All posts tagged: Steven P. Harrington

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.04.22

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.04.22

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

It’s September! Or Septembeer, if you like. Followed by Octobeer, Novembeer….you get the joke.

As we slide into New York’s fall arts openings, shows, events, parties — we’re still blown away by the incredible works that are on the streets. Right?

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring: No Sleep, Adam Dare, Werds, You Are Beautiful, Melski, George Collagi, Combo CK, Hek Tad, and Yo Like George.

Combo CK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Adam Dare and Hek Tad (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
You Are Beautiful (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Yo Like George (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentifed artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
George Collagi (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
See (photo © Jaime Rojo)
See (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Heart (photo © Jaime Rojo)
No Sleep (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Melski (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Skate park with tags (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Graffitea Cheste (Xest) Expands Definitions During 7th Edition in Spain

Graffitea Cheste (Xest) Expands Definitions During 7th Edition in Spain

Street art continues to move to small towns and cities, expressing itself in various manners. The 7th edition of the Cheste Street Art Festival (Graffitea Cheste) is a perfect example of how dispersed the scene has become as it intertwines with murals. The result is a more sophisticated survey of art movements than most towns would ever see, including those with museums.

Medianeras. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

The town of Cheste (Xest in Valencian) is in the province of Valencia, and its nearly 9,000 inhabitants are traditionally involved with agriculture, with an emphasis on wine. Sponsored by the city, a few brands, foundations, and art institutions, you won’t find many politically challenging themes, but the scale and quality of work can be appreciable.

Medianeras. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

One small series of five paintings of particular note are the blurred video versions (if you will) of interpretations of works painted at the turn of the previous century by the Spanish Valencian painter Joaquín Sorolla. With roots in graffiti and street art, the artist Salvaje Selva is a painting teacher in Madrid. Frequently he also paints with Kako Selva on collaborative murals under the moniker Gesto. Selva says these new murals are “in homage to the great master” on his Instagram page.

“It has been a real pleasure to be able to work based on the work of this great painter, who has inspired me to interpret freely and let myself go,” he says. “In addition, studying from painting and practice is always very grateful. It gives you a deeper insight into the work of artists. Within this dialogue, I wanted to include the relationship with the support and leave part of the voice of the wall itself.”

Salvaje Selva. Homage to Sorolla. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

The degree of community involvement for Graffitea Cheste is substantial and sincere with tours, symposia, and educational programming. By the end of the June festival this year, there were 13 more murals added to the extensive collection. The celebration closed with a flourish and a screening of the documentary about the great Valencian illustrator José Segrelles.

We thank photographer Lluis Olive Bulbena for sharing his discoveries with BSA readers.

Salvaje Selva. Homage to Sorolla. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Salvaje Selva. Homage to Sorolla. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Salvaje Selva. Homage to Sorolla. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Davide DPA. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Davide DPA. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
PIR. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
PIR. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
V Siniestra and Juantxo. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
V Siniestra and Juantxo. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Tardor. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Alessian Art. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Alessian Art. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Rame13. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Rame13. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Rame13. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Rame13. Graffitea Xest. Valencia, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

https://www.instagram.com/graffitea.cheste/

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheste

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BSA Film Friday: 09.02.22

BSA Film Friday: 09.02.22

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening:
1. Do Not Feed the Pigeons, Antonin Niclass’s short film
2. Pigeon Fanciers in Brooklyn set to Chopin’s One Minute Waltz. Video by Jaime Rojo
3. Playing with pigeons on the sidewalks of Manhattan. Video by Jaime Rojo
4. Duke Riley performance with pigeons of “Fly By Night” in Brooklyn Navy Yard, 2016. Video by Jaime Rojo

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BSA Special Feature: For Your Consideration; Pigeons

We dedicate today’s edition of BSA Film Friday to the pigeons of the world, with a mix of film and still photography. The first offering is Antonin Niclass’s short film “Do Not Feed the Pigeons,” wherein a flock becomes a source of unexpected wonder for a group of weary travelers. Extra points for sound editing on this one. After the film we have the visual poetry of BSA’s own Jaime Rojo in short video and photography. Enjoy it.

