All posts tagged: Steven P. Harrington

Walk With Amal: A Profound Puppet Public Performance in All 5 Boroughs

Walk With Amal: A Profound Puppet Public Performance in All 5 Boroughs

‘Interactive’: an overused buzzword today, much like ‘engagement’ and its derived forms. Regardless, nothing replaces true community engagement like well-planned and executed public performance. This fall, one of the most interactive puppet performances worldwide has been traveling through New York, and thousands of people have participated.

Heather Woodfield. Walk With Amal. (photo © Chris Jordan)

Meeting thousands of people in the streets as a way to educate us about the plight of people around the world who have become refugees, the 12-foot-tall puppet of a young Syrian girl named Little Amal is fulfilling a mission begun many months ago on the border of Syria. According to the website of Handspring Puppet Company, the South African team which made her, Little Amal has already traveled 5,000 miles in the two years preceding her New York visit.

Little Amal has traveled “from the Syrian border through Turkey, Greece, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Belgium and France” through more than 70 towns, villages, and cities in search of her mother. She even met the Pope.

Heather Woodfield. Walk With Amal. (photo © Chris Jordan)

Now in New York, organizers say she is in search of her Uncle Samir. Planned events in all 5 of the boroughs mean that she is being welcomed by hundreds of artists, cultural organizations, community groups, schools, and colleges during a 55-event, 17-day traveling festival.

We share with you today images from photographer Chris Jordan, who attended one of the recent interactive performances in the DUMBO neighborhood in Brooklyn. We also spoke with transdisciplinary artist Heather Alexa Woodfield, who has created, produced, and performed pieces for various festivals and events, including at Chashama, the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, FIGMENT NYC, the High Line, and The New Museum’s Ideas City. Woodfield tells us that The Little Amal project deeply touched her as an artist and performer, and she attended many of the performances.

Heather Woodfield. Walk With Amal. (photo © Chris Jordan)

Brooklyn Street Art: How did you hear about this project and what attracted you to it?

Heather Alexa Woodfield: I saw an article in the Guardian about The Walk with Amal in the fall of 2020. When I read that it was created by Good Chance Theatre, I knew I had to see it as their play The Jungle is one of the all-time great theatrical experiences. Since I went to Bread and Puppet every year as a child, I naturally have a deep love of radical puppetry and participatory public art.

Heather Woodfield. Walk With Amal. (photo © Chris Jordan)

Brooklyn Street Art: How many times have you walked with Amal? Were there many others interacting with her?

Heather Alexa Woodfield: I’ve walked with Amal 10 times so far. While I’ve mostly been too busy following the puppet to estimate the size of the crowd, it always seems to fill the space she occupies whether that is a vast space like Brooklyn Bridge Park or something more contained like galleries at the Natural History Museum.

Heather Woodfield. Walk With Amal. (photo © Chris Jordan)

Brooklyn Street Art: What do you feel that she symbolizes to you? Do you think people who first meet her on the street grasp the intention?

Heather Alexa Woodfield: Amal is a refugee who is being honored and celebrated all across the city. She helps us imagine a world where immigrants and refugees are welcomed and respected. I don’t think people who see her randomly immediately understand that she is a refugee. However, the experience seems to make people more willing to talk to strangers. Then conversations start, and the message gets passed. I’ve heard and participated in this exchange multiple times.

Heather Woodfield. Walk With Amal. (photo © Chris Jordan)

Brooklyn Street Art: How does art like this engage people in the public square?

Heather Alexa Woodfield: The public has a vital role to play in this artwork that is beyond spectator. Whether carrying a puppet bird or holding a flashlight to illuminate her face or simply walking with her, audience members become co-creators. This experience elicits a profound sense of collective joy that is reciprocal between the people who have gathered and the Amal team. I love seeing the puppeteers smiling just as much as the children around them.

