All posts tagged: The Dusty Rebel

BSA Images Of The Week: A Collection Of PRIDE

BSA Images Of The Week: A Collection Of PRIDE

In honor of the 50th Anniversary of the Stonewall Inn uprising in the West Village in Manhattan, we are giving the spotlight this Sunday to the many artworks that have been created by dozens of artists from all over the world in the city over the past weeks. Some of them are commissioned works and others are illegally placed on the streets, regardless of who made them or under whose sponsorship they were created or if they were placed illegally the important thing is to realize that the struggle for recognition, acceptance, and justice didn’t just happen because somebody was willing to give that to us.

It happened because a lot of people before us dared to challenged the establishment and fought to change the cultural norms, the laws in the books and ultimately the perception from the society at large. People suffered unspeakable evil and pain at the hands of unmoved gatekeepers and power brokers. People died rather than living a lie. People took to the streets to point fingers at those who stood silent when many others were dying and were deemed untouchable.

People marched to vociferate and yelled the truth and were arrested and marked undesirable. Many brothers and sisters who were much more courageous than we’ll ever be, defied a system that was designed to fail them and condemn them. Restless souls confronted our political, business, media and religious leaders right in their front yards with the truth and never backed down.

So we must pay homage to them. We have what we have because of them. We owe it to them and we need to understand that it was because of their vision, intelligence and fearless actions that the majority began to understand that without them and their help we would never get equal treatment. Equal rights. Equal opportunities.

So yes let’s celebrate, dance and sing together but let’s feel the pain of those who can’t join in on the celebrations because today still they are on the margins, hiding in the shadows, being cast out from their families and communities and even killed and tortured. Let’s remember that the job isn’t done, indeed far from it. Many countries still have in their laws harsh punishment for those that don’t conform to their established norms. Let’s keep the fight on, the light on, the courage on, the voices loud and the minds open. Happy Pride.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street (or boardwalk), this time featuring Aloha, Buff Monster, David Puck, Divine, Fox Fisher, Homo Riot, IronClad, Jason Naylor, Joe Caslin, JPO, Meres One, Nomad Clan, Ori Carino, Royce Bannon, Sam Kirk, SAMO, SeeTf, and Tatyana Fazlalizadeh.

seeTF portrait of Taylor & Lauren with Meres One’s heart shaped rainbow. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Homoriot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Joe Caslin. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jason Naylor (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Dusty Rebel. Hope Will Never Be Silent. In collaboration with #KeepFighting (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Buff Monster. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Aloha for Art In Ad Places in collaboration with The Dusty Rebel. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
David Puck. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Royce Bannon (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jeremy Novy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JPO. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jeremy Novy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jess X Snow for Art In Ad Places in collaboration with The Dusty Rebel. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Homo Riot & Suriani. “Pay It No Mind”. Mural restored. The image on the center is of Marsha P. Johnson 1945 -1992. She was a founding member of Gay
Liberation Front. She was an AIDS activist with ACT UP and co-fonder
of S.T.A.R. (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries). Miss Johnson was in the forefront during the Stonewall Inn Riots fighting for gay rights when gays didn’t have any rights and they weren’t fashionable and “scrubbed clean” for their prime time on T.V. Suriani used Mr. Richard Shupper’s portrait of Ms. Johnson (pictured below) as an inspiration for his art. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Iron Clad (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Nomad Clan. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tatyana Fazlalizadeh. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

From Tatyana about this piece: “Some of Us Did Not Die. We’re Still Here. – June Jordan, Black, bi-sexual, activist, poet and writer. .

Last fall I met with members of @griotcircle, a community of LGBTQ+ Black and brown elders for my residency with @nycchr. I got to speak with them about their lives and some things that came up were the challenges of being Black and gay in New York years ago, like having to travel in groups because queer folks would be attacked for walking alone. Or not being served at restaurants because they were also black. “

Tatyana Fazlalizadeh. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SAMO. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sam Kirk. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ori Carino. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Meres One. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fox Fisher for Art In Ad Places in collaboration with The Dusty Rebel. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Art In Ad Places X Pride

Art In Ad Places X Pride

The private art curators behind the public ad takeover initiative “Art In Ad Places” have been inviting people whom they like to show their art and curate in their exclusive campaign with phone booths. Today we feature a selection curated by their friend The Dusty Rebel to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising which was happening here in New York streets in June 1969.