Do Not Feed the Pigeons: A Moment of Magic, Courtesy of Pigeons / Via The New Yorker

Untitled. Pigeon. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pigeon Fanciers in Brooklyn set to Chopin’s One Minute Waltz. Video by Jaime Rojo

Untitled. Pigeons. Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Playing with pigeons on the sidewalks of Manhattan. Video by Jaime Rojo

Untitled. Pigeon. Jersey City, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Pigeons. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Duke Riley performance with pigeons of “Fly By Night” in Brooklyn Navy Yard, 2016. Video by Jaime Rojo

Untitled. Pigeon. Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Pigeons. (photo © Jaime Rojo)


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MEMUR Part II:  Graffiti Jam Walls in Oldenburg, Germany

MEMUR Part II: Graffiti Jam Walls in Oldenburg, Germany

Today we have part two of our coverage of the MEMUR Festival in Oldenburg, Germany. More than 30 regional and international artists painted a 280-meter-long wall of the railway elevation on the Oldenburg federal railway path – street artists on one side, graffiti artists on the other. In addition to the aerosol action, there was a photo exhibition featuring our featured documentarians, Martha Cooper and Nika Kramer, film screenings, photography and art workshops, and an educational program in cooperation with the Oldenburg City Museum and the Oldenburg Prevention Council.

1Up Crew. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Nika Kramer)

Organizers say they needed 500 liters of wall paint just to prime the walls, and probably 1000 spray cans were used during the 3-day event. The 3D style is ruling the moment, but you can see bubble style and semi-wildstyle, some neofuturism, – as well as introductions of characters and brief fictional scenarios. Most importantly, most of the pieces get ample space to breathe and to stand on their own.

See Part 1 here: Evolution of a Revolution: MEMUR Part I in Oldenburg; Street Art

1Up Crew. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
1Up Crew. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Nika Kramer)
1Up Crew. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
1Up Crew. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Nika Kramer)
SANY. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
SANY. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Nika Kramer)
TOKK. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
TOKK. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
TOKK. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
TOKK. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
TOKK. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
TOKK. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
I am Awesome Mama/City Slickaz. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
I am Awesome Mama/City Slickaz. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Peser. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Rofiks. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Rofiks. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Rofiks. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Peser. Rofiks. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Peser. Rofiks. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Padio. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Padio. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Unidentified artist. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Unidentified artist. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Memorial Piece. Wasted Youth. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Unidentified artist. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Unidentified artist. Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
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Evolution of a Revolution: MEMUR Part I in Oldenburg; Street Art

Evolution of a Revolution: MEMUR Part I in Oldenburg; Street Art

From environmental nightmares to the corporate war machine to social solidarity to identity politics to abortion to the isolation brought on by Covid, the muralists at the MEMUR Festival in Oldenburg, Germany are not muting their serious concerns about the modern world.

Amanda Arrou from San Sebastian, Spain. Chosen topic, Feminism. (photo © Martha Cooper)

For being the inaugural episode of a festival, you have to be impressed with it on many levels. First is the selection high-quality international and national artists from both the street art and graffiti world. Secondly, organizers devised an equitable solution for these two distinct, yet entirely related, subcultures to participate fully on the walls of their fair city – with respect for all. Finally, the true rebellious spirit of this organically grown and democratic global people’s art movement was preserved by encouraging artists to select a modern-day societal ill and address it with their work.

Amanda Arrou from San Sebastian, Spain. Chosen topic, Feminism. (photo © Nika Kramer)

It’s refreshing to experience a themed public exhibition like this that has not been censored by commercial interests but that endeavors to speak openly with its artworks about potentially difficult subjects to address the everyday passerby. “Street art has always been a means to criticize, reflect, and question,” says an online description of the scenes’ nascent beginnings, and that couldn’t be more true from our perspective. MEMUR 2022 calls it ‘Evolution of a Revolution,’ and since there is a widespread notion across developed world countries that leaders are not representing citizens anymore, you can imagine that these works may get people talking together and realizing that we are not polarized left-right, but top-bottom.

Amanda Arrou from San Sebastian, Spain. Chosen topic, Feminism. (photo © Nika Kramer)

Today we’ll show you images from the street art muralists’ walls on one side of the 280-meter-long wall of the railway elevation on the Oldenburg federal railway path, and tomorrow we’ll show you the ‘Wall of Fame’ created on the other side by a stunning array of graffiti writers. In both cases, we extend our heartfelt thanks to two of the main participants in the event, photographers Martha Cooper of New York and hometown superstar/international photographer Nikka Kramer. Thanks to both for sharing their images with BSA readers.

