (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. East River. January 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 10.22.17

BSA Images Of The Week: 10.22.17

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

Absent worries that the banks and oligarchs are poised to crash our economy into the ground and that the privatized profiteering war machine wants Trump to start WWIII its been a fantastic and sunny and crisp warm week in New York.  Of course the city is a little more somber since the Yankees missed their chance at the World Series last night. In the spirit of sportspersonship we wish the best to the Astros.

Aside from new street art pieces going up on the street JPO had an opening at Wall Works in the Bronx, Bezt was at Spoke Art, Royce Bannon and Matt Siren had Ember City, Philipe Pantone was at GR Gallery, Dusty Rebel is launching his “Street Cuts” App Monday, and we’re just getting a look at the new show we’re co-curating for VINZ Feel Free in a couple of weeks.

Speaking of Pantone, the two walls he did this week were strong and optically dizzying/thrilling as you would expect – while the subtley more sophisticated walls were inside for Planned Iridescence near by at the GR Gallery on Bowery. The big wall done with The L.I.S.A. Project presented several technical and material difficulties which the artist eventually solved but not without having to spend a whole lot more of time on it than originally estimated: a remarkable feat, even if the wall itself isn’t a large one compared to many others he’s executed around the world. Sure enough it got the New York welcome from a graffiti artist who took the liberty to vandalize it under the cover of darkness and on the very same night of the opening party for his show.

We have grown accustomed to see the artworks by Street Artists and muralists in public vandalized, disrespected and gone over. We don’t know what justification or reasons a graffiti writer has when tagging a well executed wall and the so-called “rules” on the street depend on who’s telling them. It is interesting that the color fits right into the palette, almost as if the tagger found an unspent can that had been left on the sidewalk nearby.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Arrex Skulls, Bunny M, City Kitty, D7606, Dain, Felipe Pantone, Fintan Magee, Gods in Love, Megzany, RUN, Stikman, Stray Ones, and Thrashbird.

Top image: Felipe Pantone in collaboration with The L.I.S.A. Project NYC in Little Italy, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Felipe Pantone in collaboration with The L.I.S.A. Project NYC in Little Italy, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Felipe Pantone in collaboration with The L.I.S.A. Project NYC in Little Italy, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Andrew Tarlow (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dain in collaboration with The L.I. S.A. Project NYC in Little Italy, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Strayones (photo © Jaime Rojo)

bunny M (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gods In Love in Cerignola, Italy. (photo © Gods In Love)

The Street Artist who goes by the name Gods in Love did this mural in the San Samuele district of Cerignola, Italy last month. He says that this part of the city is called “Fort Apache” by the locals – an indirect reference to the 1981 movie (and 1976 book) about a crime-ridden neighborhood in the Bronx during the 1960s-70s. The Native American tribe named The Apache that preceded the European’s arrival who lived/live in the mid-western part of this continent were known for being fierce warriors – thus the connotation with a violent proud, yet financially destitute, neighborhood in The Bronx, New York.

“A totem is a natural or supernatural entity that has a particular symbolic meaning for a person or tribe, and to whom it feels bound throughout life,” explains the artist. The term derives from the word ototeman used by the Native American people Ojibway. My choice of working on this figure arises from the need to create an image that can be symbolic of belonging to a neighborhood to a group, a symbol of belonging to the protection of the offspring and therefore of the future, a need for legality and correctness to fight or understand, integrating and accepting it, the illness stemmed from the discomfort of life in a changing neighborhood, willing to redeem. Mine is a metaphor, a symbol in which the neighborhood can fully recognize.”

Thrashbird (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)

RUN in Anacona, Italy. (photo © RUN)

City Kitty in collaboration with D7606 and Arrex Skulls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Megzany (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Fintan Magee in Raiatea, French Polynesia for ONO’U Tahiti 2017. (photo © Jean Ozonder)

Untitled. Busker in the NYC Subway. October 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 05.07.17

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.07.17


BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

Whether by design or organically grown, we have always gravitated to what we call “Magnet Walls” – those graffiti/Street Art gardens in a town or city that are an open canvas for artists to get up, try out new ideas, experiment with materials, implement a strategy. These walls play an important role in the ecosystem of what we call Street Art or Urban Art. They’re not always explicitly illegal because their reputation draws 10s or 100s of artists to pile on year after year without interruption. The building owners could be allowing the expressions to take place for charitable reasons, more likely just neglect.