Right now the city is flooded with hundreds of thousands (more?) of LGBTQ tourists and thanks to artists who take over public spaces not all of the messages that will greet them will be corporations co-opting a grassroots rebellion. These sentiments are artist-to-viewer, person-to-person.

Aloha. Art In Ad Places in collaboration with The Dusty Rebel. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Suriani. Art In Ad Places in collaboration with The Dusty Rebel. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fox Fisher. Art In Ad Places in collaboration with The Dusty Rebel. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Pansy Project. Art In Ad Places in collaboration with The Dusty Rebel. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Novy. Art In Ad Places in collaboration with The Dusty Rebel. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jess X Snow. Art In Ad Places in collaboration with The Dusty Rebel. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lesbica Feminista. Art In Ad Places in collaboration with The Dusty Rebel. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Art in Ad Places is an initiative of Luna Park and RJ Rushmore and more information about their project can be seen HERE. See their Instagram HERE.

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The Dusty Rebel: “Resistance Is Queer” Phone Booth Campaign in NYC

The Dusty Rebel: “Resistance Is Queer” Phone Booth Campaign in NYC

Who writes your history? Who would gladly suppress it?


By reviving and celebrating those who the mainstream historically underplays, undercuts, neatly overlooks, and otherwise de facto silences, a new takeover campaign on NY streets helps write the history of LGBTQ struggle, and keeps it just as relevant as this moment.

Photographer and journalist The Dusty Rebel now curates the same streets he documents and shares with BSA readers today his determined campaign to revive, preserve, propel forward the significant players and events that have fought in their myriad ways, with the admonishment to keep fighting. With “Resistance is Queer” he uses his images and his respect for LGBTQ history to ensure that the full spectrum of people are recognized for their contributions to this civil rights struggle for equality.

We’re grateful that he has taken the time to explain in detail the people behind the images and their significance to him personally as well as their role in a people’s history.


RESISTANCE IS QUEER


by The Dusty Rebel

The Dusty Rebel. Miss Colombia. In collaboration with #KeepFighting (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ms Colombia (aka Oswaldo Gomez)


This Resistance Is Queer poster features a photograph I took of the beloved Ms Colombia at the 2015 Easter Parade, who sadly passed away in 2018. This excerpt from The New York Times summarizes many of my thoughts on Ms Colombia:

“Daniel Albanese, a street photographer who often shot her, said that Gómez was loved because she resisted classification, refusing to soften her queerness, her personality or her aesthetic, even as the reputation and culture of the city mellowed out. ‘For me, Ms. Colombia was the embodiment of liberation,” he said. “She showed us how to thrive in the unique environment that is New York and proved this city is still a place where those who feel marginalized can flourish and be celebrated.’” — Ms. Colombia Refused to Soften Her Queerness. She Paraded It, The New York Times Magazine, 12/28/2018

The Dusty Rebel. Sister Lotti Da. In collaboration with #KeepFighting (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sister Lotti Da


As I said last year at our MoMA PS1 talk, “Every expression of queer existence is a revolutionary act.” That’s why this #ResistanceIsQueer poster features activist Sister Lotti Da, The Merry Sodomite, of the Missionary Order of Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. This photograph was taken during the casting of the circle at the 2018 NYC Drag March, which reminds me how beautiful it is when queer people take space and celebrate our lives.

The Dusty Rebel. I Like Dick. I Like Taters. Not Dictators. In collaboration with #KeepFighting (photo © Jaime Rojo)

I Like Dick. I Like Taters. Not Dictators.


This Resistance Is Queer poster features a photograph I took at the LGBT Solidarity Rally outside the Stonewall Inn on February 4, 2017. Thousands gathered for the demonstration to stand with “every immigrant, asylum seeker, refugee and every person impacted by Donald Trump’s illegal, immoral, unconstitutional and un-American executive orders.”

The Dusty Rebel. Dick Leitsch. In collaboration with #KeepFighting (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dick Leitsch


This Resistance Is Queer poster features a photograph I took of Dick Leitsch at the 52nd anniversary of the historic “Sip-In” at Julius’ Bar in the West Village. Leitsch—president of gay rights group the Mattachine Society in the 1960s—was one of the four homosexuals who led a pioneering act of civil disobedience to secure the right of gay patrons to be served in a licensed bar, helping to clear the way for gay bars to operate openly in New York State. Dick Leitsch passed away in 2018, at the age of 83.