Arsek & Erase, from Sofia, Bulgaria. Chosen topic: Hyperinflation. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Bulgarian muralists Arsek & Erase may have chosen one of the hottest current topics to address in their mural; the fear of hyperinflation and the severe damage it can do to individuals. The illustration-style painting features a vicious snake enveloping a jar of “savings”, preparing to consume it whole. Here in Oldenburg, where German inflation rose to its highest level in almost 50 years in August (8.8%), people are familiar with the topic. In their hometown of Sofia, Aresek & Erase are experiencing a 17% rate of inflation as of last month. Technically the term “hyperinflation” is somewhere above 50%, and 60 or so countries have fallen into it in the last hundred years, including Argentina today, and rather famously, the Weimar Republic (of which Oldenburg was a federated state) exactly 100 years ago, from 1921-23.

Arsek & Erase, from Sofia, Bulgaria. Chosen topic: Hyperinflation. (photo © Nika Kramer)

Suffice it to say that today many of the world’s currencies are in danger of inflationary pressures, including the dollar and Euro. There was talk amongst participants and organizers of MEMUR that the costs of the festival itself had to be recalibrated a few times because of increased costs in lodging, transportation, labor, and art materials.

“Thanks to everyone who came despite the heat to watch the artists paint, participate in the graffiti workshops and try their luck at the raffle,” said the organizers in their Instagram posting.

“All the positive feedback on the festival and the exhibition “Evolution of a Revolution” in the Kulturhalle am Pferdemarkt has only strengthened our belief that Oldenburg is ready for street art and that we definitely want to continue!’

Kitsune Jolene from Ghent. Belgium. Chosen topic: Roe vs. Wade overturning women’s rights. (photo © Martha Cooper)
        
Kitsune Jolene from Ghent. Belgium. Chosen topic: Roe vs. Wade overturning women’s rights. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Yara Jacobs from Hamburg, Germany. Chosen topic: NRW flood catastrophe. (photo © Martha Cooper)
“A Valley Doesn’t Give Up” “Don’t talk, but do” Yara Jacobs from Hamburg, Germany. Chosen topic: NRW flood catastrophe. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Robin Holthaus from Oldenburg, Germany. Chosen topic: Millionaires in Space. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Robin Holthaus from Oldenburg, Germany. Chosen topic: Millionaires in Space. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Devin Liston from California. The USA. Chosen topic: Wars and military conflicts due to corporate greed. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Devin Liston from California. The USA. Chosen topic: Wars and military conflicts due to corporate greed. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Jack Lack from Groningen, Netherlands. Chosen topic: Climate change. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Jack Lack from Groningen, Netherlands. Chosen topic: Climate change. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Tayla Broekman from Melbourne, Australia. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Tayla Broekman from Melbourne, Australia. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Kartel from Berlin, Germany. Chosen topic: Ukraine war. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Kartel from Berlin, Germany. Chosen topic: Ukraine war. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Philipp Pulkowsky, from Bremen, Germany. This is a memorial RIP mural in honor of Daniel Orwoll. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Klara Schöell, from Hamburg, Germany. Chosen topic: Effects of social isolation due to the pandemic. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Klara Schöell, from Hamburg, Germany. Chosen topic: Effects of social isolation due to the pandemic. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Bolados, from Hannover, Germany. Chosen topic: Solidarity. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Bolados, from Hannover, Germany. Chosen topic: Solidarity. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Flood Shack. A sad but contemporaneous topic that responds to the immediate community; Various artists constructed this installation using salvaged materials found when the waters receded from the recent devasting floods in Oldenburg, Germany. The building in the background houses the offices of an insurance company… (photo © Martha Cooper)
Flood Shack. Various artists. (photo © Nika Kramer)
Memur Festival. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Memur Festival. Nika Kramer and Martha Cooper. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Olly H.)
Memur Festival. Nika Kramer and Martha Cooper. Oldenburg, Germany. (photo © Olly H.)
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“The Great Reset” by Leon Keer in CA

“The Great Reset” by Leon Keer in CA

You may think of that unelected global body called the World Economic Forum when you see the word, “Reset” today.

Leon Keer. Reset. Assisted by Massina. We.Create Art Mural Festival. Sand City. Monterey, CA. (photo courtesy of Leon Keer)

The buzzworthy term is bandied about so often today that you could be forgiven for thinking about the death of cash, programmable CBDC currency, streaming surveillance, and social credit systems. The would-be a major reset, wouldn’t it?