Heather Woodfield. Walk With Amal. (photo © Chris Jordan)
Heather Woodfield. Walk With Amal. (photo © Chris Jordan)
Heather Woodfield. Walk With Amal. (photo © Chris Jordan)
Heather Woodfield. Walk With Amal. (photo © Chris Jordan)
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Pattern Recognition: Scott Albrecht “In Time”

Pattern Recognition: Scott Albrecht “In Time”

Color-blocked basketball courts appreciated from a plane, cheerful abstract murals for restaurants, hotels and cafes, and massive wood collages comprised of assembled pieces that are each finished before joining. What do these expressions of artist Scott Albrecht have to do with one another? If you study the patterns, in time, you will see.

A handsome cloth-covered hardcopy of works by the Gowanus, Brooklyn-based public/studio artist presents a selection of works from 2017-21 that have a rational color theory, smoothly dynamic geometries, and a soothing certitude in their complexity. Spotlighting public art projects, studio processes, exhibitions in New York and LA, and his residency at Hyland Mather’s place in Portugal, the collection is refined yet human.

In his description of his work, Albrecht is focused on the process as much as the product. “Most of my works are made up of a collection of pieces that go through a series of steps before they’re

assembled. Any single step per individual piece doesn’t take long–laminating, sanding, painting-but if a work has a couple of hundred pieces, and all those pieces go through the same process, time feels less linear and more compounded as I work through the steps.”

Together these steps appear to be a decoding mechanism that is necessary to understand fully. “While the work itself may be speaking to a single idea, it’s made up of a collection of individual elements coming together to form the whole,” he says. “I often equate these individual pieces to the micro-experiences we encounter that inform our relationship to an understanding.”

First encounters with Albrect’s work are gripping and calming – a deliberate collection of shapes and hues arranged in a way that is not readily apparent. It’s all about pattern recognition, says David Pescovitz, a research director at a think tank and co-editor of a tech/culture Web magazine. He writes the introduction to the book and tells us that the works are meant to be meditative, a brain exercise and visual riddle that, once solved, is rational.

“We’re so practiced at seeking patterns – searching for structure in the flood of signals coming our way, connecting the dots, trying to make sense of, well, everything–that we’re usually not aware we’re doing it.” Sighting neuroscientists and various peer review journals Pescovitz makes his case, and you are inclined to go back through the pages and let your eyes glide, parry, sense, and decode the patterns’ greater logic.

In time, you will.

Scott Albrecht: In Time. Click HERE for information about purchasing this book.

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The Humorist Kraken Elevates Everyday With a Taste for Kitsch in Paris

The Humorist Kraken Elevates Everyday With a Taste for Kitsch in Paris

Kraken elevates the everyday items that we wouldn’t normally feature as worthy of display for aesthetic enjoyment. With his new public mural for Art Azoi in Paris, he chooses some household items you normally overlook; a leveling composition of tools, implements, containers, and adorable household pets. By inclusion, they become artistic elements.

KRAKEN in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)

With his sharply rendered strokes, he gives an additional character to commonplace items in the way that an illustrator favors, playing with discomfiting facts of consumerism, consumption, and the waste of every day by everyone. Kitsch and a skewering of class come into the mix, with high and low treated equally, purposely pushing the conversation. Perhaps you would not choose to glorify these elements to the level of a public mural, but Kracken is very pleased to, with a certain laudatory and humorous respect.

KRAKEN in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
KRAKEN in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
KRAKEN in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
KRAKEN in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
KRAKEN in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
KRAKEN in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)

5 Rue des Platrières, 75020. Kraken sur la terrasse des plateaux sauvages.

Powered by @art_azoi
Curated by @eliseherszkowicz

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BSA Images Of The Week: 10.16.22

BSA Images Of The Week: 10.16.22

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

The hits just keep on coming! The mark-making on the streets accompanies us through the rain and sun and turning leaves and a flood of new migrants arriving and attacks on the subway. Not to say that crime is up, but inflation is robbing people’s buying power everywhere right now, and the poor are feeling it first. What would you do if your 2 jobs still don’t pay the rent and buy groceries for the family?

At least there is an ongoing art exhibition on New York streets in every borough.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring: Royce Bannon, Matt Siren, Clown Soldier, Dark Clouds, TCK Crew, OH!, Fresh, Shag, Caty Wooley, CN ONE, GOO, Sluto, SinArt, Desierto Norte, SK8, Dose, Absurd Conclave, ToastOro, Spot, DIP, and Pares.