The Dusty Rebel. Hope Will Never Be Silent. In collaboration with #KeepFighting (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Hope Will Never Be Silent”


An encore of my first Resistance Is Queer poster, which features a photograph I took at the 2016 NYC Drag March. Tattooed on his back is a quote—“Hope Will Never Be Silent”—is from Harvey Milk, the first openly gay person to be elected to public office in California. Milk was assassinated just under 11 months in office.


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Homo Riot, Suriani, The Dusty Rebel “Pay It No Mind”

Homo Riot, Suriani, The Dusty Rebel “Pay It No Mind”

Queer artists and writers in the graffiti and Street Art scene have always been present but like everywhere else in the culture they were more or less bullied by peers to deny it or keep it hidden. It might strike you as ironic or even hypocritical that a subculture of people who feel largely marginalized would propagate another layer of rejection onto their own peers, but humans and clans can be mysterious. And we don’t forget that it was the fags and drag queens who fought against the police in 1969, and who ultimately won through sacrifice, persistence, and collaboration – despite the odds.

Homo Riot & Suriani at work wheat pasting the artwork. (photo © Dusty Rebel)

As attitudes slowly change in mainstream society, LGBTQ+ peeps with aerosol cans, stickers, stencils and wheat-pastse are also using graff and Street Art to bring their issues to walls around the city. Today we talk to two artists – Homo Riot and Suriani, along with photographer, film maker, and social activist The Dusty Rebel, who organized their own wall this week to collaborate in saluting one of those Stonewall queens who fought back, Marsha P. Johnson. Even after this new piece was vandalized, the crew simply went back to work to put it up again. The accompanying text and probable title of the piece is “Pay It No Mind”

BSA: Dusty, you’ve been thinking about this wall for Pride for a long time now.
The Dusty Rebel (Daniel Albanese): For over a year and a half, I have been traveling around the world filming my documentary about the global Queer Street Art movement. Very little attention has been paid to the topic, which I find curious since so many street art pioneers were queer. In my exploration, I have found that many queer-identifying street artists primarily install their work without permission and it’s often more subversive- which stands in contrast to the growing dominance of muralism.

Art work vandalized. (photo © Dusty Rebel)

This wall is actually the kick off to a series of Queer Street Art that will be coming to NYC for Pride Month. I have partnered with Art In Ad Places, Keep Fighting NYC, and other community based projects to create a queer alternative to the overwhelming flood of corporate pride events. While not part of Reclaim Pride Coalition’s inaugural Queer Liberation March on June 30th, I was inspired by the activists who have organized to bring the “Spirit of Stonewall” directly to the street, and who are keeping the focus on the continuing needs of the LGBTQ+ community

Homo Riot at work restoring the mural. (photo © Dusty Rebel)

BSA: What’s the genesis of your idea for this installation? Getting walls in NYC for artists to paint free of charge is almost impossible. How did you manage to get this sweet spot?
The Dusty Rebel: Because it’s seems rare that queer artists get to paint overtly queer legal murals, I wanted to find a way to bring one to New York City.  Several months ago, I contacted my good friend Steve Stoppart, and asked him if I could have his wall on Houston — just one block over from where Keith Haring painted the legendary Bowery mural in 1982. Immediately, he said yes and told me I had permission to do anything I wanted. We have no corporate sponsor, so the wall is totally funded by all of us chipping in as a community.

Once I had the wall, I immediately reached out to Suriani and Home Riot — two artists I have known for years, and who’s work had inspired me to start my film. 

Homo Riot & Suriani. “Pay It No Mind”. Mural restored. The image on the center is of Marsha P. Johnson 1945 -1992. She was a founding member of Gay Liberation Front. She was an AIDS activist with ACT UP and co-fonder of S.T.A.R. (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries). Miss Johnson was in the forefront during the Stonewall Inn Riots fighting for gay rights when gays didn’t have any rights and they weren’t fashionable and “scrubbed clean” for their prime time on T.V. Suriani used Mr. Richard Shupper’s portrait of Ms. Johnson (pictured below) as an inspiration for his art. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Richard Shupper’s studio portrait from 1991 of Marsha P. Johnson