For anamorphic street artist Leon Keer participating at the We.mural festival in Sand City, California, his mind travels to someplace perhaps less sinister. He just knows that we appear as a global society to be going in the wrong direction in so many ways.

Leon Keer. Reset. Assisted by Massina. We.Create Art Mural Festival. Sand City. Monterey, CA. (photo courtesy of Leon Keer)

“This reset button may not be big enough,” he says. “For me, it is not about everyone’s personal situation, but a reset to a different way of dealing with each other and with how we deal with the world.”

Keer, along with artist Massina, completed this astounding perspective-bending feat right on the street. But you have to be in just the right spot to appreciate it.

Leon Keer. Reset. Assisted by Massina. We.Create Art Mural Festival. Sand City. Monterey, CA. (photo courtesy of Leon Keer)

Title: Reset
Where: Sand City – Monterey Bay California
Size: 59 ft x 13 ft
Material: Acrylics on asphalt

Artwork made with help of Massina.
Festival: We.Create Art mural festival with the support of Sand City Art Commitee and the Sand City Council

Leon Keer. Reset. Assisted by Massina. We.Mural Festival. San City. Monterey, CA. (photo courtesy of Leon Keer)
Leon Keer. Reset. Assisted by Massina. We.Mural Festival. San City. Monterey, CA. (photo courtesy of Leon Keer)
Leon Keer. Reset. Assisted by Massina. We.Mural Festival. San City. Monterey, CA. (photo courtesy of Leon Keer)
Leon Keer. Reset. Assisted by Massina. We.Mural Festival. San City. Monterey, CA. (photo courtesy of Leon Keer)
Leon Keer. Reset. Assisted by Massina. We.Mural Festival. San City. Monterey, CA. (photo courtesy of Leon Keer)
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Generation Escape: Rabi Examining Existence in  West Hollywood

Generation Escape: Rabi Examining Existence in West Hollywood

West Hollywood, California has undergone constant change since long before the Internet of Everything, and it is about to reinvent part of itself again on Holloway and Sunset with the brand new Nomad Gallery and its premiere exhibition by artist Rabi (b. 1984 David Emanuel Mordechai Torres).

Rabi. _gen+esc (generation+escape. Nomad Gallery. West Hollywood, CA. (photo courtesy of the gallery)

And who better to contemplate the complexity of the modern world?

“There are images that come together as a whole, but the main idea is that the look of the piece is constantly changing, in the same way that life is constantly evolving,” he said to us in an interview 10 years ago this fall when he was still part of the art collective CYRCLE – echoing a perspective he carries today.

Rabi. _gen+esc (generation+escape. Nomad Gallery. West Hollywood, CA. (photo courtesy of the gallery)

As Millennials are being edged out of that desired youthful demographic by the next generation of consumers, there appears to be a reckoning with the loss of citizenry, civility, privacy, the regard for pillars that once provided strong institutions; On a personal level the meaning of existence may still be clouded by perceptions about life that were filtered through the ever-present smartphone, and warped by developing technologies. With the metaphor of the firehouse, many describe a flow of data so overwhelming and confusing that, if unedited or uncontrolled can breed a semi-permanent state of confusion. A show like this countenances that reality and suggests that one can at least begin to make storylines with it.

Rabi. _gen+esc (generation+escape. Nomad Gallery. West Hollywood, CA. (photo courtesy of the gallery)

It’s a crisis for many. When we used our community-based art project called BSA to bring you the CYRCLE project over a decade ago – it was a collaborative of three artists, then two, then one. Maybe it is simply young people discovering their own voices. But looking at people sitting at restaurant dinner tables staring at their phones, one may wonder if this generation is separating into individual molecules, feeling disconnected by their digital experiences, rather than grounded by them?

It is an irony that the ‘Me’ generation of the 70s and 80s appear to not have anticipated this, so self-actualized were they. It is as if the last 20 years drank a cocktail of steroids and MDMA; seduced by the endorphin explosions in brains fried by social platforms. Increasingly targeted content meant that “individuality” and individually tailored preference took firm root, and grew; on music videos, in gaming, at Cosplay conventions, at awards shows and even New York’s Met Ball. The coveted 18-34 age group were courted with greater precision than ever; a beguiling romance with self-expression became weaponized, an arms race of stunning individuality, brandished with “authenticity”.