Pares (photo © Jaime Rojo)
DIP (photo © Steven P. Harrington)
Clown Soldier. Royce Bannon. Matt Siren (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dark Clouds (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Spot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Par (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Steven P. Harrington)
ToasToro (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Caty Wooley. Absurd Conclave. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Shag. Dose. TCK. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SK8. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Desierto Norte. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SinArt (photo © Jaime Rojo)
OH! (photo © Steven P. Harrington)
So FRESH (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sluto. HSO KSM (photo © Jaime Rojo)
GO GOO (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CN ONE (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fireworks in mid-October on the East River for seemingly no reason at all…(video © Jaime Rojo)
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So Much More Than Style: “Chile Estyle” Tells a People’s History at World Premiere in NYC

So Much More Than Style: “Chile Estyle” Tells a People’s History at World Premiere in NYC

Making its World Premiere in New York at the Urban World Film Festival this month (Oct 26-30), Chile Estyle testifies to the powerful role street art, graffiti, and political muralism have had on city citizens for decades.

Santiago de Chile has been cited for years as an international progenitor of political and consequential street art – owing perhaps to its muralism advocating social change as early as the 1960s in parallel with the student movement in Paris and the birth of graffiti movements in Philadelphia and New York. The documentary illustrates how pro-public antecedents like Mexican muralists shaped what was to come – including David Alfaro Siqueiros, who used walls to converse with the citizenry in the 1930s and 40s at home and in Chile.

Drawing a narrative line from supporting indigenous and working people to the Ramona Parra Brigade of political painting during Pinochet´s dictatorship, to the pixaçao scene in Brazil, and to the stencil culture in Argentina, you see the forces inspiring all manner of grafiteros to make their mark in Santiago, Valparaiso, and other regions of the country. With a sense of conviction, Chile Estyle shows that many origins of this global movement went far beyond style.

To give context to the gravitas driving the movement, the movie includes interviews and profiles of people like  Brigadas Ramona Parra founder Mono González, American urban culture photographer and videographer Henry Chalfant, graffiti pioneers Cekis and Sick, indigenous Mapuche artist collectives Alapinta and Aner & Tikay. It also certifies a gender counterbalance in a scene often stereotyped as ‘boys only’ with a look at the powerful women’s street culture movement courtesy Bisy, Juana Perez and Anis.

Chile Estyle: The History Of Street Art In Chile. A film by Pablo Aravena. (photo still from the movie courtesy of Hard Bop Films)

With Chile Estyle the documentary filmmaker Pablo Aravena directs viewers toward a richer appreciation for the spirit and motivation that drives Chile’s unique street art tradition; a veritable remix of style and substance foretelling the global/local nature of today’s art-in-the-streets.

We’re told that Mr. Aravena will be in attendance for the opening on October 29th, along with some special guests. We will not miss this one. New York graffiti old skoolers like to say, “know your history.” Serious heads will not miss this greater expanse of history either.

Chile Estyle: The History Of Street Art In Chile. A film by Pablo Aravena. (photo still from the movie courtesy of Hard Bop Films)

SCREENING DATE INFORMATION

“Chile Estyle” @chileestyle World Premiere at  @urbanworldff Urbanworld Film Festival 2022 October 26-30 happening in New York City! 

Chile Estyle Screening date:

Sat, Oct 29th, 4:45 PM @ Cinépolis – Theater 9

CINÉPOLIS CHELSEA

260 W 23rd St, New York, NY 10011

Order your tickets

https://uwff22.eventive.org/schedule/633db424ecaddd004cd42c79

 

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BSA Film Friday: 10.14.22

BSA Film Friday: 10.14.22

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening:
1. A tour through L’ESSENTIEL
2. Faith XLVII in Boston
3. A Team On Their Own: Maya Women Fight Inequality Through Baseball.

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BSA Special Feature: A tour through L’ESSENTIEL

Updating the 2010’s magpie approach to group show curation of the abandoned industrial palace, L’ESSENTIEL presents a video tour on par with the metaverse – since we are all still awaiting a functional version of that much-ballyhooed digital world we will expect to inhabit.