BSA: Almost as soon as the piece was completed someone defaced it. What was the message they tried to send by disrespecting the art and the artists? And how did you respond?
The Dusty Rebel: I know street art is ephemeral, and I also know that work that is unapologetically queer is especially targeted. So I knew it was coming, I just didn’t expect something that big and that fast in less than 30 hours. We made this piece as a community, for our community. We really wanted to start conversation about the issues that LGBTQ+ people face, and to honor the memory of Marsha P. Johnson and the Stonewall Riot. To have that important conversation cut short felt like a punch in the gut

In terms of how we dealt with it – we knew who it was, so we reached out to him and explained why the mural was important. He said he wasn’t motivated by homophobia and apologized. And I get it. I’ve known enough vandals to understand that sometimes when your bombing you’re not necessarily thinking about what you’re hitting. But we had planned for something like that, so we were ready to “pay it no mind” and to restore the mural.

BSA: How did Homo Riot and Suriani approach the collaborative aspect of the installation. 
The Dusty Rebel: We began planning this wall over seven months ago. I told them I wanted it to be a celebration of queer liberation and make reference to New York’s history. While they are familiar with each other’s work, neither had met in person. Both artists have very different aesthetics. Homo Riot’s work being more homoerotic and aggressive, while Suriani’s is a colorful exploration of gender. So I knew it would be a challenge, but I also knew they would take the collaboration seriously. This wasn’t just two artists who were slapping their work next to each other. They listened to each other and compromised, without compromising their artistic voices. So, I’m very proud of them and the wall they created.

Homo Riot & Suriani. “Pay It No Mind”. Mural restored. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Why do you think it’s important to have queer perspectives in Street Art?
Homo Riot: Street art is egalitarian.  It’s open to all and its consumption is not restricted to a particular class, creed or level of education.  And because it’s ubiquitous in our current environment, it provides opportunities for queer and marginalized people to be visible. In urban environments, queer art becomes part of the landscape and our presence hopefully becomes part of the collective consciousness making way for acceptance and inclusion.  In small towns and long stretches of interstate, representations of LGBTQ+ art are important for those members of our community who are isolated and may feel alone.

BSA: Why do you think it’s important to have queer perspectives in Street Art?
Suriani: I think it is important to have queer perspectives in all kinds of art or environments. Street Art is a space of free self-expression. It happens in public space, so it is accessible to everyone. Queer culture traditionally occurs in closed spaces due to the repression and violence LGBTQ+ people have suffered throughout history. Expressing our values and points of view to a larger public might spread awareness of our existence and help our communities in our fights for equality in terms of acceptance and rights

The official art world is already aware of these issues as we can see with the Brooklyn Museum’s current exhibition “Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall“. The problem is that only a very limited percentage of the population has access to museums. Urban Art is part of the city, it comes to people instead of waiting for people to come to it. Our message is directly visible to everyone who’s out there in public space: Inside of that resides its main power.

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BSA Images Of The Week: 06.25.17

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.25.17


BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

‘Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017’’ it’s called, because “Kill The Poor” was not testing well in focus groups? Luckily, most people will never get sick or old, so this shouldn’t be a problem.

It’s LGBTQ Pride weekend in New York, the home of the original Stonewall Inn where all the colorful queens bashed back at the cops in 1969. All of these years’ celebrations seem more militant in the face of President Pence’s virulent statements and acts against anybody not straight like him and his “mother”.

Also it’s Eid al-Adha today, the end of Ramadan and a big celebration for Muslim New Yorkers, so best wishes to you.

In Street Art news the big story at the moment appears to be that Banksy may actually be Robert Del Naja from Massive Attack, which may explain why so many of his world views and of humanity are rather dismal, see what we did there?

So here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Bert, Chor Boogie, El Sol 25, Gats, LMNOPI, Mr. Toll, Nepo, Resistance is Female, Sonni, Stik, Sipros, and Such.

Top image: Stik (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chor Boogie for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chor Boogie for The Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chor Boogie for The Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pride Train (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Dusty Rebel for #resistanceisfemale. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Dusty Rebel for #resistanceisfemale. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gats for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Detail. photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gats for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

NEPO (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sonni for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Such . Bert (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Such . Sipros for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sipros for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

…with some help from Mary… (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Brooklyn, NY. June 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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“No Means No” Performance Brings Bloody Handprints to Houston-Bowery Wall

“No Means No” Performance Brings Bloody Handprints to Houston-Bowery Wall

“Resist!” and “No Means No!” were the messages at the Houston-Bowery Wall on Sunday as the sun descended at the end of the weekend while a silent and dramatic performance organized by Jasmine Wahi played out before it and on it. Whether or not people had accepted artist David Choe’s apology a day earlier for “rapey” talk and personal storytelling implicating himself (the verdict is decidedly mixed) the larger issue of dangerous and corrosive attitudes about rape in cultures across the world still remains powerfully relevant.