Rabi. _gen+esc (generation+escape. Nomad Gallery. West Hollywood, CA. (photo courtesy of the gallery)

Powered by a strange identity-based militarism that allies with all things good, and its now nearly a constitutional birthright to be uniquely amazing. Any remaining norms of yesteryear are eschewed, melting away like a polar ice cap, in pursuit of the new normal. “Group individuality”; the Metaverse will allow you to be a human, animal, or a coconut cookie. It’s American exceptionalism writ global, and perhaps Rabi is encouraging you to be brave for this new world that is so boldly ushering itself in, blinkering on and off and flooding/tracking your eyes with images, your ears with sound, your heart with envy, fear, lust, relief, or release. Or you may opt to hit the escape button.

“As isolation moved us apart, we retreated deeper into our digital nativity, highlighting our society’s obsession with self-image and the ironically ubiquitous bid for individuality,” says creator and director Rabi. He calls his exhibition “_gen+esc”, an abbreviation of “generation escape”. He’s pushing into video and featuring actors in greenscreen jumpsuits – a jarringly effective yet lo-fi technique that posits a view on internal life, including the storms raging there.

Rabi. _gen+esc (generation+escape. Nomad Gallery. West Hollywood, CA. (photo courtesy of the gallery)

Does Rabi push outside the parameters in this newest exploration? It is described as “a series of short art films that explores the relationship between identity and the artistic process.”

You’ll decide when it opens on September 15. Or stay home, stage selfies, apply filters, and scroll.

Rabi: _gen+esc. Nomad Gallery. West Hollywood, CA. Thursday, September 15, 2022, at 8 pm. Click HERE for further information.


Peek Inside Organized Chaos of CYRCLE

Fatima Robinson and Rhea Scott Present: Cyrcle “Organized Chaos!”

Cyrcle Brings Summer to LA

Spring is in the Air and on the Wall: Cyrcle in Los Angeles

CYRCLE in LA ; A Winter Interlude

Hold Up Art Gallery Presents: “Cluster Mess” Gosha Levochkin New Works and a Collaboration with Cyrcle (Los Angeles, CA)

Cyrcle Crew : A Sneak Peek at “We Never Die” Show (LA)

Cyrcle + Muska at The Barracuda Wall “Post No Bills”

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BSA Images Of The Week: 08.28.22

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.28.22

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

Ultimately people respond to graffiti and street art because of the humanity that vibrates from it. You may care deeply, or care not. If it is effective, art on the street will help you to make the connection. New York is blessed this summer to have a particularly deep and wide selection of unsanctioned and sanctioned artworks across the city that is evidence of a mature, vibrant scene full of many voices, perspectives and styles. Even our art on the streets illustrates that New York is a true melting pot.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring: Dark Clouds, Blek le Rat, Damien Mitchell, Dragon76, TKid170, Banksy Hates Me, Habibi, Laurier Artiste, Blame Blanco, SanekOne, Carnin Paulino, Ruma, and The Postman.

Damien Mitchell (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Blek Le Rat in collaboration with TKid170 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Blek Le Rat in collaboration with TKid170 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Blek Le Rat in collaboration with TKid170 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Banksy Hates Me (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Laurier Artiste (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Laurier Artiste (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Habibi (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Blame Blanco (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Blame Blanco (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dragon76 for Street Art For Mankind. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dragon76 for Street Art For Mankind. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SanekOne (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Carnin Paulino (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ruma (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dark Clouds (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Postman (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stanley George, the proprietor of Stanley’s Pharmacy on The Lower East Side of Manhattan passed away on Wednesday, August 24 from surgery complications. Stanley, as he was fondly known, was a beloved and respected member of the neighborhood offering individualized remedies to his clients from hangovers to colds. He was 48 years old. The community is organizing a memorial to celebrate his life on what would have been his 49th birthday on September 14. The artwork on the gate was previously painted in honor of The Notorious B.I.G. but has faded. Community members have been leaving flowers, candles, and gifts here in Mr. George’s memory. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stanley George (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Italian Elfo Gets at the Heart of Irony and Simplicity

Italian Elfo Gets at the Heart of Irony and Simplicity

In a sea of street art murals, the simplicity of a hand-rendered text piece may be deceptive sometimes because you may miss its complexity. It is also a brave move to rely upon the minimum of elements and lack of style to create something with weight, or humor.