Here you find a tone-on-tone parade of installations by some of the best in the street art/graffiti game- a common palette and a mostly 2D execution in the spaces that helps keep it all cohesive. Aiding, or distracting, your trip is the glitchy electronic world-wailing soundtrack and the pixel-thin placards that pop out of concrete seams to introduce the pieces hanging in the air nearby. The show is impressive and gives a wholistic aura. The question is, does this ephemerous collection exist here in the physical world or in the digital one?

L’ESSENTIEL: A Collective Experience of The Ephemerous Art. Graffiti / Street Art

Faith XLVII in Boston

“Perhaps you could dream something that happens in the future,” says Faith.

A Team On Their Own: Maya Women Fight Inequality Through Baseball. Via The New Yorker

In Melissa Fajardo’s documentary short “Las Diablillas: The Mayan Rebels,” Mexican baseball players challenge the restrictive gender norms of their small town.

If you think you are being held back, the first step may be to look in the mirror. The second is to look for kindred spirits.

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ROUGE for Art Azoï in Paris

ROUGE for Art Azoï in Paris

A new mural from Rouge Hartley in Paris for the organization Art Azoi. The contemporary figurative painter is attracted to the street, although she didn’t begin with graffiti or street art. Originally from Bordeaux, she brings bright florals to the city using a uniquely blurred view of beauty; romantic, if you prefer. The emotion is here, and you can write the stories.

Rouge in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
Hi-tech paintbrush maneuvering from Rouge in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
Rouge in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
Rouge in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
Rouge in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
Rouge in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)

“For this long passing wall that we imprint on a slope, I tried to think of a sequence shot in painting. Around a still life narration, in which I voluntarily break what we have been taught, passively, to see it fade, I propose here an almost abstract sequence around resilience and free will, and unfolds in the same image the temporality of a destruction or a rebirth depending on the direction of travel.

In a summer when everything is burning I know we are capable of better. It is around my old obsessions that I allow myself to turn here: the echo between our catastrophes, political and ecological or intimate, the temporal palimpsest and the tension of time in painting, and of love.

I leave you with this little manifesto of a lover.

I ask us to be bold in love and brave in lovelessness

I expect you to have the audacity to desire your equal and to renounce making us goddesses before knocking down our mats.

I ask us to have the courage of uncompromising honesty, and the finesse of permeability, to love each other with all the future pasts, the wounds of yesteryear, and the nostalgia for possibilities that have not taken place,

To taste the density of the silences between our words,

And to the thickness of our words that say what they are,

I ask us to be vulnerable and true,

To get rid of courtesies that disempower and detours that disarm

Without strategies and without hatred,

I ask us for tenderness and time and space for the infinity of our constraints, our complexes and our wounds.

I ask us to be able to name our borders and invent more victories there than laziness

I ask us to state instead of humiliate

To leave before reducing our powers to comfortable abodes

To leave us instead of abandoning us

To love us free to be

And to be again

And again

And again” – Rouge

Rouge in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
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Holy Utopia? No, it’s Hola Utopia! The Urban Culture Festival in Hannover, Germany.

Holy Utopia? No, it’s Hola Utopia! The Urban Culture Festival in Hannover, Germany.

Europe, and Germany in particular, has a solid history of graffiti, urban culture, hip-hop, breakers, and battles dating back to at least the 1990s. As the street art scene evolved during the first two decades of the 2000s, a number of festivals have sprouted up around the globe, from Hawaii to Norway to Tunisia to Mexico City to London to Hong Kong. We’ve been to many of them. In recent years we have witnessed other German cities making entry into the scene as well, and today we bring you Hola Utopia! in Hannover.

Feros One and Dilk One. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)

Begun by founders Artie Ilsemann and Jascha Mueller this festival has so much enthusiasm behind it from the community and the artists, you can imagine that it will continue to make an impact in arts and culture in this capital of Lower Saxony with a half million residents. Hola Utopia! has the kind of solid organizing template, smoldering energy, and genuine local support that is not common among many newer festivals, many of which tend to originate as branding platforms constructed to sell products or local city governments with tourism to chase.