While this particular Houston-Bowery mural lasted the briefest amount of time of any that we can remember and wall owner Goldman Properties decided to buff it completely after less than two weeks with no comment, the roughly 20-person performance brought a myriad of issues alive with the simplest addition of dripping “bloody” red hand prints on the fresh white wall.

With rape culture at the forefront, many other conversations are in play here – women’s parity in the art world, misogyny in general – and the rising heat that accompanies this first day of summer only stirs the moments’ discontent. Perhaps cooler heads will prevail eventually but it doesn’t look like it right now. In analyzing these images by The Dusty Rebel you may say that Sundays’ stoicism facing a busy city street spoke more to a sincere grief and a steely determination to see change than simply a dissatisfaction with the status quo.

Photographer and NYC street culture documenter Daniel Albanese aka The Dusty Rebel was there during the performance, shooting photos and video and talking to people. He shares his observations and theirs along with these images and video for BSA readers today.

No Means No. Bowery / Houston Wall. Manhattan, NYC. June 18, 2017. (photo © The Dusty Rebel)


Research, photos, video by Daniel Albanese aka The Dusty Rebel

Earlier this month, New York’s most legendary wall was given to the controversial artist David Choe. The artist who rose to fame painting Facebook’s office came under fire for a 2014 podcast, in which he told a detailed story about raping a masseuse. While the artist claimed it was “bad storytelling”, many critics believed the curators of the Bowery Wall were perpetuating rape culture by giving Choe such a prominent platform.

The mural was immediately covered in tags, and eventually buffed. After two weeks of silence, Choe finally released a statement addressing the controversy. A protest—which was planned before Choe’s apology—was organized by curator Jasmine Wahi, to address rape culture. “This piece is intended to examine examples of violent and predatory misogyny,” she is quoted as saying on Facebook. “Our aim is to provoke widespread rejection of the continued normalization of rape culture by bringing visibility to the topic.”

Whatever the truth is, I think this was an unfortunate moment in the history of New York’s most legendary wall. Not just because of it’s prime location, but because Keith Haring was the first to paint there in 1982. I hope Haring’s legacy is kept in mind when considering future heirs to the wall.

I also think this is a lesson that ignoring a controversy won’t make it go away. Also, I’m glad it’s opened a wider discussion about rape, it’s ramifications, and the various ways our society perpetuates violence.


No Means No. Bowery / Houston Wall. Manhattan, NYC. June 18, 2017. (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

__________________________________________________________________
From Jasmine Wahi, protest organizer and Curator on her Instagram account:

“Yesterday, at 5 pm, 20+ of us joined together in silent solidarity against pervasive predatory #rapeculture. I’m still processing the jumble of feelings that I have- there is nothing like making yourself vulnerable and laying it all out there to fight for what is right.

What I can say is that I am forever indebted to those who joined, made up our long silent line spelling out #NOMEANSNO and #RESIST– for those men/women/non-binary people who poured ‘blood’ on themselves to acknowledge victims and survivors – for those of us who placed a bloody handprint on the wall in honor of our own personal struggles with #rapeculture (if you drive by the mural you can probably still see the prints). I, for one, could not have stood out in the 90+ degree weather with my body out for all of lower New York to see, alone. Together we are stronger. Together we stand. Together we fight back. NO MEANS NO.”

No Means No. Bowery / Houston Wall. Manhattan, NYC. June 18, 2017. (photo © The Dusty Rebel)


From Christen Clifford, Feminist performance artist on her Instagram

“Rape culture is pervasive and even if you don’t think it swirls around you, it does. Today I was proud to participate with many artists and curators I admire under the organization of Jasmine Wahi – these conversations about rape are everywhere – and we all have choices to perpetuate or dismantle. The owners of the Bowery Wall chose to ask an artist WHO ADMITTED TO SEXUAL ASSAULT – to paint their wall.

These choices matter. Today we said in silence “No Means No” and “Resist” and we left handprints on the wall – honoring specific people we knew – I wish I didn’t have so many handprints to leave- and I was thinking especially of the people I have been in close contact with in the last few days in relation to the situation in Buffalo. Stronger together. Only together can we change the rules.”