The role of these magnet walls is important …and so we are happy to see that while some walls have ceased to exist in some New York neighborhoods in recent years, mostly due to the voracious appetite of developers and the dulling effects of gentrification – “the shack” in Bushwick, the candy factory in Soho to mention just two of them – others are flourishing elsewhere. Today we have many images from a block known as the Great Wall of Savas in Queens.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring: Aito Katazaki, A Cool55, Amanda Marie, bunnyM, Dirt Cobain, Hektad, JerkFace, Key Detail, Martian Code Art, Pat Perry, Stikman, Thrashbird, What Will You Leave Behind, and WhisBe.

Top image: Thrashbird at The Great Wall of Savas. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Thrashbird at The Great Wall of Savas. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Thrashbird at The Great Wall of Savas. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Thrashbird at The Great Wall of Savas. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Thrashbird & WhisBe collab at The Great Wall of Savas. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pat Perry for Art in Ad Places. “Drop Bones Not Bombs”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jerkface (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Amanda Marie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Saint Francis reaching out to an Angry Bird – as he would, because he’s a saint. Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A Cool55 at The Great Wall of Savas. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A Cool55 at The Great Wall of Savas. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The artist’s name is What Will You Leave Behind. “Email me your heart”(photo © Jaime Rojo)

A small poem in the corner reads, “Email me your heart. Then in the morning while we watch the sun rise, kneeling down by the river, the blood drips freely as we wash our hands clean”

bunnyM (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Aito Kitazaki at The Great Wall of Favas. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Aito Kitazaki for East Village Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Key Detail for East Village Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Martian Code Art and Hektad at The Great Wall of Savas. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dirt Cobain at The Great Wall of Savas. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Queens, NYC. April 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

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Instantaneous Memorials on Street to “Army of One”

Instantaneous Memorials on Street to “Army of One”

As a followup to yesterday’s posting regarding the passing of Jef Campion, known as the street artist Army of One/ JC2, it is perhaps no surprise that nearly immediately there are a couple of tributes to him on the street – at least in LA.

Street Artist Free Humanity sent us these new photos of a new stencil piece by Teach_Art_One featuring Jef looking over his shoulder at you and placing his name on the wall.  According to Free Humanity these new works are on the spots that Jef had hit when visiting Melrose and Fairfax in Los Angeles.

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A brand new memorial tribute to Army of One in Los Angeles. Teach_Art_One (photo © Thrashbird)

“I was blessed to call him a brother,” says Free Humanity of Army of One. FH feels that the new stencils appeared as a way to keep him on the streets. Awash in the grief of the moment FH wanted to say “the only way to have someone live forever is to never stop loving them.”

Apart from the high emotions of this time, we wanted to remark that this act of the tribute wall is analogous to the myriad walls that have been going up for decades in cities like Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York – usually in the community mural style – to mark the passing of someone. Sometimes it is a community leader not related to art but of great standing to the people who live in the locality. Other times a tribute will commemorate a person in the context of an historical event that they were pivotal to.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Teach_Art_One-tribute-to-Jef-Campion-by-thrashbird

A brand new memorial tribute to Army of One in Los Angeles. Teach_Art_One (photo © Thrashbird)

Graffiti crews have been paying tributes to their fallen for many years on memorial walls. Over the last year for example we have covered a large number of walls made by the crew and friends of graffiti writer Nekst. Needless to say the act of crossing out, going over, or dissing works like those would be considered to be as close to sacrilege as the streets can imagine.

These new stencils honoring Army of One carry on this tradition and it is additionally visually remarkable because the newly sprayed stencil is a street art piece depicting a street artist who is putting up street art – It is akin to looking at a mirror’s reflection in a mirror.

 

 

Photographer Thrashbird’s Instagram is @thrashBird13

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