Feros One and Dilk One are photographed here with Artie, Mark, and Jascha, the organizers of Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)

Possibly the reason why this duo, along with communications team member Mark Dix, are able to begin this year’s festival with the German premiere of Alexandra Henry’s film “Street Heroines” and a gallery exhibition at the repurposed Helmkehof warehouse complex – in addition to hosting a half dozen or so artists to paint walls – is because of the urban art community that has deep roots here like the UJZ Glocksee e.V.

Glocksee-Gasse, as it is called, is the organic sort of space that evolves its own character in the community. The organizers say it is the oldest independent youth center in Germany, with “a firm place in Hannover’s cultural landscape.” This is exactly the kind of foundational community that can give a festival room to grow and offer different populations an opportunity to participate if intentionally included.

Feros One and Dilk One. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)

You’ll also be encouraged to see the series of statements on the website that form the philosophical tenants that form the festival. Of course, there is the star-gazing optimism of “Hola Utopia dares to formulate and visualize utopian thoughts to take steps to make the world a better place to live in.”

More impressively perhaps is their statement on privilege that gives more hope toward an equitable festival; “Hola Utopia is aware of its own privileged position that it occupies in its work to devote itself to the design of a utopian world. Injustice in our own environment is openly discussed and with show solidarity to people who are negatively affected.”

Feros One and Dilk One. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)

Thanks to photographer Kevin Münkel we’re pleased to share with you images of this year’s artists, including Lily Brick, Nasca One, Bier En Brood, Galletamaria, Rookie The Weird, Feros One, and Dilk One. The Ukrainian duo of Feros One and Dilk One remind us of the occurrence of twins in the street art scene, including Brooklyn’s Skewville, São Paulo’s Os Gemeos, and the German How & Nosm. Are there more?

Enjoy the scenes from Hannover and Hola Utopia!

Feros One and Dilk One. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Galletamaria. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Galletamaria. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Galletamaria. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Galletamaria. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Lily Brick. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Lily Brick. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Lily Brick and assistant. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Lily Brick. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Nasca One. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Nasca One. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Nasca One. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Nasca One. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Rookie The Weird. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Rookie The Weird. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Rookie The Weird. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Bier En Brood. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)
Bier En Brood. He will finish his mural later this month. Hola Utopia! 2022 Festival. Hannover, Germany. October 2022. (photo © Kevin Münkel)

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Fabio Petani: “NITROGEN OXIDE & ZANTEDESCHIA AETHIOPICA”

Fabio Petani: “NITROGEN OXIDE & ZANTEDESCHIA AETHIOPICA”

Fabio Petani may win the prize for the most murals this season; Not that there is a prize for this honor, except your skill improves and you get to meet more people at more street art festivals…

This one is at the 2nd Edition of the Artu Street Art Festival held this September in Castenaso, Italy. He calls it “NITROGEN OXIDE & ZANTEDESCHIA AETHIOPICA”.

Fabio Petani. “Nitrogen Oxide & Zantedeschia Aethiopica”. Artu Street Art Festival. Castenaso, Italy. 2022. (photo © Fabio Petani)
Fabio Petani. “Nitrogen Oxide & Zantedeschia Aethiopica”. Artu Street Art Festival. Castenaso, Italy. 2022. (photo © Fabio Petani)
Fabio Petani. “Nitrogen Oxide & Zantedeschia Aethiopica”. Artu Street Art Festival. Castenaso, Italy. 2022. (photo © Fabio Petani)
Fabio Petani. “Nitrogen Oxide & Zantedeschia Aethiopica”. Artu Street Art Festival. Castenaso, Italy. 2022. (photo © SF Drone)
Fabio Petani. “Nitrogen Oxide & Zantedeschia Aethiopica”. Artu Street Art Festival. Castenaso, Italy. 2022. (photo © SF Drone)
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Medianeras Nestled in the French Alps for “Eternelles Crapulles”

Medianeras Nestled in the French Alps for “Eternelles Crapulles”

Not that you can ever hope to compete with the Alps…

When you live in such a picturesque town like Briançon, France, your daily existence includes its grandeur. Perhaps that is why Medianeras chose to paint an equally grand Generation Z subject who fairly demands your attention as well.