No Means No. Bowery / Houston Wall. Manhattan, NYC. June 18, 2017. (photo © The Dusty Rebel)


Ann Lewis, Artist and Activist

“Today a moment of silence was held for all of us who have managed the emotions, the repercussions, and the trauma of sexual assault, rape, and rape culture.

Those who perpetuate and apologize for these behaviors have no concept of the lifelong trauma, significant personal changes, and the destruction of confidence and self trust that comes with sexual assault. Apologizing is not enough. You want to undo the harm? Fund rape kit testing, planned parenthood, or women’s shelters who take in those abused by their partners.

Apologies don’t change lives. Actions do.”


Bella Hall, observer

Feeling honored to have witnessed these amazing artists fighting to dismantle rape culture, and fucking proud of the voices and fists raised today in the fierce NYC heat.


No Means No. Bowery / Houston Wall. Manhattan, NYC. June 18, 2017. (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

Layqa Nuna Yawar, performer, muralist and instigator

“My reasons to do so boil down to feeling a personal responsibility to hold David Choe, Goldman Properties and the entire street art / graffiti / muralism culture accountable for it’s actions and lack of self-criticism. Being part of this culture means celebrating those who contribute to it as well as asking hard questions about what it is that we do, especially now that it has reached a high level of visibility and the weight that a mural can carry to either affect change or be part of the problem. To either support practitioners who perpetuate rape culture or to call them out, not only at this site but everywhere.

This incident raised issues that go beyond painting on the streets and David Choe’s mural but that affect many people who practice public interventions. I joined this action in solidarity with my artists friends, curators, male and female survivors of rape, femme identified and oppressed people of color who continue to fight everyday and that are often silenced or very rarely given opportunities like painting this very visible mural.”

No Means No. Bowery / Houston Wall. Manhattan, NYC. June 18, 2017. (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

No Means No. Bowery / Houston Wall. Manhattan, NYC. June 18, 2017. (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

Video via The Dusty Rebel

 

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Signs of a New Movement: From the Women’s March On Washington

Signs of a New Movement: From the Women’s March On Washington

First conceptualizing and then actually hand-making a sign to take to a march is a variant of Street Art – part of the theatrical, political, personal, contentious activation of public space that you individually can take entirely with your own act of creativity. For pros and amateurs alike it can seem enthralling, liberating, even risky to put your artistic skill and opinions out there for others to gaze upon and analyze.

Still a protected form of speech (so far), the results of your industry can be thrilling, humorous, confusing, absolutely enraging. Depends.

King of beauty shows grips the arm of Miss Handled. Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

On the occasion of Donald Trump’s first day as president, January 21st brought an enormous flood of defiant and celebratory art, performance, and chanting to Washington. Also, thousands of pink crocheted ‘pussy’ hats.

We follow Street Art wherever we go around the world and we are always on the lookout for new, effective, poetic, strident, abstract, in-context messages and techniques. This march met and exceeded expectations.

 Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

With three times as many attendees as the actual inauguration, the Women’s March in Washington D.C. on Saturday may have been the biggest in US history. Reportedly there were hundreds of “sister marches” which it spawned across the world. Just in terms of math that means an unprecedented number of aesthetically inclined people were challenging themselves to make signs, props and all manner of theatrical costumery to get their point across.

 Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

“I’m from Columbus, Indiana – home of Mike Pence and that is very discouraging for me because I do not support Mike Pence’s views on LGBTQ rights at all. I am here to protect my daughters, and my granddaughter. I am here to protect Women’s Rights. I am here to protect the immigrants in this country, who have made this country strong. I believe this is a nation of immigrants. I believe our country has been hijacked by a narcissistic, self-centered, very very sick human being. And I think we all must stand up against this and fight back now. And that’s why I’m here!”

Themes addressed often spoke to subtle and overt misogyny and women’s empowerment and dominion over their health, bodies, intelligence, families; all in direct response to Trump’s cavalier disparagement and violence toward women on the record and alleged in courts.

Other topics of signs for this least favorite new president skewered Russian involvement in the election, a cabinet of mostly white male billionaires from banking and oil, his mocking of a person with disabilities, racism toward anyone not white, a mocking disregard for all environmental matters, and cats.