Elfo (photo courtesy of the artist)

Tuscany-based Elfo preempts your response in this new simple piece, purporting to be an advisory against graffiti. In the process, he draws attention to the fact that anti-graffiti signage on the street is large no different than graffiti. The spontaneity of graffiti is often the source of its power, however, and this hand-rendered piece is anticipatory and contradictory.

The best irony is that this is graffiti.

Elfo (photo courtesy of the artist)
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BSA Film Friday: 08.26.22

BSA Film Friday: 08.26.22

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening:
1. Bandaloop. Excerpts from Field. Part II of the multi-year work LOOM.
2. Bandaloop. FLOOD, World premiere.
3. Bandaloop. Redemption Too, at Least Some / A Work-in-Progress Collaboration from DBR and Bandaloop.
4. Bandaloop teams up with BMW to celebrate its headquarters’ 50th anniversary in Munich.

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BSA Special Feature: Bandaloop

As you survey the world of breaking (rocking) that blossomed in the Hip Hop era that enveloped graffiti writing among its elements, one may conclude that public performance itself has undergone revolution in the last 4 or 5 decades. A hybrid of rock-climbing, rappelling, parkour and high-flying feats, the vertical dance company has challenged expectations frequently in its battle with gravity – often in view of an awestruck public. This is redefining, reclaiming public space at its finest.

Bandaloop. Excerpts from Field. Part II of the multi-year work LOOM.

Bandaloop. FLOOD, World premiere.

Bandaloop. Redemption Too, at Least Some / A Work-in-Progress Collaboration from DBR and Bandaloop.

Bandaloop teams up with BMW to celebrate its headquarters’ 50th anniversary in Munich.

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Selection Of New Works at Welling Court 2022 in Queens, NYC

Selection Of New Works at Welling Court 2022 in Queens, NYC

Rocking this little neighborhood since 2009, The Welling Court Mural Project in Queens, New York brought a bevy of old skool and new again this summer to add to the collaborative art project that cheers the locals and thrills visitors. By now, you could call it historic, with writers from the OG crowd like Tats Cru, Lady Pink, John Fekner, and Chino giving their best alongside a slew of newbies in the mural art scene. Alison Wallis is the sole director these days, and her roots with the graffiti and street art community go deep, which means a well of trust is involved.

Too Fly. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As she scans the list of artists who have given of themselves to this neighborhood for more than a decade in this community project, Wallis writes in the manifesto: “with early career, mid-career, and burgeoning young artists to help foster beauty of all life, peace, and support for all people of any race, belief, and/or sexual identity around the globe.” Once again it is good to see the many ways a community can join together in an evolving and inspiring collective statement that integrates positive social change via the culture of street art.

Headache. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Vexta. Dirty Bandits. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Adam Fujita. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Caleb Neelon and Lena Mac. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Danielle Mastrion. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Alice Mizrachi. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ashsaint. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lexi Bella. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rari Grafix. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pinky Weber. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Queen Andrea. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Chino. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Harbor Arts. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Daze. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BG183 Tats Cru. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JCorp. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lady Pink. Detail. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Slow. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Fuhgeddaboudit Bodega. Welling Court Mural Project NYC 2022. Queens, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Walk Along The High Line Park: Summer 2022

Walk Along The High Line Park: Summer 2022

Like 8 million other people every year, we walk with you today to look at art and flowers along the High Line. A mile and a half long, this elevated linear park, greenway, and rail trail converted a New York Central Railroad spur on the west side of Manhattan in New York City into a calming, serene, generous natural hideaway above many streets.

Paola Pivi. The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The public art program features a rotating supply of general audience works and you are never quite sure what you will find. More impressive perhaps is the botanical aspect of this experience, which grounds visitors, assuring us somehow that all that crazy stuff we experience on the streets is just one aspect of our beautiful city. Don’t take it all too seriously. Knowing that this park is open and available to all New Yorkers is one of Manhattan’s greatest gifts.

The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Purple Coneflower at The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hawaiian hibiscus at The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Echinops at The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Nina Beier. The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) at The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A wild orchid (?) or a lilie (?) at The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Carrot Flower or Cow Parsley at The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A butterfly bush of some variety, maybe a Buddleja davidii ‘White Profusion’ at The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Les Lalanne. The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Les Lalanne. The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Les Lalanne. The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tanacetum at The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Black Eyed Susan at The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jordan Casteel. The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Astors at The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Coral Honeysuckle at The High Line Park. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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