Medianeras. In collaboration with Eternelles Crapulles. Briançon, France. October 2022. (photo © Medianeras)

“We decided to open this wall to show an empowered and defiant youth,’ said the artist duo of Analí Chanquia and Vanesa Galdeano. With the intention, they say, of presenting a “more equal and fair society in this windy place with violet horizons that disappear in the clouds,” the artists painted for this festival that began in 2018 here called “Eternelles Crapulles”.

Medianeras. In collaboration with Eternelles Crapulles. Briançon, France. October 2022. (photo © Medianeras)
Medianeras. In collaboration with Eternelles Crapulles. Briançon, France. October 2022. (photo © Medianeras)
Medianeras. In collaboration with Eternelles Crapulles. Briançon, France. October 2022. (photo © Medianeras)
Medianeras. In collaboration with Eternelles Crapulles. Briançon, France. October 2022. (photo © Medianeras)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 10.09.22

BSA Images Of The Week: 10.09.22

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

As the graffiti and street art high season draws to a close, we remark on the stunning array of new faces on the New York scene this year, as well as a large crop of maturing talents from the last decade or so. The length of the cycle for artists working on the street varies some, but we’ve been around enough to see many of the early 2000s stars fade away or move on to other things. The voice of this new generation is as challenging as ever and perhaps more savvy in many ways. Still, it’s good to see the re-appearance this month of folks like Hera in New York – a talent whose global and studio escapades have made her a revered street artist over about two decades.

Our thanks to all the artists of all persuasions and longevity for giving voice and character to our public spaces.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring: Queen Andrea, Praxis,CRKSHNK, Lexi Bella, Danielle Mastrion, Homesick, Hera, Panic, Seo, Insane 51, Habibi, Didi, Keops, OSK, AAA, EXR, RJG Rock, L.O.U.R.S., Nohemi, Hazard One, and Emesa.

Hera AKA Herakut with Didi. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hera with Didi. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hera with Didi. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hera with Didi. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hera with Didi. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Danielle Mastrion (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Emesa (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hazard One (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lexi Bella (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Nohemi (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Insane 51 for The Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Insane 51 for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Queen Andrea (photo © Jaime Rojo)
L.O.U.R.S. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
L.O.U.R.S. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
RJG Rock (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Keops (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Homesick (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SEO PANIC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AAA x EXR (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Praxis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Praxis in collaboration with OSK. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Praxis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CRKSHNK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Habibi (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Manhattan. October 2022. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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GERA1 Spreads “Affection” in Berlin

GERA1 Spreads “Affection” in Berlin

Berlin is possibly most famous among the youthful demographic for the organic illegal graffiti and street art that covers entire neighborhoods – something that has stayed true for decades. Additionally, real estate companies and private curation groups have been sponsoring large murals on housing buildings throughout the city for the last decade.

Gera1. “Affection”. Organized by No Unicorn Yet. Berlin, September, 2022. (photo © Million Motions)

Today we have the new one in Marzahn-Hellersdorf on Stendaler Straße by the artist Gera 1 from Athens, Greece. A graffiti writer since 2009, Gera 1 graduated with a Fine Arts degree in Thessaloniki, and has painted large-scale works in Paris, Milan, and elsewhere in Europe. The multilayer image features a female form awash in a dream of CMYK, the principal colors used by printers everywhere. The color palette is a signature of the artist, who favors “glitch art”, realistic portraits, and abstract forms.

Our thanks to Moritz at Wandelism.

Gera1. “Affection”. Organized by No Unicorn Yet. Berlin, September, 2022. (photo © Million Motions)
Gera1. “Affection”. Organized by No Unicorn Yet. Berlin, September, 2022. (photo © Million Motions)
Gera1. “Affection”. Organized by No Unicorn Yet. Berlin, September, 2022. (photo © Million Motions)
Gera1. “Affection”. Organized by No Unicorn Yet. Berlin, September, 2022. (photo © Million Motions)
Gera1. “Affection”. Organized by No Unicorn Yet. Berlin, September, 2022. (photo © Million Motions)
Gera1. “Affection”. Organized by No Unicorn Yet. Berlin, September, 2022. (photo © Million Motions)
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