You undoubtedly agree that cats are appropriate for nearly any march, as long as you don’t expect any actual cats to actually march, because that would be beneath them.

 Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

“We will not go away! Welcome to your first day!” was one of many chants that the New York photographer named The Dusty Rebel heard during his two day survey of the streets of the capital.

A dedicated eagle eye on the streets capturing buskers, beauties, prosletizers, preachers, politicos, and flim-flammers, Dusty says that this visit to DC was an overwhelming experience and sometimes challenging to capture. We’re thankful that he did and that he shares some of his favorite shots with BSA readers today.

 Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

In fact, this momentous series of marches across the world looks like it may have launched a new political movement, possibly sparking an increased level of engagement of citizenry with the wheels of government. It’s hard to tell but at least for now it’s brought more handmade art to the street.

“Sounds like it’s already time to start coming up with new sign ideas!,” says Becki F. on her Facebook page when it has been announced that the next march is being planned for April 15th – tax day. One possible outcome will be that the President admits that yes, people do care about his tax returns.

Plush female symbol made from a recycled vintage quilt by Jewelry designer Cat Luck. Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

Someone is not feeling Tindr. America Swipes Left sign by Steve Dean. Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

One of Shepard Fairey’s newest posters proved inspirational to many in the Muslim community as well as many supporters, some of whom donned US flags as hijabs.  Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

Many signs featured images of Star Wars character Princess Leia as a tribute to the actress who played her and who recently passed away, Carrie Fisher stars as the princess leads The Resistance. Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

Musician Stevie Nicks was quoted on this sign by Panhandle Slim from Savannah, GA, while Madonna blathered curse words at the mic. Music released in response to Trump/Pence’s election/inauguration include new songs by A Tribe Called Quest, John Mellencamp, Tori Amos, Arcade Fire with Mavis Staples, Green Day, Gorillaz, Coco Rosie, and a growing list. March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

 Mad Pussy sign by Taramarie Mitravich. Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

Using a Trump quote from a video tape released in October, this sign features the Statue of Liberty. Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

Here the Statue of Liberty is portrayed as silenced. Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

 Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

 Women’s March On Washington, DC. January 21, 2017.  (photo © The Dusty Rebel)

 

To learn more about the Women’s March On Washington or to get involved click HERE

 

 

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BSA Film Friday 10.28.16

BSA Film Friday 10.28.16

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Louis Masai: The Art Of Beeing. New York City
2. “BILLS” from InDecline
3. The All-Seeing Trump in an NYC Park from The Dusty Rebel
4. Erik Vestman & Nils Petter: Up On The Roofs

 

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BSA Special Feature: Louis Masai: The Art Of Beeing. New York City

He’s doing it! The cross country trip/tour of painting murals that draws attention to the entire species that we are killing off. Louis Masai calls it “The Art of Beeing,” and here’s the first city of the tour, NYC.

 

“BILLS” from InDecline

Modern anti-hero artists named InDecline have produced this new rage-filled art film full of action, violence, politics, and even comedy.

The All-Seeing Trump in an NYC Park from The Dusty Rebel

A new video this week features Trump as a fortune teller – until the city evicts him.

Here’s how The Dusty Rebel describes it:

“A mysterious Donald Trump fortune-telling machine has been popping up all over New York City. In Tribeca Park, dozens gathered around to hear the automatic Trump list off his various visions for America’s future. One of the dozens of misfortunes was: ‘Not every woman is a dog – only the fat, disgusting ones. And don’t worry: in the future, when I am president, I’ll do something about it. We are gonna make America SEXY again!’ After the Zoltar-like Trump finished, the machine dispenses a paper fortune, which states things like, ‘The future is not to be feared, unless you are Black, Mexican, or Muslim.’

The Tribeca Park installation lasted a short time before a man, who never identifies himself, demanded the All-Seeing Trump machine be removed. Quickly the press ask him who he is and what authority he has to ask for the machine to be removed. While he never answers, the people with him are from the NYC Park Department. At one point, things getting a bit tense between the press and the Parks Department workers.”

More from The Dusty Rebel

Erik Vestman & Nils Petter: Up On The Roofs

“Sometimes, I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”
– Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Lewis Carroll

Swedish duo Erik and Nils want to be higher than the birds, up on the rooftops. It is a simple spark for your imagination, delivering you back to storybooks and children’s stories with a silhouette on the roof against the sky. With the right  inspiration, you can add your own story.

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BOO-tilicious Wolverine does Beyoncé : Halloween Street Theater

BOO-tilicious Wolverine does Beyoncé : Halloween Street Theater

This is why you live in New York and also why you troll around the streets after the Halloween Parade looking for tricks and treats. After all that live communal street theater and the pressure is off to be a Wolverine you are at liberty to set your “Single Ladies” performance free on the sidewalk.  BOO-tilicious!

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Thanks to The Dusty Rebel for this tip, and thank you to Matt Weiss, who says,  “Best part of my night. The end. This is why I call this man my brother and will be with me till my dying day. You’re welcome.”

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Another Man’s Treasure: “Art Is Trash” Creates on the Street

Another Man’s Treasure: “Art Is Trash” Creates on the Street

Converting Your Garbage Into a Fleeting Work of Art

With legal murals proliferating through the neighborhoods and cities that are embracing and inviting Street Art, it is refreshing to see that the renegade spirit of D.I.Y. is still coursing through the creative veins of the street.

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Art Is Trash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Today we take a look at “Art is Trash” (El Arte Es Basura) the nom de street of Barcelona-based Francisco de Pajaro, who appropriates the stuff you threw away and creates art with it. Sometimes he rearranges boxes and bags and lampshades and that old headboard from your bed to create a new canvas. Other times he connects his characters with pieces that other street artists have left – creating a sort of “forced collaboration”. Most frequently he is spontaneously taking inspiration from whatever materials are at hand and creating something new with them.

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Art Is Trash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

He also is pretty successful at stand-alone comedic characters who pop up on a field of graffiti tags with their own drama and an occasional fly.

Round the corner and you may witness his contingent of horse riding warriors wielding long paint rollers and an assortment of miscreants, jesters, ruffians and scallywags with wide eyes and long-stretched arms in tow. brooklyn-street-art-art-is-trash-francisco-de-pajaro-jaime-rojo-06-14-web-10

Art Is Trash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Catch him in action, and you see the same sort of free-style improvisation you might find at a comedy-jam; an artist working rapidly with the materials before him, unrestricted and unencumbered by contracts, provisions, conventions or censorship.

Art is Trash recently left an entertaining trail through New York streets. Here we present you with just a sample of his in-the-moment offerings… and a few flies.

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Art Is Trash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Art Is Trash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Art Is Trash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Art Is Trash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Art Is Trash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Art Is Trash forced collaboration with Hiss. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Art Is Trash in collaboration with Balu and The Dusty Rebel. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Art Is Trash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Art Is Trash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Art Is Trash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Art Is Trash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Art Is Trash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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13 from 2013: Daniel Albanese “A Yawning Morning Cat from Dee Dee”

13 from 2013: Daniel Albanese “A Yawning Morning Cat from Dee Dee”

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Happy Holidays to all you stupendous and talented and charming BSA readers! We thank you from the bottom of our socks for your support this year. The best way we can think of to celebrate and commemorate the year as we finish it is to bring you 13 FROM 2013 – Just one favorite image from a Street Art or graffiti photographer that brings a story, a remembrance, an insight or a bit of inspiration to the person who took it. For the last 13 days they will share a gem with all of us as we collectively say goodbye and thank you to ’13.

December-29

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“Photographer of Street Art, Strangers, Protests, & Urbanity”, Daniel Albanese has been documenting New York street life for more than a decade with his blog The Dusty Rebel.  To Daniel Street Art is not a phenomena full of hype, it is an every day part of city life that he treasures and is regaled by as he passes through the city.

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Dee Dee. NYC 2013. (photo © Daniel Albanese)

A Yawning Morning Cat from Dee Dee

~ Daniel Albanese

Ever since works by the mysterious Dee Dee began to appear around NYC, I’ve loved finding them. This piece is a prime example of their aesthetic, which often consists of contrasting images coupled with curious text.

I took this photograph early one morning; I was running late, and as I came around a construction barrier and made my way through the crowd of commuters, I was greeted by this yawning cat. Kneeling down to take the photo, several people—who just moments before were rushing to work—stopped to see what caught my eye.

For me, it was was one of those moments when it becomes clear that we all walk around this city with very different perspectives, and how street art has the ability to slow us down and take notice of our environment.

Artist: Dee Dee

Location: New York City, 2013

 

 

 
#13from2013

Check out our Brooklyn Street Art 2013 Images of the Year by Jaime Rojo here.

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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